Fig. 1. (a) Dimensions of the casting with runners (unit: mm), (b) a melt flow simulation using Flow-3D software together with Reilly's model[44], predicted that a large amount of bifilms (denoted by the black particles) would be contained in the final casting. (c) A solidification simulation using Pro-cast software showed that no shrinkage defect was contained in the final casting.

AZ91 합금 주물 내 연행 결함에 대한 캐리어 가스의 영향

TianLiabJ.M.T.DaviesaXiangzhenZhuc
aUniversity of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, United Kingdom
bGrainger and Worrall Ltd, Bridgnorth WV15 5HP, United Kingdom
cBrunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology, Brunel University London, Kingston Ln, London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, United Kingdom

Abstract

An entrainment defect (also known as a double oxide film defect or bifilm) acts a void containing an entrapped gas when submerged into a light-alloy melt, thus reducing the quality and reproducibility of the final castings. Previous publications, carried out with Al-alloy castings, reported that this trapped gas could be subsequently consumed by the reaction with the surrounding melt, thus reducing the void volume and negative effect of entrainment defects. Compared with Al-alloys, the entrapped gas within Mg-alloy might be more efficiently consumed due to the relatively high reactivity of magnesium. However, research into the entrainment defects within Mg alloys has been significantly limited. In the present work, AZ91 alloy castings were produced under different carrier gas atmospheres (i.e., SF6/CO2, SF6/air). The evolution processes of the entrainment defects contained in AZ91 alloy were suggested according to the microstructure inspections and thermodynamic calculations. The defects formed in the different atmospheres have a similar sandwich-like structure, but their oxide films contained different combinations of compounds. The use of carrier gases, which were associated with different entrained-gas consumption rates, affected the reproducibility of AZ91 castings.

연행 결함(이중 산화막 결함 또는 이중막이라고도 함)은 경합금 용융물에 잠길 때 갇힌 가스를 포함하는 공극으로 작용하여 최종 주물의 품질과 재현성을 저하시킵니다. Al-합금 주물을 사용하여 수행된 이전 간행물에서는 이 갇힌 가스가 주변 용융물과의 반응에 의해 후속적으로 소모되어 공극 부피와 연행 결함의 부정적인 영향을 줄일 수 있다고 보고했습니다. Al-합금에 비해 마그네슘의 상대적으로 높은 반응성으로 인해 Mg-합금 내에 포집된 가스가 더 효율적으로 소모될 수 있습니다. 그러나 Mg 합금 내 연행 결함에 대한 연구는 상당히 제한적이었습니다. 현재 작업에서 AZ91 합금 주물은 다양한 캐리어 가스 분위기(즉, SF6/CO2, SF6/공기)에서 생산되었습니다. AZ91 합금에 포함된 연행 결함의 진화 과정은 미세 조직 검사 및 열역학 계산에 따라 제안되었습니다. 서로 다른 분위기에서 형성된 결함은 유사한 샌드위치 구조를 갖지만 산화막에는 서로 다른 화합물 조합이 포함되어 있습니다. 다른 동반 가스 소비율과 관련된 운반 가스의 사용은 AZ91 주물의 재현성에 영향을 미쳤습니다.

Keywords

Magnesium alloy, Casting, Oxide film, Bifilm, Entrainment defect, Reproducibility

1. Introduction

As the lightest structural metal available on Earth, magnesium became one of the most attractive light metals over the last few decades. The magnesium industry has consequently experienced a rapid development in the last 20 years [1,2], indicating a large growth in demand for Mg alloys all over the world. Nowadays, the use of Mg alloys can be found in the fields of automobiles, aerospace, electronics and etc.[3,4]. It has been predicted that the global consumption of Mg metals will further increase in the future, especially in the automotive industry, as the energy efficiency requirement of both traditional and electric vehicles further push manufactures lightweight their design [3,5,6].

The sustained growth in demand for Mg alloys motivated a wide interest in the improvement of the quality and mechanical properties of Mg-alloy castings. During a Mg-alloy casting process, surface turbulence of the melt can lead to the entrapment of a doubled-over surface film containing a small quantity of the surrounding atmosphere, thus forming an entrainment defect (also known as a double oxide film defect or bifilm) [7][8][9][10]. The random size, quantity, orientation, and placement of entrainment defects are widely accepted to be significant factors linked to the variation of casting properties [7]. In addition, Peng et al. [11] found that entrained oxides films in AZ91 alloy melt acted as filters to Al8Mn5 particles, trapping them as they settle. Mackie et al. [12] further suggested that entrained oxide films can act to trawl the intermetallic particles, causing them to cluster and form extremely large defects. The clustering of intermetallic compounds made the entrainment defects more detrimental for the casting properties.

Most of the previous studies regarding entrainment defects were carried out on Al-alloys [7,[13][14][15][16][17][18], and a few potential methods have been suggested for diminishing their negative effect on the quality of Al-alloy castings. Nyahumwa et al.,[16] shows that the void volume within entrainment defects could be reduced by a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process. Campbell [7] suggested the entrained gas within the defects could be consumed due to reaction with the surrounding melt, which was further verified by Raiszedeh and Griffiths [19].The effect of the entrained gas consumption on the mechanical properties of Al-alloy castings has been investigated by [8,9], suggesting that the consumption of the entrained gas promoted the improvement of the casting reproducibility.

Compared with the investigation concerning the defects within Al-alloys, research into the entrainment defects within Mg-alloys has been significantly limited. The existence of entrainment defects has been demonstrated in Mg-alloy castings [20,21], but their behaviour, evolution, as well as entrained gas consumption are still not clear.

In a Mg-alloy casting process, the melt is usually protected by a cover gas to avoid magnesium ignition. The cavities of sand or investment moulds are accordingly required to be flushed with the cover gas prior to the melt pouring [22]. Therefore, the entrained gas within Mg-alloy castings should contain the cover gas used in the casting process, rather than air only, which may complicate the structure and evolution of the corresponding entrainment defects.

SF6 is a typical cover gas widely used for Mg-alloy casting processes [23][24][25]. Although this cover gas has been restricted to use in European Mg-alloy foundries, a commercial report has pointed out that this cover is still popular in global Mg-alloy industry, especially in the countries which dominated the global Mg-alloy production, such as China, Brazil, India, etc. [26]. In addition, a survey in academic publications also showed that this cover gas was widely used in recent Mg-alloy studies [27]. The protective mechanism of SF6 cover gas (i.e., the reaction between liquid Mg-alloy and SF6 cover gas) has been investigated by several previous researchers, but the formation process of the surface oxide film is still not clearly understood, and even some published results are conflicting with each other. In early 1970s, Fruehling [28] found that the surface film formed under SF6 was MgO mainly with traces of fluorides, and suggested that SF6 was absorbed in the Mg-alloy surface film. Couling [29] further noticed that the absorbed SF6 reacted with the Mg-alloy melt to form MgF2. In last 20 years, different structures of the Mg-alloy surface films have been reported, as detailed below.(1)

Single-layered film. Cashion [30,31] used X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Spectroscopy (AES) to identify the surface film as MgO and MgF2. He also found that composition of the film was constant throughout the thickness and the whole experimental holding time. The film observed by Cashion had a single-layered structure created from a holding time from 10 min to 100 min.(2)

Double-layered film. Aarstad et. al [32] reported a doubled-layered surface oxide film in 2003. They observed several well-distributed MgF2 particles attached to the preliminary MgO film and grew until they covered 25–50% of the total surface area. The inward diffusion of F through the outer MgO film was the driving force for the evolution process. This double-layered structure was also supported by Xiong’s group [25,33] and Shih et al. [34].(3)

Triple-layered film. The triple-layered film and its evolution process were reported in 2002 by Pettersen [35]. Pettersen found that the initial surface film was a MgO phase and then gradually evolved to the stable MgF2 phase by the inward diffusion of F. In the final stage, the film has a triple-layered structure with a thin O-rich interlayer between the thick top and bottom MgF2 layers.(4)

Oxide film consisted of discrete particles. Wang et al [36] stirred the Mg-alloy surface film into the melt under a SF6 cover gas, and then inspect the entrained surface film after the solidification. They found that the entrained surface films were not continues as the protective surface films reported by other researchers but composed of discrete particles. The young oxide film was composed of MgO nano-sized oxide particles, while the old oxide films consist of coarse particles (about 1  µm in average size) on one side that contained fluorides and nitrides.

The oxide films of a Mg-alloy melt surface or an entrained gas are both formed due to the reaction between liquid Mg-alloy and the cover gas, thus the above-mentioned research regarding the Mg-alloy surface film gives valuable insights into the evolution of entrainment defects. The protective mechanism of SF6 cover gas (i.e., formation of a Mg-alloy surface film) therefore indicated a potential complicated evolution process of the corresponding entrainment defects.

However, it should be noted that the formation of a surface film on a Mg-alloy melt is in a different situation to the consumption of an entrained gas that is submerged into the melt. For example, a sufficient amount of cover gas was supported during the surface film formation in the studies previously mentioned, which suppressed the depletion of the cover gas. In contrast, the amount of entrained gas within a Mg-alloy melt is finite, and the entrained gas may become fully depleted. Mirak [37] introduced 3.5%SF6/air bubbles into a pure Mg-alloy melt solidifying in a specially designed permanent mould. It was found that the gas bubbles were entirely consumed, and the corresponding oxide film was a mixture of MgO and MgF2. However, the nucleation sites (such as the MgF2 spots observed by Aarstad [32] and Xiong [25,33]) were not observed. Mirak also speculated that the MgF2 formed prior to MgO in the oxide film based on the composition analysis, which was opposite to the surface film formation process reported in previous literatures (i.e., MgO formed prior to MgF2). Mirak’s work indicated that the oxide-film formation of an entrained gas may be quite different from that of surface films, but he did not reveal the structure and evolution of the oxide films.

In addition, the use of carrier gas in the cover gases also influenced the reaction between the cover gas and the liquid Mg-alloy. SF6/air required a higher content of SF6 than did a SF6/CO2 carrier gas [38], to avoid the ignition of molten magnesium, revealing different gas-consumption rates. Liang et.al [39] suggested that carbon was formed in the surface film when CO2 was used as a carrier gas, which was different from the films formed in SF6/air. An investigation into Mg combustion [40] reported a detection of Mg2C3 in the Mg-alloy sample after burning in CO2, which not only supported Liang’s results, but also indicated a potential formation of Mg carbides in double oxide film defects.

The work reported here is an investigation into the behaviour and evolution of entrainment defects formed in AZ91 Mg-alloy castings, protected by different cover gases (i.e., SF6/air and SF6/CO2). These carrier gases have different protectability for liquid Mg alloy, which may be therefore associated with different consumption rates and evolution processes of the corresponding entrained gases. The effect of the entrained-gas consumption on the reproducibility of AZ91 castings was also studied.

2. Experiment

2.1. Melting and casting

Three kilograms AZ91 alloy was melted in a mild steel crucible at 700 ± 5 °C. The composition of the AZ91 alloy has been shown in Table 1. Prior to heating, all oxide scale on the ingot surface was removed by machining. The cover gases used were 0.5%SF6/air or 0.5%SF6/CO2 (vol.%) at a flow rate of 6 L/min for different castings. The melt was degassed by argon with a flow rate of 0.3 L/min for 15 min [41,42], and then poured into sand moulds. Prior to pouring, the sand mould cavity was flushed with the cover gas for 20 min [22]. The residual melt (around 1 kg) was solidified in the crucible.

Table 1. Composition (wt.%) of the AZ91 alloy used in this study.

AlZnMnSiFeNiMg
9.40.610.150.020.0050.0017Residual

Fig. 1(a) shows the dimensions of the casting with runners. A top-filling system was deliberately used to generate entrainment defects in the final castings. Green and Campbell [7,43] suggested that a top-filling system caused more entrainment events (i.e., bifilms) during a casting process, compared with a bottom-filling system. A melt flow simulation (Flow-3D software) of this mould, using Reilly’s model [44] regarding the entrainment events, also predicted that a large amount of bifilms would be contained in the final casting (denoted by the black particles in Fig. 1b).

Fig. 1. (a) Dimensions of the casting with runners (unit: mm), (b) a melt flow simulation using Flow-3D software together with Reilly's model[44], predicted that a large amount of bifilms (denoted by the black particles) would be contained in the final casting. (c) A solidification simulation using Pro-cast software showed that no shrinkage defect was contained in the final casting.

Shrinkage defects also affect the mechanical properties and reproducibility of castings. Since this study focused on the effect of bifilms on the casting quality, the mould has been deliberately designed to avoid generating shrinkage defects. A solidification simulation using ProCAST software showed that no shrinkage defect would be contained in the final casting, as shown in Fig. 1c. The casting soundness has also been confirmed using a real time X-ray prior to the test bar machining.

The sand moulds were made from resin-bonded silica sand, containing 1wt. % PEPSET 5230 resin and 1wt. % PEPSET 5112 catalyst. The sand also contained 2 wt.% Na2SiF6 to act as an inhibitor [45]. The pouring temperature was 700 ± 5 °C. After the solidification, a section of the runner bars was sent to the Sci-Lab Analytical Ltd for a H-content analysis (LECO analysis), and all the H-content measurements were carried out on the 5th day after the casting process. Each of the castings was machined into 40 test bars for a tensile strength test, using a Zwick 1484 tensile test machine with a clip extensometer. The fracture surfaces of the broken test bars were examined using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Philips JEOL7000) with an accelerating voltage of 5–15 kV. The fractured test bars, residual Mg-alloy solidified in the crucible, and the casting runners were then sectioned, polished and also inspected using the same SEM. The cross-section of the oxide film found on the test-bar fracture surface was exposed by the Focused Ion Beam milling technique (FIB), using a CFEI Quanta 3D FEG FIB-SEM. The oxide film required to be analysed was coated with a platinum layer. Then, a gallium ion beam, accelerated to 30 kV, milled the material substrate surrounding the platinum coated area to expose the cross section of the oxide film. EDS analysis of the oxide film’s cross section was carried out using the FIB equipment at accelerating voltage of 30 kV.

2.2. Oxidation cell

As previously mentioned, several past researchers investigated the protective film formed on a Mg-alloy melt surface [38,39,[46][47][48][49][50][51][52]. During these experiments, the amount of cover gas used was sufficient, thus suppressing the depletion of fluorides in the cover gas. The experiment described in this section used a sealed oxidation cell, which limited the supply of cover gas, to study the evolution of the oxide films of entrainment defects. The cover gas contained in the oxidation cell was regarded as large-size “entrained bubble”.

As shown in Fig. 2, the main body of the oxidation cell was a closed-end mild steel tube which had an inner length of 400 mm, and an inner diameter of 32 mm. A water-cooled copper tube was wrapped around the upper section of the cell. When the tube was heated, the cooling system created a temperature difference between the upper and lower sections, causing the interior gas to convect within the tube. The temperature was monitored by a type-K thermocouple located at the top of the crucible. Nie et al. [53] suggested that the SF6 cover gas would react with the steel wall of the holding furnace when they investigated the surface film of a Mg-alloy melt. To avoid this reaction, the interior surface of the steel oxidation cell (shown in Fig. 2) and the upper half section of the thermocouple were coated with boron nitride (the Mg-alloy was not in contact with boron nitride).

Fig. 2. Schematic of the oxidation cell used to study the evolution of the oxide films of the entrainment defects (unit mm).

During the experiment, a block of solid AZ91 alloy was placed in a magnesia crucible located at the bottom of the oxidation cell. The cell was heated to 100 °C in an electric resistance furnace under a gas flow rate of 1 L/min. The cell was held at this temperature for 20 min, to replace the original trapped atmosphere (i.e. air). Then, the oxidation cell was further heated to 700 °C, melting the AZ91 sample. The gas inlet and exit valves were then closed, creating a sealed environment for oxidation under a limited supply of cover gas. The oxidation cell was then held at 700 ± 10 °C for periods of time from 5 min to 30 min in 5-min intervals. At the end of each holding time, the cell was quenched in water. After cooling to room temperature, the oxidised sample was sectioned, polished, and subsequently examined by SEM.

3. Results

3.1. Structure and composition of the entrainment defects formed in SF6/air

The structure and composition of the entrainment defect formed in the AZ91 castings under a cover gas of 0.5%SF6/air was observed by SEM and EDS. The results indicate that there exist two types of entrainment defects which are sketched in Fig. 3: (1) Type A defect whose oxide film has a traditional single-layered structure and (2) Type B defect, whose oxide film has two layers. The details of these defects were introduced in the following. Here it should be noticed that, as the entrainment defects are also known as biofilms or double oxide film, the oxide films of Type B defect were referred to as “multi-layered oxide film” or “multi-layered structure” in the present work to avoid a confusing description such as “the double-layered oxide film of a double oxide film defect”.

Fig. 3. Schematic of the different types of entrainment defects found in AZ91 castings. (a) Type A defect with a single-layered oxide film and (b) Type B defect with two-layered oxide film.

Fig. 4(a-b) shows a Type A defect having a compact single-layered oxide film with about 0.4 µm thickness. Oxygen, fluorine, magnesium and aluminium were detected in this film (Fig. 4c). It is speculated that oxide film is the mixture of fluoride and oxide of magnesium and aluminium. The detection of fluorine revealed that an entrained cover gas was contained in the formation of this defect. That is to say that the pores shown in Fig. 4(a) were not shrinkage defects or hydrogen porosity, but entrainment defects. The detection of aluminium was different with Xiong and Wang’s previous study [47,48], which showed that no aluminium was contained in their surface film of an AZ91 melt protected by a SF6 cover gas. Sulphur could not be clearly recognized in the element map, but there was a S-peak in the corresponding ESD spectrum.

Fig. 4. (a) A Type A entrainment defect formed in SF6/air and having a single-layered oxide film, (b) the oxide film of this defect, (c) SEM-EDS element maps (using Philips JEOL7000) corresponding to the area highlighted in (b).

Fig. 5(a-b) shows a Type B entrainment defect having a multi-layered oxide film. The compact outer layers of the oxide films were enriched with fluorine and oxygen (Fig. 5c), while their relatively porous inner layers were only enriched with oxygen (i.e., poor in fluorine) and partly grew together, thus forming a sandwich-like structure. Therefore, it is speculated that the outer layer is the mixture of fluoride and oxide, while the inner layer is mainly oxide. Sulphur could only be recognized in the EDX spectrum and could not be clearly identified in the element map, which might be due to the small S-content in the cover gas (i.e., 0.5% volume content of SF6 in the cover gas). In this oxide film, aluminium was contained in the outer layer of this oxide film but could not be clearly detected in the inner layer. Moreover, the distribution of Al seems to be uneven. It can be found that, in the right side of the defect, aluminium exists in the film but its concentration can not be identified to be higher than the matrix. However, there is a small area with much higher aluminium concentration in the left side of the defect. Such an uneven distribution of aluminium was also observed in other defects (shown in the following), and it is the result of the formation of some oxide particles in or under the film.

Fig. 5. (a) A Type B entrainment defect formed in SF6/air and having a multi-layered oxide film, (b) the oxide films of this defect have grown together, (c) SEM-EDS element maps (using Philips JEOL7000) corresponding to the area shown in (b).

Figs. 4 and 5 show cross sectional observations of the entrainment defects formed in the AZ91 alloy sample cast under a cover gas of SF6/air. It is not sufficient to characterize the entrainment defects only by the figures observed from the two-dimensional section. To have a further understanding, the surface of the entrainment defects (i.e. the oxide film) was further studied by observing the fracture surface of the test bars.

Fig. 6(a) shows fracture surfaces of an AZ91 alloy tensile test bar produced in SF6/air. Symmetrical dark regions can be seen on both sides of the fracture surfaces. Fig. 6(b) shows boundaries between the dark and bright regions. The bright region consisted of jagged and broken features, while the surface of the dark region was relatively smooth and flat. In addition, the EDS results (Fig. 6c-d and Table 2) show that fluorine, oxygen, sulphur, and nitrogen were only detected in the dark regions, indicating that the dark regions were surface protective films entrained into the melt. Therefore, it could be suggested that the dark regions were an entrainment defect with consideration of their symmetrical nature. Similar defects on fracture surfaces of Al-alloy castings have been previously reported [7]Nitrides were only found in the oxide films on the test-bar fracture surfaces but never detected in the cross-sectional samples shown in Figs. 4 and 5. An underlying reason is that the nitrides contained in these samples may have hydrolysed during the sample polishing process [54].

Fig. 6. (a) A pair of the fracture surfaces of a AZ91 alloy tensile test bar produced under a cover gas of SF6/air. The dimension of the fracture surface is 5 mm × 6 mm, (b) a section of the boundary between the dark and bright regions shown in (a), (c-d) EDS spectrum of the (c) bright regions and (d) dark regions, (e) schematic of an entrainment defect contained in a test bar.

Table 2. EDS results (wt.%) corresponding to the regions shown in Fig. 6 (cover gas: SF6/air).

Empty CellCOMgFAlZnSN
Dark region in Fig. 6(b)3.481.3279.130.4713.630.570.080.73
Bright region in Fig. 6(b)3.5884.4811.250.68

In conjunction with the cross-sectional observation of the defects shown in Figs. 4 and 5, the structure of an entrainment defect contained in a tensile test bar was sketched as shown in Fig. 6(e). The defect contained an entrained gas enclosed by its oxide film, creating a void section inside the test bar. When the tensile force applied on the defect during the fracture process, the crack was initiated at the void section and propagated along the entrainment defect, since cracks would be propagated along the weakest path [55]. Therefore, when the test bar was finally fractured, the oxide films of entrainment defect appeared on both fracture surfaces of the test bar, as shown in Fig. 6(a).

3.2. Structure and composition of the entrainment defects formed in SF6/CO2

Similar to the entrainment defect formed in SF6/air, the defects formed under a cover gas of 0.5%SF6/CO2 also had two types of oxide films (i.e., single-layered and multi-layered types). Fig. 7(a) shows an example of the entrainment defects containing a multi-layered oxide film. A magnified observation to the defect (Fig. 7b) shows that the inner layers of the oxide films had grown together, presenting a sandwich-like structure, which was similar to the defects formed in an atmosphere of SF6/air (Fig. 5b). An EDS spectrum (Fig. 7c) revealed that the joint area (inner layer) of this sandwich-like structure mainly contained magnesium oxides. Peaks of fluorine, sulphur, and aluminium were recognized in this EDS spectrum, but their amount was relatively small. In contrast, the outer layers of the oxide films were compact and composed of a mixture of fluorides and oxides (Fig. 7d-e).

Fig. 7. (a) An example of entrainment defects formed in SF6/CO2 and having a multi-layered oxide film, (b) magnified observation of the defect, showing the inner layer of the oxide films has grown together, (c) EDS spectrum of the point denoted in (b), (d) outer layer of the oxide film, (e) SEM-EDS element maps (using Philips JEOL7000) corresponding to the area shown in (d).

Fig. 8(a) shows an entrainment defect on the fracture surfaces of an AZ91 alloy tensile test bar, which was produced in an atmosphere of 0.5%SF6/CO2. The corresponding EDS results (Table 3) showed that oxide film contained fluorides and oxides. Sulphur and nitrogen were not detected. Besides, a magnified observation (Fig. 8b) indicated spots on the oxide film surface. The diameter of the spots ranged from hundreds of nanometres to a few micron meters.

Fig. 8. (a) A pair of the fracture surfaces of a AZ91 alloy tensile test bar, produced in an atmosphere of SF6/CO2. The dimension of the fracture surface is 5 mm × 6 mm, (b) surface appearance of the oxide films on the fracture surfaces, showing spots on the film surface.

To further reveal the structure and composition of the oxide film clearly, the cross-section of the oxide film on a test-bar fracture surface was onsite exposed using the FIB technique (Fig. 9). As shown in Fig. 9a, a continuous oxide film was found between the platinum coating layer and the Mg-Al alloy substrate. Fig. 9 (b-c) shows a magnified observation to oxide films, indicating a multi-layered structure (denoted by the red box in Fig. 9c). The bottom layer was enriched with fluorine and oxygen and should be the mixture of fluoride and oxide, which was similar to the “outer layer” shown in Figs. 5 and 7, while the only-oxygen-enriched top layer was similar to the “inner layer” shown in Figs. 5 and 7.

Fig. 9. (a) A cross-sectional observation of the oxide film on the fracture surface of the AZ91 casting produced in SF6/CO2, exposed by FIB, (b) a magnified observation of area highlighted in (a), and (c) SEM-EDS elements map of the area shown in (b), obtained by CFEI Quanta 3D FEG FIB-SEM.

Except the continuous film, some individual particles were also observed in or below the continuous film, as shown in Fig. 9. An Al-enriched particle was detected in the left side of the oxide film shown in Fig. 9b and might be speculated to be spinel Mg2AlO4 because it also contains abundant magnesium and oxygen elements. The existing of such Mg2AlO4 particles is responsible for the high concentration of aluminium in small areas of the observed film and the uneven distribution of aluminium, as shown in Fig. 5(c). Here it should be emphasized that, although the other part of the bottom layer of the continuous oxide film contains less aluminium than this Al-enriched particle, the Fig. 9c indicated that the amount of aluminium in this bottom layer was still non-negligible, especially when comparing with the outer layer of the film. Below the right side of the oxide film shown in Fig. 9b, a particle was detected and speculated to be MgO because it is rich in Mg and O. According to Wang’s result [56], lots of discrete MgO particles can be formed on the surface of the Mg melt by the oxidation of Mg melt and Mg vapor. The MgO particles observed in our present work may be formed due to the same reasons. While, due to the differences in experimental conditions, less Mg melt can be vapored or react with O2, thus only a few of MgO particles formed in our work. An enrichment of carbon was also found in the film, revealing that CO2 was able to react with the melt, thus forming carbon or carbides. This carbon concentration was consistent with the relatively high carbon content of the oxide film shown in Table 3 (i.e., the dark region). In the area next to the oxide film.

Table 3. EDS results (wt.%) corresponding to the regions shown in Fig. 8 (cover gas: SF6/ CO2).

Empty CellCOMgFAlZnSN
Dark region in Fig. 8(a)7.253.6469.823.827.030.86
Bright region in Fig. 8(a)2.100.4482.8313.261.36

This cross-sectional observation of the oxide film on a test bar fracture surface (Fig. 9) further verified the schematic of the entrainment defect shown in Fig. 6(e). The entrainment defects formed in different atmospheres of SF6/CO2 and SF6/air had similar structures, but their compositions were different.

3.3. Evolution of the oxide films in the oxidation cell

The results in Section 3.1 and 3.2 have shown the structures and compositions of entrainment defects formed in AZ91 castings under cover gases of SF6/air and SF6/CO2. Different stages of the oxidation reaction may lead to the different structures and compositions of entrainment defects. Although Campbell has conjectured that an entrained gas may react with the surrounding melt, it is rarely reported that the reaction occurring between the Mg-alloy melt and entrapped cover gas. Previous researchers normally focus on the reaction between a Mg-alloy melt and the cover gas in an open environment [38,39,[46][47][48][49][50][51][52], which was different from the situation of a cover gas trapped into the melt. To further understand the formation of the entrainment defect in an AZ91 alloy, the evolution process of oxide films of the entrainment defect was further studied using an oxidation cell.

Fig. 10 (a and d) shows a surface film held for 5 min in the oxidation cell, protected by 0.5%SF6/air. There was only one single layer consisting of fluoride and oxide (MgF2 and MgO). In this surface film. Sulphur was detected in the EDS spectrum, but its amount was too small to be recognized in the element map. The structure and composition of this oxide film was similar to the single-layered films of entrainment defects shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 10. Oxide films formed in the oxidation cell under a cover gas of 0.5%SF6/air and held at 700 °C for (a) 5 min; (b) 10 min; (c) 30 min, and (d-f) the SEM-EDS element maps (using Philips JEOL7000) corresponding to the oxide film shown in (a-c) respectively, (d) 5 min; (e) 10 min; (f) 30 min. The red points in (c and f) are the location references, denoting the boundary of the F-enriched layer in different element maps.

After a holding time of 10 min, a thin (O, S)-enriched top layer (around 700 nm) appeared upon the preliminary F-enriched film, forming a multi-layered structure, as shown in Fig. 10(b and e). The thickness of the (O, S)-enriched top layer increased with increased holding time. As shown in Fig. 10(c and f), the oxide film held for 30 min also had a multi-layered structure, but the thickness of its (O, S)-enriched top layer (around 2.5 µm) was higher than the that of the 10-min oxide film. The multi-layered oxide films shown in Fig. 10(b-c) presented a similar appearance to the films of the sandwich-like defect shown in Fig. 5.

The different structures of the oxide films shown in Fig. 10 indicated that fluorides in the cover gas would be preferentially consumed due to the reaction with the AZ91 alloy melt. After the depletion of fluorides, the residual cover gas reacted further with the liquid AZ91 alloy, forming the top (O, S)-enriched layer in the oxide film. Therefore, the different structures and compositions of entrainment defects shown in Figs. 4 and 5 may be due to an ongoing oxidation reaction between melt and entrapped cover gas.

This multi-layered structure has not been reported in previous publications concerning the protective surface film formed on a Mg-alloy melt [38,[46][47][48][49][50][51]. This may be due to the fact that previous researchers carried out their experiments with an un-limited amount of cover gas, creating a situation where the fluorides in the cover gas were not able to become depleted. Therefore, the oxide film of an entrainment defect had behaviour traits similar to the oxide films shown in Fig. 10, but different from the oxide films formed on the Mg-alloy melt surface reported in [38,[46][47][48][49][50][51].

Similar with the oxide films held in SF6/air, the oxide films formed in SF6/CO2 also had different structures with different holding times in the oxidation cell. Fig. 11(a) shows an oxide film, held on an AZ91 melt surface under a cover gas of 0.5%SF6/CO2 for 5 min. This film had a single-layered structure consisting of MgF2. The existence of MgO could not be confirmed in this film. After the holding time of 30 min, the film had a multi-layered structure; the inner layer was of a compact and uniform appearance and composed of MgF2, while the outer layer is the mixture of MgF2 and MgO. Sulphur was not detected in this film, which was different from the surface film formed in 0.5%SF6/air. Therefore, fluorides in the cover gas of 0.5%SF6/CO2 were also preferentially consumed at an early stage of the film growth process. Compared with the film formed in SF6/air, the MgO in film formed in SF6/CO2 appeared later and sulphide did not appear within 30 min. It may mean that the formation and evolution of film in SF6/air is faster than SF6/CO2. CO2 may have subsequently reacted with the melt to form MgO, while sulphur-containing compounds accumulated in the cover gas and reacted to form sulphide in very late stage (may after 30 min in oxidation cell).

Fig. 11. Oxide films formed in the oxidation cell under a cover gas of 0.5%SF6/CO2, and their SEM-EDS element maps (using Philips JEOL7000). They were held at 700 °C for (a) 5 min; (b) 30 min. The red points in (b) are the location references, denoting the boundary between the top and bottom layers in the oxide film.

4. Discussion

4.1. Evolution of entrainment defects formed in SF6/air

HSC software from Outokumpu HSC Chemistry for Windows (http://www.hsc-chemistry.net/) was used to carry out thermodynamic calculations needed to explore the reactions which might occur between the trapped gases and liquid AZ91 alloy. The solutions to the calculations suggest which products are most likely to form in the reaction process between a small amount of cover gas (i.e., the amount within a trapped bubble) and the AZ91-alloy melt.

In the trials, the pressure was set to 1 atm, and the temperature set to 700 °C. The amount of the cover gas was assumed to be 7 × 10−7 kg, with a volume of approximately 0.57 cm3 (3.14 × 10−8 kmol) for 0.5%SF6/air, and 0.35 cm3 (3.12 × 10−8 kmol) for 0.5%SF6/CO2. The amount of the AZ91 alloy melt in contact with the trapped gas was assumed to be sufficient to complete all reactions. The decomposition products of SF6 were SF5, SF4, SF3, SF2, F2, S(g), S2(g) and F(g) [57][58][59][60].

Fig. 12 shows the equilibrium diagram of the thermodynamic calculation of the reaction between the AZ91 alloy and 0.5%SF6/air. In the diagram, the reactants and products with less than 10−15 kmol have not been shown, as this was 5 orders of magnitude less than the amount of SF6 present (≈ 1.57 × 10−10 kmol) and therefore would not affect the observed process in a practical way.

