Figure 1 (A) A schematic of ovarian cancer metastases involving tumor cells or clusters (yellow) shedding from a primary site and disseminating along ascitic currents of peritoneal fluid (green arrows) in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer typically disseminates in four common abdomino-pelvic sites: (1) cul-de-sac (an extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus); (2) right infracolic space (the apex formed by the termination of the small intestine of the small bowel mesentery at the ileocecal junction); (3) left infracolic space (superior site of the sigmoid colon); (4) Right paracolic gutter (communication between the upper and lower abdomen defined by the ascending colon and peritoneal wall). (B) The schematic of a perfusion model used to study the impact of sustained fluid flow on treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules (Top left). A side view of the perfusion model and growth of ovarian cancer nodules to a stromal bed (Top right). The photograph of a perfusion model used in the experiments (Bottom left) and depth-informed confocal imaging of ovarian cancer nodules in channels with and without carboplatin treatment (Bottom right). The perfusion model is 24 × 40 mm, with three channels that are 4 × 30 mm each and a height of 254 μm. The inlet and outlet ports of channels are 2.2 mm in diameter and positioned 5 mm from the edge of the chip. (C) A schematic of a 24-well plate model used to study the treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules under static conditions (without flow) (Top left). A side view of the static models and growth of ovarian cancer nodules on a stromal bed (Top right). Confocal imaging of 3D ovarian cancer nodules in a 24-well plate without and with carboplatin treatment (Bottom). Scale bars: 1 mm.

Figure 1
(A) A schematic of ovarian cancer metastases involving tumor cells or clusters (yellow) shedding from a primary site and disseminating along ascitic currents of peritoneal fluid (green arrows) in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer typically disseminates in four common abdomino-pelvic sites: (1) cul-de-sac (an extension of the peritoneal cavity between the rectum and back wall of the uterus); (2) right infracolic space (the apex formed by the termination of the small intestine of the small bowel mesentery at the ileocecal junction); (3) left infracolic space (superior site of the sigmoid colon); (4) Right paracolic gutter (communication between the upper and lower abdomen defined by the ascending colon and peritoneal wall). (B) The schematic of a perfusion model used to study the impact of sustained fluid flow on treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules (Top left). A side view of the perfusion model and growth of ovarian cancer nodules to a stromal bed (Top right). The photograph of a perfusion model used in the experiments (Bottom left) and depth-informed confocal imaging of ovarian cancer nodules in channels with and without carboplatin treatment (Bottom right). The perfusion model is 24 × 40 mm, with three channels that are 4 × 30 mm each and a height of 254 μm. The inlet and outlet ports of channels are 2.2 mm in diameter and positioned 5 mm from the edge of the chip. (C) A schematic of a 24-well plate model used to study the treatment resistance and molecular features of 3D ovarian cancer nodules under static conditions (without flow) (Top left). A side view of the static models and growth of ovarian cancer nodules on a stromal bed (Top right). Confocal imaging of 3D ovarian cancer nodules in a 24-well plate without and with carboplatin treatment (Bottom). Scale bars: 1 mm.