Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Hydrodynamic Performance of a Sloping Floating Breakwater with and Without Chain-Net

Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Hydrodynamic Performance of a Sloping Floating Breakwater with and Without Chain-Net

Keywords

  • Sloping floating breakwater
  • Chain net
  • Anchorage system
  • Hydrodynamic performance

Abstract

두 개의 부유체 사이에 간격이 있는 경사진 부유식 방파제(FB)에 대한 새로운 연구가 제안되었습니다. 구조물의 기울기는 파동 에너지 소산을 유발할 수 있습니다. 경사진 구조물의 문제는 파도가 넘친다는 것입니다. 이 문제를 해결하기 위해 두 플로터 사이의 간격을 고려합니다. 

오버 토핑이 발생하면 마루를 통과하는 물이 두 플로터 사이의 틈으로 쏟아지며 결과적으로 파도 에너지가 감쇠됩니다. 체인 네트가 모델에 추가되고 전송 계수에 대한 영향이 연구됩니다. 또한, 구조물의 유체역학적 성능에 대한 자유도의 영향을 조사하기 위해 말뚝으로 고정된(1 자유도) 계류 라인으로 고정된(3도의 자유도) 두 가지 고정 시스템에서 자유 모델을 연구했습니다.

게다가, 실험은 5개의 다른 파도 주기와 4개의 다른 파도 높이를 가진 규칙파에서 수행됩니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 실험 결과, 경사형 부유식 방파제가 직사각형 상자형보다 최대 15% 성능이 우수한 것으로 나타났다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다.

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 

체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다. 말뚝에 의해 고정된 FB에 대한 투과계수는 단파에서 케이블에 의해 고정된 FB보다 최대값으로 약 14% 낮고 장파에서 약 4-10% 더 높다. 

흘수가 증가함에 따라 전송 계수는 감소하지만 건현은 허용 비율의 초과를 제한하기 위한 최소 요구 사항을 충족해야 합니다. 체인 그물이 있는 모델은 없는 모델에 비해 전달 계수가 최대 14% 감소하여 더 나은 성능을 나타냅니다.

A novel study of sloping floating breakwater (FB) that has a gap between two floaters is proposed. The slope of a structure can cause wave energy dissipation. A problem with sloping structures is wave overtopping. To solve this problem, a gap is considered between the two floaters. If overtopping occurs, water passing the crest will pour into the gap between the two floaters, as a result wave energy will be attenuated. A chain net is added to the model and its effect on the transmission coefficient is studied. Furthermore, in order to investigate the effects of the degree of freedom on the hydrodynamic performance of the structure, the model is studied in the two anchorage systems which are anchored by pile (1 degree of freedom) and anchored by mooring lines (3 degree of freedom). Moreover, the experiments are performed under regular waves with five different wave periods and four different wave heights. The results of the experiments show a sloping floating breakwater that has a better performance than that of rectangular box type by 15% as maximum value. The transmission coefficients for the FB anchored by pile are lower about 14% as maximum value than that of the FB anchored by cable in shorter waves and are higher about 4–10% in longer waves. With increasing the draft, the transmission coefficient decreases but the freeboard should meet the minimum requirements to restrict overtopping in the allowable rate. The model with a chain net exhibits a better performance as compared with the model without it by a maximum 14% reduction in the transmission coefficients.

  • Fig. 1extended data figure 1
  • Fig. 2extended data figure 2
  • Fig. 3extended data figure 3
  • Fig. 4extended data figure 4
  • Fig. 5extended data figure 5
  • Fig. 6extended data figure 6
  • Fig. 7extended data figure 7
  • Fig. 8extended data figure 8
  • Fig. 9extended data figure 9
  • Fig. 10extended data figure 10
  • Fig. 11extended data figure 11
  • Fig. 12extended data figure 12
  • Fig. 13extended data figure 13
  • Fig. 14extended data figure 14
  • Fig. 15extended data figure 15
  • Fig. 16extended data figure 16
  • Fig. 17extended data figure 17
  • Fig. 18extended data figure 18
  • Fig. 19extended data figure 19
  • Fig. 20extended data figure 20
  • Fig. 21extended data figure 21
  • Fig. 22extended data figure 22
  • Fig. 23extended data figure 23
  • Fig.24extended data figure 24
  • Fig. 25extended data figure 25
  • Fig. 26extended data figure 26
  • Fig. 27extended data figure 27