Fig. 12. An equilibrium diagram for the reaction between 7e-7 kg 0.5%SF6/air and a sufficient amount of AZ91 alloy. The X axis is the amount of AZ91 alloy melt having reacted with the entrained gas, and the vertical Y-axis is the amount of the reactants and products.

This reaction process could be divided into 3 stages.

Stage 1: The formation of fluorides. the AZ91 melt preferentially reacted with SF6 and its decomposition products, producing MgF2, AlF3, and ZnF2. However, the amount of ZnF2 may have been too small to be detected practically (1.25 × 10−12 kmol of ZnF2 compared with 3 × 10−10 kmol of MgF2), which may be the reason why Zn was not detected in any the oxide films shown in Sections 3.13.3. Meanwhile, sulphur accumulated in the residual gas as SO2.

Stage 2: The formation of oxides. After the liquid AZ91 alloy had depleted all the available fluorides in the entrapped gas, the amount of AlF3 and ZnF2 quickly reduced due to a reaction with Mg. O2(g) and SO2 reacted with the AZ91 melt, forming MgO, Al2O3, MgAl2O4, ZnO, ZnSO4 and MgSO4. However, the amount of ZnO and ZnSO4 would have been too small to be found practically by EDS (e.g. 9.5 × 10−12 kmol of ZnO,1.38 × 10−14 kmol of ZnSO4, in contrast to 4.68 × 10−10 kmol of MgF2, when the amount of AZ91 on the X-axis is 2.5 × 10−9 kmol). In the experimental cases, the concentration of F in the cover gas is very low, whole the concentration f O is much higher. Therefore, the stage 1 and 2, i.e, the formation of fluoride and oxide may happen simultaneously at the beginning of the reaction, resulting in the formation of a singer-layered mixture of fluoride and oxide, as shown in Figs. 4 and 10(a). While an inner layer consisted of oxides but fluorides could form after the complete depletion of F element in the cover gas.

Stages 1- 2 theoretically verified the formation process of the multi-layered structure shown in Fig. 10.

The amount of MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 in the oxide film was of a sufficient amount to be detected, which was consistent with the oxide films shown in Fig. 4. However, the existence of aluminium could not be recognized in the oxide films grown in the oxidation cell, as shown in Fig. 10. This absence of Al may be due to the following reactions between the surface film and AZ91 alloy melt:(1)

Al2O3 + 3Mg + = 3MgO + 2Al, △G(700 °C) = -119.82 kJ/mol(2)

Mg + MgAl2O4 = MgO + Al, △G(700 °C) =-106.34 kJ/molwhich could not be simulated by the HSC software since the thermodynamic calculation was carried out under an assumption that the reactants were in full contact with each other. However, in a practical process, the AZ91 melt and the cover gas would not be able to be in contact with each other completely, due to the existence of the protective surface film.

Stage 3: The formation of Sulphide and nitride. After a holding time of 30 min, the gas-phase fluorides and oxides in the oxidation cell had become depleted, allowing the melt reaction with the residual gas, forming an additional sulphur-enriched layer upon the initial F-enriched or (F, O)-enriched surface film, thus resulting in the observed multi-layered structure shown in Fig. 10 (b and c). Besides, nitrogen reacted with the AZ91 melt until all reactions were completed. The oxide film shown in Fig. 6 may correspond to this reaction stage due to its nitride content. However, the results shows that the nitrides were not detected in the polished samples shown in Figs. 4 and 5, but only found on the test bar fracture surfaces. The nitrides may have hydrolysed during the sample preparation process, as follows [54]:(3)

Mg3N2 + 6H2O =3Mg(OH)2 + 2NH3↑(4)

AlN+ 3H2O =Al(OH)3 + NH3

In addition, Schmidt et al. [61] found that Mg3N2 and AlN could react to form ternary nitrides (Mg3AlnNn+2, n= 1, 2, 3…). HSC software did not contain the database of ternary nitrides, and it could not be added into the calculation. The oxide films in this stage may also contain ternary nitrides.

4.2. Evolution of entrainment defects formed in SF6/CO2

Fig. 13 shows the results of the thermodynamic calculation between AZ91 alloy and 0.5%SF6/CO2. This reaction processes can also be divided into three stages.

Fig. 13. An equilibrium diagram for the reaction between 7e-7 kg 0.5%SF6/CO2 and a sufficient amount of AZ91 alloy. The X axis denotes the amount of Mg alloy melt having reacted with the entrained gas, and the vertical Y-axis denotes the amounts of the reactants and products.

Stage 1: The formation of fluorides. SF6 and its decomposition products were consumed by the AZ91 melt, forming MgF2, AlF3, and ZnF2. As in the reaction of AZ91 in 0.5%SF6/air, the amount of ZnF2 was too small to be detected practically (1.51 × 10−13 kmol of ZnF2 compared with 2.67 × 10−10 kmol of MgF2). Sulphur accumulated in the residual trapped gas as S2(g) and a portion of the S2(g) reacted with CO2, to form SO2 and CO. The products in this reaction stage were consistent with the film shown in Fig. 11(a), which had a single layer structure that contained fluorides only.

Stage 2: The formation of oxides. AlF3 and ZnF2 reacted with the Mg in the AZ91 melt, forming MgF2, Al and Zn. The SO2 began to be consumed, producing oxides in the surface film and S2(g) in the cover gas. Meanwhile, the CO2 directly reacted with the AZ91 melt, forming CO, MgO, ZnO, and Al2O3. The oxide films shown in Figs. 9 and 11(b) may correspond to this reaction stage due to their oxygen-enriched layer and multi-layered structure.

The CO in the cover gas could further react with the AZ91 melt, producing C. This carbon may further react with Mg to form Mg carbides, when the temperature reduced (during solidification period) [62]. This may be the reason for the high carbon content in the oxide film shown in Figs. 89. Liang et al. [39] also reported carbon-detection in an AZ91 alloy surface film protected by SO2/CO2. The produced Al2O3 may be further combined with MgO, forming MgAl2O4 [63]. As discussed in Section 4.1, the alumina and spinel can react with Mg, causing an absence of aluminium in the surface films, as shown in Fig. 11.

Stage 3: The formation of Sulphide. the AZ91 melt began to consume S2(g) in the residual entrapped gas, forming ZnS and MgS. These reactions did not occur until the last stage of the reaction process, which could be the reason why the S-content in the defect shown Fig. 7(c) was small.

In summary, thermodynamic calculations indicate that the AZ91 melt will react with the cover gas to form fluorides firstly, then oxides and sulphides in the last. The oxide film in the different reaction stages would have different structures and compositions.

4.3. Effect of the carrier gases on consumption of the entrained gas and the reproducibility of AZ91 castings

The evolution processes of entrainment defects, formed in SF6/air and SF6/CO2, have been suggested in Sections 4.1 and 4.2. The theoretical calculations were verified with respect to the corresponding oxide films found in practical samples. The atmosphere within an entrainment defect could be efficiently consumed due to the reaction with liquid Mg-alloy, in a scenario dissimilar to the Al-alloy system (i.e., nitrogen in an entrained air bubble would not efficiently react with Al-alloy melt [64,65], however, nitrogen would be more readily consumed in liquid Mg alloys, commonly referred to as “nitrogen burning” [66]).

The reaction between the entrained gas and the surrounding liquid Mg-alloy converted the entrained gas into solid compounds (e.g. MgO) within the oxide film, thus reducing the void volume of the entrainment defect and hence probably causing a collapse of the defect (e.g., if an entrained gas of air was depleted by the surrounding liquid Mg-alloy, under an assumption that the melt temperature is 700 °C and the depth of liquid Mg-alloy is 10 cm, the total volume of the final solid products would be 0.044% of the initial volume taken by the entrapped air).

The relationship between the void volume reduction of entrainment defects and the corresponding casting properties has been widely studied in Al-alloy castings. Nyahumwa and Campbell [16] reported that the Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) process caused the entrainment defects in Al-alloy castings to collapse and their oxide surfaces forced into contact. The fatigue lives of their castings were improved after HIP. Nyahumwa and Campbell [16] also suggested a potential bonding of the double oxide films that were in contact with each other, but there was no direct evidence to support this. This binding phenomenon was further investigated by Aryafar et.al.[8], who re-melted two Al-alloy bars with oxide skins in a steel tube and then carried out a tensile strength test on the solidified sample. They found that the oxide skins of the Al-alloy bars strongly bonded with each other and became even stronger with an extension of the melt holding time, indicating a potential “healing” phenomenon due to the consumption of the entrained gas within the double oxide film structure. In addition, Raidszadeh and Griffiths [9,19] successfully reduced the negative effect of entrainment defects on the reproducibility of Al-alloy castings, by extending the melt holding time before solidification, which allowed the entrained gas to have a longer time to react with the surrounding melt.

With consideration of the previous work mentioned, the consumption of the entrained gas in Mg-alloy castings may diminish the negative effect of entrainment defects in the following two ways.

(1) Bonding phenomenon of the double oxide films. The sandwich-like structure shown in Fig. 5 and 7 indicated a potential bonding of the double oxide film structure. However, more evidence is required to quantify the increase in strength due to the bonding of the oxide films.

(2) Void volume reduction of entrainment defects. The positive effect of void-volume reduction on the quality of castings has been widely demonstrated by the HIP process [67]. As the evolution processes discussed in Section 4.14.2, the oxide films of entrainment defects can grow together due to an ongoing reaction between the entrained gas and surrounding AZ91 alloy melt. The volume of the final solid products was significant small compared with the entrained gas (i.e., 0.044% as previously mentioned).

Therefore, the consumption rate of the entrained gas (i.e., the growth rate of oxide films) may be a critical parameter for improving the quality of AZ91 alloy castings. The oxide film growth rate in the oxidization cell was accordingly further investigated.

Fig. 14 shows a comparison of the surface film growth rates in different cover gases (i.e., 0.5%SF6/air and 0.5%SF6/CO2). 15 random points on each sample were selected for film thickness measurements. The 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was computed under an assumption that the variation of the film thickness followed a Gaussian distribution. It can be seen that all the surface films formed in 0.5%SF6/air grew faster than those formed in 0.5%SF6/CO2. The different growth rates suggested that the entrained-gas consumption rate of 0.5%SF6/air was higher than that of 0.5%SF6/CO2, which was more beneficial for the consumption of the entrained gas.

Fig. 14. A comparison of the AZ91 alloy oxide film growth rates in 0.5%SF6/air and 0.5%SF6/CO2

It should be noted that, in the oxidation cell, the contact area of liquid AZ91 alloy and cover gas (i.e. the size of the crucible) was relatively small with consideration of the large volume of melt and gas. Consequently, the holding time for the oxide film growth within the oxidation cell was comparatively long (i.e., 5–30 min). However, the entrainment defects contained in a real casting are comparatively very small (i.e., a few microns size as shown in Figs. 36, and [7]), and the entrained gas is fully enclosed by the surrounding melt, creating a relatively large contact area. Hence the reaction time for cover gas and the AZ91 alloy melt may be comparatively short. In addition, the solidification time of real Mg-alloy sand castings can be a few minutes (e.g. Guo [68] reported that a Mg-alloy sand casting with 60 mm diameter required 4 min to be solidified). Therefore, it can be expected that an entrained gas trapped during an Mg-alloy melt pouring process will be readily consumed by the surrounding melt, especially for sand castings and large-size castings, where solidification times are long.

Therefore, the different cover gases (0.5%SF6/air and 0.5%SF6/CO2) associated with different consumption rates of the entrained gases may affect the reproducibility of the final castings. To verify this assumption, the AZ91 castings produced in 0.5%SF6/air and 0.5%SF6/CO2 were machined into test bars for mechanical evaluation. A Weibull analysis was carried out using both linear least square (LLS) method and non-linear least square (non-LLS) method [69].

Fig. 15(a-b) shows a traditional 2-p linearized Weibull plot of the UTS and elongation of the AZ91 alloy castings, obtained by the LLS method. The estimator used is P= (i-0.5)/N, which was suggested to cause the lowest bias among all the popular estimators [69,70]. The casting produced in SF6/air has an UTS Weibull moduli of 16.9, and an elongation Weibull moduli of 5.0. In contrast, the UTS and elongation Weibull modulus of the casting produced in SF6/CO2 are 7.7 and 2.7 respectively, suggesting that the reproducibility of the casting protected by SF6/CO2 were much lower than that produced in SF6/air.

Fig. 15. The Weibull modulus of AZ91 castings produced in different atmospheres, estimated by (a-b) the linear least square method, (c-d) the non-linear least square method, where SSR is the sum of residual squares.

In addition, the author’s previous publication [69] demonstrated a shortcoming of the linearized Weibull plots, which may cause a higher bias and incorrect R2 interruption of the Weibull estimation. A Non-LLS Weibull estimation was therefore carried out, as shown in Fig. 15 (c-d). The UTS Weibull modulus of the SF6/air casting was 20.8, while the casting produced under SF6/CO2 had a lower UTS Weibull modulus of 11.4, showing a clear difference in their reproducibility. In addition, the SF6/air elongation (El%) dataset also had a Weibull modulus (shape = 5.8) higher than the elongation dataset of SF6/CO2 (shape = 3.1). Therefore, both the LLS and Non-LLS estimations suggested that the SF6/air casting has a higher reproducibility than the SF6/CO2 casting. It supports the method that the use of air instead of CO2 contributes to a quicker consumption of the entrained gas, which may reduce the void volume within the defects. Therefore, the use of 0.5%SF6/air instead of 0.5%SF6/CO2 (which increased the consumption rate of the entrained gas) improved the reproducibility of the AZ91 castings.

However, it should be noted that not all the Mg-alloy foundries followed the casting process used in present work. The Mg-alloy melt in present work was degassed, thus reducing the effect of hydrogen on the consumption of the entrained gas (i.e., hydrogen could diffuse into the entrained gas, potentially suppressing the depletion of the entrained gas [7,71,72]). In contrast, in Mg-alloy foundries, the Mg-alloy melt is not normally degassed, since it was widely believed that there is not a ‘gas problem’ when casting magnesium and hence no significant change in tensile properties [73]. Although studies have shown the negative effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of Mg-alloy castings [41,42,73], a degassing process is still not very popular in Mg-alloy foundries.

Moreover, in present work, the sand mould cavity was flushed with the SF6 cover gas prior to pouring [22]. However, not all the Mg-alloy foundries flushed the mould cavity in this way. For example, the Stone Foundry Ltd (UK) used sulphur powder instead of the cover-gas flushing. The entrained gas within their castings may be SO2/air, rather than the protective gas.

Therefore, although the results in present work have shown that using air instead of CO2 improved the reproducibility of the final casting, it still requires further investigations to confirm the effect of carrier gases with respect to different industrial Mg-alloy casting processes.

7. Conclusion

Entrainment defects formed in an AZ91 alloy were observed. Their oxide films had two types of structure: single-layered and multi-layered. The multi-layered oxide film can grow together forming a sandwich-like structure in the final casting.2.

Both the experimental results and the theoretical thermodynamic calculations demonstrated that fluorides in the trapped gas were depleted prior to the consumption of sulphur. A three-stage evolution process of the double oxide film defects has been suggested. The oxide films contained different combinations of compounds, depending on the evolution stage. The defects formed in SF6/air had a similar structure to those formed in SF6/CO2, but the compositions of their oxide films were different. The oxide-film formation and evolution process of the entrainment defects were different from that of the Mg-alloy surface films previous reported (i.e., MgO formed prior to MgF2).3.

The growth rate of the oxide film was demonstrated to be greater under SF6/air than SF6/CO2, contributing to a quicker consumption of the damaging entrapped gas. The reproducibility of an AZ91 alloy casting improved when using SF6/air instead of SF6/CO2.

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge funding from the EPSRC LiME grant EP/H026177/1, and the help from Dr W.D. Griffiths and Mr. Adrian Carden (University of Birmingham). The casting work was carried out in University of Birmingham.

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Figure 3. Comparison of water surface profiles over porous media with 12 mm particle diameter in laboratory measurements (symbols) and numerical results (lines).

다공층에 대한 돌발 댐 붕괴의 3차원 유동 수치해석 시뮬레이션

A. Safarzadeh1*, P. Mohsenzadeh2, S. Abbasi3
1 Professor of Civil Eng., Water Engineering and Mineral Waters Research Center, Univ. of Mohaghegh Ardabili,Ardabil, Iran
2 M.Sc., Graduated of Civil-Hydraulic Structures Eng., Faculty of Eng., Univ. of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran
3 M.Sc., Graduated of Civil -Hydraulic Structures Eng., Faculty of Eng., Univ. of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran Safarzadeh@uma.ac.ir

Highlights

유체 이동에 의해 생성된 RBF는 Ls-Dyna에서 Fluent, ICFD ALE 및 SPH 방법으로 시뮬레이션되었습니다.
RBF의 과예측은 유체가 메인 도메인에서 고속으로 분리될 때 발생합니다.
이 과잉 예측은 요소 크기, 시간 단계 크기 및 유체 모델에 따라 다릅니다.
유체 성능을 검증하려면 최대 RBF보다 임펄스가 권장됩니다.

Abstract

Dam break is a very important problem due to its effects on economy, security, human casualties and environmental consequences. In this study, 3D flow due to dam break over the porous substrate is numerically simulated and the effect of porosity, permeability and thickness of the porous bed and the water depth in the porous substrate are investigated. Classic models of dam break over a rigid bed and water infiltration through porous media were studied and results of the numerical simulations are compared with existing laboratory data. Validation of the results is performed by comparing the water surface profiles and wave front position with dam break on rigid and porous bed. Results showed that, due to the effect of dynamic wave in the initial stage of dam break, a local peak occurs in the flood hydrograph. The presence of porous bed reduces the acceleration of the flood wave relative to the flow over the solid bed and it decreases with the increase of the permeability of the bed. By increasing the permeability of the bed, the slope of the ascending limb of the flood hydrograph and the peak discharge drops. Furthermore, if the depth and permeability of the bed is such that the intrusive flow reaches the rigid substrate under the porous bed, saturation of the porous bed, results in a sharp increase in the slope of the flood hydrograph. The maximum values of the peak discharge at the end of the channel with porous bed occurred in saturated porous bed conditions.

댐 붕괴는 경제, 보안, 인명 피해 및 환경적 영향으로 인해 매우 중요한 문제입니다. 본 연구에서는 다공성 기재에 대한 댐 파괴로 인한 3차원 유동을 수치적으로 시뮬레이션하고 다공성 기재의 다공성, 투과도 및 다공성 층의 두께 및 수심의 영향을 조사합니다. 단단한 바닥에 대한 댐 파괴 및 다공성 매체를 통한 물 침투의 고전 모델을 연구하고 수치 시뮬레이션 결과를 기존 실험실 데이터와 비교합니다. 결과 검증은 강체 및 다공성 베드에서 댐 파단과 수면 프로파일 및 파면 위치를 비교하여 수행됩니다. 그 결과 댐파괴 초기의 동적파동의 영향으로 홍수수문곡선에서 국부첨두가 발생하는 것으로 나타났다. 다공성 베드의 존재는 고체 베드 위의 유동에 대한 홍수파의 가속을 감소시키고 베드의 투과성이 증가함에 따라 감소합니다. 베드의 투수성을 증가시켜 홍수 수문곡선의 오름차순 경사와 첨두방류량이 감소한다. 더욱이, 만약 층의 깊이와 투과성이 관입 유동이 다공성 층 아래의 단단한 기질에 도달하는 정도라면, 다공성 층의 포화는 홍수 수문곡선의 기울기의 급격한 증가를 초래합니다. 다공층이 있는 채널의 끝단에서 최대 방전 피크값은 포화 다공층 조건에서 발생하였다.

Keywords

Keywords: Dams Break, 3D modeling, Porous Bed, Permeability, Flood wave

Reference

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Fig. 1 Multi-physics phenomena in the laser-material interaction zone

COMPARISON BETWEEN GREEN AND
INFRARED LASER IN LASER POWDER BED
FUSION OF PURE COPPER THROUGH HIGH
FIDELITY NUMERICAL MODELLING AT MESOSCALE

316-L 스테인리스강의 레이저 분말 베드 융합 중 콜드 스패터 형성의 충실도 높은 수치 모델링

W.E. ALPHONSO1*, M. BAYAT1 and J.H. HATTEL1
*Corresponding author
1Technical University of Denmark (DTU), 2800, Kgs, Lyngby, Denmark

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 금속 적층 제조(MAM) 기술로, 기존 제조 공정에 비해 부품 설계 자유도, 조립품 통합, 부품 맞춤화 및 낮은 툴링 비용과 같은 여러 이점을 산업에 제공합니다.

전기 코일 및 열 관리 장치는 일반적으로 높은 전기 및 열 전도성 특성으로 인해 순수 구리로 제조됩니다. 따라서 순동의 L-PBF가 가능하다면 기하학적으로 최적화된 방열판과 자유형 전자코일을 제작할 수 있습니다.

그러나 L-PBF로 조밀한 순동 부품을 생산하는 것은 적외선에 대한 낮은 광 흡수율과 높은 열전도율로 인해 어렵습니다. 기존의 L-PBF 시스템에서 조밀한 구리 부품을 생산하려면 적외선 레이저의 출력을 500W 이상으로 높이거나 구리의 광흡수율이 높은 녹색 레이저를 사용해야 합니다.

적외선 레이저 출력을 높이면 후면 반사로 인해 레이저 시스템의 광학 구성 요소가 손상되고 렌즈의 열 광학 현상으로 인해 공정이 불안정해질 수 있습니다. 이 작업에서 FVM(Finite Volume Method)에 기반한 다중 물리학 중간 규모 수치 모델은 Flow-3D에서 개발되어 용융 풀 역학과 궁극적으로 부품 품질을 제어하는 ​​물리적 현상 상호 작용을 조사합니다.

녹색 레이저 열원과 적외선 레이저 열원은 기판 위의 순수 구리 분말 베드에 단일 트랙 증착을 생성하기 위해 개별적으로 사용됩니다.

용융 풀 역학에 대한 레이저 열원의 유사하지 않은 광학 흡수 특성의 영향이 탐구됩니다. 수치 모델을 검증하기 위해 단일 트랙이 구리 분말 베드에 증착되고 시뮬레이션된 용융 풀 모양과 크기가 비교되는 실험이 수행되었습니다.

녹색 레이저는 광흡수율이 높아 전도 및 키홀 모드 용융이 가능하고 적외선 레이저는 흡수율이 낮아 키홀 모드 용융만 가능하다. 레이저 파장에 대한 용융 모드의 변화는 궁극적으로 기계적, 전기적 및 열적 특성에 영향을 미치는 열 구배 및 냉각 속도에 대한 결과를 가져옵니다.

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) is a Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) technology which offers several advantages to industries such as part design freedom, consolidation of assemblies, part customization and low tooling cost over conventional manufacturing processes. Electric coils and thermal management devices are generally manufactured from pure copper due to its high electrical and thermal conductivity properties. Therefore, if L-PBF of pure copper is feasible, geometrically optimized heat sinks and free-form electromagnetic coils can be manufactured. However, producing dense pure copper parts by L-PBF is difficult due to low optical absorptivity to infrared radiation and high thermal conductivity. To produce dense copper parts in a conventional L-PBF system either the power of the infrared laser must be increased above 500W, or a green laser should be used for which copper has a high optical absorptivity. Increasing the infrared laser power can damage the optical components of the laser systems due to back reflections and create instabilities in the process due to thermal-optical phenomenon of the lenses. In this work, a multi-physics meso-scale numerical model based on Finite Volume Method (FVM) is developed in Flow-3D to investigate the physical phenomena interaction which governs the melt pool dynamics and ultimately the part quality. A green laser heat source and an infrared laser heat source are used individually to create single track deposition on pure copper powder bed above a substrate. The effect of the dissimilar optical absorptivity property of laser heat sources on the melt pool dynamics is explored. To validate the numerical model, experiments were conducted wherein single tracks are deposited on a copper powder bed and the simulated melt pool shape and size are compared. As the green laser has a high optical absorptivity, a conduction and keyhole mode melting is possible while for the infrared laser only keyhole mode melting is possible due to low absorptivity. The variation in melting modes with respect to the laser wavelength has an outcome on thermal gradient and cooling rates which ultimately affect the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties.

Keywords

Pure Copper, Laser Powder Bed Fusion, Finite Volume Method, multi-physics

Fig. 1 Multi-physics phenomena in the laser-material interaction zone
Fig. 1 Multi-physics phenomena in the laser-material interaction zone
Fig. 2 Framework for single laser track simulation model including powder bed and substrate (a) computational domain with boundaries (b) discretization of the domain with uniform quad mesh.
Fig. 2 Framework for single laser track simulation model including powder bed and substrate (a) computational domain with boundaries (b) discretization of the domain with uniform quad mesh.
Fig. 3 2D melt pool contours from the numerical model compared to experiments [16] for (a) VED = 65 J/mm3 at 7 mm from the beginning of the single track (b) VED = 103 J/mm3 at 3 mm from the beginning of the single track (c) VED = 103 J/mm3 at 7 mm from the beginning of the single track. In the 2D contour, the non-melted region is indicated in blue, and the melted region is indicated by red and green when the VED is 65 J/mm3 and 103 J/mm3 respectively.
Fig. 3 2D melt pool contours from the numerical model compared to experiments [16] for (a) VED = 65 J/mm3 at 7 mm from the beginning of the single track (b) VED = 103 J/mm3 at 3 mm from the beginning of the single track (c) VED = 103 J/mm3 at 7 mm from the beginning of the single track. In the 2D contour, the non-melted region is indicated in blue, and the melted region is indicated by red and green when the VED is 65 J/mm3 and 103 J/mm3 respectively.
Fig. 4 3D temperature contour plots of during single track L-PBF process at time1.8 µs when (a) VED = 65 J/mm3 (b) VED = 103 J/mm3 along with 2D melt pool contours at 5 mm from the laser initial position. In the 2D contour, the non-melted region is indicated in blue, and the melted region is indicated by red and green when the VED is 65 J/mm3 and 103 J/mm3 respectively.
Fig. 4 3D temperature contour plots of during single track L-PBF process at time1.8 µs when (a) VED = 65 J/mm3 (b) VED = 103 J/mm3 along with 2D melt pool contours at 5 mm from the laser initial position. In the 2D contour, the non-melted region is indicated in blue, and the melted region is indicated by red and green when the VED is 65 J/mm3 and 103 J/mm3 respectively.

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Fig. 9 Test facility a plan view, b the bottom elevation of the reservoir to the channel (Bell et al. 1992)

2-D Dam-Break Flow Modeling Based on Weighted Average Flux Method

Iranian Journal of Science and Technology, Transactions of Civil Engineering volume 46, pages1515–1525 (2022)Cite this article

Abstract

천해 방정식을 기반으로 하는 2차원 흐름 모델은 댐 붕괴 흐름을 모델링하기 위해 개발되었습니다. 공간 이산화는 유한 체적 셀 중심 유형 방법에 의해 얻어집니다.

수치 시스템은 명시적인 방식으로 해결됩니다. 플럭스 모델링은 시간과 공간 모두에서 2차 정확도로 TVD WAF 방식으로 배포되었습니다. 로컬 리만 문제는 셀 인터페이스에서 HLLC 방법으로 해결됩니다. 수치 모델은 모델 결과와 해석 솔루션을 비교하여 검증합니다.

그런 다음 수치 모델의 결과는 90° 및 180° 편차 각도를 갖는 수로 및 삼각형 바텀 씰 위의 직선 수로에서 사용 가능한 실험 데이터와 비교됩니다. 결과는 댐 파괴파를 예측하는 현재 모델의 합리적인 성능을 확인합니다.

A two-dimensional flow model based on shallow water equations is developed for modeling dam-break flows. The spatial discretization is obtained by the finite volume cell centered type method. The numerical system is solved in explicit way. The flux modeling has been deployed by TVD WAF scheme with a second-order accuracy in both time and space. The local Riemann problem is solved by the HLLC method in the interface of the cells. The numerical model is verified by comparison of model results and analytical solutions. Then the results of numerical model are compared with available experimental data of dam-break waves in a channel with 90° and 180° deviation angle and in a straight channel over a triangular bottom sill. The results confirm the reasonable performance of the present model in predicting dam-break waves.

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Keywords

  • Finite volume
  • Shallow water equations
  • Dam-break
  • HLLC
  • TVD
  • WAF
Fig. 2 Generic control volume and notations
Fig. 2 Generic control volume and notations
Fig. 1 The generated grid for a channel with a 180° bend
Fig. 1 The generated grid for a channel with a 180° bend
Fig. 4 a Water surface profle and b velocity profle of dam-break problem with left dry bed
Fig. 4 a Water surface profle and b velocity profle of dam-break problem with left dry bed
Fig. 5 a Water surface profle and b velocity profle of appearance dry region
Fig. 5 a Water surface profle and b velocity profle of appearance dry region
Fig. 6 Comparison of the present model results and exact solution for transcritical fow over a bump with a shock
Fig. 6 Comparison of the present model results and exact solution for transcritical fow over a bump with a shock
Fig. 7 Geometry of the reservoir and L-shaped channel: plan view (Soares-Frazao et al. 2019)
Fig. 7 Geometry of the reservoir and L-shaped channel: plan view (Soares-Frazao et al. 2019)
Fig. 9 Test facility a plan view, b the bottom elevation of the reservoir to the channel (Bell et al. 1992)
Fig. 9 Test facility a plan view, b the bottom elevation of the reservoir to the channel (Bell et al. 1992)

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Fig. 1. Schematic figure showing the PREP with additional gas flowing on the end face of electrode.

플라즈마 회전 전극 공정 중 분말 형성에 대한 공정 매개변수 및 냉각 가스의 영향

Effects of process parameters and cooling gas on powder formation during the plasma rotating electrode process

Yujie Cuia Yufan Zhaoa1 Haruko Numatab Kenta Yamanakaa Huakang Biana Kenta Aoyagia AkihikoChibaa
aInstitute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577, JapanbDepartment of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577, Japan

Highlights

•The limitation of increasing the rotational speed in decreasing powder size was clarified.

•Cooling and disturbance effects varied with the gas flowing rate.

•Inclined angle of the residual electrode end face affected powder formation.

•Additional cooling gas flowing could be applied to control powder size.

Abstract

The plasma rotating electrode process (PREP) is rapidly becoming an important powder fabrication method in additive manufacturing. However, the low production rate of fine PREP powder limits the development of PREP. Herein, we investigated different factors affecting powder formation during PREP by combining experimental methods and numerical simulations. The limitation of increasing the rotation electrode speed in decreasing powder size is attributed to the increased probability of adjacent droplets recombining and the decreased tendency of granulation. The effects of additional Ar/He gas flowing on the rotational electrode on powder formation is determined through the cooling effect, the disturbance effect, and the inclined effect of the residual electrode end face simultaneously. A smaller-sized powder was obtained in the He atmosphere owing to the larger inclined angle of the residual electrode end face compared to the Ar atmosphere. Our research highlights the route for the fabrication of smaller-sized powders using PREP.

플라즈마 회전 전극 공정(PREP)은 적층 제조 에서 중요한 분말 제조 방법으로 빠르게 자리잡고 있습니다. 그러나 미세한 PREP 분말의 낮은 생산율은 PREP의 개발을 제한합니다. 여기에서 우리는 실험 방법과 수치 시뮬레이션을 결합하여 PREP 동안 분말 형성에 영향을 미치는 다양한 요인을 조사했습니다. 분말 크기 감소에서 회전 전극 속도 증가의 한계는 인접한 액적 재결합 확률 증가 및 과립화 경향 감소에 기인합니다.. 회전 전극에 흐르는 추가 Ar/He 가스가 분말 형성에 미치는 영향은 냉각 효과, 외란 효과 및 잔류 전극 단면의 경사 효과를 통해 동시에 결정됩니다. He 분위기에서는 Ar 분위기에 비해 잔류 전극 단면의 경사각이 크기 때문에 더 작은 크기의 분말이 얻어졌다. 우리의 연구는 PREP를 사용하여 더 작은 크기의 분말을 제조하는 경로를 강조합니다.

