Weld bead surface images showing the slag formation location for (a) wire 1 and (b) wire 2.

가스 금속 아크 용접 (GMAW) 와이어의 합금 원소가 CMT (Cold Metal Transfer)에서 용접 풀 흐름 및 슬래그 형성 위치에 미치는 영향

Md. R. U. Ahsan1,3, Muralimohan. Cheepu2, Yeong-Do Park* 2,3
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, International University of Business, Agriculture and Technology,
Dhaka 1230, Bangladesh.
r.ahsan06me@gmail.com
2Department of Advanced Materials and Industrial Management Engineering, Dong-Eui University, Busan
47340, Republic of Korea.
muralicheepu@gmail.com
3Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Dong-Eui University, B

Abstract

용접시 표면 장력 구동 흐름 또는 마랑고니 흐름은 용접 비드 모양을 제어하는데 중요한 역할을 하므로 용접 접합 품질에 영향을 미칩니다. 용해된 금속의 표면 장력은 보통 음의 온도 계수를 가지므로 용접 풀이 중심에서 토우 방향으로 흐르게 됩니다.

표면 장력의 이 온도 계수는 황(S), 산소(O), 셀레늄(Se) 및 텔루륨(Te)과 같은 표면 활성 요소가 있는 경우 양의 계수로 변경할 수 있습니다. 소모품에 존재하는 탈산화 원소의 양이 용접 금속에 존재하는 산소량을 결정합니다. 탈산화제 양이 적으면 용접 금속에 산소 농도가 높아집니다.

적절한 양의 산소가 있으면 용융지에 표면 장력 구배의 양의 온도 계수가 발생할 수 있습니다. 이 경우 용접 풀은 토우에서 중앙 방향으로 흐릅니다. 그 결과, 아크와 용융지에 있는 화농성 반응의 경우, 합금 요소의 다양한 산화물이 슬래그(slag)라고 합니다. 슬래그는 용융지 표면에 떠서 용융지 흐름 패턴에 따라 누적됩니다.

그 결과, 슬래그는 용융지 흐름 패턴에 따라 용접 비드 중심 또는 토우 중심을 따라 형성됩니다. 슬래그는 용접 비드의 외관과 도장 접착력을 저하시키므로 제거해야 합니다. 쉽게 분리할 수 있기 때문에 용접 비드 중심 부근에서 슬래그가 형성되는 것이 좋습니다.

용접 풀의 현장 고속 비디오 촬영, 용접 금속 화학 성분 분석, 소모품 합금 요소가 용접 풀 흐름 패턴 및 슬래그 형성 위치에 미치는 영향이 공개되어 CMT-GMAW의 생산성 향상을 위해 용접 소모품 선택을 용이하게 할 수 있습니다.

The surface tension driven flow or Marangoni flow in welding plays an important role in governing weld bead shape hence affecting the weld joint quality. The surface tension of molten metal usually has a negative temperature coefficient causing the weld pool to flow from the center towards the toe.

This temperature coefficient of the surface tension can be altered to be a positive one in the presence of surface-active elements like sulfur (S), oxygen (O), selenium (Se) and tellurium (Te). The amount of deoxidizing elements present in the consumables governs the amount of oxygen present in the weld metal. The presence of a lower amount of deoxidizers results in higher concentration of oxygen in the weld metal.

The presence of adequate amount of oxygen can result in a positive temperature coefficient of surface tension gradient in the weld pool. In such situation, the weld pool flows from the toe towards the direction of the center. As a result, of pyrometallurgical reactions in the arc and the weld pool various oxides of the alloying elements are former which are referred as slag.

The slags float on the weld pool surface and accumulate following the weld pool flow pattern. As a result, slags form either along the center of the weld bead or the toe depending on the weld pool flow pattern. The slags need to be removed as they degrade the weld bead appearance and paint adhesiveness.

Due to easy detachability, slag formation near the center of the weld bead is desired. From in-situ high-speed videography of weld pool, weld metal chemical composition analysis, the effect of consumables alloying elements on weld pool flow pattern and slag formation location are disclosed, which can facilitate the selection of the welding consumables for better productivity in CMT-GMAW.

Weld bead surface images showing the slag formation location for (a) wire 1 and (b) wire 2.
Weld bead surface images showing the slag formation location for (a) wire 1 and (b) wire 2.
Fig. 2: High-speed movie frames and schematic showing the weld pool flow pattern and the slag formation location for wire 1 and wire 2.
Fig. 2: High-speed movie frames and schematic showing the weld pool flow pattern and the slag formation location for wire 1 and wire 2.
Fig. 3: Quantitative analysis data on slag formation for different wire.
Fig. 3: Quantitative analysis data on slag formation for different wire.

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