References

  1. Abul-Azm AG, Gesraha MR (2000) Approximation to the hydrodynamics of floating pontoons under oblique waves. Ocean Eng 27:365–384Article Google Scholar 
  2. Biesheuvel AC (2013) Effectiveness of floating breakwaters. Delf University of Technology, DissertaionGoogle Scholar 
  3. Chen Zh, Wang Y, Dong H, Zheng B (2012) Time-domain hydrodynamic analysis of pontoon-plate floating breakwater. J Water Sci Eng 5(3):291–303Google Scholar 
  4. Daneshfaraz R, Kaya B (2008) solution of the propagation of the waves in open channels by the transfer matrix method. J Ocean Eng 35:1075–1079Article Google Scholar 
  5. Daneshfaraz R, Sadeghfam S, Tahni A (2020) exprimental investigation of screen as energy dissipators in the movable-Bed channel. Iran J Sci Technol Trans Civil Eng 44:1237–1246Article Google Scholar 
  6. Deng Zh, Wang L, Zhao X, Huang Zh (2019) Hydrodynamic performance of a T-shaped floating breakwater. J Appl Ocean Res 82:325–336Article Google Scholar 
  7. Dong GH, Zheng YN, Li YC, Teng B, Guan CT, Lin DF (2008) Experiments on wave transmission coefficients of floating breakwaters. Ocean Eng 35:931–938Article Google Scholar 
  8. Duan WY, Xu SP, Xu QL et al (2017) Performance of an F-type floating break water: a numerical and experimental study. Proc I MechE Part M 231(2):583–599Google Scholar 
  9. Gesraha MR (2006) Analysis of π shaped floating breakwater in oblique waves: I. Impervious rigid wave boards. Appl Ocean Res 28:327–338Article Google Scholar 
  10. He F, Huang Zh, Wing-Keung Law A (2013) An experimental study of a floating breakwater with asymmetric pneumatic chambers for wave energy extraction. J Appl Energy 106:222–231Article Google Scholar 
  11. Ikeno M, Shimoda N, Iwata K (1988) A new type of breakwater utilizing air compressibility. In: Proceedings of the 21st Coastal Engineering Conference, ASCE. pp 2426–2339
  12. Ji Ch, Cheng Y, Cui J, Yuan Zh, Gaidai O (2018) Hydrodynamic performance of floating breakwaters in long wave regime: an experimental study. J Ocean Eng 152:154–166Article Google Scholar 
  13. Koutandos E, Prinos P, Gironella X (2005) Floating breakwaters under regular and irregular wave forcing: reflection and transmission characteristics. J Hydraul Res 43(2):174–188Article Google Scholar 
  14. Liu Zh, Wang Y, Wang W, Hua X (2019) Numerical modeling and optimization of a winged box-type floating breakwater by Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. J Ocean Eng 188:106246Article Google Scholar 
  15. LotfollahiYaghin MA, Mojtahedi A, Aminfar MH (2012) Physical model studies and system identification of hydrodynamics around a vertical square-section cylinder in irregular sea waves. J Ocean Eng 55:10–22Article Google Scholar 
  16. Mansard E, Funke E (1980) The measurement of the incident and reflected spectra using the least squares method. In: Proceedings of the 17th Coastal Engineering Conference ASCE, Sydney. pp 154–172
  17. Mojtahedi A, ShokatianBeiragh M, Farajpour I, Mohammadian M (2020) Investigation on hydrodynamic performance of an enviromentally friendly pile breakwater. J Ocean Eng 217:107942Article Google Scholar 
  18. Noroozi B, Bazargan J, Safarzadeh A (2021) Introducing the T-shaped weir: a new nonlinear weir. Water Supply. https://doi.org/10.2166/ws.2021.144Article Google Scholar 
  19. Pena E, Ferreras J, Sanchez-Tembleque F (2011) Experimental study on wave transmission coefficient, mooring lines and module connector forces with different designs of floating breakwaters. J Ocean Eng 38:1150–1160Article Google Scholar 
  20. Safarzadeh A, Zaji AH, Bonakdari H (2017) Comparative Assessment of the Hybrid Genetic Algorithm-Artificial neural network and genetic programming methods for the predicition of longitudinal velocity field around a single straight groyne. Appl Soft Comput 60:213–228Article Google Scholar 
  21. Tang HJ, Huang CC, Chen WM (2011) Dynamics of dual pontoon floating structure for cage aquaculture in a two-dimensional numerical wave tank. J Fluid Struct 27:918–936Article Google Scholar 
  22. U.S. Army coastal engineering research center (1984) Shore protection manual. U.S. Government Printing Office, WashingtonGoogle Scholar 
  23. Williams AN, Lee HS, Huang Z (2000) Floating pontoon breakwaters. Ocean Eng 27:221–240Article Google Scholar 
  24. Yang Zh, Xie M, Gao Zh, Xu T, Guo W, Ji X, Yuan Ch (2018) Experimental investigation on hydrodynamic effectiveness of a water ballast type floating breakwater. J Ocean Eng 167:77–94Article Google Scholar 
  25. Zhang X, Ma Sh, Duan W (2018) A new L type floating breakwater derived from vortex dissipation simulation. J Ocean Eng 164:455–464Article Google Scholar