Keywords

Plasma rotating electrode process

Ti-6Al-4 V alloy, Rotating speed, Numerical simulation, Gas flowing, Powder size

Introduction

With the development of additive manufacturing, there has been a significant increase in high-quality powder production demand [1,2]. The initial powder characteristics are closely related to the uniform powder spreading [3,4], packing density [5], and layer thickness observed during additive manufacturing [6], thus determining the mechanical properties of the additive manufactured parts [7,8]. Gas atomization (GA) [9–11], centrifugal atomization (CA) [12–15], and the plasma rotating electrode process (PREP) are three important powder fabrication methods.

Currently, GA is the dominant powder fabrication method used in additive manufacturing [16] for the fabrication of a wide range of alloys [11]. GA produces powders by impinging a liquid metal stream to droplets through a high-speed gas flow of nitrogen, argon, or helium. With relatively low energy consumption and a high fraction of fine powders, GA has become the most popular powder manufacturing technology for AM.

The entrapped gas pores are generally formed in the powder after solidification during GA, in which the molten metal is impacted by a high-speed atomization gas jet. In addition, satellites are formed in GA powder when fine particles adhere to partially molten particles.

The gas pores of GA powder result in porosity generation in the additive manufactured parts, which in turn deteriorates its mechanical properties because pores can become crack initiation sites [17]. In CA, a molten metal stream is poured directly onto an atomizer disc spinning at a high rotational speed. A thin film is formed on the surface of the disc, which breaks into small droplets due to the centrifugal force. Metal powder is obtained when these droplets solidify.

Compared with GA powder, CA powder exhibits higher sphericity, lower impurity content, fewer satellites, and narrower particle size distribution [12]. However, very high speed is required to obtain fine powder by CA. In PREP, the molten metal, melted using the plasma arc, is ejected from the rotating rod through centrifugal force. Compared with GA powder, PREP-produced powders also have higher sphericity and fewer pores and satellites [18].

For instance, PREP-fabricated Ti6Al-4 V alloy powder with a powder size below 150 μm exhibits lower porosity than gas-atomized powder [19], which decreases the porosity of additive manufactured parts. Furthermore, the process window during electron beam melting was broadened using PREP powder compared to GA powder in Inconel 718 alloy [20] owing to the higher sphericity of the PREP powder.

In summary, PREP powder exhibits many advantages and is highly recommended for powder-based additive manufacturing and direct energy deposition-type additive manufacturing. However, the low production rate of fine PREP powder limits the widespread application of PREP powder in additive manufacturing.

Although increasing the rotating speed is an effective method to decrease the powder size [21,22], the reduction in powder size becomes smaller with the increased rotating speed [23]. The occurrence of limiting effects has not been fully clarified yet.

Moreover, the powder size can be decreased by increasing the rotating electrode diameter [24]. However, these methods are quite demanding for the PREP equipment. For instance, it is costly to revise the PREP equipment to meet the demand of further increasing the rotating speed or electrode diameter.

Accordingly, more feasible methods should be developed to further decrease the PREP powder size. Another factor that influences powder formation is the melting rate [25]. It has been reported that increasing the melting rate decreases the powder size of Inconel 718 alloy [26].

In contrast, the powder size of SUS316 alloy was decreased by decreasing the plasma current within certain ranges. This was ascribed to the formation of larger-sized droplets from fluid strips with increased thickness and spatial density at higher plasma currents [27]. The powder size of NiTi alloy also decreases at lower melting rates [28]. Consequently, altering the melting rate, varied with the plasma current, is expected to regulate the PREP powder size.

Furthermore, gas flowing has a significant influence on powder formation [27,29–31]. On one hand, the disturbance effect of gas flowing promotes fluid granulation, which in turn contributes to the formation of smaller-sized powder [27]. On the other hand, the cooling effect of gas flowing facilitates the formation of large-sized powder due to increased viscosity and surface tension. However, there is a lack of systematic research on the effect of different gas flowing on powder formation during PREP.

Herein, the authors systematically studied the effects of rotating speed, electrode diameter, plasma current, and gas flowing on the formation of Ti-6Al-4 V alloy powder during PREP as additive manufactured Ti-6Al-4 V alloy exhibits great application potential [32]. Numerical simulations were conducted to explain why increasing the rotating speed is not effective in decreasing powder size when the rotation speed reaches a certain level. In addition, the different factors incited by the Ar/He gas flowing on powder formation were clarified.

Fig. 1. Schematic figure showing the PREP with additional gas flowing on the end face of electrode.
Fig. 1. Schematic figure showing the PREP with additional gas flowing on the end face of electrode.

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Fig. 1. Model geometry with the computational domain, extrusion nozzle, toolpath, and boundary conditions. The model is presented while printing the fifth layer.

재료 압출 적층 제조에서 증착된 층의 안정성 및 변형

Md Tusher Mollah Raphaël 사령관 Marcin P. Serdeczny David B. Pedersen Jon Spangenberg덴마크 공과 대학 기계 공학과, Kgs. 덴마크 링비

2020년 12월 22일 접수, 2021년 5월 1일 수정, 2021년 7월 15일 수락, 2021년 7월 21일 온라인 사용 가능, 기록 버전 2021년 8월 17일 .

Abstract

이 문서는 재료 압출 적층 제조 에서 여러 레이어를 인쇄하는 동안 증착 흐름의 전산 유체 역학 시뮬레이션 을 제공합니다 개발된 모델은 증착된 레이어의 형태를 예측하고 점소성 재료 를 인쇄하는 동안 레이어 변형을 캡처합니다 . 물리학은 일반화된 뉴턴 유체 로 공식화된 Bingham 구성 모델의 연속성 및 운동량 방정식에 의해 제어됩니다. . 증착된 층의 단면 모양이 예측되고 재료의 다양한 구성 매개변수에 대해 층의 변형이 연구됩니다. 층의 변형은 인쇄물의 정수압과 압출시 압출압력으로 인한 것임을 알 수 있다. 시뮬레이션에 따르면 항복 응력이 높을수록 변형이 적은 인쇄물이 생성되는 반면 플라스틱 점도 가 높을수록 증착된 레이어에서변형이 커 집니다 . 또한, 인쇄 속도, 압출 속도 의 영향, 층 높이 및 인쇄된 층의 변형에 대한 노즐 직경을 조사합니다. 마지막으로, 이 모델은 후속 인쇄된 레이어의 정수압 및 압출 압력을 지원하기 위해 증착 후 점소성 재료가 요구하는 항복 응력의 필요한 증가에 대한 보수적인 추정치를 제공합니다.

This paper presents computational fluid dynamics simulations of the deposition flow during printing of multiple layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing. The developed model predicts the morphology of the deposited layers and captures the layer deformations during the printing of viscoplastic materials. The physics is governed by the continuity and momentum equations with the Bingham constitutive model, formulated as a generalized Newtonian fluid. The cross-sectional shapes of the deposited layers are predicted, and the deformation of layers is studied for different constitutive parameters of the material. It is shown that the deformation of layers is due to the hydrostatic pressure of the printed material, as well as the extrusion pressure during the extrusion. The simulations show that a higher yield stress results in prints with less deformations, while a higher plastic viscosity leads to larger deformations in the deposited layers. Moreover, the influence of the printing speed, extrusion speed, layer height, and nozzle diameter on the deformation of the printed layers is investigated. Finally, the model provides a conservative estimate of the required increase in yield stress that a viscoplastic material demands after deposition in order to support the hydrostatic and extrusion pressure of the subsequently printed layers.

Fig. 1. Model geometry with the computational domain, extrusion nozzle, toolpath, and boundary conditions. The model is presented while printing the fifth layer.
Fig. 1. Model geometry with the computational domain, extrusion nozzle, toolpath, and boundary conditions. The model is presented while printing the fifth layer.

키워드

점성 플라스틱 재료, 재료 압출 적층 제조(MEX-AM), 다층 증착, 전산유체역학(CFD), 변형 제어
Viscoplastic Materials, Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (MEX-AM), Multiple-Layers Deposition, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Deformation Control

Introduction

Three-dimensional printing of viscoplastic materials has grown in popularity over the recent years, due to the success of Material Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (MEX-AM) [1]. Viscoplastic materials, such as ceramic pastes [2,3], hydrogels [4], thermosets [5], and concrete [6], behave like solids when the applied load is below their yield stress, and like a fluid when the applied load exceeds their yield stress [7]. Viscoplastic materials are typically used in MEX-AM techniques such as Robocasting [8], and 3D concrete printing [9,10]. The differences between these technologies lie in the processing of the material before the extrusion and in the printing scale (from microscale to big area additive manufacturing). In these extrusion-based technologies, the structure is fabricated in a layer-by-layer approach onto a solid surface/support [11, 12]. During the process, the material is typically deposited on top of the previously printed layers that may be already solidified (wet-on-dry printing) or still deformable (wet-on-wet printing) [1]. In wet-on-wet printing, control over the deformation of layers is important for the stability and geometrical accuracy of the prints. If the material is too liquid after the deposition, it cannot support the pressure of the subsequently deposited layers. On the other hand, the material flowability is a necessity during extrusion through the nozzle. Several experimental studies have been performed to analyze the physics of the extrusion and deposition of viscoplastic materials, as reviewed in Refs. [13–16]. The experimental measurements can be supplemented with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain a more complete picture of MEX-AM. A review of the CFD studies within the material processing and deposition in 3D concrete printing was presented by Roussel et al. [17]. Wolfs et al. [18] predicted numerically the failure-deformation of a cylindrical structure due to the self-weight by calculating the stiffness and strength of the individual layers. It was found that the deformations can take place in all layers, however the most critical deformation occurs in the bottom layer. Comminal et al. [19,20] presented three-dimensional simulations of the material deposition in MEX-AM, where the fluid was approximated as Newtonian. Subsequently, the model was experimentally validated in Ref. [21] for polymer-based MEX-AM, and extended to simulate the deposition of multiple layers in Ref. [22], where the previously printed material was assumed solid. Xia et al. [23] simulated the influence of the viscoelastic effects on the shape of deposited layers in MEX-AM. A numerical model for simulating the deposition of a viscoplastic material was recently presented and experimentally validated in Refs. [24] and [25]. These studies focused on predicting the cross-sectional shape of a single printed layer for different processing conditions (relative printing speed, and layer height). Despite these research efforts, a limited number of studies have focused on investigating the material deformations in wet-on-wet printing when multiple layers are deposited on top of each other. This paper presents CFD simulations of the extrusion-deposition flow of a viscoplastic material for several subsequent layers (viz. three- and five-layers). The material is continuously printed one layer over another on a fixed solid surface. The rheology of the viscoplastic material is approximated by the Bingham constitutive equation that is formulated using the Generalized Newtonian Fluid (GNF) model. The CFD model is used to predict the cross-sectional shapes of the layers and their deformations while printing the next layers on top. Moreover, the simulations are used to quantify the extrusion pressure applied by the deposited material on the substrate, and the previously printed layers. Numerically, it is investigated how the process parameters (i.e., the extrusion speed, printing speed, nozzle diameter, and layer height) and the material rheology affect the deformations of the deposited layers. Section 2 describes the methodology of the study. Section 3 presents and discusses the results. The study is summarized and concluded in Section 4.

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Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process

Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process

반고체 레오 다이 캐스팅 공정으로 제작된 알루미늄 합금 브래킷의 수치 시뮬레이션 및 생산 실험 검증을 기반으로 한 게이팅 시스템 설계

International Journal of Metalcasting volume 16, pages878–893 (2022)Cite this article

Abstract

In this study a gating system including sprue, runner and overflows for semi-solid rheocasting of aluminum alloy was designed by means of numerical simulations with a commercial software. The effects of pouring temperature, mold temperature and injection speed on the filling process performance of semi-solid die casting were studied. Based on orthogonal test analysis, the optimal die casting process parameters were selected, which were metal pouring temperature 590 °C, mold temperature 260 °C and injection velocity 0.5 m/s. Semi-solid slurry preparation process of Swirled Enthalpy Equilibration Device (SEED) was used for die casting production experiment. Aluminum alloy semi-solid bracket components were successfully produced with the key die casting process parameters selected, which was consistent with the simulation result. The design of semi-solid gating system was further verified by observing and analyzing the microstructure of different zones of the casting. The characteristic parameters, particle size and shape factor of microstructure of the produced semi-solid casting showed that the semi-solid aluminum alloy components are of good quality.

이 연구에서 알루미늄 합금의 반고체 레오캐스팅을 위한 스프루, 러너 및 오버플로를 포함하는 게이팅 시스템은 상용 소프트웨어를 사용한 수치 시뮬레이션을 통해 설계되었습니다. 주입 온도, 금형 온도 및 사출 속도가 반고체 다이캐스팅의 충전 공정 성능에 미치는 영향을 연구했습니다. 직교 테스트 분석을 기반으로 금속 주입 온도 590°C, 금형 온도 260°C 및 사출 속도 0.5m/s인 최적의 다이 캐스팅 공정 매개변수가 선택되었습니다. Swirled Enthalpy Equilibration Device(SEED)의 반고체 슬러리 제조 공정을 다이캐스팅 생산 실험에 사용하였다. 알루미늄 합금 반고체 브래킷 구성 요소는 시뮬레이션 결과와 일치하는 주요 다이 캐스팅 공정 매개변수를 선택하여 성공적으로 생산되었습니다. 반고체 게이팅 시스템의 설계는 주조의 다른 영역의 미세 구조를 관찰하고 분석하여 추가로 검증되었습니다. 생산된 반고체 주조물의 특성 매개변수, 입자 크기 및 미세 구조의 형상 계수는 반고체 알루미늄 합금 부품의 품질이 양호함을 보여주었습니다.

Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process
Gating System Design Based on Numerical Simulation and Production Experiment Verification of Aluminum Alloy Bracket Fabricated by Semi-solid Rheo-Die Casting Process

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Keywords

  • semi-solid rheo-die casting
  • gating system
  • process parameters
  • numerical simulation
  • microstructure
Fig. 8. Pressure distribution during the infiltration of preform with the 50 ¯m particles and 20 % starches: (a) 25 % filled, (b) 57 % filled, and (c) 99 % filled.

Experimental study and numerical simulation of infiltration of AlSi12 alloys into Si porous preforms with micro-computed tomography inspection characteristics

마이크로 컴퓨터 단층 촬영 검사 특성을 가진 Si 다공성 프리폼에 AlSi12 합금의 침투에 대한 실험적 연구 및 수치 시뮬레이션

Ruizhe LIU1 and Haidong ZHAO1
1National Engineering Research Center of Near-Net-Shape Forming for Metallic Materials, South China University of Technology,
Guangzhou 510640, China

Abstract

전분 함량(10, 20 및 30%)과 입자 크기(20, 50 및 90 m)가 다른 실리콘 입자 예비 성형체는 압축 성형 및 열처리를 통해 제작되었습니다. 프리폼의 기공 특성은 고해상도(³1 m) 3차원(3D) X선 마이크로 컴퓨터 단층 촬영(V-CT)으로 검사되었습니다. AlSi12 합금의 프리폼으로의 침투는 진공 보조 압력 침투 장치에서 800 °C 및 400 kPa의 조건에서 서로 다른 압력 적용 시간(3, 8 및 15초)으로 수행되었습니다. 고해상도(³500 nm) 수직 주사 백색광 간섭 프로파일로미터를 사용하여 복합 재료의 전면을 감지했습니다. Navier-Stokes 방정식을 기반으로 하는 ¯-CT 검사에서 실제 기공 형상을 고려하여 침투를 미시적으로 시뮬레이션했습니다. 그 결과 전분 함량과 입자크기가 증가할수록 복합재료의 표면적이 증가하는 것으로 나타났다. 전분 함량과 비교하여 입자 크기는 전면 표면적에 더 많은 영향을 미칩니다. 시뮬레이션에서 침투가 진행됨에 따라 액체 AlSi12의 압력이 감소했습니다. 복합재의 잔류 기공은 침투와 함께 증가했습니다. 실험 및 시뮬레이션 결과에 따르면 침투 방향을 따라 더 큰 압력 강하가 복합 재료의 더 많은 잔류 기공을 유도합니다.

Silicon particle preforms with different starch contents (10, 20 and 30%) and particle sizes (20, 50 and 90 ¯m) were fabricated by compression mold forming and heat treatment. The pore characteristics of preforms were inspected with a high-resolution (³1 ¯m) three-dimensional (3D) X-ray micro-computed tomography (¯-CT). The infiltration of AlSi12 alloys into the preforms were carried out under the condition of 800 °C and 400 kPa with different pressure-applied times (3, 8 and 15 s) in a vacuum-assisted pressure infiltration apparatus. A highresolution (³500 nm) vertical scanning white light interfering profilometer was used to detect the front surfaces of composites. The infiltration was simulated at micro-scale by considering the actual pore geometry from the ¯- CT inspection based on the Navier-Stokes equation. The results demonstrated that as the starch content and particle size increased, the front surface area of composite increased. Compared with the starch content, the particle size has more influence on the front surface area. In the simulation, as the infiltration progressed, the pressure of liquid AlSi12 decreased. The residual pores of composites increased with infiltration. According to the experiment and simulation results, a larger pressure drop along the infiltration direction leads to more residual pores of composites.

Fig. 1. Size distributions of Si particles.
Fig. 1. Size distributions of Si particles.
Fig. 2. Schematic of different locations of composites.
Fig. 2. Schematic of different locations of composites.
Fig. 3. Three-dimensional geometry with the reconstruction technology, enmeshment and infiltration parameters of Si preforms: (a) geometry, and (b) meshes and flow direction.
Fig. 3. Three-dimensional geometry with the reconstruction technology, enmeshment and infiltration parameters of Si preforms: (a) geometry, and (b) meshes and flow direction.
Fig. 4. Number-based frequencies of effective pore radius and throat radius: (a) effective pore radius of preforms with the 50 ¯m particles, (b) effective throat radius of preforms with the 50 ¯m particles, (c) effective pore radius of preforms with the 20 % starches, and (d) effective throat radius of preforms with the 20 % starches.
Fig. 4. Number-based frequencies of effective pore radius and throat radius: (a) effective pore radius of preforms with the 50 ¯m particles, (b) effective throat radius of preforms with the 50 ¯m particles, (c) effective pore radius of preforms with the 20 % starches, and (d) effective throat radius of preforms with the 20 % starches.
Fig. 5. 3D topological morphologies of front surfaces of composites: (a) 50 ¯m-10 %, (b) 50 ¯m-20 %, (c) 50 ¯m-30 %, (d) 20 ¯m-20 %, and (e) 90 ¯m-20 %.
Fig. 5. 3D topological morphologies of front surfaces of composites: (a) 50 ¯m-10 %, (b) 50 ¯m-20 %, (c) 50 ¯m-30 %, (d) 20 ¯m-20 %, and (e) 90 ¯m-20 %.
Fig. 6. Schematic of capillary tube.
Fig. 6. Schematic of capillary tube.
Fig. 8. Pressure distribution during the infiltration of preform with the 50 ¯m particles and 20 % starches: (a) 25 % filled, (b) 57 % filled, and (c) 99 % filled.
Fig. 8. Pressure distribution during the infiltration of preform with the 50 ¯m particles and 20 % starches: (a) 25 % filled, (b) 57 % filled, and (c) 99 % filled.
Fig. 9. Pressure distributions of liquid AlSi12 during the infiltration of preforms: (a) different fill fractions, (b) different starch contents, and (c) different particle sizes.
Fig. 9. Pressure distributions of liquid AlSi12 during the infiltration of preforms: (a) different fill fractions, (b) different starch contents, and (c) different particle sizes.
Fig. 10. Metallographs of composites: (a) different locations of composite with the 20 ¯m particles and 20 % starches, and (b) different locations of composite with the 90 ¯m particles and 20 % starches.
Fig. 10. Metallographs of composites: (a) different locations of composite with the 20 ¯m particles and 20 % starches, and (b) different locations of composite with the 90 ¯m particles and 20 % starches.
Fig. 11. Area fractions of residual pores of composites: (a) 50 ¯m (different starch contents), and (b) 20 % (different particle sizes).
Fig. 11. Area fractions of residual pores of composites: (a) 50 ¯m (different starch contents), and (b) 20 % (different particle sizes).

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Liquid-solid co-printing of multi-material 3D fluidic devices via material jetting

재료 분사를 통한 다중 재료 3D 유체 장치의 액체-고체 공동 인쇄

Liquid-solid co-printing of multi-material 3D fluidic devices via material jetting

BrandonHayes,Travis Hainsworth, Robert MacCurdy
University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boulder, 80309, CO, USA

Abstract

다중 재료 재료 분사 적층 제조 공정은 3차원(3D) 부품을 레이어별로 구축하기 위해 다양한 모델 및 지지 재료의 미세 액적을 증착합니다.

최근의 노력은 액체가 마이크로/밀리 채널에서 쉽게 퍼지할 수 있는 지지 재료로 작용할 수 있고 구조에 영구적으로 남아 있는 작동 유체로 작용할 수 있음을 보여주었지만 인쇄 프로세스 및 메커니즘에 대한 자세한 이해가 부족합니다.

액체 인쇄의 제한된 광범위한 적용. 이 연구에서 광경화성 및 광경화성 액체 방울이 동시에 증착되는 액체-고체 공동 인쇄라고 하는 “한 번에 모두 가능한” 다중 재료 인쇄 프로세스가 광범위하게 특성화됩니다. 액체-고체 공동 인쇄의 메커니즘은 실험적인 고속 이미징 및 CFD(전산 유체 역학) 연구를 통해 설명됩니다.

이 연구는 액체의 표면 장력이 액체 표면에서 광중합하여 재료의 단단한 층을 형성하는 분사된 광중합체 미세 방울을 지지할 수 있음을 보여줍니다.

마이크로/밀리 유체 소자의 액체-고체 공동 인쇄를 위한 설계 규칙은 믹서, 액적 발생기, 고도로 분기되는 구조 및 통합된 단방향 플랩 밸브와 같은 평면, 3D 및 복합 재료 마이크로/메조 유체 구조에 대한 사례 연구뿐만 아니라 제시됩니다.

우리는 액체-고체 공동 인쇄 과정을 마이크로/메조플루이딕 회로, 전기화학 트랜지스터, 칩 장치 및 로봇을 포함한 응용 프로그램을 사용하여 3D, 통합된 복합 재료 유체 회로 및 유압 구조의 단순하고 빠른 제작을 가능하게 하는 적층 제조의 핵심 새로운 기능으로 구상합니다.

Multi-material material jetting additive manufacturing processes deposit micro-scale droplets of different model and support materials to build three-dimensional (3D) parts layer by layer. Recent efforts have demonstrated that liquids can act as support materials, which can be easily purged from micro/milli-channels, and as working fluids, which permanently remain in a structure, yet the lack of a detailed understanding of the print process and mechanism has limited widespread applications of liquid printing. In this study, an “all in one go” multi-material print process, herein termed liquid–solid co-printing in which non photo-curable and photo-curable liquid droplets are simultaneous deposited, is extensively characterized. The mechanism of liquid–solid co-printing is explained via experimental high speed imaging and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) studies. This work shows that a liquid’s surface tension can support jetted photopolymer micro-droplets which photo-polymerize on the liquid surface to form a solid layer of material. Design rules for liquid–solid co-printing of micro/milli-fluidic devices are presented as well as case studies of planar, 3D, and multi-material micro/mesofluidic structures such as mixers, droplet generators, highly branching structures, and an integrated one-way flap valve. We envision the liquid–solid co-printing process as a key new capability in additive manufacturing to enable simple and rapid fabrication of 3D, integrated print-in-place multi-material fluidic circuits and hydraulic structures with applications including micro/mesofluidic circuits, electrochemical transistors, lab-on-a-chip devices, and robotics.

Liquid-solid co-printing of multi-material 3D fluidic devices via material jetting
Liquid-solid co-printing of multi-material 3D fluidic devices via material jetting

Keywords

Additive manufacturing; Mesofluidics; Modeling and simulation; Multi-material; Material jetting

Fig. 5. The predicted shapes of initial breach (a) Rectangular (b) V-notch. Fig. 6. Dam breaching stages.

Investigating the peak outflow through a spatial embankment dam breach

공간적 제방댐 붕괴를 통한 최대 유출량 조사

Mahmoud T.GhonimMagdy H.MowafyMohamed N.SalemAshrafJatwaryFaculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt

Abstract

Investigating the breach outflow hydrograph is an essential task to conduct mitigation plans and flood warnings. In the present study, the spatial dam breach is simulated by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, FLOW-3D. The model parameters were adjusted by making a comparison with a previous experimental model. The different parameters (initial breach shape, dimensions, location, and dam slopes) are studied to investigate their effects on dam breaching. The results indicate that these parameters have a significant impact. The maximum erosion rate and peak outflow for the rectangular shape are higher than those for the V-notch by 8.85% and 5%, respectively. Increasing breach width or decreasing depth by 5% leads to increasing maximum erosion rate by 11% and 15%, respectively. Increasing the downstream slope angle by 4° leads to an increase in both peak outflow and maximum erosion rate by 2.0% and 6.0%, respectively.

유출 유출 수문곡선을 조사하는 것은 완화 계획 및 홍수 경보를 수행하는 데 필수적인 작업입니다. 본 연구에서는 3차원 전산유체역학 모델인 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 공간 댐 붕괴를 시뮬레이션합니다. 이전 실험 모델과 비교하여 모델 매개변수를 조정했습니다.

다양한 매개변수(초기 붕괴 형태, 치수, 위치 및 댐 경사)가 댐 붕괴에 미치는 영향을 조사하기 위해 연구됩니다. 결과는 이러한 매개변수가 상당한 영향을 미친다는 것을 나타냅니다. 직사각형 형태의 최대 침식율과 최대 유출량은 V-notch보다 각각 8.85%, 5% 높게 나타났습니다.

위반 폭을 늘리거나 깊이를 5% 줄이면 최대 침식률이 각각 11% 및 15% 증가합니다. 하류 경사각을 4° 증가시키면 최대 유출량과 최대 침식률이 각각 2.0% 및 6.0% 증가합니다.

Keywords

Spatial dam breach; FLOW-3D; Overtopping erosion; Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

1. Introduction

There are many purposes for dam construction, such as protection from flood disasters, water storage, and power generationEmbankment failures may have a catastrophic impact on lives and infrastructure in the downstream regions. One of the most common causes of embankment dam failure is overtopping. Once the overtopping of the dam begins, the breach formation will start in the dam body then end with the dam failure. This failure occurs within a very short time, which threatens to be very dangerous. Therefore, understanding and modeling the embankment breaching processes is essential for conducting mitigation plans, flood warnings, and forecasting flood damage.

The analysis of the dam breaching process is implemented by different techniques: comparative methods, empirical models with dimensional and dimensionless solutions, physical-based models, and parametric models. These models were described in detail [1]Parametric modeling is commonly used to simulate breach growth as a time-dependent linear process and calculate outflow discharge from the breach using hydraulics principles [2]. Alhasan et al. [3] presented a simple one-dimensional mathematical model and a computer code to simulate the dam breaching process. These models were validated by small dams breaching during the floods in 2002 in the Czech Republic. Fread [4] developed an erosion model (BREACH) based on hydraulics principles, sediment transport, and soil mechanics to estimate breach size, time of formation, and outflow discharge. Říha et al. [5] investigated the dam break process for a cascade of small dams using a simple parametric model for piping and overtopping erosion, as well as a 2D shallow-water flow model for the flood in downstream areas. Goodarzi et al. [6] implemented mathematical and statistical methods to assess the effect of inflows and wind speeds on the dam’s overtopping failure.

Dam breaching studies can be divided into two main modes of erosion. The first mode is called “planar dam breach” where the flow overtops the whole dam width. While the second mode is called “spatial dam breach” where the flow overtops through the initial pilot channel (i.e., a channel created in the dam body). Therefore, the erosion will be in both vertical and horizontal directions [7].

The erosion process through the embankment dams occurs due to the shear stress applied by water flows. The dam breaching evolution can be divided into three stages [8][9], but Y. Yang et al. [10] divided the breach development into five stages: Stage I, the seepage erosion; Stage II, the initial breach formation; Stage III, the head erosion; Stage IV, the breach expansion; and Stage V, the re-equilibrium of the river channel through the breach. Many experimental tests have been carried out on non-cohesive embankment dams with an initial breach to examine the effect of upstream inflow discharges on the longitudinal profile evolution and the time to inflection point [11].

Zhang et al. [12] studied the effect of changing downstream slope angle, sediment grain size, and dam crest length on erosion rates. They noticed that increasing dam crest length and decreasing downstream slope angle lead to decreasing sediment transport rate. While the increase in sediment grain size leads to an increased sediment transport rate at the initial stages. Höeg et al. [13] presented a series of field tests to investigate the stability of embankment dams made of various materials. Overtopping and piping were among the failure tests carried out for the dams composed of homogeneous rock-fill, clay, or gravel with a height of up to 6.0 m. Hakimzadeh et al. [14] constructed 40 homogeneous cohesive and non-cohesive embankment dams to study the effect of changing sediment diameter and dam height on the breaching process. They also used genetic programming (GP) to estimate the breach outflow. Refaiy et al. [15] studied different scenarios for the downstream drain geometry, such as length, height, and angle, to minimize the effect of piping phenomena and therefore increase dam safety.

Zhu et al. [16] examined the effect of headcut erosion on dam breach growth, especially in the case of cohesive dams. They found that the breach growth in non-cohesive embankments is slower than cohesive embankments due to the little effect of headcut. Schmocker and Hager [7] proposed a relationship for estimating peak outflow from the dam breach process.(1)QpQin-1=1.7exp-20hc23d5013H0

where: Qp = peak outflow discharge.

Qin = inflow discharge.

hc = critical flow depth.

d50 = mean sediment diameter.

Ho = initial dam height.

Yu et al. [17] carried out an experimental study for homogeneous non-cohesive embankment dams in a 180° bending rectangular flume to determine the effect of overtopping flows on breaching formation. They found that the main factors influencing breach formation are water level, river discharge, and embankment material diameter.

Wu et al. [18] carried out a series of experiments to investigate the effect of breaching geometry on both non-cohesive and cohesive embankment dams in a U-bend flume due to overtopping flows. In the case of non-cohesive embankments, the non-symmetrical lateral expansion was noticed during the breach formation. This expansion was described by a coefficient ranging from 2.7 to 3.3.

The numerical models of the dam breach can be categorized according to different parameters, such as flow dimensions (1D, 2D, or 3D), flow governing equations, and solution methods. The 1D models are mainly used to predict the outflow hydrograph from the dam breach. Saberi et al. [19] applied the 1D Saint-Venant equation, which is solved by the finite difference method to investigate the outflow hydrograph during dam overtopping failure. Because of the ability to study dam profile evolution and breach formation, 2D models are more applicable than 1D models. Guan et al. [20] and Wu et al. [21] employed both 2D shallow water equations (SWEs) and sediment erosion equations, which are solved by the finite volume method to study the effect of the dam’s geometry parameters on outflow hydrograph and dam profile evolution. Wang et al. [22] also proposed a second-order hybrid-type of total variation diminishing (TVD) finite-difference to estimate the breach outflow by solving the 2D (SWEs). The accuracy of (SWEs) for both vertical flow contraction and surface roughness has been assessed [23]. They noted that the accuracy of (SWEs) is acceptable for milder slopes, but in the case of steeper slopes, modelers should be more careful. Generally, the accuracy of 2D models is still low, especially with velocity distribution over the flow depth, lateral momentum exchange, density-driven flows, and bottom friction [24]. Therefore, 3D models are preferred. Larocque et al. [25] and Yang et al. [26] started to use three-dimensional (3D) models that depend on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations.

Previous experimental studies concluded that there is no clear relationship between the peak outflow from the dam breach and the initial breach characteristics. Some of these studies depend on the sharp-crested weir fixed at the end of the flume to determine the peak outflow from the breach, which leads to a decrease in the accuracy of outflow calculations at the microscale. The main goals of this study are to carry out a numerical simulation for a spatial dam breach due to overtopping flows by using (FLOW-3D) software to find an empirical equation for the peak outflow discharge from the breach and determine the worst-case that leads to accelerating the dam breaching process.

2. Numerical simulation

The current study for spatial dam breach is simulated by using (FLOW-3D) software [27], which is a powerful computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program.

2.1. Geometric presentations

A stereolithographic (STL) file is prepared for each change in the initial breach geometry and dimensions. The CAD program is useful for creating solid objects and converting them to STL format, as shown in Fig. 1.

2.2. Governing equations

The governing equations for water flow are three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS).

The continuity equation:(2)∂ui∂xi=0

The momentum equation:(3)∂ui∂t+1VFuj∂ui∂xj=1ρ∂∂xj-pδij+ν∂ui∂xj+∂uj∂xi-ρu`iu`j¯

where u is time-averaged velocity,ν is kinematic viscosity, VF is fractional volume open to flow, p is averaged pressure and -u`iu`j¯ are components of Reynold’s stress. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique is used to simulate the free surface profile. Hirt et al. [28] presented the VOF algorithm, which employs the function (F) to express the occupancy of each grid cell with fluid. The value of (F) varies from zero to unity. Zero value refers to no fluid in the grid cell, while the unity value refers to the grid cell being fully occupied with fluid. The free surface is formed in the grid cells having (F) values between zero and unity.(4)∂F∂t+1VF∂∂xFAxu+∂∂yFAyv+∂∂zFAzw=0

where (u, v, w) are the velocity components in (x, y, z) coordinates, respectively, and (AxAyAz) are the area fractions.

2.3. Boundary and initial conditions

To improve the accuracy of the results, the boundary conditions should be carefully determined. In this study, two mesh blocks are used to minimize the time consumed in the simulation. The boundary conditions for mesh block 1 are as follows: The inlet and sides boundaries are defined as a wall boundary condition (wall boundary condition is usually used for bound fluid by solid regions. In the case of viscous flows, no-slip means that the tangential velocity is equal to the wall velocity and the normal velocity is zero), the outlet is defined as a symmetry boundary condition (symmetry boundary condition is usually used to reduce computational effort during CFD simulation. This condition allows the flow to be transferred from one mesh block to another. No inputs are required for this boundary condition except that its location should be defined accurately), the bottom boundary is defined as a uniform flow rate boundary condition, and the top boundary is defined as a specific pressure boundary condition with assigned atmospheric pressure. The boundary conditions for mesh block 2 are as follows: The inlet is defined as a symmetry boundary condition, the outlet is defined as a free flow boundary condition, the bottom and sides boundaries are defined as a wall boundary condition, and the top boundary is defined as a specific pressure boundary condition with assigned atmospheric pressure as shown in Fig. 2. The initial conditions required to be set for the fluid (i.e., water) inside of the domain include configuration, temperature, velocities, and pressure distribution. The configuration of water depends on the dimensions and shape of the dam reservoir. While the other conditions have been assigned as follows: temperature is normal water temperature (25 °c) and pressure distribution is hydrostatic with no initial velocity.

2.4. Numerical method

FLOW-3D uses the finite volume method (FVM) to solve the governing equation (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) over the computational domain. A finite-volume method is an Eulerian approach for representing and evaluating partial differential equations in algebraic equations form [29]. At discrete points on the mesh geometry, values are determined. Finite volume expresses a small volume surrounding each node point on a mesh. In this method, the divergence theorem is used to convert volume integrals with a divergence term to surface integrals. After that, these terms are evaluated as fluxes at each finite volume’s surfaces.

2.5. Turbulent models

Turbulence is the chaotic, unstable motion of fluids that occurs when there are insufficient stabilizing viscous forces. In FLOW-3D, there are six turbulence models available: the Prandtl mixing length model, the one-equation turbulent energy model, the two-equation (k – ε) model, the Renormalization-Group (RNG) model, the two-equation (k – ω) models, and a large eddy simulation (LES) model. For simulating flow motion, the RNG model is adopted to simulate the motion behavior better than the k – ε and k – ω.

models [30]. The RNG model consists of two main equations for the turbulent kinetic energy KT and its dissipation.εT(5)∂kT∂t+1VFuAx∂kT∂x+vAy∂kT∂y+wAz∂kT∂z=PT+GT+DiffKT-εT(6)∂εT∂t+1VFuAx∂εT∂x+vAy∂εT∂y+wAz∂εT∂z=C1.εTKTPT+c3.GT+Diffε-c2εT2kT

where KT is the turbulent kinetic energy, PT is the turbulent kinetic energy production, GT is the buoyancy turbulence energy, εT is the turbulent energy dissipation rate, DiffKT and Diffε are terms of diffusion, c1, c2 and c3 are dimensionless parameters, in which c1 and c3 have a constant value of 1.42 and 0.2, respectively, c2 is computed from the turbulent kinetic energy (KT) and turbulent production (PT) terms.

2.6. Sediment scour model

The sediment scour model available in FLOW-3D can calculate all the sediment transport processes including Entrainment transport, Bedload transport, Suspended transport, and Deposition. The erosion process starts once the water flows remove the grains from the packed bed and carry them into suspension. It happens when the applied shear stress by water flows exceeds critical shear stress. This process is represented by entrainment transport in the numerical model. After entrained, the grains carried by water flow are represented by suspended load transport. After that, some suspended grains resort to settling because of the combined effect of gravity, buoyancy, and friction. This process is described through a deposition. Finally, the grains sliding motions are represented by bedload transport in the model. For the entrainment process, the shear stress applied by the fluid motion on the packed bed surface is calculated using the standard wall function as shown in Eq.7.(7)ks,i=Cs,i∗d50

where ks,i is the Nikuradse roughness and Cs,i is a user-defined coefficient. The critical bed shear stress is defined by a dimensionless parameter called the critical shields number as expressed in Eq.8.(8)θcr,i=τcr,i‖g‖diρi-ρf

where θcr,i is the critical shields number, τcr,i is the critical bed shear stress, g is the absolute value of gravity acceleration, di is the diameter of the sediment grain, ρi is the density of the sediment species (i) and ρf is the density of the fluid. The value of the critical shields number is determined according to the Soulsby-Whitehouse equation.(9)θcr,i=0.31+1.2d∗,i+0.0551-exp-0.02d∗,i

where d∗,i is the dimensionless diameter of the sediment, given by Eq.10.(10)d∗,i=diρfρi-ρf‖g‖μf213

where μf is the fluid dynamic viscosity. For the sloping bed interface, the value of the critical shields number is modified according to Eq.11.(11)θ`cr,i=θcr,icosψsinβ+cos2βtan2φi-sin2ψsin2βtanφi

where θ`cr,i is the modified critical shields number, φi is the angle of repose for the sediment, β is the angle of bed slope and ψ is the angle between the flow and the upslope direction. The effects of the rolling, hopping, and sliding motions of grains along the packed bed surface are taken by the bedload transport process. The volumetric bedload transport rate (qb,i) per width of the bed is expressed in Eq.12.(12)qb,i=Φi‖g‖ρi-ρfρfdi312

where Φi is the dimensionless bedload transport rate is calculated by using Meyer Peter and Müller equation.(13)Φi=βMPM,iθi-θ`cr,i1.5cb,i

where βMPM,i is the Meyer Peter and Müller user-defined coefficient and cb,i is the volume fraction of species i in the bed material. The suspended load transport is calculated as shown in Eq.14.(14)∂Cs,i∂t+∇∙Cs,ius,i=∇∙∇DCs,i

where Cs,i is the suspended sediment mass concentration, D is the diffusivity, and us,i is the grain velocity of species i. Entrainment and deposition are two opposing processes that take place at the same time. The lifting and settling velocities for both entrainment and deposition processes are calculated according to Eq.15 and Eq.16, respectively.(15)ulifting,i=αid∗,i0.3θi-θ`cr,igdiρiρf-1(16)usettling,i=υfdi10.362+1.049d∗,i3-10.36

where αi is the entrainment coefficient of species i and υf is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid.

2.7. Grid type

Using simple rectangular orthogonal elements in planes and hexahedral in volumes in the (FLOW-3D) program makes the mesh generation process easier, decreases the required memory, and improves numerical accuracy. Two mesh blocks were used in a joined form with a size ratio of 2:1. The first mesh block is coarser, which contains the reservoir water, and the second mesh block is finer, which contains the dam. For achieving accuracy and efficiency in results, the mesh size is determined by using a grid convergence test. The optimum uniform cell size for the first mesh block is 0.012 m and for the second mesh block is 0.006 m.

2.8. Time step

The maximum time step size is determined by using a Courant number, which controls the distance that the flow will travel during the simulation time step. In this study, the Courant number was taken equal to 0.25 to prevent the flow from traveling through more than one cell in the time step. Based on the Courant number, a maximum time step value of 0.00075 s was determined.

2.9. Numerical model validation

The numerical model accuracy was achieved by comparing the numerical model results with previous experimental results. The experimental study of Schmocker and Hager [7] was based on 31 tests with changes in six parameters (d50, Ho, Bo, Lk, XD, and Qin). All experimental tests were conducted in a straight open glass-sided flume. The horizontal flume has a rectangular cross-section with a width of 0.4 m and a height of 0.7 m. The flume was provided with a flow straightener and an intake with a length of 0.66 m. All tested dams were inserted at various distances (XD) from the intake. Test No.1 from this experimental program was chosen to validate the numerical model. The different parameters used in test No.1 are as follows:

(1) uniform sediment with a mean diameter (d50 = 0.31 mm), (2) Ho = 0.2 m, (3) Bo = 0.2 m, (4) Lk = 0.1 m,

(5) XD = 1.0 m, (6) Qin = 6.0 lit/s, (7) Su and Sd = 2:1, (8) mass density (ρs = 2650 kg/m3(9) Homogenous and non-cohesive embankment dam. As shown in Fig. 2, the simulation is contained within a rectangular grid with dimensions: 3.56 m in the x-direction (where 0.66 m is used as inlet, 0.9 m as dam base width, and 1.0 m as outlet), in y-direction 0.2 m (dam length), and in the z-direction 0.3 m, which represents the dam height (0.2 m) with a free distance (0.1 m) above the dam. There are two main reasons that this experimental program is preferred for the validation process. The first reason is that this program deals with homogenous, non-cohesive soil, which is available in FLOW-3D. The second reason is that this program deals with small-scale models which saves time for numerical simulation. Finally, some important assumptions were considered during the validation process. The flow is assumed to be incompressible, viscous, turbulent, and three-dimensional.

By comparing dam profiles at different time instants for the experimental test with the current numerical model, it appears that the numerical model gives good agreement as shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 4, with an average error percentage of 9% between the experimental results and the numerical model.

3. Analysis and discussions

The current model is used to study the effects of different parameters such as (initial breach shapes, dimensions, locations, upstream and downstream dam slopes) on the peak outflow discharge, QP, time of peak outflow, tP, and rate of erosion, E.

This study consists of a group of scenarios. The first scenario is changing the shapes of the initial breach according to Singh [1], the most predicted shapes are rectangular and V-notch as shown in Fig. 5. The second scenario is changing the initial breach dimensions (i.e., width and depth). While the third scenario is changing the location of the initial breach. Eventually, the last scenario is changing the upstream and downstream dam slopes.

All scenarios of this study were carried out under the same conditions such as inflow discharge value (Qin=1.0lit/s), dimensions of the tested dam, where dam height (Ho=0.20m), crest width.

(Lk=0.1m), dam length (Bo=0.20m), and homogenous & non-cohesive soil with a mean diameter (d50=0.31mm).

3.1. Dam breaching process evolution

The dam breaching process is a very complex process due to the quick changes in hydrodynamic conditions during dam failure. The dam breaching process starts once water flows reach the downstream face of the dam. During the initial stage of dam breaching, the erosion process is relatively quiet due to low velocities of flow. As water flows continuously, erosion rates increase, especially in two main zones: the crest and the downstream face. As soon as the dam crest is totally eroded, the water levels in the dam reservoir decrease rapidly, accompanied by excessive erosion in the dam body. The erosion process continues until the water levels in the dam reservoir equal the remaining height of the dam.

According to Zhou et al. [11], the breaching process consists of three main stages. The first stage starts with beginning overtopping flow, then ends when the erosion point directed upstream and reached the inflection point at the inflection time (ti). The second stage starts from the end of the stage1 until the occurrence of peak outflow discharge at the peak outflow time (tP). The third stage starts from the end of the stage2 until the value of outflow discharge becomes the same as the value of inflow discharge at the final time (tf). The outflow discharge from the dam breach increases rapidly during stage1 and stage2 because of the large dam storage capacity (i.e., the dam reservoir is totally full of water) and excessive erosion. While at stage3, the outflow values start to decrease slowly because most of the dam’s storage capacity was run out. The end of stage3 indicates that the dam storage capacity was totally run out, so the outflow equalized with the inflow discharge as shown in Fig. 6 and Fig. 7.

3.2. The effect of initial breach shape

To identify the effect of the initial breach shape on the evolution of the dam breaching process. Three tests were carried out with different cross-section areas for each shape. The initial breach is created at the center of the dam crest. Each test had an ID to make the process of arranging data easier. The rectangular shape had an ID (Rec5h & 5b), which means that its depth and width are equal to 5% of the dam height, and the V-notch shape had an ID (V-noch5h & 1:1) which means that its depth is equal to 5% of the dam height and its side slope is equal to 1:1. The comparison between rectangular and V-notch shapes is done by calculating the ratio between maximum dam height at different times (ZMax) to the initial dam height (Ho), rate of erosion, and hydrograph of outflow discharge for each test. The rectangular shape achieves maximum erosion rate and minimum inflection time, in addition to a rapid decrease in the dam reservoir levels. Therefore, the dam breaching is faster in the case of a rectangular shape than in a V-notch shape, which has the same cross-section area as shown in Fig. 8.

Also, by comparing the hydrograph for each test, the peak outflow discharge value in the case of a rectangular shape is higher than the V-notch shape by 5% and the time of peak outflow for the rectangular shape is shorter than the V-notch shape by 9% as shown in Fig. 9.

3.3. The effect of initial breach dimensions

The results of the comparison between the different initial breach shapes indicate that the worst initial breach shape is rectangular, so the second scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the initial rectangular breach dimensions. Groups of tests were carried out with different depths and widths for the rectangular initial breach. The first group had a depth of 5% from the dam height and with three different widths of 5,10, and 15% from the dam height, the second group had a depth of 10% with three different widths of 5,10, and 15%, the third group had a depth of 15% with three different widths of 5,10, and 15% and the final group had a width of 15% with three different heights of 5, 10, and 15% for a rectangular breach shape. The comparison was made as in the previous section to determine the worst case that leads to the quick dam failure as shown in Fig. 10.

The results show that the (Rec 5 h&15b) test achieves a maximum erosion rate for a shorter period of time and a minimum ratio for (Zmax / Ho) as shown in Fig. 10, which leads to accelerating the dam failure process. The dam breaching process is faster with the minimum initial breach depth and maximum initial breach width. In the case of a minimum initial breach depth, the retained head of water in the dam reservoir is high and the crest width at the bottom of the initial breach (L`K) is small, so the erosion point reaches the inflection point rapidly. While in the case of the maximum initial breach width, the erosion perimeter is large.

3.4. The effect of initial breach location

The results of the comparison between the different initial rectangular breach dimensions indicate that the worst initial breach dimension is (Rec 5 h&15b), so the third scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the initial breach location. Three locations were checked to determine the worst case for the dam failure process. The first location is at the center of the dam crest, which was named “Center”, the second location is at mid-distance between the dam center and dam edge, which was named “Mid”, and the third location is at the dam edge, which was named “Edge” as shown in Fig. 11. According to this scenario, the results indicate that the time of peak outflow discharge (tP) is the same in the three cases, but the maximum value of the peak outflow discharge occurs at the center location. The difference in the peak outflow values between the three cases is relatively small as shown in Fig. 12.

The rates of erosion were also studied for the three cases. The results show that the maximum erosion rate occurs at the center location as shown in Fig. 13. By making a comparison between the three cases for the dam storage volume. The results show that the center location had the minimum values for the dam storage volume, which means that a large amount of water has passed to the downstream area as shown in Fig. 14. According to these results, the center location leads to increased erosion rate and accelerated dam failure process compared with the two other cases. Because the erosion occurs on both sides, but in the case of edge location, the erosion occurs on one side.

3.5. The effect of upstream and downstream dam slopes

The results of the comparison between the different initial rectangular breach locations indicate that the worst initial breach location is the center location, so the fourth scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the upstream (Su) and downstream (Sd) dam slopes. Three slopes were checked individually for both upstream and downstream slopes to determine the worst case for the dam failure process. The first slope value is (2H:1V), the second slope value is (2.5H:1V), and the third slope value is (3H:1V). According to this scenario, the results show that the decreasing downstream slope angle leads to increasing time of peak outflow discharge (tP) and decreasing value of peak outflow discharge. The difference in the peak outflow values between the three cases for the downstream slope is 2%, as shown in Fig. 15, but changing the upstream slope has a negligible impact on the peak outflow discharge and its time as shown in Fig. 16.

The rates of erosion were also studied in the three cases for both upstream and downstream slopes. The results show that the maximum erosion rate increases by 6.0% with an increasing downstream slope angle by 4°, as shown in Fig. 17. The results also indicate that the erosion rates aren’t affected by increasing or decreasing the upstream slope angle, as shown in Fig. 18. According to these results, increasing the downstream slope angle leads to increased erosion rate and accelerated dam failure process compared with the upstream slope angle. Because of increasing shear stress applied by water flows in case of increasing downstream slope.

According to all previous scenarios, the dimensionless peak outflow discharge QPQin is presented for a fixed dam height (Ho) and inflow discharge (Qin). Fig. 19 illustrates the relationship between QP∗=QPQin and.

Lr=ho2/3∗bo2/3Ho. The deduced relationship achieves R2=0.96.(17)QP∗=2.2807exp-2.804∗Lr

4. Conclusions

A spatial dam breaching process was simulated by using FLOW-3D Software. The validation process was performed by making a comparison between the simulated results of dam profiles and the dam profiles obtained by Schmocker and Hager [7] in their experimental study. And also, the peak outflow value recorded an error percentage of 12% between the numerical model and the experimental study. This model was used to study the effect of initial breach shape, dimensions, location, and dam slopes on peak outflow discharge, time of peak outflow, and the erosion process. By using the parameters obtained from the validation process, the results of this study can be summarized in eight points as follows.1.

The rectangular initial breach shape leads to an accelerating dam failure process compared with the V-notch.2.

The value of peak outflow discharge in the case of a rectangular initial breach is higher than the V-notch shape by 5%.3.

The time of peak outflow discharge for a rectangular initial breach is shorter than the V-notch shape by 9%.4.

The minimum depth and maximum width for the initial breach achieve maximum erosion rates (increasing breach width, b0, or decreasing breach depth, h0, by 5% from the dam height leads to an increase in the maximum rate of erosion by 11% and 15%, respectively), so the dam failure is rapid.5.

The center location of the initial breach leads to an accelerating dam failure compared with the edge location.6.

The initial breach location has a negligible effect on the peak outflow discharge value and its time.7.

Increasing the downstream slope angle by 4° leads to an increase in both peak outflow discharge and maximum rate of erosion by 2.0% and 6.0%, respectively.8.

The upstream slope has a negligible effect on the dam breaching process.

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Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.

MULTI-PHYSICS NUMERICAL MODELLING OF 316L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS AT MESO-SCALE

W.E. Alphonso1, M.Bayat1,*, M. Baier 2, S. Carmignato2, J.H. Hattel1
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby, Denmark
2Department of Management and Engineering – University of Padova, Padova, Italy

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 레이저 열원을 사용하여 선택적으로 통합되는 분말 층으로 복잡한 3D 금속 부품을 만드는 금속 적층 제조(MAM) 기술입니다. 처리 영역은 수십 마이크로미터 정도이므로 L-PBF를 다중 규모 제조 공정으로 만듭니다.

기체 기공의 형성 및 성장 및 용융되지 않은 분말 영역의 생성은 다중물리 모델에 의해 예측할 수 있습니다. 또한 이러한 모델을 사용하여 용융 풀 모양 및 크기, 온도 분포, 용융 풀 유체 흐름 및 입자 크기 및 형태와 같은 미세 구조 특성을 계산할 수 있습니다.

이 작업에서는 용융, 응고, 유체 흐름, 표면 장력, 열 모세관, 증발 및 광선 추적을 통한 다중 반사를 포함하는 스테인리스 스틸 316-L에 대한 충실도 다중 물리학 중간 규모 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 완전한 실험 설계(DoE) 방법을 사용하는 통계 연구가 수행되었으며, 여기서 불확실한 재료 특성 및 공정 매개변수, 즉 흡수율, 반동 압력(기화) 및 레이저 빔 크기가 용융수지 모양 및 크기에 미치는 영향을 분석했습니다.

또한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 위에서 언급한 불확실한 입력 매개변수의 중요성을 강조하기 위해 흡수율이 가장 큰 영향을 미치고 레이저 빔 크기가 그 뒤를 잇는 주요 효과 플롯이 생성되었습니다. 용융 풀 크기에 대한 반동 압력의 중요성은 흡수율에 따라 달라지는 용융 풀 부피와 함께 증가합니다.

모델의 예측 정확도는 유사한 공정 매개변수로 생성된 단일 트랙 실험과 시뮬레이션의 용융 풀 모양 및 크기를 비교하여 검증됩니다.

더욱이, 열 렌즈 효과는 레이저 빔 크기를 증가시켜 수치 모델에서 고려되었으며 나중에 결과적인 용융 풀 프로파일은 모델의 견고성을 보여주기 위한 실험과 비교되었습니다.

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) is a Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) technology where a complex 3D metal part is built from powder layers, which are selectively consolidated using a laser heat source. The processing zone is in the order of a few tenths of micrometer, making L-PBF a multi-scale manufacturing process. The formation and growth of gas pores and the creation of un-melted powder zones can be predicted by multiphysics models. Also, with these models, the melt pool shape and size, temperature distribution, melt pool fluid flow and its microstructural features like grain size and morphology can be calculated. In this work, a high fidelity multi-physics meso-scale numerical model is developed for stainless steel 316-L which includes melting, solidification, fluid flow, surface tension, thermo-capillarity, evaporation and multiple reflection with ray-tracing. A statistical study using a full Design of Experiments (DoE) method was conducted, wherein the impact of uncertain material properties and process parameters namely absorptivity, recoil pressure (vaporization) and laser beam size on the melt pool shape and size was analysed. Furthermore, to emphasize on the significance of the above mentioned uncertain input parameters on the melt pool dynamics, a main effects plot was created which showed that absorptivity had the highest impact followed by laser beam size. The significance of recoil pressure on the melt pool size increases with melt pool volume which is dependent on absorptivity. The prediction accuracy of the model is validated by comparing the melt pool shape and size from the simulation with single track experiments that were produced with similar process parameters. Moreover, the effect of thermal lensing was considered in the numerical model by increasing the laser beam size and later on the resultant melt pool profile was compared with experiments to show the robustness of the model.

Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm

CONCLUSION

In this work, a high-fidelity multi-physics numerical model was developed for L-PBF using the FVM method in Flow-3D. The impact of uncertainty in the input parameters including absorptivity, recoil pressure and laser beam size on the melt pool is addressed using a DoE method. The DoE analysis shows that absorptivity has the highest impact on the melt pool. The recoil pressure and laser beam size only become significant once absorptivity is 0.45. Furthermore, the numerical model is validated by comparing the predicted melt pool shape and size with experiments conducted with similar process parameters wherein a high prediction accuracy is achieved by the model. In addition, the impact of thermal lensing on the melt pool dimensions by increasing the laser beam spot size is considered in the validated numerical model and the resultant melt pool is compared with experiments.

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Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.

MULTIPHYSICS SIMULATION OF THEMRAL AND FLUID DYNAMICS PHENOMENA DURING THE PULSED LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS OF 316-L STEEL

M. Bayat* , V. K. Nadimpalli, J. H. Hattel
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Produktionstorvet
425, Kgs. 2800, Lyngby, Denmark

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 다양한 산업 분야에서 많은 관심을 받았으며, 주로 기존 제조 기술을 사용하여 만들 수 없었던 복잡한 토폴로지 최적화 구성 요소를 구현하는 잘 알려진 능력 덕분입니다. . 펄스 L-PBF(PL-PBF)에서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 주기 지속 시간과 듀티 주기 중 하나 또는 둘 다를 수정하여 변조할 수 있습니다. 따라서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 향후 적용을 위해 이 프로세스를 더 잘 제어할 수 있는 길을 열어주는 새로운 프로세스 매개변수로 간주될 수 있습니다. 따라서 이 작업에서 우리는 레이저의 시간적 프로파일을 변경하는 것이 PL-PBF 공정에서 용융 풀 조건과 트랙의 최종 모양 및 형상에 어떻게 영향을 미칠 수 있는지 조사하는 것을 목표로 합니다. 이와 관련하여 본 논문에서는 CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) 소프트웨어 패키지인 Flow-3D를 기반으로 하는 316-L 스테인리스강 PL-PBF 공정의 다중물리 수치 모델을 개발하고 이 모델을 사용하여 열과 유체를 시뮬레이션합니다. 다양한 펄스 모드에서 공정 과정 중 용융 풀 내부에서 발생하는 유동 조건. 따라서 고정된 레이저 듀티 사이클(50%)이 있는 레이저 주기 지속 시간이 용융 풀의 모양과 크기 및 최종 트랙 형태에 미치는 영향을 연구하기 위해 매개변수 연구가 수행됩니다. 더 긴 주기 기간에서 더 많은 재료가 더 큰 용융 풀 내에서 변위됨에 따라 용융 풀의 후류에 더 눈에 띄는 혹이 형성되며, 동시에 더 심각한 반동 압력을 받습니다. 또한 시뮬레이션에서 50% 듀티 사이클에서 1000μs에서 형성된 보다 대칭적인 용융 풀과 비교하여 400μs 사이클 주기에서 더 긴 용융 풀이 형성된다는 것이 관찰되었습니다. 풀 볼륨은 1000μs의 경우 더 큽니다. 매개변수 연구는 연속 트랙과 파손된 트랙 PL-PBF 사이의 경계를 설명하며, 여기서 연속 트랙은 항상 소량의 용융 재료를 유지함으로써 유지됩니다.

English Abstract

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) has attracted a lot of attention from various industrial sectors and mainly thanks to its well-proven well-known capacity of realizing complex topology-optimized components that have so far been impossible to make using conventional manufacturing techniques. In Pulsed L-PBF (PL-PBF), the laser’s temporal profile can be modulated via modifying either or both the cycle duration and the duty cycle. Thus, the laser’s temporal profile could be considered as a new process parameter that paves the way for a better control of this process for future applications. Therefore, in this work we aim to investigate how changing the laser’s temporal profile can affect the melt pool conditions and the final shape and geometry of a track in the PL-PBF process. In this respect, in this paper a multiphysics numerical model of the PL-PBF process of 316-L stainless steel is developed based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package Flow-3D and the model is used to simulate the heat and fluid flow conditions occurring inside the melt pool during the course of the process at different pulsing modes. Thus, a parametric study is carried out to study the influence of the laser’s cycle duration with a fixed laser duty cycle (50 %) on the shape and size of the melt pool and the final track morphology. It is noticed that at longer cycle periods, more noticeable humps form at the wake of the melt pool as more material is displaced within bigger melt pools, which are at the same time subjected to more significant recoil pressures. It is also observed in the simulations that at 50 % duty cycle, longer melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period compared to the more symmetrical melt pools formed at 1000 μs, primarily because of shorter laser off-times in the former, even though melt pool volume is bigger for the 1000 μs case. The parameteric study illustrates the boundary between a continuous track and a broken track PL-PBF wherein the continuous track is retained by always maintaining a small volume of molten material.

Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) – (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.

CONCLUSIONS

In this work a CFD model of the modulated PL-PBF process of stainless steel 316-L is developed in the commercial software package Flow-3D. The model involves physics such as solidification, melting, evaporation, convection, laser-material interaction, capillarity, Marangoni effect and the recoil pressure effect. In the current study, a parametric study is carried out to understand how the change in the cycle period duration affects the melt pool’s thermo-fluid conditions during the modulated PL-PBF process. It is observed that at the pulse mode with 50 % duty cycle and 400 μs cycle period, an overlapped chain of humps form at the wake of the melt pool and at a spatial frequency of occurrence of about 78 μm. Furthermore and as expected, it is noted that the melt pool volume, the size of the hump as well as the crater size at the end of the track, increase with increase in the cycle period duration, as more material is re-deposited at the back of the melt pool and that itself is caused by more pronounced recoil pressures. Moreover, it is noticed that due to the short off-time period of the laser in the 400 μs cycle period case, there is always an amount of liquid metal left from the previous cycle, at the time the new cycle starts. This is found to be the main reason why longer and elongated melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period, compared to the bigger, shorter and more symmetrical-like melt pools forming at the 1000 μs case. In this study PL-PBF single tracks including the broken track and the continuous track examples were studied to illustrate the boundary of this transition at a given laser scan parameter setting. At higher scan speeds, it is expected that the Plateau–Rayleigh instability will compete with the pulsing behavior to change the transition boundary between a broken and continuous track, which is suggested as future work from this study.

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Figure 6. Circular section of the viscosity and shear-rate clouds.

Simulation and Visual Tester Verification of Solid Propellant Slurry Vacuum Plate Casting

Wu Yue,Li Zhuo,Lu RongFirst published: 26 February 2020 https://doi.org/10.1002/prep.201900411Citations: 3

Abstract

Using an improved Carreau constitutive model, a numerical simulation of the casting process of a type of solid propellant slurry vacuum plate casting was carried out using the Flow3D software. Through the flow process in the orifice flow channel and the combustion chamber, the flow velocity of the slurry passing through the plate flow channel was quantitatively analyzed, and the viscosity, shear rate, and leveling characteristics of the slurry in the combustion chamber were qualitatively analyzed and predicted. The pouring time, pouring quality, and flow state predicted by the numerical simulation were verified using a visual tester consisting of a vacuum plate casting system in which a pouring experiment was carried out. Studies have shown that HTPB three-component propellant slurry is a typical yielding pseudoplastic fluid. When the slurry flows through the flower plate and the airfoil, the fluid shear rate reaches its maximum value and the viscosity of the slurry decreases. The visual pouring platform was built and the experiment was controlled according to the numerically-calculated parameters, ensuring the same casting speed. The comparison between the predicted casting quality and the one obtained in the verification test resulted in an error less than 10 %. Moreover, the error between the simulated casting completion time and the process verification test result was also no more than 10 %. Last, the flow state of the slurry during the simulation was consistent with the one during the experimental test. The overall leveling of the slurry in the combustion chamber was adequate and no relatively large holes and flaws developed during the pouring process.

개선된 Carreau 구성 모델을 사용하여 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 고체 추진제 슬러리 진공판 유형의 Casting Process에 대한 수치 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다. 오리피스 유로와 연소실에서의 유동과정을 통해 판 유로를 통과하는 슬러리의 유속을 정량적으로 분석하고, 연소실에서 슬러리의 점도, 전단율, 레벨링 특성을 정성적으로 분석하하고, 예측하였습니다.

타설시간, 타설품질, 수치해석으로 예측된 ​​유동상태는 타설실험을 수행한 진공판주조시스템으로 구성된 비주얼 테스터를 이용하여 검증하였습니다.

연구에 따르면 HTPB 3성분 추진제 슬러리는 전형적인 생성 가소성 유체입니다. 슬러리가 플라워 플레이트와 에어포일을 통과할 때 유체 전단율이 최대값에 도달하고 슬러리의 점도가 감소합니다.

시각적 주입 플랫폼이 구축되었고 동일한 주조 속도를 보장하기 위해 수치적으로 계산된 매개변수에 따라 실험이 제어되었습니다. 예측된 casting 품질과 검증 테스트에서 얻은 품질을 비교한 결과 10 % 미만의 오류가 발생했습니다.

또한 모의 casting 완료시간과 공정검증시험 결과의 오차도 10 % 이하로 나타났습니다.

마지막으로 시뮬레이션 중 슬러리의 흐름 상태는 실험 테스트 시와 일치하였다. 연소실에서 슬러리의 전체 레벨링은 적절했으며 주입 과정에서 상대적으로 큰 구멍과 결함이 발생하지 않았습니다.

Figure 1. The equipment used in the vacuum flower-plate pouring process.
Figure 1. The equipment used in the vacuum flower-plate pouring process.
Figure 2. Calculation model.
Figure 2. Calculation model.
Figure 3. Grid block division unit.
Figure 3. Grid block division unit.
Figure 4. Circular section of the speed cloud.
Figure 4. Circular section of the speed cloud.
Figure 5. Viscosity and shear rate distribution cloud pattern flowing through the plate holes.
Figure 5. Viscosity and shear rate distribution cloud pattern flowing through the plate holes.
Figure 6. Circular section of the viscosity and shear-rate clouds.
Figure 6. Circular section of the viscosity and shear-rate clouds.
Figure 7. Volume fraction cloud chart at different time.
Figure 7. Volume fraction cloud chart at different time.
Figure 8. Experimental program.
Figure 8. Experimental program.
Figure 9. Emulation experimental device.
Figure 9. Emulation experimental device.
Figure 10. Visualization of the flow state of the pulp inside the tester.
Figure 10. Visualization of the flow state of the pulp inside the tester.

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Numerical study of the effect of flow velocity and flood roughness components on hydraulic flow performance in composite sections with converging floodplains

Numerical study of the effect of flow velocity and flood roughness components on hydraulic flow performance in composite sections with converging floodplains

Authors

1 Civil Enigneering Department, Lahijan Branch.Islamic Azad University.Lahijan.Iran

2 Department of Civil Engnieering, University of Qom,Qom,Iran

3 Civil Engineering Department, Lahijan Branch,Islamic Azad Univeristy,Lahijan,Iran

Abstract

홍수와 그 위험을 통제해야 할 필요성은 누구에게도 숨겨져 있지 않습니다. 또한 이 현상으로 인해 다양한 경제, 사회 및 환경 문제가 영향을 받습니다. 홍수 제어 방법의 설계 및 최적 관리의 첫 번째 단계는 홍수 중 하천 거동을 올바르게 식별하는 것입니다.

홍수 경로 지정, 하상 및 하천 면적 결정 등과 같은 대부분의 하천 엔지니어링 프로젝트에서 하천 단면의 수리학적 매개변수의 평균값을 계산하는 것으로 충분합니다. 오늘날 유체 환경 연구에서 수치 및 분석 방법의 사용이 성장하고 발전했습니다.

신뢰할 수 있는 결과 생성으로 인해 물리적 모델에 대한 좋은 대안이 될 수 있었습니다. 오늘날 수치 모델의 급속한 발전과 컴퓨터 계산 속도의 증가로 인해 3D 수치 모델의 사용이 선호되며 또한 강의 속도 분포 및 전단 응력을 측정하는 데 시간이 많이 걸리고 비용이 많이 들기 때문에 결과 3D 수치 모델의 가치가 있을 것입니다.

한편, 본 연구에서는 복합단면에 대해 FLOW-3D 모델을 이용한 종합적인 수치연구가 이루어지지 않았음을 보여주고 있어 적절한 연구기반을 제공하고 있습니다.

따라서 본 연구의 혁신은 발산 및 수렴 범람원을 동반하는 비 각형 복합 단면에서 흐름의 상태 및 수리 성능에 대한 거칠기와 같은 매개 변수의 영향에 대한 수치 연구입니다.

수치해석 결과를 검증하기 위해 Younesi(2013) 연구를 이용하였습니다. 이 실험에서는 먼저 고정층이 있는 복합 프리즘 및 비 프리즘 단면의 수리 흐름을 조사한 다음 조건을 유지하면서 프리즘 및 비 프리즘 모드에서 퇴적물 이동 실험을 수행했습니다.

실험은 15미터 길이의 연구 채널에서 수행되었습니다. 이 운하는 초당 250리터의 시스템에서 재순환을 위해 제공될 수 있는 유속과 0.0088 000의 종경사를 가진 폭 400mm의 두 개의 대칭 범람원이 있는 합성 운하입니다. 범람원의 가장자리는 0.18미터와 같고 주요 운하의 너비는 0.4미터와 같습니다(그림 1).

본수로의 바닥과 벽을 거칠게 하기 위해 평균직경 0.65mm의 퇴적물을 사용하였으며, 각 단계에서 범람원의 벽과 바닥은 평균직경 0.65, 1.3, 1.78의 퇴적물로 거칠게 하였습다. (mm). 삼각형 오버플로는 운하 상류에서 운하로의 유입량을 측정하는 데 사용됩니다.

상대깊이 0.15와 0.25, 직경 14mm의 마이크로몰리나 실험과 상대깊이 0.35의 실험에서는 유속을 측정하기 위해 3차원 속도계(ADV)를 사용하였습니다. 수위는 0.1mm의 정확도로 깊이 게이지로 측정 되었습니다.

본 연구에서는 수면 프로파일의 수치적 모델을 검증하기 위해 실험 0.25-2에서 발산대의 시작, 중간 및 끝에서 세 단면의 평균 깊이 속도 분포 및 경계 전단 응력) -11.3-NP 및 0.25-2-5.7-NP 및 또한 각형 복합 단면의 0.25-2-2 P 테스트가 평가되었습니다.

각형 합성 단면의 P.20-2-2-P 테스트와 관련된 RMSE 및 NRMSE 지수 값 및 표 (2) 실험 11.3에서 RMSE 및 NRMSE 지수 값 -2-0.25-NP 및 -0.25. 2-5.7-NP가 제공됩니다. 실험 0.25-2-5.7-NP-11.3-2-0.25, NP 및 P.2.0-2-2-P의 평균 깊이 속도의 검증과 관련된 결과가 표시됩니다. 0.25-2-5.7-NP 실험에서 초, 중, 기말 NRMSE의 양은 각각 5.7, 11.8, 10.3%로 계산되었으며, 이는 초급이 우수, 중급이 양호, 최종 성적. 배치. 보시다시피, RMSE 값은 각각 0.026, 0.037 및 0.026으로 계산됩니다.

실험 11.3-2-0.25, NP에서 초급, 중급 및 최종 수준의 NRMSE 값은 각각 7, 11.2 및 15.4%로 계산되었으며, 이는 초급에서 우수 범주 및 우수 범주에서 중간 및 최종 수준. 가져 가다. 보시다시피, RMSE 값은 각각 0.032, 0.038, 0.04로 계산됩니다. 0.25-2-P 실험에서 NRMSE 값은 1.7%로 계산되어 우수 범주에 속한다. 보시다시피 RMSE 값도 0.004로 계산됩니다. 중간 깊이의 속도 분포와 관련하여 수치 모델은 실험실 결과에 적합하며 접합 영역에 작은 오류만 입력되었다고 말할 수 있습니다. 이는 2차 전지의 이동 결과로 간주될 수 있습니다. 모서리를 향해.
결론: 본 연구에서는 3차원 유동 해석이 가능한 Flow 3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 각형 및 비각형 단면이 복합된 수로의 유동 패턴을 조사했습니다. 3개의 다른 상대 거칠기(1, 2 및 2.74)와 3개의 상대 깊이(0.15, 0.25 및 0.35) 및 5.7 및 11.3도의 발산 각도에 대해 속도의 세로 성분 변화, 평균 깊이 속도 분포, 경계 범람원에 의해 전달되는 유속뿐만 아니라 전단 응력 분포를 조사했습니다.

결과는 수로를 따라 범람원의 폭이 증가함에 따라 유속량이 감소함을 보여주었다. 또한 조도가 유동패턴에 미치는 영향에 대한 연구는 일반적으로 벽의 거칠기에 따라 모든 구간에서 유속량이 감소하는 것으로 나타났으며, 또한 본관과 범람원의 교차점에서의 유동패턴은 벽의 거칠기 영향을 더 많이 받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 결과는 또한 상대 깊이가 증가하거나 상대 거칠기가 감소함에 따라 주 수로와 범람원 사이의 속도 구배가 감소함을 보여주었습니다.

Intrpduction: The need to control floods and their dangers is not hidden from anyone. In addition, a wide range of economic, social and environmental issues are affected by this phenomenon. The first step in the design and optimal management of flood control methods is the correct identification of river behavior during floods. In most river engineering projects such as flood routing, determining the bed and river area, etc., calculating the average values of hydraulic parameters of the river section is sufficient. Today, the use of numerical and analytical methods in the study of fluid environment have grown and developed. Due to the production of reliable results, they have been able to be a good alternative to physical models. Today, with the rapid development of numerical models and increasing the speed of computer calculations, the use of 3D numerical models is preferred and also due to the fact that measuring the velocity distribution and shear stress in rivers is very time consuming and expensive, the results of 3D numerical models It will be valuable. On the other hand, the present studies show that comprehensive numerical research using FLOW-3D model has not been performed on composite sections, so a suitable ground for research is provided. Therefore, the innovation of the present study is the numerical study of the effects of parameters such as roughness on the status and hydraulic performance of the flow in non-prismatic composite sections, which are accompanied by divergent and convergent floodplains, which have received less attention numerically.

Methodology: Younesi (2013) research has been used to validate the results of numerical simulation. In these experiments, first the hydraulic flow in composite prismatic and non-prismatic sections with fixed bed was examined and then, while maintaining the conditions, sediment transfer experiments were performed in prismatic and non-prismatic mode. The experiments were performed in a research channel 15 meters long. This canal is a composite canal with two symmetrical floodplains with a width of 400 mm with a flow rate that can be provided for recirculation in the system of 250 liters per second and a longitudinal slope of 0.0088 000. The depth of the main canal to the edge of the floodplain is equal to 0.18 meters and the width of the main canal is equal to 0.4 meters (Figure 1). In order to roughen the bed and walls of the main canal, sediments with an average diameter of 0.65 mm have been used and at each stage, the walls and bed of floodplains have been roughened by sediments with an average diameter of 0.65, 1.3 and 1.78 (mm). A triangular overflow is used to measure the inflow to the canal, upstream of the canal. In order to measure the flow velocity in experiments with relative depth of 0.15 and 0.25, a micromolina with a diameter of 14 mm and in experiments with relative depth of 0.35, a three-dimensional speedometer (ADV) was used. The water level was also taken by depth gauges with an accuracy of 0.1 mm.
Result and Diccussion: In the present study, in order to validate the numerical model of water surface profile, average depth velocity distribution and boundary shear stress in the three sections at the beginning, middle and end of the divergence zone) in experiments 0.25-2-11.3-NP and 0.25-2-5.7-NP and Also, the 0.25-2-2 P test of the prismatic composite section has been evaluated. In Table (1) the values of RMSE and NRMSE indices related to the P.20-2-2-P test of the prismatic composite section, and also in Table (2) the values of the RMSE and NRMSE indices in the experiments 11.3-2-0.25-NP and -0.25. 2-5.7-NP is provided. The results related to the validation of the average depth velocity of the experiments 0.25-2-5.7- NP-11.3-2-0.25, NP and P.2.0-2-2-P are shown. In 0.25-2-5.7-NP experiment, the amount of NRMSE in elementary, middle and final grades was calculated to be 5.7, 11.8 and 10.3%, respectively, which is in the excellent grade in the elementary grade and good in the middle and final grades. Placed. As can be seen, the RMSE values are calculated as 0.026, 0.037 and 0.026, respectively. In the experiment 11.3-2-0.25, NP, the NRMSE values in the primary, middle and final levels were calculated as 7, 11.2 and 15.4%, respectively, which are in the excellent category in the primary level and in the good category in the middle and final levels. Take. As can be seen, the RMSE values are calculated as 0.032, 0.038 and 0.04, respectively. In the 0.25-2-P experiment, the NRMSE value was calculated to be 1.7%, which is in the excellent category. As can be seen, the RMSE value is also calculated to be 0.004. Regarding the medium-depth velocity distribution, it can be said that the numerical model has an acceptable compliance with the laboratory results and only a small error has been entered in the junction area, which can be considered as a result of the movement of secondary cells towards the corners.
Conclusion: in this research The flow pattern in waterways with composite prismatic and non-prismatic sections was investigated using Flow 3D software that is capable of three-dimensional flow analysis. For three different relative roughnesses (1, 2 and 2.74) as well as three relative depths (0.15, 0.25 and 0.35) and divergence angles of 5.7 and 11.3 degrees, changes in the longitudinal component of velocity, The average depth velocity distribution, the boundary shear stress distribution as well as the flow rate transmitted by the floodplains were investigated. The results showed that with increasing the width of floodplains along the canal, the amount of velocity decreases. Also, the study of the effect of roughness on the flow pattern showed that in general, with wall roughness, the amount of velocity has decreased in all sections and also the flow pattern at the junction of the main canal and floodplain is more affected by wall roughness. The results also showed that with increasing relative depth or decreasing relative roughness, the velocity gradient between the main channel and floodplains decreases

Keywords

Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.

On-Chip Fabrication and In-Flow 3D-Printing of Cell-Laden Microgel Constructs: From Chip to Scaffold Materials in One Integral Process

세포가 함유된 마이크로겔의 온칩 제작 및 인-플로우 3D 프린팅
구성:하나의 통합 프로세스에서 칩에서 스캐폴드 재료까지

Vollmer, Gültekin Tamgüney, Aldo Boccacini
Submitted date: 10/05/2021 • Posted date: 11/05/2021
Licence: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

바이오프린팅은 세포가 실린 스캐폴드의 제조를 위한 유력한 기술로 발전했습니다. 바이오잉크는 바이오프린팅의 가장 중요한 구성요소입니다. 최근 마이크로겔은 세포 보호 및 세포 미세 환경 제어를 가능하게 하는 매우 유망한 바이오 잉크로 도입되었습니다. 그러나 이들의 미세유체 제작은 본질적으로 한계가 있는 것으로 보입니다.

여기에서 우리는 안정적인 스캐폴드에 직접 유입되는 바이오프린팅과 함께 세포가 실린 마이크로겔의 미세유체 생산을 위한 미세유체 및 3D 인쇄의 직접 결합을 소개합니다. 방법론은 세포를 단분산 미세 방울로 연속 온칩 캡슐화하여 후속 유입 교차 연결을 통해 세포가 함유된 마이크로겔을 생성할 수 있으며, 이는 미세관을 종료한 후 자동으로 얇은 연속 마이크로겔 필라멘트로 끼이게 됩니다.

3D 프린트 헤드로의 통합으로 독립형 3차원 스캐폴드에 필라멘트를 직접 유입 인쇄할 수 있습니다. 이 방법은 다양한 교차 연결 방법 및 세포주에 대해 설명됩니다. 이러한 발전으로 미세유체학은 더 이상 바이오 제조의 병목을 초래하는 현상이 아닙니다.

Bioprinting has evolved into a thriving technology for the fabrication of cell-laden scaffolds. Bioinks are the most critical component for bioprinting. Recently, microgels have been introduced as a very promising bioink enabling cell protection and the control of the cellular microenvironment. However, their microfluidic fabrication inherently seemed to be a limitation. Here we introduce a direct coupling of microfluidics and 3D-printing for the microfluidic production of cell-laden microgels with direct in-flow bioprinting into stable scaffolds. The methodology enables the continuous on-chip encapsulation of cells into monodisperse microdroplets with subsequent in-flow cross-linking to produce cell-laden microgels, which after exiting a microtubing are automatically jammed into thin continuous microgel filaments. The integration into a 3D printhead allows direct in-flow printing of the filaments into free-standing three-dimensional scaffolds. The method is demonstrated for different cross-linking methods and cell lines. With this advancement, microfluidics is no longer a bottleneck for biofabrication.

Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.
Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.
Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.

Keywords

biomaterials, microgels, microfluidics, 3D printing, bioprinting

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Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C

Multiscale Process Modeling of Residual Deformation and Defect Formation for Laser Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

Qian Chen, PhD
University of Pittsburgh, 2021

레이저 분말 베드 퓨전(L-PBF) 적층 제조(AM)는 우수한 기계적 특성으로 그물 모양에 가까운 복잡한 부품을 생산할 수 있습니다. 그러나 빌드 실패 및 다공성과 같은 결함으로 이어지는 원치 않는 잔류 응력 및 왜곡이 L-PBF의 광범위한 적용을 방해하고 있습니다.

L-PBF의 잠재력을 최대한 실현하기 위해 잔류 변형, 용융 풀 및 다공성 형성을 예측하는 다중 규모 모델링 방법론이 개발되었습니다. L-PBF의 잔류 변형 및 응력을 부품 규모에서 예측하기 위해 고유 변형 ​​방법을 기반으로 하는 다중 규모 프로세스 모델링 프레임워크가 제안됩니다.

고유한 변형 벡터는 마이크로 스케일에서 충실도가 높은 상세한 다층 프로세스 시뮬레이션에서 추출됩니다. 균일하지만 이방성인 변형은 잔류 왜곡 및 응력을 예측하기 위해 준 정적 평형 유한 요소 분석(FEA)에서 레이어별로 L-PBF 부품에 적용됩니다.

부품 규모에서의 잔류 변형 및 응력 예측 외에도 분말 규모의 다중물리 모델링을 수행하여 공정 매개변수, 예열 온도 및 스패터링 입자에 의해 유도된 용융 풀 변동 및 결함 형성을 연구합니다. 이러한 요인과 관련된 용융 풀 역학 및 다공성 형성 메커니즘은 시뮬레이션 및 실험을 통해 밝혀졌습니다.

제안된 부품 규모 잔류 응력 및 왜곡 모델을 기반으로 경로 계획 방법은 큰 잔류 변형 및 건물 파손을 방지하기 위해 주어진 형상에 대한 레이저 스캐닝 경로를 조정하기 위해 개발되었습니다.

연속 및 아일랜드 스캐닝 전략을 위한 기울기 기반 경로 계획이 공식화되고 공식화된 컴플라이언스 및 스트레스 최소화 문제에 대한 전체 감도 분석이 수행됩니다. 이 제안된 경로 계획 방법의 타당성과 효율성은 AconityONE L-PBF 시스템을 사용하여 실험적으로 입증되었습니다.

또한 기계 학습을 활용한 데이터 기반 프레임워크를 개발하여 L-PBF에 대한 부품 규모의 열 이력을 예측합니다. 본 연구에서는 실시간 열 이력 예측을 위해 CNN(Convolutional Neural Network)과 RNN(Recurrent Neural Network)을 포함하는 순차적 기계 학습 모델을 제안합니다.

유한 요소 해석과 비교하여 100배의 예측 속도 향상이 달성되어 실제 제작 프로세스보다 빠른 예측이 가능하고 실시간 온도 프로파일을 사용할 수 있습니다.

Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) additive manufacturing (AM) is capable of producing complex parts near net shape with good mechanical properties. However, undesired residual stress and distortion that lead to build failure and defects such as porosity are preventing broader applications of L-PBF. To realize the full potential of L-PBF, a multiscale modeling methodology is developed to predict residual deformation, melt pool, and porosity formation. To predict the residual deformation and stress in L-PBF at part-scale, a multiscale process modeling framework based on inherent strain method is proposed.

Inherent strain vectors are extracted from detailed multi-layer process simulation with high fidelity at micro-scale. Uniform but anisotropic strains are then applied to L-PBF part in a layer-by-layer fashion in a quasi-static equilibrium finite element analysis (FEA) to predict residual distortion and stress. Besides residual distortion and stress prediction at part scale, multiphysics modeling at powder scale is performed to study the melt pool variation and defect formation induced by process parameters, preheating temperature and spattering particles. Melt pool dynamics and porosity formation mechanisms associated with these factors are revealed through simulation and experiments.

Based on the proposed part-scale residual stress and distortion model, path planning method is developed to tailor the laser scanning path for a given geometry to prevent large residual deformation and building failures. Gradient based path planning for continuous and island scanning strategy is formulated and full sensitivity analysis for the formulated compliance- and stress-minimization problem is performed.

The feasibility and effectiveness of this proposed path planning method is demonstrated experimentally using the AconityONE L-PBF system. In addition, a data-driven framework utilizing machine learning is developed to predict the thermal history at part-scale for L-PBF.

In this work, a sequential machine learning model including convolutional neural network (CNN) and recurrent neural network (RNN), long shortterm memory unit, is proposed for real-time thermal history prediction. A 100x prediction speed improvement is achieved compared to the finite element analysis which makes the prediction faster than real fabrication process and real-time temperature profile available.

Figure 1.1: Schematic Overview of Metal Laser Powder Bed Fusion Process [2]
Figure 1.1: Schematic Overview of Metal Laser Powder Bed Fusion Process [2]
Figure 1.2: Commercial Powder Bed Fusion Systems
Figure 1.2: Commercial Powder Bed Fusion Systems
Figure 1.3: Commercial Metal Components Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: (a) GE Fuel Nozzle; (b) Stryker Hip Biomedical Implant.
Figure 1.3: Commercial Metal Components Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: (a) GE Fuel Nozzle; (b) Stryker Hip Biomedical Implant.
Figure 2.1: Proposed Multiscale Process Simulation Framework
Figure 2.1: Proposed Multiscale Process Simulation Framework
Figure 2.2: (a) Experimental Setup for In-situ Thermocouple Measurement in the EOS M290 Build Chamber; (b) Themocouple Locations on the Bottom Side of the Substrate.
Figure 2.2: (a) Experimental Setup for In-situ Thermocouple Measurement in the EOS M290 Build Chamber; (b) Themocouple Locations on the Bottom Side of the Substrate.
Figure 2.3: (a) Finite Element Model for Single Layer Thermal Analysis; (b) Deposition Layer
Figure 2.3: (a) Finite Element Model for Single Layer Thermal Analysis; (b) Deposition Layer
Figure 2.4: Core-skin layer: (a) Surface Morphology; (b) Scanning Strategy; (c) Transient Temperature Distribution and Temperature History at (d) Point 1; (e) Point 2 and (f) Point 3
Figure 2.4: Core-skin layer: (a) Surface Morphology; (b) Scanning Strategy; (c) Transient Temperature Distribution and Temperature History at (d) Point 1; (e) Point 2 and (f) Point 3
Figure 2.5: (a) Scanning Orientation of Each Layer; (b) Finite Element Model for Micro-scale Representative Volume
Figure 2.5: (a) Scanning Orientation of Each Layer; (b) Finite Element Model for Micro-scale Representative Volume
Figure 2.6: Bottom Layer (a) Thermal History; (b) Plastic Strain and (c) Elastic Strain Evolution History
Figure 2.6: Bottom Layer (a) Thermal History; (b) Plastic Strain and (c) Elastic Strain Evolution History
Figure 2.7: Bottom Layer Inherent Strain under Default Process Parameters along Horizontal Scanning Path
Figure 2.7: Bottom Layer Inherent Strain under Default Process Parameters along Horizontal Scanning Path
Figure 2.8: Snapshots of the Element Activation Process
Figure 2.8: Snapshots of the Element Activation Process
Figure 2.9: Double Cantilever Beam Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process (a) Before and (b) After Cutting off; (c) Faro Laser ScanArm V3 for Distortion Measurement
Figure 2.9: Double Cantilever Beam Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process (a) Before and (b) After Cutting off; (c) Faro Laser ScanArm V3 for Distortion Measurement
Figure 2.10: Square Canonical Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process
Figure 2.10: Square Canonical Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process
Figure 2.11: Finite Element Mesh for the Square Canonical and Snapshots of Element Activation Process
Figure 2.11: Finite Element Mesh for the Square Canonical and Snapshots of Element Activation Process
Figure 2.12: Simulated Distortion Field for the Double Cantilever Beam before Cutting off the Supports: (a) Inherent Strain Method; (b) Simufact Additive 3.1
Figure 2.12: Simulated Distortion Field for the Double Cantilever Beam before Cutting off the Supports: (a) Inherent Strain Method; (b) Simufact Additive 3.1
Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C
Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C
s) at the Preheating Temperature of 500 °C
s) at the Preheating Temperature of 500 °C
Figure 3.15: Melt Pool Cross Section Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment for Single Track
Figure 3.15: Melt Pool Cross Section Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment for Single Track

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Fig. 2 Schematic diagram of the experimental Rijke tube

RIJKE 튜브 내부의 열음향 장에 대한 새로운 조사

A novel investigation of the thermoacoustic field inside a Rijke tube

B. EntezamW. Van Moorhem and J. MajdalaniPublished Online:22 Aug 2012 https://doi.org/10.2514/6.1998-2582

Abstract

이 논문에서는 Rijke 튜브 내부의 시간 종속 유동장의 실험 연구 및 계산 시뮬레이션에서 진행한 결과를 제시하고 해석합니다. 기존의 추측과 스케일링 분석을 기반으로 한 이론적 논의가 진행됩니다. 주요 결과에는 열 구동 진동에서 중요한 역할을 하는 것으로 보이는 유사성 매개변수가 포함됩니다. 이 매개변수는 열 섭동을 속도, 압력 및 특성 길이의 제곱과 관련시킵니다. 열 진동을 압력 및 속도 진동의 결합된 효과에 기인하는 간단한 이론은 계산, 실험 및 스케일링 고려 사항을 통해 논의됩니다. 이전의 분석 이론은 열 진동을 속도 또는 압력 진동에 연결했기 때문에 현재 분석 모델은 기존 추측에 동의하고 조정합니다. Rayleigh 기준에 따라 열원은 Rijke-tube 하단에서 1/4의 임계 거리에 위치해야 공명이 발생합니다. 이 관찰은 결합이 최대화되는 임계점이 음향 속도와 압력의 곱인 음향 강도가 가장 큰 공간 위치에 해당하기 때문에 제안된 해석을 확인합니다. 수치 시뮬레이션은 Rijke 튜브 내부의 압력 진동이 열 입력이 증가함에 따라 기하급수적으로 증가한다는 것을 보여줍니다. 충분히 작은 열 입력으로 음향 싱크가 소스를 초과하고 음향 감쇠가 발생합니다. 열 입력이 임계 임계값 이상으로 증가하면 음향 싱크가 불충분해져서 ​​내부 에너지 축적으로 인해 빠른 음향 증폭이 발생합니다.

In this paper, results proceeding from experimental studies and computational simulations of the time-dependent flowfield inside a Rijke tube are presented and interpreted. A theoretical discussion based on existing speculations and scaling analyses is carried out. The main results include a similarity parameter that appears to play an important role in the heat driven oscillations. This parameter relates heat perturbations to velocity, pressure, and the square of a characteristic length. A simple theory that attributes heat oscillations to the combined effects of pressure and velocity oscillations is discussed via computational, experimental, and scaling considerations. Since previous analytical theories link heat oscillations to either velocity or pressure oscillations, the current analytical model agrees with and reconciles between existing speculations. In compliance with the Rayleigh criterion, it is found that the heat source must be positioned at a critical distance of 1/4 from the Rijke-tube lower end for resonance to occur. This observation confirms our proposed interpretation since the critical point where coupling is maximized corresponds to a spatial location where the acoustic intensity, product of both acoustic velocities and pressures, is largest. Numerical simulations show that pressure oscillations inside the Rijke tube grow exponentially with increasing heat input With a sufficiently small heat input, the acoustic sinks exceed the sources and acoustic damping takes place. When the heat input is augmented beyond a critical threshold, acoustic sinks become insufficient causing rapid acoustic amplification by virtue of internal energy accumulation.

Fig. 2 Schematic diagram of the experimental Rijke tube
Fig. 2 Schematic diagram of the experimental Rijke tube
A novel investigation of the thermoacoustic field inside a Rijke tube
A novel investigation of the thermoacoustic field inside a Rijke tube

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Forming characteristics and control method of weld bead for GMAW on curved surface

곡면에 GMAW용 용접 비드의 형성 특성 및 제어 방법

Forming characteristics and control method of weld bead for GMAW on curved surface

The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology (2021)Cite this article

Abstract

곡면에서 GMAW 기반 적층 가공의 용접 성형 특성은 중력의 영향을 크게 받습니다. 성형면의 경사각이 크면 혹 비드(hump bead)와 같은 심각한 결함이 발생합니다.

본 논문에서는 양생면에서 용접 비드 형성의 형성 특성과 제어 방법을 연구하기 위해 용접 용융 풀 유동 역학의 전산 모델을 수립하고 제안된 모델을 검증하기 위해 증착 실험을 수행하였습니다.

결과는 용접 비드 경사각(α)이 증가함에 따라 역류의 속도가 증가하고 상향 용접의 경우 α > 60°일 때 불규칙한 험프 결함이 나타나는 것으로 나타났습니다.

상부 과잉 액체의 하향 압착력과 하부 상향 유동의 반동력과 표면장력 사이의 상호작용은 용접 혹 형성의 주요 요인이었다. 하향 용접의 경우 양호한 형태를 얻을 수 있었으며, 용접 비드 경사각이 증가함에 따라 용접 높이는 감소하고 용접 폭은 증가하였습니다.

하향 및 상향 용접을 위한 곡면의 용융 거동 및 성형 특성을 기반으로 험프 결함을 제어하기 위해 위브 용접을 통한 증착 방법을 제안하였습니다.

성형 궤적의 변화로 인해 용접 방향의 중력 성분이 크게 감소하여 용융 풀 흐름의 안정성이 향상되었으며 복잡한 표면에서 안정적이고 일관된 용접 비드를 얻는 데 유리했습니다.

하향 용접과 상향 용접 사이의 단일 비드의 치수 편차는 7% 이내였으며 하향 및 상향 혼합 혼합 비드 중첩 증착에서 비드의 변동 편차는 0.45로 GMAW 기반 적층 제조 공정에서 허용될 수 있었습니다.

이러한 발견은 GMAW를 기반으로 하는 곡선 적층 적층 제조의 용접 비드 형성 제어에 기여했습니다.

The weld forming characteristics of GMAW-based additive manufacturing on curved surface are dramatically influenced by gravity. Large inclined angle of the forming surface would lead to severe defects such as hump bead. In this paper, a computational model of welding molten pool flow dynamics was established to research the forming characteristic and control method of weld bead forming on cured surface, and deposition experiments were conducted to verify the proposed model. Results indicated that the velocity of backward flows increased with the increase of weld bead tilt angle (α) and irregular hump defects appeared when α > 60° for upward welding. The interaction between the downward squeezing force of the excess liquid at the top and the recoil force of the upward flow at the bottom and the surface tension were primary factors for welding hump formation. For downward welding, a good morphology shape could be obtained, and the weld height decreased and the weld width increased with the increase of weld bead tilt angle. Based on the molten behaviors and forming characteristics on curved surface for downward and upward welding, the method of deposition with weave welding was proposed to control hump defects. Gravity component in the welding direction was significantly reduced due to the change of forming trajectory, which improved the stability of the molten pool flow and was beneficial to obtain stable and consistent weld bead on complex surface. The dimensional deviations of the single bead between downward and upward welding were within 7% and the fluctuation deviation of the bead in multi-bead overlapping deposition with mixing downward and upward welding was 0.45, which could be acceptable in GMAW-based additive manufacturing process. These findings contributed to the weld bead forming control of curve layered additive manufacturing based on GMAW.

Keywords

  • Molten pool behaviors
  • GMAW-based WAAM
  • Deposition with weave welding
  • Welding on curved surface
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Figure 1 Location map of barrier lakes, Sichuan-Tibet region, China

Barrier Lake의 홍수 침수 진행 및 평가지역 생태 시공간 반응 사례 연구 (쓰촨-티베트 지역)

Flood Inundation Evolution of Barrier Lake and Evaluation of Regional Ecological Spatiotemporal Response — A Case Study of Sichuan-Tibet Region

Abstract

중국 쓰촨-티베트 지역은 댐 호수의 발생과 붕괴를 동반한 지진 재해가 빈번한 지역이었습니다. 댐 호수의 붕괴는 하류 직원의 생명과 재산 안전을 심각하게 위협합니다.

동시에 국내외 학자들은 주변의 댐 호수에 대해 우려하고 있으며 호수에 대한 생태 연구는 거의 없으며 댐 호수가 생태에 미치는 영향은 우리 호수 건설 프로젝트에서 매우 중요한 계몽 의의를 가지고 있습니다.

이 기사의 목적은 방벽호의 댐 붕괴 위험을 과학적으로 예측하고 생태 환경에 대한 영향을 조사하며 통제 조치를 제시하는 것입니다. 본 논문은 쓰촨-티베트 지역의 Diexihaizi, Tangjiashan 댐호, Hongshihe 댐의 4대 댐 호수 사건을 기반으로 원격 감지 이미지에서 수역을 추출하고 HEC-RAS 모델을 사용하여 위험이 있는지 여부를 결정합니다.

댐 파손 여부 및 댐의 경로 예측; InVEST 모델을 이용하여 1990년부터 2020년까지 가장 작은 행정 구역(군/구)이 위치한 서식지를 평가 및 분석하고, 홍수 침수 결과를 기반으로 평가합니다. 결과는 공학적 처리 후 안정적인 댐 호수(Diexi Haizi)가 서식지 품질 지수에 안정화 효과가 있음을 보여줍니다.

댐 호수의 형성은 인근 토지 이용 유형과 지역 경관 생태 패턴을 변화 시켰습니다. 서식지 품질 지수는 사이 호수 주변 1km 지역에서 약간 감소하지만 3km 지역과 5km 지역에서 서식지 품질이 향상됩니다. 인공 홍수 방류 및 장벽 호수의 공학적 보강이 필요합니다.

이 논문에서 인간의 통제가 강한 지역은 다른 지역의 서식지 질 지수보다 더 잘 회복될 것입니다.

The Sichuan-Tibet region of China has always been an area with frequent earthquake disasters, accompanied by the occurrence and collapse of dammed lakes. The collapse of dammed lakes seriously threatens the lives and property safety of downstream personnel.

At the same time, domestic and foreign scholars are concerned about the surrounding dammed lake there are few ecological studies on the lake, and the impact of the dammed lake on the ecology has very important enlightenment significance for our lake construction project. It is the purpose of this article to scientifically predict the risk of dam break in a barrier lake, explore its impact on the ecological environment and put forward control measures.

Based on the four major dammed lake events of Diexihaizi, Tangjiashan dammed lake, and Hongshihe dammed lake in the Sichuan-Tibet area, this paper extracts water bodies from remote sensing images and uses the HEC-RAS model to determine whether there is a risk of the dam break and whether Forecast the route of the dam; and use the InVEST model to evaluate and analyze the habitat of the smallest administrative district (county/district) where it is located from 1990 to 2020 and make an evaluation based on the results of flood inundation.

The results show that the stable dammed lake (Diexi Haizi) after engineering treatment has a stabilizing effect on the habitat quality index. The formation of the dammed lake has changed the nearby land-use types and the regional landscape ecological pattern.

The habitat quality index will decrease slightly in the 1 km area around Sai Lake, but the habitat quality will increase in the 3 km area and the 5 km area. Artificial flood discharge and engineering reinforcement of barrier lakes are necessary. In this paper, the areas with strong human control will recover better than other regions’ habitat quality index.

Fengshan Jiang (  florachaing@mail.ynu.edu.cn )
Yunnan University https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6231-6180
Xiaoai Dai
Chengdu University of Technology https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1342-6417
Zhiqiang Xie
Yunnan University
Tong Xu
Yunnan University
Siqiao Yin
Yunnan University
Ge Qu
Chengdu University of Technology
Shouquan Yang
Yunnan University
Yangbin Zhang
Yunnan University
Zhibing Yang
Yunnan University
Jiarui Xu
Yunnan University
Zhiqun Hou
Kunming institute of surveying and mapping

Keywords

dammed lake, regional ecology, flood simulation, habitat quality

Figure 1 Location map of barrier lakes, Sichuan-Tibet region, China
Figure 1 Location map of barrier lakes, Sichuan-Tibet region, China
Figure 8 Habitat quality changes in Maoxian County
Figure 8 Habitat quality changes in Maoxian County
Figure 9 Habitat quality changes in Beichuan County
Figure 9 Habitat quality changes in Beichuan County
Figure 10 Habitat quality change map of Qingchuan County
Figure 10 Habitat quality change map of Qingchuan County

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Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling

Laser Powder Bed에서 Laser Drilling에 의한 Keyhole 형성 Ti6Al4V 생체 의학 합금의 융합: 메조스코픽 전산유체역학 시뮬레이션 대 경험적 검증을 사용한 수학적 모델링

Keyhole Formation by Laser Drilling in Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Ti6Al4V Biomedical Alloy: Mesoscopic Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation versus Mathematical Modelling Using Empirical Validation

Asif Ur Rehman 1,2,3,*
,† , Muhammad Arif Mahmood 4,*
,† , Fatih Pitir 1
, Metin Uymaz Salamci 2,3
,
Andrei C. Popescu 4 and Ion N. Mihailescu 4

Abstract

LPBF(Laser Powder Bed fusion) 공정에서 작동 조건은 열 분포를 기반으로 레이저 유도 키홀 영역을 결정하는 데 필수적입니다. 얕은 구멍과 깊은 구멍으로 분류되는 이러한 영역은 LPBF 프로세스에서 확률과 결함 형성 강도를 제어합니다.

LPBF 프로세스의 핵심 구멍을 연구하고 제어하기 위해 수학적 및 CFD(전산 유체 역학) 모델이 제공됩니다. CFD의 경우 이산 요소 모델링 기법을 사용한 유체 체적 방법이 사용되었으며, 분말 베드 보이드 및 표면에 의한 레이저 빔 흡수를 포함하여 수학적 모델이 개발되었습니다.

동적 용융 풀 거동을 자세히 살펴봅니다. 실험적, CFD 시뮬레이션 및 분석적 컴퓨팅 결과 간에 정량적 비교가 수행되어 좋은 일치를 얻습니다.

LPBF에서 레이저 조사 영역 주변의 온도는 높은 내열성과 분말 입자 사이의 공기로 인해 분말층 주변에 비해 급격히 상승하여 레이저 횡방향 열파의 이동이 느려집니다. LPBF에서 키홀은 에너지 밀도에 의해 제어되는 얕고 깊은 키홀 모드로 분류될 수 있습니다. 에너지 밀도를 높이면 얕은 키홀 구멍 모드가 깊은 키홀 구멍 모드로 바뀝니다.

깊은 키홀 구멍의 에너지 밀도는 다중 반사와 키홀 구멍 내의 2차 반사 빔의 집중으로 인해 더 높아져 재료가 빠르게 기화됩니다.

깊은 키홀 구멍 모드에서는 온도 분포가 높기 때문에 액체 재료가 기화 온도에 가까우므로 얕은 키홀 구멍보다 구멍이 형성될 확률이 훨씬 높습니다. 온도가 급격히 상승하면 재료 밀도가 급격히 떨어지므로 비열과 융해 잠열로 인해 유체 부피가 증가합니다.

그 대가로 표면 장력을 낮추고 용융 풀 균일성에 영향을 미칩니다.

In the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) process, the operating conditions are essential in determining laser-induced keyhole regimes based on the thermal distribution. These regimes, classified into shallow and deep keyholes, control the probability and defects formation intensity in the LPBF process. To study and control the keyhole in the LPBF process, mathematical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are presented. For CFD, the volume of fluid method with the discrete element modeling technique was used, while a mathematical model was developed by including the laser beam absorption by the powder bed voids and surface. The dynamic melt pool behavior is explored in detail. Quantitative comparisons are made among experimental, CFD simulation and analytical computing results leading to a good correspondence. In LPBF, the temperature around the laser irradiation zone rises rapidly compared to the surroundings in the powder layer due to the high thermal resistance and the air between the powder particles, resulting in a slow travel of laser transverse heat waves. In LPBF, the keyhole can be classified into shallow and deep keyhole mode, controlled by the energy density. Increasing the energy density, the shallow keyhole mode transforms into the deep keyhole mode. The energy density in a deep keyhole is higher due to the multiple reflections and concentrations of secondary reflected beams within the keyhole, causing the material to vaporize quickly. Due to an elevated temperature distribution in deep keyhole mode, the probability of pores forming is much higher than in a shallow keyhole as the liquid material is close to the vaporization temperature. When the temperature increases rapidly, the material density drops quickly, thus, raising the fluid volume due to the specific heat and fusion latent heat. In return, this lowers the surface tension and affects the melt pool uniformity.

Keywords: laser powder bed fusion; computational fluid dynamics; analytical modelling; shallow
and deep keyhole modes; experimental correlation

Figure 1. Powder bed schematic with voids.
Figure 1. Powder bed schematic with voids.
Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling
Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling
Figure 3. Temperature field contour formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 3. Temperature field contour formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 4. Detailed view of shallow depth melt mode with temperature field at 0.695 ms
Figure 4. Detailed view of shallow depth melt mode with temperature field at 0.695 ms
Figure 5. Melt flow stream traces formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 5. Melt flow stream traces formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 6. Density evolution of the melt pool at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 6. Density evolution of the melt pool at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 7. Un-melted and melted regions at different time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 7. Un-melted and melted regions at different time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 8. Transformation from shallow depth melt flow to deep keyhole formation when laser power increased from (a) 170 W to (b) 200 W
Figure 8. Transformation from shallow depth melt flow to deep keyhole formation when laser power increased from (a) 170 W to (b) 200 W
Figure 9. Stream traces and laser beam multiple reflections in deep keyhole melt flow mode
Figure 9. Stream traces and laser beam multiple reflections in deep keyhole melt flow mode
Figure 10. A comparison between analytical and CFD simulation results for peak thermal distribution value in the deep keyhole formation
Figure 10. A comparison between analytical and CFD simulation results for peak thermal distribution value in the deep keyhole formation
Figure 11. A comparison among experiments [49], CFD and analytical simulations for deep keyhole top width and bottom width
Figure 11. A comparison among experiments [49], CFD and analytical simulations for deep keyhole top width and bottom width

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Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.

Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves

무작위 파동에서 우산 흡입 앵커 기초 주변의 세굴 특성 및 평형 세굴 깊이 예측

Ruigeng Hu 1
, Hongjun Liu 2
, Hao Leng 1
, Peng Yu 3 and Xiuhai Wang 1,2,*

1 College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266000, China;
huruigeng@stu.ouc.edu.cn (R.H.); lh4517@stu.ouc.edu.cn (H.L.)
2 Key Lab of Marine Environment and Ecology (Ocean University of China), Ministry of Education,
Qingdao 266000, China; hongjun@ouc.edu.cn
3 Qingdao Geo-Engineering Survering Institute, Qingdao 266100, China; yp6650@stu.ouc.edu.cn

Abstract

무작위 파동 하에서 우산 흡입 앵커 기초(USAF) 주변의 국부 세굴을 연구하기 위해 일련의 수치 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 본 연구에서는 먼저 본 모델의 정확성을 검증하기 위해 검증을 수행하였다.

또한, 세굴 진화와 세굴 메커니즘을 각각 분석하였다. 또한 USAF 주변의 평형 세굴 깊이 Seq를 예측하기 위해 두 가지 수정된 모델이 제안되었습니다. 마지막으로 Seq에 대한 Froude 수 Fr과 Euler 수 Eu의 영향을 연구하기 위해 매개변수 연구가 수행되었습니다.

결과는 현재 수치 모델이 무작위 파동에서 세굴 형태를 묘사하는 데 정확하고 합리적임을 나타냅니다.

수정된 Raaijmaker의 모델은 KCs,p < 8일 때 본 연구의 시뮬레이션 결과와 잘 일치함을 보여줍니다. 수정된 확률적 모델의 예측 결과는 KCrms,a < 4일 때 n = 10일 때 가장 유리합니다. Fr과 Eu가 높을수록 둘 다 더 집중적 인 말굽 소용돌이와 더 큰 결과를 초래합니다.

Figure 1. The close-up of umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF).
Figure 1. The close-up of umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF).
Figure 2. (a) The sketch of seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional model; (b) boundary condation:Wvwave boundary, S-symmetric boundary, O-outflow boundary; (c) USAF model.
Figure 2. (a) The sketch of seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional model; (b) boundary condation:Wvwave boundary, S-symmetric boundary, O-outflow boundary; (c) USAF model.
Figure 5. Comparison of time evolution of scour between the present study and Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17].
Figure 5. Comparison of time evolution of scour between the present study and Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17].
Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.
Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.

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Fig. 1. Hydraulic jump flow structure.

Performance assessment of OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D in the numerical modeling of a low Reynolds number hydraulic jump

낮은 레이놀즈 수 유압 점프의 수치 모델링에서 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 성능 평가

ArnauBayona DanielValerob RafaelGarcía-Bartuala Francisco ​JoséVallés-Morána P. AmparoLópez-Jiméneza

Abstract

A comparative performance analysis of the CFD platforms OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D is presented, focusing on a 3D swirling turbulent flow: a steady hydraulic jump at low Reynolds number. Turbulence is treated using RANS approach RNG k-ε. A Volume Of Fluid (VOF) method is used to track the air–water interface, consequently aeration is modeled using an Eulerian–Eulerian approach. Structured meshes of cubic elements are used to discretize the channel geometry. The numerical model accuracy is assessed comparing representative hydraulic jump variables (sequent depth ratio, roller length, mean velocity profiles, velocity decay or free surface profile) to experimental data. The model results are also compared to previous studies to broaden the result validation. Both codes reproduced the phenomenon under study concurring with experimental data, although special care must be taken when swirling flows occur. Both models can be used to reproduce the hydraulic performance of energy dissipation structures at low Reynolds numbers.

CFD 플랫폼 OpenFOAM 및 FLOW-3D의 비교 성능 분석이 3D 소용돌이치는 난류인 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 안정적인 유압 점프에 초점을 맞춰 제시됩니다. 난류는 RANS 접근법 RNG k-ε을 사용하여 처리됩니다.

VOF(Volume Of Fluid) 방법은 공기-물 계면을 추적하는 데 사용되며 결과적으로 Eulerian-Eulerian 접근 방식을 사용하여 폭기가 모델링됩니다. 입방체 요소의 구조화된 메쉬는 채널 형상을 이산화하는 데 사용됩니다. 수치 모델 정확도는 대표적인 유압 점프 변수(연속 깊이 비율, 롤러 길이, 평균 속도 프로파일, 속도 감쇠 또는 자유 표면 프로파일)를 실험 데이터와 비교하여 평가됩니다.

모델 결과는 또한 결과 검증을 확장하기 위해 이전 연구와 비교됩니다. 소용돌이 흐름이 발생할 때 특별한 주의가 필요하지만 두 코드 모두 실험 데이터와 일치하는 연구 중인 현상을 재현했습니다. 두 모델 모두 낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 에너지 소산 구조의 수리 성능을 재현하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

CFDRANS, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D ,Hydraulic jump, Air–water flow, Low Reynolds number

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FLOW-3D AM

flow3d AM-product
FLOW-3D AM-product

와이어 파우더 기반 DED | Wire Powder Based DED

일부 연구자들은 부품을 만들기 위해 더 넓은 범위의 처리 조건을 사용하여 하이브리드 와이어 분말 기반 DED 시스템을 찾고 있습니다. 예를 들어, 이 시뮬레이션은 다양한 분말 및 와이어 이송 속도를 가진 하이브리드 시스템을 살펴봅니다.

와이어 기반 DED | Wire Based DED

와이어 기반 DED는 분말 기반 DED보다 처리량이 높고 낭비가 적지만 재료 구성 및 증착 방향 측면에서 유연성이 떨어집니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 와이어 기반 DED의 처리 결과를 이해하는데 유용하며 최적화 연구를 통해 빌드에 대한 와이어 이송 속도 및 직경과 같은 최상의 처리 매개 변수를 찾을 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM은 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF), 바인더 제트 및 DED (Directed Energy Deposition)와 같은 적층 제조 공정 ( additive manufacturing )을 시뮬레이션하고 분석하는 CFD 소프트웨어입니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 다중 물리 기능은 공정 매개 변수의 분석 및 최적화를 위해 분말 확산 및 압축, 용융 풀 역학, L-PBF 및 DED에 대한 다공성 형성, 바인더 분사 공정을 위한 수지 침투 및 확산에 대해 매우 정확한 시뮬레이션을 제공합니다.

3D 프린팅이라고도하는 적층 제조(additive manufacturing)는 일반적으로 층별 접근 방식을 사용하여, 분말 또는 와이어로 부품을 제조하는 방법입니다. 금속 기반 적층 제조 공정에 대한 관심은 지난 몇 년 동안 시작되었습니다. 오늘날 사용되는 3 대 금속 적층 제조 공정은 PBF (Powder Bed Fusion), DED (Directed Energy Deposition) 및 바인더 제트 ( Binder jetting ) 공정입니다.  FLOW-3D  AM  은 이러한 각 프로세스에 대한 고유 한 시뮬레이션 통찰력을 제공합니다.

파우더 베드 융합 및 직접 에너지 증착 공정에서 레이저 또는 전자 빔을 열원으로 사용할 수 있습니다. 두 경우 모두 PBF용 분말 형태와 DED 공정용 분말 또는 와이어 형태의 금속을 완전히 녹여 융합하여 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 그러나 바인더 젯팅(Binder jetting)에서는 결합제 역할을 하는 수지가 금속 분말에 선택적으로 증착되어 층별로 부품을 형성합니다. 이러한 부품은 더 나은 치밀화를 달성하기 위해 소결됩니다.

FLOW-3D AM 의 자유 표면 추적 알고리즘과 다중 물리 모델은 이러한 각 프로세스를 높은 정확도로 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 (L-PBF) 공정 모델링 단계는 여기에서 자세히 설명합니다. DED 및 바인더 분사 공정에 대한 몇 가지 개념 증명 시뮬레이션도 표시됩니다.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF)

LPBF 공정에는 유체 흐름, 열 전달, 표면 장력, 상 변화 및 응고와 같은 복잡한 다중 물리학 현상이 포함되어 공정 및 궁극적으로 빌드 품질에 상당한 영향을 미칩니다. FLOW-3D AM 의 물리적 모델은 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존 방정식을 동시에 해결하는 동시에 입자 크기 분포 및 패킹 비율을 고려하여 중규모에서 용융 풀 현상을 시뮬레이션합니다.

FLOW-3D DEM FLOW-3D WELD 는 전체 파우더 베드 융합 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용됩니다. L-PBF 공정의 다양한 단계는 분말 베드 놓기, 분말 용융 및 응고,이어서 이전에 응고 된 층에 신선한 분말을 놓는 것, 그리고 다시 한번 새 층을 이전 층에 녹이고 융합시키는 것입니다. FLOW-3D AM  은 이러한 각 단계를 시뮬레이션하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

파우더 베드 부설 공정

FLOW-3D DEM을 통해 분말 크기 분포, 재료 특성, 응집 효과는 물론 롤러 또는 블레이드 움직임 및 상호 작용과 같은 기하학적 효과와 관련된 분말 확산 및 압축을 이해할 수 있습니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 공정 매개 변수가 후속 인쇄 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 직접적인 영향을 미치는 패킹 밀도와 같은 분말 베드 특성에 어떻게 영향을 미치는지에 대한 정확한 이해를 제공합니다.

다양한 파우더 베드 압축을 달성하는 한 가지 방법은 베드를 놓는 동안 다양한 입자 크기 분포를 선택하는 것입니다. 아래에서 볼 수 있듯이 세 가지 크기의 입자 크기 분포가 있으며, 이는 가장 높은 압축을 제공하는 Case 2와 함께 다양한 분말 베드 압축을 초래합니다.

파우더 베드 분포 다양한 입자 크기 분포
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용하여 파우더 베드 배치
파우더 베드 압축 결과
세 가지 다른 입자 크기 분포를 사용한 분말 베드 압축

입자-입자 상호 작용, 유체-입자 결합 및 입자 이동 물체 상호 작용은 FLOW-3D DEM을 사용하여 자세히 분석 할 수도 있습니다 . 또한 입자간 힘을 지정하여 분말 살포 응용 분야를 보다 정확하게 연구 할 수도 있습니다.

FLOW-3D AM  시뮬레이션은 이산 요소 방법 (DEM)을 사용하여 역 회전하는 원통형 롤러로 인한 분말 확산을 연구합니다. 비디오 시작 부분에서 빌드 플랫폼이 위로 이동하는 동안 분말 저장소가 아래로 이동합니다. 그 직후, 롤러는 분말 입자 (초기 위치에 따라 색상이 지정됨)를 다음 층이 녹고 구축 될 준비를 위해 구축 플랫폼으로 펼칩니다. 이러한 시뮬레이션은 저장소에서 빌드 플랫폼으로 전송되는 분말 입자의 선호 크기에 대한 추가 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

Melting | 파우더 베드 용해

DEM 시뮬레이션에서 파우더 베드가 생성되면 STL 파일로 추출됩니다. 다음 단계는 CFD를 사용하여 레이저 용융 공정을 시뮬레이션하는 것입니다. 여기서는 레이저 빔과 파우더 베드의 상호 작용을 모델링 합니다. 이 프로세스를 정확하게 포착하기 위해 물리학에는 점성 흐름, 용융 풀 내의 레이저 반사 (광선 추적을 통해), 열 전달, 응고, 상 변화 및 기화, 반동 압력, 차폐 가스 압력 및 표면 장력이 포함됩니다. 이 모든 물리학은 이 복잡한 프로세스를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하기 위해 TruVOF 방법을 기반으로 개발되었습니다.

레이저 출력 200W, 스캔 속도 3.0m / s, 스폿 반경 100μm에서 파우더 베드의 용융 풀 분석.

용융 풀이 응고되면 FLOW-3D AM  압력 및 온도 데이터를 Abaqus 또는 MSC Nastran과 같은 FEA 도구로 가져와 응력 윤곽 및 변위 프로파일을 분석 할 수도 있습니다.

Multilayer | 다층 적층 제조

용융 풀 트랙이 응고되면 DEM을 사용하여 이전에 응고된 층에 새로운 분말 층의 확산을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 유사하게, 레이저 용융은 새로운 분말 층에서 수행되어 후속 층 간의 융합 조건을 분석 할 수 있습니다.

해석 진행 절차는 첫 번째 용융층이 응고되면 입자의 두 번째 층이 응고 층에 증착됩니다. 새로운 분말 입자 층에 레이저 공정 매개 변수를 지정하여 용융 풀 시뮬레이션을 다시 수행합니다. 이 프로세스를 여러 번 반복하여 연속적으로 응고된 층 간의 융합, 빌드 내 온도 구배를 평가하는 동시에 다공성 또는 기타 결함의 형성을 모니터링 할 수 있습니다.

다층 적층 적층 제조 시뮬레이션

LPBF의 키홀 링 | Keyholing in LPBF

키홀링 중 다공성은 어떻게 형성됩니까? 이것은 TU Denmark의 연구원들이 FLOW-3D AM을 사용하여 답변한 질문이었습니다. 레이저 빔의 적용으로 기판이 녹으면 기화 및 상 변화로 인한 반동 압력이 용융 풀을 압박합니다. 반동 압력으로 인한 하향 흐름과 레이저 반사로 인한 추가 레이저 에너지 흡수가 공존하면 폭주 효과가 발생하여 용융 풀이 Keyholing으로 전환됩니다. 결국, 키홀 벽을 따라 온도가 변하기 때문에 표면 장력으로 인해 벽이 뭉쳐져서 진행되는 응고 전선에 의해 갇힐 수 있는 공극이 생겨 다공성이 발생합니다. FLOW-3D AM 레이저 파우더 베드 융합 공정 모듈은 키홀링 및 다공성 형성을 시뮬레이션 하는데 필요한 모든 물리 모델을 보유하고 있습니다.

바인더 분사 (Binder jetting)

Binder jetting 시뮬레이션은 모세관 힘의 영향을받는 파우더 베드에서 바인더의 확산 및 침투에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 공정 매개 변수와 재료 특성은 증착 및 확산 공정에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다.

Scan Strategy | 스캔 전략

스캔 전략은 온도 구배 및 냉각 속도에 영향을 미치기 때문에 미세 구조에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다. 연구원들은 FLOW-3D AM 을 사용하여 결함 형성과 응고된 금속의 미세 구조에 영향을 줄 수 있는 트랙 사이에서 발생하는 재 용융을 이해하기 위한 최적의 스캔 전략을 탐색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM 은 하나 또는 여러 레이저에 대해 시간에 따른 방향 속도를 구현할 때 완전한 유연성을 제공합니다.

Beam Shaping | 빔 형성

레이저 출력 및 스캔 전략 외에도 레이저 빔 모양과 열유속 분포는 LPBF 공정에서 용융 풀 역학에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. AM 기계 제조업체는 공정 안정성 및 처리량에 대해 다중 코어 및 임의 모양의 레이저 빔 사용을 모색하고 있습니다. FLOW-3D AM을 사용하면 멀티 코어 및 임의 모양의 빔 프로파일을 구현할 수 있으므로 생산량을 늘리고 부품 품질을 개선하기 위한 최상의 구성에 대한 통찰력을 제공 할 수 있습니다.

이 영역에서 수행 된 일부 작업에 대해 자세히 알아 보려면 “The Next Frontier of Metal AM”웨비나를 시청하십시오.

Multi-material Powder Bed Fusion | 다중 재료 분말 베드 융합

이 시뮬레이션에서 스테인리스 강 및 알루미늄 분말은 FLOW-3D AM 이 용융 풀 역학을 정확하게 포착하기 위해 추적하는 독립적으로 정의 된 온도 의존 재료 특성을 가지고 있습니다. 시뮬레이션은 용융 풀에서 재료 혼합을 이해하는 데 도움이됩니다.

다중 재료 용접 사례 연구

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사

GM과 University of Utah의 연구원들은 FLOW-3D WELD 를 사용 하여 레이저 키홀 용접을 통한 이종 금속의 혼합을 이해했습니다. 그들은 반동 압력 및 Marangoni 대류와 관련하여 구리와 알루미늄의 혼합 농도에 대한 레이저 출력 및 스캔 속도의 영향을 조사했습니다. 그들은 시뮬레이션을 실험 결과와 비교했으며 샘플 내의 절단 단면에서 재료 농도 사이에 좋은 일치를 발견했습니다.

이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056
참조 : Wenkang Huang, Hongliang Wang, Teresa Rinker, Wenda Tan, 이종 금속의 레이저 키홀 용접에서 금속 혼합 조사 , Materials & Design, Volume 195, (2020). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matdes.2020.109056

방향성 에너지 증착

FLOW-3D AM 의 내장 입자 모델 을 사용하여 직접 에너지 증착 프로세스를 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 분말 주입 속도와 고체 기질에 입사되는 열유속을 지정함으로써 고체 입자는 용융 풀에 질량, 운동량 및 에너지를 추가 할 수 있습니다. 다음 비디오에서 고체 금속 입자가 용융 풀에 주입되고 기판에서 용융 풀의 후속 응고가 관찰됩니다.

Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device

Fabrication and Experimental Investigation of a Novel 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Micro Cytometric Device

Yongquan Wang*a , Jingyuan Wangb, Hualing Chenc

School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, 710049, P. R. China
a yqwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,, bwjy2006@stu.xjtu.edu.cn,, c hlchen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,

Abstract:

This paper presents the fabrication of a novel micro-machined cytometric device, and the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The proposed device is simple in structure, with the uniqueness that the depth of its microchannels is non-uniform. Using the SU-8 soft lithography containing two exposures, as well as micro-molding techniques, the PDMS device is successfully fabricated. Two kinds of experiments, i.e., the red ink fluidity observation experiments and the fluorescent optical experiments, are then performed for the device prototypes with different step heights, or channel depth differences, to explore the influence laws of the feature parameter on the devices hydrodynamic focusing behaviors. The experimental results show that the introducing of the steps can efficiently enhance the vertical focusing performance of the device. At appropriate geometry and operating conditions, good 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be obtained.

Korea Abstract

이 논문은 새로운 마이크로 머신 세포 측정 장치의 제조와 3D 유체 역학적 초점 성능에 대한 실험적 조사를 제시합니다. 제안 된 장치는 구조가 단순하며, 마이크로 채널의 깊이가 균일하지 않다는 독특함이 있습니다. 두 가지 노출이 포함 된 SU-8 소프트 리소그래피와 마이크로 몰딩 기술을 사용하여 PDMS 장치가 성공적으로 제작되었습니다. 그런 다음 두 종류의 실험, 즉 적색 잉크 유동성 관찰 실험과 형광 광학 실험을 단계 높이 또는 채널 깊이 차이가 다른 장치 프로토 타입에 대해 수행하여 장치 유체 역학적 초점에 대한 기능 매개 변수의 영향 법칙을 탐색합니다. 행동. 실험 결과는 단계의 도입이 장치의 수직 초점 성능을 효율적으로 향상시킬 수 있음을 보여줍니다. 적절한 형상과 작동 조건에서 우수한 3D 유체 역학적 초점을 얻을 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Flow cytometer, Hydrodynamic focusing, Three-dimensional (3D), Micro-machined

Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig.4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig. 4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights

References 

Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios
Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios

Conclusions

In this paper, we presented a novel micro-machined cytometric device and its fabrication process,
emphasizing on the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The
proposed device is simple in structure, low cost, and easy to be batch produced. Besides this, as a
device based on standard micro-fabrication methodology, it can be conveniently integrated with other
micro-fluidic and/or micro-optical units to form a complete detection and analysis system.
The experimental tests for the prototype devices not only verified the design conception, but also
gave us a comprehensive understanding of the device hydro-focusing performance. The experimental
results show that, as the uniqueness of this design, the introducing of the feature steps can
significantly enhance the vertical focusing performance of the devices, which is crucial for the
achievement of 3D focusing. In summary, for the proposed novel device, good 3D hydrodynamic
focusing can be attained at appropriate geometry and operating conditions.
In addition, an improved design can be obtained by replacing the flat cover with an identical
device unit, in other words, the same two device units are bonded together (The channels are inward
and aligned) to form a new device. Then the sample stream can focused to the center of the assembly
outlet channel due to the hydrodynamic forces equally in both horizontal and vertical directions, and
thus avoiding the adsorption or friction issues of cells/particles to the top channel wall.

References

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Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).

Experimental and numerical investigation of the origin of surface roughness in laser powder bed fused overhang regions

레이저 파우더 베드 융합 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기의 원인에 대한 실험 및 수치 조사

Shaochuan Feng,Amar M. Kamat,Soheil Sabooni &Yutao PeiPages S66-S84 | Received 18 Jan 2021, Accepted 25 Feb 2021, Published online: 10 Mar 2021

ABSTRACT

Surface roughness of laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) printed overhang regions is a major contributor to deteriorated shape accuracy/surface quality. This study investigates the mechanisms behind the evolution of surface roughness (Ra) in overhang regions. The evolution of surface morphology is the result of a combination of border track contour, powder adhesion, warp deformation, and dross formation, which is strongly related to the overhang angle (θ). When 0° ≤ θ ≤ 15°, the overhang angle does not affect Ra significantly since only a small area of the melt pool boundaries contacts the powder bed resulting in slight powder adhesion. When 15° < θ ≤ 50°, powder adhesion is enhanced by the melt pool sinking and the increased contact area between the melt pool boundary and powder bed. When θ > 50°, large waviness of the overhang contour, adhesion of powder clusters, severe warp deformation and dross formation increase Ra sharply.

레이저 파우더 베드 퓨전 (L-PBF) 프린팅 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기는 형상 정확도 / 표면 품질 저하의 주요 원인입니다. 이 연구 는 오버행 영역에서 표면 거칠기 (Ra ) 의 진화 뒤에 있는 메커니즘을 조사합니다 . 표면 형태의 진화는 오버행 각도 ( θ ) 와 밀접한 관련이있는 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착, 뒤틀림 변형 및 드로스 형성의 조합의 결과입니다 . 0° ≤  θ  ≤ 15° 인 경우 , 용융풀 경계의 작은 영역 만 분말 베드와 접촉하여 약간의 분말 접착이 발생하기 때문에 오버행 각도가 R a에 큰 영향을 주지 않습니다 . 15° < θ 일 때  ≤ 50°, 용융 풀 싱킹 및 용융 풀 경계와 분말 베드 사이의 증가된 접촉 면적으로 분말 접착력이 향상됩니다. θ  > 50° 일 때 오버행 윤곽의 큰 파형, 분말 클러스터의 접착, 심한 휨 변형 및 드 로스 형성이 Ra 급격히 증가 합니다.

KEYWORDS: Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF), melt pool dynamics, overhang region, shape deviation, surface roughness

1. Introduction

레이저 분말 베드 융합 (L-PBF)은 첨단 적층 제조 (AM) 기술로, 집중된 레이저 빔을 사용하여 금속 분말을 선택적으로 융합하여 슬라이스 된 3D 컴퓨터 지원에 따라 층별로 3 차원 (3D) 금속 부품을 구축합니다. 설계 (CAD) 모델 (Chatham, Long 및 Williams 2019 ; Tan, Zhu 및 Zhou 2020 ). 재료가 인쇄 층 아래에 ​​존재하는지 여부에 따라 인쇄 영역은 각각 솔리드 영역 또는 돌출 영역으로 분류 될 수 있습니다. 따라서 오버행 영역은 고체 기판이 아니라 분말 베드 바로 위에 건설되는 특수 구조입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017). 오버행 영역은지지 구조를 포함하거나 포함하지 않고 구축 할 수 있으며, 지지대가있는 돌출 영역의 L-PBF는 지지체가 더 낮은 밀도로 구축된다는 점을 제외 하고 (Wang and Chou 2018 ) 고체 기판의 공정과 유사합니다 (따라서 기계적 강도가 낮기 때문에 L-PBF 공정 후 기계적으로 쉽게 제거 할 수 있습니다. 따라서지지 구조로 인쇄 된 오버행 영역은 L-PBF 공정 후 지지물 제거, 연삭 및 연마와 같은 추가 후 처리 단계가 필요합니다.

수평 내부 채널의 제작과 같은 일부 특정 경우에는 공정 후 지지대를 제거하기가 어려우므로 채널 상단 절반의 돌출부 영역을 지지대없이 건설해야합니다 (Hopkinson and Dickens 2000 ). 수평 내부 채널에 사용할 수없는지지 구조 외에도 내부 표면, 특히 등각 냉각 채널 (Feng, Kamat 및 Pei 2021 ) 에서 발생하는 복잡한 3D 채널 네트워크의 경우 표면 마감 프로세스를 구현하는 것도 어렵습니다 . 결과적으로 오버행 영역은 (i) 잔류 응력에 의한 변형, (ii) 계단 효과 (Kuo et al. 2020 ; Li et al. 2020 )로 인해 설계된 모양에서 벗어날 수 있습니다 .) 및 (iii) 원하지 않는 분말 소결로 인한 향상된 표면 거칠기; 여기서, 앞의 두 요소는 일반적으로 mm 길이 스케일에서 ‘매크로’편차로 분류되고 후자는 일반적으로 µm 길이 스케일에서 ‘마이크로’편차로 인식됩니다.

열 응력에 의한 변형은 오버행 영역에서 발생하는 중요한 문제입니다 (Patterson, Messimer 및 Farrington 2017 ). 국부적 인 용융 / 냉각은 용융 풀 내부 및 주변에서 큰 온도 구배를 유도하여 응고 된 층에 집중적 인 열 응력을 유발합니다. 열 응력에 의한 뒤틀림은 고체 영역을 현저하게 변형하지 않습니다. 이러한 영역은 아래의 여러 레이어에 의해 제한되기 때문입니다. 반면에 오버행 영역은 구속되지 않고 공정 중 응력 완화로 인해 상당한 변형이 발생합니다 (Kamat 및 Pei 2019 ). 더욱이 용융 깊이는 레이어 두께보다 큽니다 (이전 레이어도 재용 해되어 빌드 된 레이어간에 충분한 결합을 보장하기 때문입니다 [Yadroitsev et al. 2013 ; Kamath et al.2014 ]),응고 된 두께가 설계된 두께보다 크기 때문에형태 편차 (예 : 드 로스 [Charles et al. 2020 ; Feng et al. 2020 ])가 발생합니다. 마이크로 스케일에서 인쇄 된 표면 (R a 및 S a ∼ 10 μm)은 기계적으로 가공 된 표면보다 거칠다 (Duval-Chaneac et al. 2018 ; Wen et al. 2018 ). 이 문제는고형화 된 용융 풀의 가장자리에 부착 된 용융되지 않은 분말의 결과로 표면 거칠기 (R a )가 일반적으로 약 20 μm인 오버행 영역에서 특히 심각합니다 (Mazur et al. 2016 ; Pakkanen et al. 2016 ).

오버행 각도 ( θ , 빌드 방향과 관련하여 측정)는 오버행 영역의 뒤틀림 편향과 표면 거칠기에 영향을 미치는 중요한 매개 변수입니다 (Kamat and Pei 2019 ; Mingear et al. 2019 ). θ ∼ 45 ° 의 오버행 각도 는 일반적으로지지 구조없이 오버행 영역을 인쇄 할 수있는 임계 값으로 합의됩니다 (Pakkanen et al. 2016 ; Kadirgama et al. 2018 ). θ 일 때이 임계 값보다 크면 오버행 영역을 허용 가능한 표면 품질로 인쇄 할 수 없습니다. 오버행 각도 외에도 레이저 매개 변수 (레이저 에너지 밀도와 관련된)는 용융 풀의 모양 / 크기 및 용융 풀 역학에 영향을줌으로써 오버행 영역의 표면 거칠기에 영향을줍니다 (Wang et al. 2013 ; Mingear et al . 2019 ).

용융 풀 역학은 고체 (Shrestha 및 Chou 2018 ) 및 오버행 (Le et al. 2020 ) 영역 모두에서 수행되는 L-PBF 공정을 포함한 레이저 재료 가공의 일반적인 물리적 현상입니다 . 용융 풀 모양, 크기 및 냉각 속도는 잔류 응력으로 인한 변형과 ​​표면 거칠기에 모두 영향을 미치므로 처리 매개 변수와 표면 형태 / 품질 사이의 다리 역할을하며 용융 풀을 이해하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 추가 조사를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 거동과 표면 거칠기에 미치는 영향. 현재까지 고체 영역의 L-PBF 동안 용융 풀 동작을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 여러 연구가 수행되었습니다. 유한 요소 방법 (FEM)과 같은 시뮬레이션 기술 (Roberts et al. 2009 ; Du et al.2019 ), 유한 차분 법 (FDM) (Wu et al. 2018 ), 전산 유체 역학 (CFD) (Lee and Zhang 2016 ), 임의의 Lagrangian-Eulerian 방법 (ALE) (Khairallah and Anderson 2014 )을 사용하여 증발 반동 압력 (Hu et al. 2018 ) 및 Marangoni 대류 (Zhang et al. 2018 ) 현상을포함하는 열 전달 (온도 장) 및 물질 전달 (용융 흐름) 프로세스. 또한 이산 요소법 (DEM)을 사용하여 무작위 분산 분말 베드를 생성했습니다 (Lee and Zhang 2016 ; Wu et al. 2018 ). 이 모델은 분말 규모의 L-PBF 공정을 시뮬레이션했습니다 (Khairallah et al. 2016) 메조 스케일 (Khairallah 및 Anderson 2014 ), 단일 트랙 (Leitz et al. 2017 )에서 다중 트랙 (Foroozmehr et al. 2016 ) 및 다중 레이어 (Huang, Khamesee 및 Toyserkani 2019 )로.

그러나 결과적인 표면 거칠기를 결정하는 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학은 문헌에서 거의 관심을받지 못했습니다. 솔리드 영역의 L-PBF에 대한 기존 시뮬레이션 모델이 어느 정도 참조가 될 수 있지만 오버행 영역과 솔리드 영역 간의 용융 풀 역학에는 상당한 차이가 있습니다. 오버행 영역에서 용융 금속은 분말 입자 사이의 틈새로 아래로 흘러 용융 풀이 다공성 분말 베드가 제공하는 약한 지지체 아래로 가라 앉습니다. 이것은 중력과 표면 장력의 영향이 용융 풀의 결과적인 모양 / 크기를 결정하는 데 중요하며, 결과적으로 오버행 영역의 마이크로 스케일 형태의 진화에 중요합니다. 또한 분말 입자 사이의 공극, 열 조건 (예 : 에너지 흡수,2019 ; Karimi et al. 2020 ; 노래와 영 2020 ). 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 형상 편차를 증가시킬뿐만 아니라 주기적 하중 동안 미세 균열의 시작 지점 역할을함으로써 기계적 강도를 저하시킵니다 (Günther et al. 2018 ). 오버행 영역의 높은 표면 거칠기는 (마이크로) 정확도 / 품질에 대한 엄격한 요구 사항이있는 부품 제조에서 L-PBF의 적용을 제한합니다.

본 연구는 실험 및 시뮬레이션 연구를 사용하여 오버행 영역 (지지물없이 제작)의 미세 형상 편차 형성 메커니즘과 표면 거칠기의 기원을 체계적이고 포괄적으로 조사합니다. 결합 된 DEM-CFD 시뮬레이션 모델은 경계 트랙 윤곽, 분말 접착 및 뒤틀림 변형의 효과를 고려하여 오버행 영역의 용융 풀 역학과 표면 형태의 형성 메커니즘을 나타 내기 위해 개발되었습니다. 표면 거칠기 R의 시뮬레이션 및 단일 요인 L-PBF 인쇄 실험을 사용하여 오버행 각도의 함수로 연구됩니다. 용융 풀의 침몰과 관련된 오버행 영역에서 분말 접착의 세 가지 메커니즘이 식별되고 자세히 설명됩니다. 마지막으로, 인쇄 된 오버행 영역에서 높은 표면 거칠기 문제를 완화 할 수 있는 잠재적 솔루션에 대해 간략하게 설명합니다.

The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
The shape and size of the L-PBF printed samples are illustrated in Figure 1
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 2. Borders in the overhang region depending on the overhang angle θ
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 3. (a) Profile of the volumetric heat source, (b) the model geometry of single-track printing on a solid substrate (unit: µm), and (c) the comparison of melt pool dimensions obtained from the experiment (right half) and simulation (left half) for a calibrated optical penetration depth of 110 µm (laser power 200 W and scan speed 800 mm/s, solidified layer thickness 30 µm, powder size 10–45 µm).
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 4. The model geometry of an overhang being L-PBF processed: (a) 3D view and (b) right view.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 5. The cross-sectional contour of border tracks in a 45° overhang region.
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 6. Evolution of melt pool in the overhang region (θ = 45°, P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s, the streamlines are shown by arrows).
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 7. The overhang contour is contributed by (a) only outer borders when θ ≤ 60° (b) both inner borders and outer borders when θ > 60°.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 8. Schematic of powder adhesion on a 45° overhang region.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 9. The L-PBF printed samples with various overhang angle (a) θ = 0° (cube), (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 55° and (e) θ = 60°.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 10. Two mechanisms of powder adhesion related to the overhang angle: (a) simulation-predicted, θ = 45°; (b) simulation-predicted, θ = 60°; (c, e) optical micrographs, θ = 45°; (d, f) optical micrographs, θ = 60°. (e) and (f) are partial enlargement of (c) and (d), respectively.
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 11. Simulation-predicted surface morphology in the overhang region at different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45°, (d) θ = 60° and (e) θ = 80° (Blue solid lines: simulation-predicted contour; red dashed lines: the planar profile of designed overhang region specified by the overhang angles).
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 12. Effect of overhang angle on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 13. Surface morphology of L-PBF printed overhang regions with different overhang angle: (a) θ = 15°, (b) θ = 30°, (c) θ = 45° and (d) θ = 60° (overhang border parameters: P = 100 W, v = 1000 mm/s).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).
Figure 14. Effect of (a) laser power (scan speed = 1000 mm/s) and (b) scan speed (lase power = 100 W) on surface roughness Ra in overhang regions (θ = 45°, laser power and scan speed referred to overhang border parameters, and the other process parameters are listed in Table 2).

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Figure 1. Cross-sectional dimensions of a V-groove channel

Modeling Open Surface Microfluidics

개방형 표면 미세 유체 모델링

Open surface microfluidic systems are becoming increasingly popular in the fields of biology, biotechnology, medicine, point-of-care (POC) and home care systems. The design of such systems usually involves fluid being transported by capillary forces. Capillarity can enhance fluid transport for small volumes of fluid and can provide a reliable alternative to micro-scale pumping mechanisms. Advantages of capillary systems include:

  • Low cost due to easy and fast fabrication
  • User friendliness due to the simplicity of their design
  • Increased portability ensured by the capillary actuation of fluids
  • Enhanced accessibility caused by the open-surface nature of their design
  • Complete elimination of air bubbles guaranteed by the uniformly moving fluid front

For these reasons, open capillary systems are the preferred design option for various POC systems.

개방형 표면 미세 유체 시스템은 생물학, 생명 공학, 의학, POC (Point-of-Care) 및 홈 케어 시스템 분야에서 점점 인기를 얻고 있습니다. 이러한 시스템의 설계에는 일반적으로 모세관 힘에 의해 유체가 운반됩니다. 모세관은 소량의 유체에 대한 유체 수송을 향상시킬 수 있으며 마이크로 규모 펌핑 메커니즘에 대한 신뢰할 수있는 대안을 제공 할 수 있습니다. 모세관 시스템의 장점은 다음과 같습니다.

  • 쉽고 빠른 제작으로 인한 저렴한 비용
  • 디자인의 단순성으로 인한 사용자 편의성
  • 유체의 모세관 작동으로 인한 휴대 성 향상
  • 디자인의 개방형 특성으로 인한 접근성 향상
  • 균일하게 움직이는 유체 전면으로 보장되는 기포의 완전한 제거

이러한 이유로 개방형 모세관 시스템은 다양한 POC 시스템에서 선호되는 설계 옵션입니다.

모세관 흐름의 시작 조건

V 홈 치수
그림 1. V 홈 채널의 단면 치수 : W = 150 μm, h1 = 300 μm, h2 = 1200 μm, α = 14.5ο.

University at Buffalo와 University of Grenoble의 연구원들의 최근 논문에서 마이크로 그루브가 잠재적으로 모세관 효과를 향상시킬 수있는 방법을 보여주었습니다 [1]. 이 논문의 결과를 바탕으로, FLOW-3D를 사용하여 평행 한 플레이트로 대체 된 좁은 V- 홈 마이크로 채널 내부 유체의 자발적 모세관 흐름 (SCF)에 대한 사례 연구를 논의 할 것  입니다. 모세관 흐름의 시작에 대한 특정 조건이 충족되면 혈류를 모니터링하기위한 POC 시스템의 설계를 위해 전혈과 같은 점성 유체를 사용해도 큰 유체 속도를 얻을 수 있습니다.

모세관 흐름의 조건은 Gibbs 자유 에너지의 최소화를 기반으로 한 정적 접근 방식을 사용하여 이론적으로 설정할 수 있습니다. 보다 구체적으로, 입구 압력이 0 일 때 모세관 흐름이 시작되는 조건은 다음과 같습니다.

(수식 1)           pF/pW < cos⁡ θ

여기서  θ  는 영 접촉각이고  F  및  W  는 각각 유동의 임의 단면에서 자유 및 습식 둘레입니다. 그림 1에 표시된 것과 같은 반각 α 를 갖는 V- 홈 마이크로 채널의  경우 몇 가지 수학적 조작 후 eq. 1은 다음과 같이 다시 작성할 수 있습니다.

(수식 2)         sin α = cos⁡ θ

우리의 경우  α  ≈ 14.5 ο 가 있으므로 모세관 흐름의 조건은  θ  <75.5 o 입니다.

FLOW-3D 에서 시뮬레이션

정적 접근 방식이 SCF의 시작에 관한 중요한 정보를 제공하지만 수치 접근 방식은 현장 진료 장치에서 유동 역학을 연구하는 데 더 적합합니다. 접촉각이 37 °  이고 전혈의 유체 특성 을 갖는 V- 홈 마이크로 채널에 대해 CFD 분석을 수행했습니다 . 혈액의 점도는 거의 일정하기 때문에 흐름 체제는 뉴턴으로 간주됩니다 [1]. 유체 운동이 모세관 효과에 의해서만 발생하도록 모든 경계와 계산 영역 전체에 균일 한 주변 압력이 적용되었습니다. 시뮬레이션은 처음 4mm의 유체 이동을 포함하는 초기 시뮬레이션과 4mm에서 8mm의 유체 이동을 예측하는 재시작 시뮬레이션의 두 부분으로 나뉩니다.

결과 및 검증

처음 8mm 이동에 대한 유동 역학은 그림 2에 나와 있습니다.이 그림은 세 가지 다른 시간에 슬롯에서 전진 인터페이스의 모양을 보여줍니다. 필라멘트 (Concus-Finn 필라멘트)의 점진적인 확장은 주 흐름보다 앞서 볼 수 있습니다.

모세관 흐름 시뮬레이션
그림 2. 세 가지 다른 시간에서 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 진행하는 모세관 흐름의 동적 계산 : (a) 0.04, (b) 0.07 및 (c) 0.11 초와 삽입물 (i1), (i2) 및 (i3) Concus-Finn 필라멘트의 진화 [1].

분석, 수치 및 실험 결과 간의 비교는 그림 3에 나와 있습니다. 수치 예측과 실험 간에는 탁월한 일치가 있습니다. 분석 솔루션도 플롯되었지만 채널 하단에있는 Concus – Finn 필라멘트의 효과가 고려되지 않았기 때문에 수치 및 실험 결과에 대한 유효한 비교를 나타내지 않을 수 있습니다.

모세관 흐름 검증
그림 3. (A) 시간의 함수로서 채널의 속도. 빨간색 점 : FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 (중간 높이에서); 녹색 점 : 실험 관찰 (채널 중앙 높이); 파선 녹색 선 : 하단 V 홈의 효과를 무시한 분석 속도. (B) 시간의 함수로서 액체 전면의 원점으로부터의 거리. 빨간색 점 : FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 (중간 높이에서); 녹색 점 : 실험 관찰 (채널 중앙 높이); 파선 녹색 선 : 하단 V 홈의 효과를 무시한 분석 속도 [1].

전혈 이외에도 식용 색소로 착색 한 물과 점성이 높은 알기 네이트 용액을 포함하여 장치가 고점도 유체를 이동시킬 수있는 가능성을 테스트하는 등 다양한 유체를 연구했습니다. 혈액과 같은 고점도 액체는 1 초 이내에 이동할 수 있습니다 (아래 애니메이션 참조).https://www.youtube.com/embed/v4OYoHStJ1w?controls=1&rel=0&playsinline=0&modestbranding=0&autoplay=0&enablejsapi=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.flow3d.com&widgetid=1

사례 연구는 상대적으로 큰 점도 (물의 4 배)를 갖는 전혈의 경우 최대 7.5cm / s의 속도를 달성했음을 보여줍니다. 실험 결과 및  FLOW-3D  예측에 따라 전체 채널은 0.2 초 이내에 혈액으로 채워졌습니다. FLOW-3D  시뮬레이션 결과는 실험 관찰 결과와 매우 일치하며, V-groove 내부의 거리에 따라 속도가 감소하지만 장치의 전체 길이에 걸쳐 중요 함을 나타냅니다.

참고 문헌

  1. Berthier, J., K. Brakke, E. P. Furlani, I. H. Karampelas, and G. Delapierre. “Open-surface microfluidics.” In Proceedings of the Nanotech International Conference, pp. 15-19. 2014.
  2. Hirt, Cyril W., and Billy D. Nichols. “Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries.” Journal of computational physics 39, no. 1 (1981): 201-225.
  3. Rajaratnam, N., and M. R. Chamani. “Energy loss at drops.” Journal of Hydraulic Research 33, no. 3 (1995): 373-384.
Fig. 1. Schematic description of the laser welding process considered in this study.

Analysis of molten pool dynamics in laser welding with beam oscillation and filler wire feeding

Won-Ik Cho, Peer Woizeschke
Bremer Institut für angewandte Strahltechnik GmbH, Klagenfurter Straße 5, Bremen 28359, Germany

Received 30 July 2020, Revised 3 October 2020, Accepted 18 October 2020, Available online 1 November 2020.

Abstract

Molten pool flow and heat transfer in a laser welding process using beam oscillation and filler wire feeding were calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). There are various indirect methods used to analyze the molten pool dynamics in fusion welding. In this work, based on the simulation results, the surface fluctuation was directly measured to enable a more intuitive analysis, and then the signal was analyzed using the Fourier transform and wavelet transform in terms of the beam oscillation frequency and buttonhole formation. The 1st frequency (2 x beam oscillation frequency, the so-called chopping frequency), 2nd frequency (4 x beam oscillation frequency), and beam oscillation frequency components were the main components found. The 1st and 2nd frequency components were caused by the effect of the chopping process and lumped line energy. The beam oscillation frequency component was related to rapid, unstable molten pool behavior. The wavelet transform effectively analyzed the rapid behaviors based on the change of the frequency components over time.

Korea Abstract

빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 사용하는 레이저 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 흐름 및 열 전달은 CFD (전산 유체 역학)를 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 용융 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 데 사용되는 다양한 간접 방법이 있습니다.

본 연구에서는 시뮬레이션 결과를 바탕으로 보다 직관적 인 분석이 가능하도록 표면 변동을 직접 측정 한 후 빔 발진 주파수 및 버튼 홀 형성 측면에서 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환을 사용하여 신호를 분석했습니다.

1 차 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수), 2 차 주파수 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수) 및 빔 발진 주파수 성분이 발견 된 주요 구성 요소였습니다. 1 차 및 2 차 주파수 성분은 쵸핑 공정과 집중 라인 에너지의 영향으로 인해 발생했습니다.

빔 진동 주파수 성분은 빠르고 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 웨이블릿 변환은 시간 경과에 따른 주파수 구성 요소의 변화를 기반으로 빠른 동작을 효과적으로 분석했습니다.

1 . 소개

융합 용접에서 용융 풀 역학은 용접 결함과 시각적 이음새 품질에 직접적인 영향을 미칩니다. 이러한 역학을 연구하기 위해 고속 카메라를 사용하는 직접 방법과 광학 또는 음향 신호를 사용하는 간접 방법과 같은 다양한 측정 방법을 사용하여 여러 실험 방법을 고려했습니다. 시간 도메인의 원래 신호는 특별히 주파수 도메인에서 변환 된 신호로 변환되어 용융 풀 동작에 영향을 미치는 주파수 성분을 분석합니다. Kotecki et al. (1972)는 고속 카메라를 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀을 관찰했습니다. [1]. 그들은 120Hz 리플 DC 출력을 가진 용접 전원을 사용할 때 용융 풀 진동 주파수가 120Hz임을 보여주었습니다. 전원을 끈 후 진동 주파수는 용융 풀의 고유 주파수를 나타내는 용융 풀 크기와 관련이 있습니다. 진동은 응고 중에 용접 표면 스케일링을 생성했습니다. Zacksenhouse and Hardt (1983)는 레이저 섀도 잉 동작 측정 기술을 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 완전히 관통 된 용융 풀의 동작을 측정했습니다 [2] . 그들은 2.5mm 두께의 강판에서 6mm 풀 반경 (고정 용접)에 대해 용융 풀의 고유 주파수가 18.9Hz라는 것을 발견했습니다. Semak et al. (1995) 고속 카메라를 사용하여 레이저 스폿 용접에서 용융 풀 및 키홀 역학 조사 [3]. 그들은 깊이가 약 3mm이고 반경이 약 3mm 인 용융 풀에서 200Hz의 낮은 체적 진동 주파수를 관찰했습니다. 0.45mm Aendenroomer와 den Ouden (1998)은 강철의 펄스 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동을보고했습니다 [4] . 그들은 침투 깊이에 따라 진동 모드 변화를 보였고 주파수는 50Hz에서 150Hz 사이에서 변화했습니다. 주파수는 완전히 침투 된 용융 풀에서 더 낮았습니다. Hermans와 den Ouden (1999)은 단락 가스 금속 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동을 분석했습니다. [5]. 그들은 용융 풀의 단락 주파수와 고유 주파수가 같을 때 부분적으로 침투 된 용융 풀의 경우 공정 안정성이 향상되었음을 보여주었습니다. Yudodibroto et al. (2004)는 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동에 대한 필러 와이어의 영향을 조사했습니다 [6] . 그들은 금속 전달이 특히 부분적으로 침투 된 용융 풀에서 진동 거동을 방해한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Geiger et al. (2009) 레이저 키홀 용접에서 발광 분석 [7]. 신호의 주파수 분석을 사용하여 용융 풀 (1.5kHz 미만)과 키홀 (약 3kHz)에 해당하는 진동 주파수 범위를 찾았습니다. Kägeler와 Schmidt (2010)는 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 크기의 변화를 관찰하기 위해 고속 카메라를 사용했습니다 [8] . 그들은 용융 풀에서 지배적 인 저주파 진동 성분 (100Hz 미만)을 발견했습니다. Shi et al. (2015) 고속 카메라를 사용하여 펄스 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접에서 용융 풀 진동 주파수 분석 [9]. 그들은 용접 침투 깊이가 작을수록 용융 풀의 진동 빈도가 더 높다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 추출 된 진동 주파수는 완전 용입 용접의 경우 85Hz 미만 이었지만 부분 용입 용접의 경우 110Hz에서 125Hz 사이였습니다. Volpp와 Vollertsen (2016)은 레이저 키홀 역학을 분석하기 위해 광학 신호를 사용했습니다 [10] . 그들은 공간 레이저 강도 분포로 인해 0.8에서 154 kHz 사이의 고주파 범위에서 피크를 발견했습니다. 위에서 언급 한 실험적 접근법은 공정 조건, 측정 방법 및 측정 된 위치에 따라 수십 Hz에서 수십 kHz까지 광범위한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 결과를 보여 주었다는 점에 유의해야합니다.

융합 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 연구하기 위해 분석 접근 방식도 사용되었습니다. Zacksenhouse와 Hardt (1983)는 2.5mm 두께의 강판에서 대칭형 완전 관통 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 [2] . 매스 스프링 해석 모델을 사용하여 용융 풀 반경 6mm (고정 용접)에 대해 20.4Hz (실험에서 18.9Hz)의 고유 진동수와 3mm 풀 반경 (연속 용접)에 대해 40Hz의 고유 진동수를 예측했습니다. ). Postacioglu et al. (1989)는 원통형 용융 풀과 키홀을 가정하여 레이저 용접의 용융 풀에서 키홀 진동의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 .. 특정 열쇠 구멍 모양의 경우 약 900Hz의 기본 주파수가 계산되었습니다. Postacioglu et al. (1991)은 또한 레이저 용접에서 용접 속도를 고려하기 위해 타원형 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다 [12] . 그들은 타원형 용융 풀의 모양이 고유 진동수에 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 고유 진동수는 축의 길이 비율이 낮았으며, 즉 타원의 반장 축과 반 단축의 비율이 낮았습니다. Kroos et al. (1993)은 축 대칭 용융 풀과 키홀을 가정하여 레이저 키홀 용접의 동적 거동에 대한 이론적 모델을 개발했습니다 .. 키홀 폐쇄 시간은 0.1ms였으며 안정성 분석은 약 500Hz의 주파수에서 공진과 같은 진동을 예측했습니다. Maruo와 Hirata (1993)는 완전 관통 아크 용접에서 용융 풀을 모델링했습니다 [14] . 그들은 녹은 웅덩이가 정적 타원 모양을 가지고 있다고 가정했습니다. 그들은 고유 진동수와 진동 모드 사이의 관계를 조사하고 용융 풀 크기가 감소함에 따라 고유 진동수가 증가한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Klein et al. (1994)는 원통형 키홀 모양을 사용하여 완전 침투 레이저 용접에서 키홀 진동을 연구했습니다 [15] . 그들은 점성 감쇠로 인해 키홀 진동이 낮은 kHz 범위로 제한된다는 것을 보여주었습니다. Klein et al. (1996)은 또한 레이저 출력의 작은 변동이 강한 키홀 진동으로 이어질 수 있음을 보여주었습니다[16] . 그들은 키홀 진동의 주요 공진 주파수 범위가 500 ~ 3500Hz라는 것을 발견했습니다. Andersen et al. (1997)은 고정 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접 [17] 에서 고정 된 원통형 모양을 가정하여 용융 풀의 고유 진동수를 예측 했으며 완전 용입 용접에서 용융 풀 폭이 증가함에 따라 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 3.175mm 두께의 강판의 경우 주파수는 20Hz ~ 100Hz 범위였습니다. 위에 표시된 분석 방법은 일반적으로 단순한 용융 풀 모양을 가정하고 고유 진동수를 계산했습니다. 이것은 단순한 용융 풀 모양으로 고정 용접 공정을 분석하는 데 충분하지만 대부분의 용접 사례를 설명하는 과도 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 역학 분석에는 적합하지 않습니다.

반면에 수치 접근 방식은 고온 및 강한 빛과 같은 실험적 제한없이 자세한 정보를 제공하기 때문에 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 이점이 있습니다. 전산 유체 역학 (CFD)의 수치 시뮬레이션 기술이 발전함에 따라 용융 풀 역학 분석에 대한 많은 연구가 수행되었습니다. 실제 용융 표면 변화는 VOF (체적 부피) 방법을 사용하여 계산할 수 있습니다. Cho et al. (2010) CO 2 레이저-아크 하이브리드 용접 공정을 위한 수학적 모델 개발 [18], 구형 방울이 생성 된 금속 와이어의 용융 과정이 와이어 공급 속도와 일치한다고 가정합니다. 그들은 필러 와이어가 희석되는 용융 풀 동작을 보여주었습니다. Cho et al. (2012)는 높은 빔 품질과 높은 금속 흡수율로 인해 업계에서 널리 사용되는 디스크 레이저 키홀 용접으로 수학적 모델을 확장했습니다 [19] . 그들은 열쇠 구멍에서 레이저 광선 번들의 다중 반사를 고려하고 용융 풀에서 keyholing과 같은 빠른 표면 변화를 자세히보고했습니다. 최근 CFD 시뮬레이션은 험핑 (Otto et al., 2016 [20] ) 및 기공 (Lin et al., 2017 [21] )과 같은보다 구체적인 현상을 분석하는데도 사용되었습니다 .) 레이저 용접에서. 그러나 용융 풀 역학과 관련된 연구는 거의 수행되지 않았습니다. Ko et al. (2000)은 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 가스 텅스텐 아크 용접 풀의 동적 거동을 조사했습니다 [22] . 그들은 완전히 침투 된 용융 풀이 부분적으로 침투 된 풀보다 낮은 주파수에서 진동한다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 진동은 수십 분의 1 초 내에 무시할 수있는 크기로 감쇠되었습니다. Geiger et al. (2009)는 또한 수치 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 거동을 보여주었습니다 [7]. 그들은 계산 된 증발 속도를 주파수 분석에 사용하여 공정에서 나오는 빛의 실험 결과와 비교했습니다. 판금 레이저 용접에서 중요한 공간 빔 진동 및 추가 필러 재료가있는 공정에 대한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 연구도 불충분합니다. Hu et al. (2018)은 금속 전달 메커니즘을 밝히기 위해 전자빔 3D 프린팅에서 와이어 공급 모델링을 수행했습니다. 그들은 주로 열 입력에 의해 결정되는 액체 브리지 전이, 액적 전이 및 중간 전이의 세 가지 유형의 금속 전달 모드를 보여주었습니다 .. Meng et al. (2020)은 레이저 빔 용접에서 용융 풀에 필러 와이어에 의해 추가 된 추가 요소의 전자기 교반 효과를 모델링했습니다. 용가재의 연속적인 액체 브릿지 이동이 가정되었고, 그 결과 전자기 교반의 영향이 키홀 깊이에 미미한 반면 필러 와이어 혼합을 향상 시켰습니다 [24] . Cho et al. (2017) 용접 방향에 수직 인 1 차원 빔 진동과 용접 라인을 따라 공급되는 필러 와이어를 사용하여 레이저 용접을위한 시뮬레이션 모델 개발 [25]. 그들은 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 특정 용접 현상, 즉 용융 풀의 단추 구멍 형성을 보여주었습니다. Cho et al. (2018)은 다중 반사 수와 전력 흡수량의 푸리에 변환을 사용하여 주파수 영역에서 소위 쵸핑 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수) 성분을 발견했습니다 [26] . 그러나 그들은 용융 풀 역학을 분석하기 위해 간접 신호를 사용했습니다. 따라서보다 직관적 인 분석을 위해서는 표면의 변동을 직접 측정해야합니다.

이 연구는 이전 연구에서 개발 된 레이저 용접 모델을 사용하여 3 차원 과도 CFD 시뮬레이션을 수행하여 빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 포함한 레이저 용접 공정에서 용융 풀 역학을 조사합니다. 용융 된 풀 표면의 시간적 변화는 시뮬레이션 결과에서 추출되었습니다. 추출 된 데이터는 주파수 영역뿐만 아니라 시간-주파수 영역에서도 분석되었습니다. 신호 처리를 통해 도출 된 결과는 특징적인 용융 풀 역학을 나타내며 빔 진동 주파수 및 단추 구멍 형성 측면에서 레이저 용접의 역학을 줄일 수있는 잠재력을 제공합니다.

2 . 방법론

그림 1도 1은 용접 방향에 수직 인 1 차원 빔 진동과 용접 라인을 따라 공급되는 필러 와이어를 사용하는 레이저 용접 프로세스의 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 1mm 두께의 알루미늄 합금 (AlSi1MgMn) 시트는 시트 표면에 초점을 맞춘 멀티 kW 파이버 레이저 (YLR-8000S, IPG Photonics, USA)를 사용하여 용접되었습니다. 시트는 에어 갭이있는 맞대기 이음으로 정렬되었습니다. 1 차원 스캐너 (ILV DC-Scanner, Ingenieurbüro für Lasertechnik + Verschleiss-Schutz (ILV), 독일)를 사용하여 레이저 빔의 1 차원 정현파 진동을 실현했습니다. 이 스캔 시스템에서 최대 진동 폭은 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 1.4mm입니다. 오정렬에 대한 공차를 개선하기 위해 동일한 최대 너비 값이 사용되었습니다. 와이어 공급 시스템은 1을 공급했습니다. 2mm 직경의 알루미늄 합금 (AlSi5) 필러 와이어를 일정한 공급 속도로 에어 갭을 채 웁니다. 1mm 에어 갭의 경우 와이어 이송 속도는 용접 속도의 1.5 배 값으로 설정되었으며 참조 실험 조건은 문헌에서 얻었습니다 (Schultz, 2015 참조).[27] ).

그림 1

CFD 시뮬레이션은 레이저 용접에서 열 전달 및 용융 풀 동작을 계산하기 위해 수행되었습니다. 그림 2 는 CFD 시뮬레이션을위한 계산 영역을 보여줍니다. 실온에서 1.2mm 직경의 필러 와이어가 공급되고 레이저 빔이 진동했습니다. 1mm 두께의 공작물이 용접 속도로 왼쪽에서 오른쪽으로 이동했습니다. 0.1mm의 최소 메쉬 크기가 도메인에서 생성되었습니다. 침투 깊이가 더 깊은 이전 연구의 메쉬 테스트 결과는 0.2mm 이하의 메쉬 크기로 시뮬레이션 정확도가 확보 된 것으로 나타 났으므로 [28] 본 연구에서 사용 된 메쉬 크기가 적절할 수 있습니다. 도메인을 구성하는 세포의 수는 약 120 만 개였습니다. 1 번 테이블사용 된 레이저 용접 매개 변수를 보여줍니다. 용융 풀 역학 측면에서 다양한 진동 주파수와 에어 갭 크기가 고려되었으며 12 개의 용접 사례가 표 2 에 나와 있습니다. 표 3 은 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 알루미늄 합금과 순수 알루미늄 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] )의 표면 장력 계수를 제외하고 온도와 무관 한 열-물리적 재료 특성을 보여줍니다 . 여기서 표면 장력 계수는 액체 온도에서 온도와 표면 장력 계수 사이의 선형 관계를 가진 유일한 온도 의존적 ​​특성이었습니다.

그림 2

표 1 . . 레이저 용접 매개 변수.

레이저 용접 매개 변수
레이저 빔 파워3.0kW
빔 허리 반경50µm *
용접 속도6.0m / 분
와이어 공급 속도9.0m / 분
빔 진동 폭1.4mm
빔 진동 주파수100Hz, 150Hz, 200Hz, 250Hz
에어 갭 크기0.8mm, 0.9mm, 1.0mm, 1.1mm

반경은 1.07μm의 파장, 4.2mm • mrad의 빔 품질, 시준 초점 거리 및 초점 렌즈 200mm, 광섬유 직경 100μm의 원형 빔을 가정하여 계산되었습니다.

표 2 . 이 연구에서 고려한 용접 사례.

에어 갭 크기 [mm]진동 주파수 [Hz]
100150200250
0.9사례 1엑스엑스엑스
1.0사례 2사례 4사례 7사례 10
1.1사례 3사례 5사례 8사례 11
1.2엑스사례 6사례 912면

표 3 . 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 열 물리적 재료 특성 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] ).

특성상징
밀도ρ2700kg / m3
열 전도성케이1.7×102Wm K
점도ν1.15×10−삼kg / ms
표면 장력 계수 티엘*γ엘0.871 J / m2
표면 장력 온도 구배 *−1.55×10−4J / m 2 K
표면 장력 계수γγ엘−ㅏ(티−티엘)
비열8.5×102J / kg K
융합 잠열h에스엘3.36×105J / kg
기화 잠열 *hV1.05×107J / kg
Solidus 온도티에스847K
Liquidus 온도티엘905K
끓는점 *티비2743K

순수한 알루미늄.

시뮬레이션을 위해 단상 뉴턴 유체와 비압축성 층류가 가정되었습니다. 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존의 지배 방정식을 해결하여 계산 영역에서 속도, 압력 및 온도 분포를 얻었습니다. VOF 방법은 자유 표면 경계를 찾는 데 사용되었습니다. 스칼라 보존 방정식을 추가로 도입하여 용융 풀에서 충전재의 부피 분율을 계산했습니다. 시뮬레이션에 사용 된 레이저 용접의 수학적 모델은 다음과 같습니다. 레이저 빔은 가우스와 같은 전력 밀도 분포를 기반으로 697 개의 광선 에너지 번들로 나뉩니다. 광선 추적 방법을 사용하여 다중 반사를 고려했습니다. 재료에 대한 레이저 빔의 반사 (또는 흡수) 에너지는 프레 넬 반사 모델을 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 온도에 따른 흡수율의 변화를 고려 하였다. 혼합물의 흡수율은베이스 및 충전제 물질 분획의 가중 평균을 사용하여 계산되었습니다. 반동 압력과 부력도 고려되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다. 경계 조건으로 에너지와 압력의 균형은 VOF 방법으로 계산 된 자유 표면에서 고려되었습니다. 레이저 용접 모델과 지배 방정식은 FLOW-3D v.11.2 (2017), Flow Science, Inc.에서 유한 차분 방법과 유한 체적 방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 해결되었습니다.[29] . 계산에는 48GB RAM이 장착 된 Intel® Xeon® 프로세서 E5649로 구성된 워크 스테이션이 사용되었습니다. 계산 시스템을 사용하여 0.2 초 레이저 용접을 시뮬레이션하는 데 약 18 시간이 걸렸습니다. 지배 방정식 (Cho and Woizeschke, 2020 [30] ) 및 레이저 용접 모델 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] )에 대한 자세한 설명은 부록 A 에서 확인할 수 있습니다 .

그림 3 은 용융 풀 변동의 직접 측정에 대한 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 용융 풀의 역학을 분석하기 위해 시뮬레이션 중에 용융 풀 표면의 시간적 변동 운동을 측정했습니다. 상단 및 하단 표면 모두에서 10kHz의 샘플링 주파수로 변동을 측정 한 반면, 측정 위치는 X 축의 레이저 빔 위치에서 2mm 떨어진 용접 중심선에있었습니다. 그림 4시간 신호를 분석하는 데 사용되는 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 개략적 설명을 보여줍니다. 측정 된 시간 신호는 고속 푸리에 변환 (FFT) 방법을 사용하여 주파수 영역으로 변환되었습니다. 결과는 측정 기간 동안 평균화 된 주파수 성분의 크기를 보여줍니다. 웨이블릿 변환 방법은 시간-주파수 영역에서 국부적 인 특성을 찾는 데 사용되었습니다. 결과는 주파수 구성 요소의 크기뿐만 아니라 시간 변화도 보여줍니다.

그림 3
그림 4

3 . 결과

이 연구 에서는 표 2에 표시된 12 가지 용접 사례 를 시뮬레이션했습니다. 그림 5 는 3 차원 시뮬레이션 결과를 평면도 와 바닥면으로 보여줍니다. 결과는 용융 된 풀의 거동에 따라 분류 할 수 있습니다 : 단추 구멍 형성 없음 (녹색), 안정 또는 불안정 단추 구멍 있음 (파란색), 불안정한 단추 구멍으로 인한 구멍 결함 (빨간색). 일반적인 열쇠 구멍보다 훨씬 큰 직경을 가진 단추 구멍은 레이저 용접의 특정 진동 조건에서 나타날 수 있습니다 (Vollertsen, 2016 [31]). 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 용접 이음 부 코스 및 스케일링 측면에서 시각적 이음새 품질이 향상되었습니다. 고주파에서 스케일링은 무시할 수있을 정도 였고 코스는 균질했습니다. 언더컷 결함의 발생도 감소했습니다. 그러나 관통 결함 부족 (case 7, case 10)이 나타났다. 에어 갭은 단추 구멍 형성에 중요했습니다. 에어 갭 크기가 증가함에 따라 단추 구멍이 더 쉽게 형성되었지만 구멍 결함으로 더 쉽게 남아 있습니다. 안정적인 단추 구멍 형성은 고려 된 공극 조건의 좁은 영역에서만 나타납니다.

그림 5

그림 6 은 시뮬레이션과 실험에서 융합 영역의 모양을 보여줍니다. 버튼 홀이없는 경우 1, 불안정한 버튼 홀 형성이있는 경우 8, 안정적인 버튼 홀 형성이있는 경우 11의 3 가지 경우에 대해 시뮬레이션 결과와 실험 결과를 비교하여 유사성을 나타냈다. 본 연구에서 고려한 용접 조건의 경우 표면 품질 결과는 Fig. 5 와 같이 큰 차이를 보였으 나 단면 융착 영역 [26] 과 형상은 큰 차이를 보이지 않았다.

그림 6

무화과. 7 과 8 은 각각 100Hz와 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 시뮬레이션 결과를 기반으로 분석 된 용융 풀 역학과 시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과를 보여줍니다. 이전 연구에서 볼 수 있듯이 레이저 빔의 진동 주파수는 단추 구멍 형성과 밀접한 관련이 있습니다 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] 참조 ). 그림 7 (a) 및 (b)는 각각 시뮬레이션 및 실험을 기반으로 한 진동 주파수 100Hz에서 대표적인 용융 풀 동작을 보여줍니다. 완전히 관통 된 키홀 및 버튼 홀 형성은 관찰되지 않았으며 응고 후 거친 비드 표면이 남았습니다. 그림 7(c)와 (d)는 각각 윗면과 바닥면의 표면 변동에 대한 시뮬레이션 결과를 기반으로 한 용융 풀 역학 분석을 보여줍니다. 샘플링 데이터는 상단 표면이 공작물의 상단 표면 위치에서 평균적으로 변동하는 반면 하단 표면은 공작물의 하단 표면 위치에서 평균적으로 변동하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 표면 변동의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환 결과는 명확한 1  주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수, Cho et al., 2018 [26] 참조 ) 및 2  주파수 (4 x 빔 발진)를 보여줍니다. 주파수) 두 표면의 구성 요소, 그러나 바닥 표면과 첫 번째에 대한 결과주파수 성분이 더 강합니다. 반면 그림 8 (a)와 (b)에서 보는 바와 같이 250Hz의 진동 주파수에서 시뮬레이션과 실험 결과는 안정된 버튼 홀 형성과 응고 후 매끄러운 비드 표면을 나타냈다. 그림 8 의 샘플링 신호의 진폭은 그림 7 의 진폭 보다 작으며 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과에서 중요한 주파수 성분이 발견되지 않았습니다.

Fi 7
그림 8

Fig. 9 는 진동 주파수 200Hz에서 시뮬레이션 결과를 바탕으로 분석 된 용융 풀 역학과 시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과를 보여준다. 이 주파수에서 Fig. 9 (a)와 (b) 에서 보는 바와 같이 , 시뮬레이션과 실험 모두에서 불안정한 buttonhole 거동이 관찰되었다. 바닥면에서 샘플링 데이터의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과 빔 발진 주파수 성분이 발견되었습니다.

그림 9

4 . 토론

시뮬레이션 및 실험 결과는 비드 표면 품질이 향상되고 빔 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 버튼 홀이 형성되는 것으로 나타났습니다. 표면의 변동 데이터에 대한 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환의 결과에 따라 다음과 같은 주요 주파수 구성 요소가 발견되었습니다. 1  및 2 버튼 홀 형성이없는 주파수, 불안정한 용융 풀 거동이있는 빔 진동 주파수, 안정적인 버튼 홀 형성이있는 중요한 주파수 성분이 없습니다. 이들 중 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련된 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 완전히 관통 된 키홀과 반복적으로 생성 및 붕괴되는 불안정한 버튼 홀의 특성으로 인해 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 명확한 실선 형태로 나타나지 않았습니다. 분석 결과는 윗면보다 바닥면에서 더 분명했습니다. 이는 필러 와이어 공급 및 키홀 링 공정에서 강한 하향 흐름으로 인해 용융 풀 역학이 바닥 표면 영역에서 더 강했기 때문입니다. 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 용융 풀 역학과 상단 표면과 하단 표면 간의 차이가 감소했습니다.

첫 번째 주파수 (2 x 빔 진동 주파수)는이 연구에서 관찰 된 가장 분명한 구성 요소였습니다. Schultz et al. (2018)은 또한 실험을 통해 동일한 성분을 발견했습니다 [32] , 용융 풀 표면 운동에 대한 푸리에 분석을 수행했습니다. 첫 번째 주파수 성분은 빔 발진주기 당 두 개의 주요 이벤트가 있음을 의미합니다. 이것은 레이저 빔이 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 와이어를 절단하거나 절단하는 프로세스와 일치합니다. 용융 된 와이어 팁은 낮은 진동 주파수에서 고르지 않고 날카로운 모서리를 갖는 것으로 나타났습니다 (Cho et al., 2018 [26] ). 이것은 첫 번째 원인이 될 수 있습니다.용융 된 풀에서 지배적이되는 주파수 성분. 진동 주파수가 증가하면 용융 된 와이어 팁이 더 균일 해 지므로 효과가 감소합니다. 용접 방향으로의 정현파 횡 방향 빔 진동을 통한 에너지 집중도 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 발생합니다. 그림 10 은 발진 주파수에 따른 레이저 빔의 라인 에너지 (단위 길이 당 에너지)의 변화를 보여줍니다. 그림 10 b) 의 라인 에너지 는 레이저 출력을 공정 속도로 나누어 계산했습니다. 여기서 처리 속도는(w이자형엘디나는엔지에스피이자형이자형디)2+(디(에스나는엔유에스영형나는디ㅏ엘wㅏV이자형나는엔에프나는지.10ㅏ))디티)2. 낮은 발진 주파수에서 라인 에너지는 발진 폭의 양쪽 끝에 과도하게 집중됩니다. 이러한 집중된 에너지는 과도한 키홀 링 프로세스를 초래하므로 언더컷 결함이 나타날 수있는 높은 흐름 역학이 발생합니다. 진동 주파수가 증가함에 따라 집중 에너지는 더 작은 조각으로 나뉩니다. 따라서 높은 진동 주파수에서 과도한 키홀 링 및 수반되는 언더컷 결함의 발생이 감소되었습니다. 위에서 언급 한 두 가지 현상 (불균일 한 와이어 팁과 집중된 라인 에너지)은 빔 발진주기 당 두 번 발생하며 발진 주파수가 증가하면 그 효과가 감소합니다. 따라서 저주파 에서 2  주파수 성분 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수)이 나타나는 것은이 두 현상의 동시 작용입니다.

그림 10

두 가지 현상 중 첫 번째 주파수 에 대한 주된 효과 는 집중된 라인 에너지입니다. Cho et al. (2018)은 전력 흡수 데이터를 푸리에 변환을 사용하여 분석했을 때 1  주파수 성분이 더 우세 해졌고, 2  주파수 성분은 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 상대적으로 약화 되었음을 보여주었습니다 [26] . 용융 된 와이어 팁은 또한 빈도가 증가함에 따라 더욱 균일 해졌습니다. 결과는 진동 주파수의 증가가 용융 풀에 대한 와이어의 영향을 제거하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 따라서 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 라인 에너지 집중의 영향 만 남을 수 있습니다. 그림 10 과 같이, 집중 선 에너지가 작은 조각으로 분할되기 때문에 효과도 감소하지만 최대 값이 변경되지 않았기 때문에 여전히 효과적입니다.

빔 진동 주파수 성분은 불안정한 단추 구멍 및 열쇠 구멍 붕괴를 수반하는 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 언더컷 결함이있는 케이스 8 (발진 주파수 200Hz)에서 발진 주파수 성분이 관찰되었습니다. 이것은 특히 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍과 불안정한 단추 구멍에서 불안정한 용융 풀 동작을 보여주었습니다. 경우 10 (진동 주파수 250Hz)의 경우 상대적으로 건강한 비드가 형성 되었으나, 도 11 (a) 와 같이 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 t1의 시간 간격으로 진동 주파수 성분이 관찰되었다 . 이 시간 간격 t1의 용융 풀 거동은 그림 11에 나와 있습니다.(비). 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍이 즉시 무너지는 것이 분명하게 관찰되었습니다. 이것은 진동 주파수 성분이 불안정한 용융 풀 거동과 밀접한 관련이 있음을 보여줍니다. 발견 된 주파수 성분으로부터 완전히 관통 된 열쇠 구멍과 같은 불안정한 용융 풀 거동을 예측할 수 있습니다. 완전히 관통 된 키홀이 반복적으로 붕괴되기 때문에 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 그림 9 (d) 와 같이 웨이블릿 변환 결과에서 명확한 실선 형태로 보이지 않습니다 .

그림 11

Cho and Woizeschke (2020)에 따르면 단추 구멍 형성은 자체 지속 가능한 카테 노이드처럼 작용하기 때문에 용융 풀 역학을 감소시킬 수 있습니다 [30] . 그림 12 는 버튼 홀 형성 측면에서 t2의 시간 간격에서 용융 풀 거동의 변화를 보여줍니다. 단추 구멍은 t2의 간헐적 인 부분에만 형성되었습니다. 1st 이후이 시간 동안 웨이블릿 변환의 결과로 주파수 성분이 사라졌고, 버튼 홀 형성은 용융 풀 역학을 줄이는 데 효과적이었습니다. 따라서, 웨이블릿 변환의 결과로 주파수 성분이 지워지는 것을 관찰함으로써 버튼 홀 형성을 예측할 수있다. 이와 관련하여 웨이블릿 변환 기술은 시간에 따른 용융 풀 변화를 나타낼 수 있습니다. 이 기술은 향후 용융 풀 동작을 모니터링하는 데 사용될 수 있습니다.

그림 12

5 . 결론

CFD 시뮬레이션 결과를 사용하여 빔 진동 및 필러 와이어 공급을 통한 레이저 용접에서 용융 풀 역학을 분석 할 수있었습니다. 용융 풀 표면의 변동 데이터의 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환은 여기서 용융 풀 역학을 분석하는 데 사용되었습니다. 결과는 다음과 같은 결론으로 ​​이어집니다.1.

 주파수 (2 x 빔 발진 주파수, 이른바 초핑 주파수), 2  주파수 (4 x 빔 발진 주파수) 및 빔 발진 주파수 성분은 푸리에 변환 및 웨이블릿 변환 분석에서 발견 된 주요 성분이었습니다.2.

 주파수와 2  주파수 성분 의 출현은 두 가지 사건, 즉 레이저 빔에 의한 필러 와이어의 절단 공정과 집중된 레이저 라인 에너지의 효과의 결과였습니다. 이는 빔 진동주기 당 두 번 발생했습니다. 따라서 두 번째 주파수 성분은 동시 작용으로 인해 발생했습니다. 빔 진동 주파수 성분은 불안정한 용융 풀 동작과 관련이 있습니다. 구성 요소는 열쇠 구멍과 단추 구멍의 붕괴와 함께 나타났습니다.삼.

낮은 발진 주파수에서는 1  주파수와 2  주파수 성분이 함께 나타 났지만 발진 주파수가 증가함에 따라 그 크기가 함께 감소했습니다. 집중 선 에너지는 주파수가 증가함에 따라 최대 값이 변하지 않는 반면, 잘게 잘린 선단이 평평 해져 그 효과가 사라졌기 때문에 쵸핑 프로세스보다 더 큰 영향을 미쳤습니다.4.

용융 풀 거동의 빠른 시간적 변화는 웨이블릿 변환 방법을 사용하여 분석되었습니다. 따라서이 방법은 열쇠 구멍 및 단추 구멍의 형성 및 붕괴와 같은 일시적인 용융 풀 변화를 해석하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다.

CRediT 저자 기여 성명

조원익 : 개념화, 방법론, 소프트웨어, 검증, 형식 분석, 조사, 데이터 큐 레이션, 글쓰기-원고, 글쓰기-검토 및 편집. Peer Woizeschke : 감독, 프로젝트 관리, 작문-검토 및 편집.

경쟁 관심의 선언

저자는이 논문에보고 된 작업에 영향을 미칠 수있는 경쟁적인 재정적 이해 관계 나 개인적 관계가 없다고 선언합니다.

감사의 말

이 작업은 알루미늄 합금 용접 역량 센터 (Centr-Al)에서 수행되었습니다. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, 프로젝트 번호 290705638 , “용접 풀 캐비티를 생성하여 레이저 깊은 용입 용접에서 매끄러운 이음매 표면”) 의 자금은 감사하게도 인정됩니다.

부록 A . 사용 된 지배 방정식 및 레이저 용접 모델

1 . 지배 방정식 (Cho 및 Woizeschke [ 30 ])

-대량 보존 방정식,(A1)∇·V→=미디엄˙에스ρ어디, V→속도 벡터입니다. ρ밀도이고 미디엄˙에스필러 와이어를 공급하여 질량 소스의 비율입니다. 단위미디엄에스단위 부피당 질량입니다. WFS (와이어 공급 속도) 및 필러 와이어의 직경과 같은 매스 소스 및 필러 와이어 조건,디w계산 영역에서 다음과 같은 관계가 있습니다.(A2)미디엄=∫미디엄에스디V=미디엄0+씨×ρ×W에프에스×π디w24×티어디, 미디엄총 질량, 미디엄0초기 총 질량, V볼륨입니다.씨단위 변환 계수입니다. 티시간입니다.

-운동량 보존 방정식,(A3)∂V→∂티+V→·∇V→=−1ρ∇피+ν∇2V→−케이V→+미디엄˙에스ρ(V에스→−V→)+지어디, 피압력입니다. ν동적 점도입니다. 케이뭉툭한 영역의 다공성 매체 모델에 대한 항력 계수, V에스→질량 소스에 대한 속도 벡터입니다. 지신체 힘으로 인한 신체 가속도입니다.

-에너지 절약 방정식,(A4)∂h∂티+V→·∇h=1ρ∇·(케이∇티)+h˙에스어디, h특정 엔탈피입니다. 케이열전도율, 티온도이고 h˙에스특정 엔탈피 소스로, Eq 의 질량 소스와 연관됩니다 (A1) . 계산 영역의 총 에너지,이자형다음과 같이 계산됩니다.(A5)이자형=∫미디엄에스h에스디V=∫미디엄에스씨Vw티w디V어디, 씨Vw질량 원의 비열, 티w질량 소스의 온도입니다.

또한, 엔탈피 기반 연속체 모델을 사용하여 고체-액체 상 전이를 고려했습니다.

-VOF 방정식,(A6)∂에프∂티+∇·(V→에프)=에프˙에스어디, 에프유체가 차지하는 부피 분율이며 0과 1 사이의 값을 가지며 에프˙에스질량의 소스와 연결된 유체의 체적 분율의 비율 식. (A1) . 질량 공급원에 해당하는 부피 분율은 다음에 할당됩니다.에프에스.

-스칼라 보존 방정식,(A7)∂Φ∂티+∇·(V→Φ)=Φ˙에스어디, Φ필러 와이어의 스칼라 값입니다. 셀의 유체가 전적으로 필러 와이어로 구성된 경우Φ1이고 유체에 대한 필러 와이어의 부피 분율에 따라 0과 1 사이에서 변경됩니다. Φ˙에스Eq 에서 질량 소스에 연결된 스칼라 소스의 비율입니다 (A1) . 스칼라 소스는 전적으로 필러 와이어이기 때문에 1에 할당됩니다. 확산 효과는 고려되지 않았습니다.

2 . 레이저 용접 모델 (Cho et al. [26] )

흡수율을 계산하기 위해 프레 넬 반사 모델을 사용했습니다. ㅏ=1−ρ씨재료의 표면 상에 도시 된 바와 같이 수학 식. (A8) 원 편광 빔의 경우.(A8)ㅏ=1−ρ씨=1−12(ρ에스+ρ피)어디,ρ에스=(엔1씨영형에스θ−피)2+큐2(엔1씨영형에스θ+피)2+큐2,ρ에스=(피−엔1에스나는엔θ티ㅏ엔θ)2+큐2(피+엔1에스나는엔θ티ㅏ엔θ)2+큐2,피2=12{[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]2+2엔22케이22+[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]},큐2=12{[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]2+2엔22케이22−[엔22−케이22−(엔1에스나는엔θ)2]}.어디, 복잡한 인덱스 엔1과 케이1반사 지수와 공기의 흡수 지수이며 엔2과 케이2공작물을위한 것입니다. θ입사각입니다. 도시 된 바와 같이 수학 식. (A9)에서 , 혼합물의 흡수율은 식에서 얻은 모재 및 필러 와이어 분획의 가중 평균이됩니다 . (A7) .(A9)ㅏ미디엄나는엑스티유아르 자형이자형=Φㅏw나는아르 자형이자형+(1−Φ)ㅏ비ㅏ에스이자형어디, ㅏ비ㅏ에스이자형과 ㅏw나는아르 자형이자형각각 비금속과 필러 와이어의 흡수율입니다.

자유 표면 경계에서의 반동 압력 에이 싱은 Eq. (A10) .(A10)피아르 자형(티)≅0.54피에스ㅏ티(티)=0.54피0이자형엑스피(엘V티−티비아르 자형¯티티비)어디, 피에스ㅏ티포화 압력, 피0대기압입니다. 엘V기화의 잠열, 티비끓는 온도이고 아르 자형¯보편적 인 기체 상수입니다.

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A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig7

A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys

Mohamad Bayat Venkata K. Nadimpalli David B. Pedersen Jesper H. Hattel
Department of mechanical engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Building 425, 2800 Kgs., Lyngby, Denmark

Received 21 August 2020, Revised 18 November 2020, Accepted 25 November 2020, Available online 15 December 2020.

Abstract

Several different interfacial forces affect the free surface of liquid metals during metal additive manufacturing processes. One of these is thermo-capillarity or the so-called Marangoni effect. In this work, a novel framework is introduced for unraveling the effects of thermo-capillarity on the melt pool morphology/size and its thermo-fluid conditions during the Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) process. In this respect, a multi-physics numerical model is developed based on the commercial software package Flow-3D. The model is verified and validated via mesh-independency analysis and by comparison of the predicted melt pool profile with those from lab-scale single-track experiments. Two sets of parametric studies are carried out to find the role of both positive and inverse thermo-capillarity on the melt pool shape and its thermal and fluid dynamics conditions. The thermo-fluid conditions of the melt pool are further investigated using appropriate dimensionless numbers. The results show that for the higher Marangoni number cases, the melt pool temperature drops, and at the same time, the temperature field becomes more uniform. Also, it is shown that at higher Marangoni numbers, temperature gradients decrease, thus reducing the role of conduction in the heat transfer from the melt pool. Furthermore, for the first time, a novel methodology is introduced for the calculation of the melt pool’s average Nusselt number. The average Nusselt numbers calculated for the positive and inverse thermo-capillarity are then used for finding the effective liquid conductivity required for a computationally cheaper pure heat conduction simulation. The results show that the deviation between the average melt pool temperature, using the pure conduction model with effective conductivity, and the one obtained from the advanced fluid dynamics model is less than 2%.

Keywords

Thermo-capillarity, Melt pool, Heat and fluid flow, Numerical model, L-PBF

Korea Abstract

금속 적층 제조 공정 중 액체 금속의 자유 표면에 여러 가지 다른 계면력이 영향을 미칩니다. 이들 중 하나는 열 모세관 또는 소위 Marangoni 효과입니다.

이 작업에서는 L-PBF (Laser Powder Bed Fusion) 공정 중 용융 풀 형태 / 크기 및 열 유동 조건에 대한 열 모세관의 영향을 밝히기 위한 새로운 프레임워크가 도입되었습니다.

이러한 점에서 상용 소프트웨어 패키지 Flow-3D를 기반으로 다중 물리 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 모델은 메쉬 독립 분석을 통해 그리고 예측 된 용융 풀 프로필을 실험실 규모의 단일 트랙 실험에서 얻은 프로필과 비교하여 검증 및 검증됩니다.

용융 풀 모양과 열 및 유체 역학 조건에 대한 양 및 역 열 모세관의 역할을 찾기 위해 두 세트의 매개 변수 연구가 수행됩니다. 용융 풀의 열 유동 조건은 적절한 무 차원 숫자를 사용하여 추가로 조사됩니다.

결과는 Marangoni 수가 더 높은 경우 용융 풀 온도가 떨어지고 동시에 온도 필드가 더 균일 해짐을 보여줍니다. 또한 Marangoni 수가 높을수록 온도 구배가 감소하여 용융 풀에서 열 전달에서 전도의 역할이 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

또한 용융 풀의 평균 Nusselt 수를 계산하기위한 새로운 방법론이 처음으로 도입되었습니다. 그런 다음 양수 및 역 열 모세관에 대해 계산 된 평균 Nusselt 수는 계산적으로 더 저렴한 순수 열 전도 시뮬레이션에 필요한 효과적인 액체 전도도를 찾는 데 사용됩니다. 결과는 유효 전도도가 있는 순수 전도 모델을 사용한 평균 용융 풀 온도와 고급 유체 역학 모델에서 얻은 편차가 2 % 미만임을 보여줍니다.

A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig1
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig1
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig2
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig2
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig3
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig3
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig4
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig4
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig5
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig5
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig6
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig6
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig7
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig7
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig8
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig8
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig9
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig9
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig10
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig10
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig11
A fundamental investigation of thermo-capillarity in laser powder bed fusion of metals and alloys Fig11
Dam-Break Flows: Comparison between Flow-3D, MIKE 3 FM, and Analytical Solutions with Experimental Data

Dam-Break Flows: Comparison between Flow-3D, MIKE 3 FM, and Analytical Solutions with Experimental Data

by Hui Hu,Jianfeng Zhang andTao Li *
State Key Laboratory Base of Eco-Hydraulic Engineering in Arid Area, School of Water Resources and Hydropower, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710048, China
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci.20188(12), 2456; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8122456Received: 14 October 2018 /
Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 2 December 2018

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a flow model with different numbers of spatial dimensions in a hydraulic features solution, with parameters such a free surface profile, water depth variations, and averaged velocity evolution in a dam-break under dry and wet bed conditions with different tailwater depths. Two similar three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic models (Flow-3D and MIKE 3 FM) were studied in a dam-break simulation by performing a comparison with published experimental data and the one-dimensional (1D) analytical solution. The results indicate that the Flow-3D model better captures the free surface profile of wavefronts for dry and wet beds than other methods. The MIKE 3 FM model also replicated the free surface profiles well, but it underestimated them during the initial stage under wet-bed conditions. However, it provided a better approach to the measurements over time. Measured and simulated water depth variations and velocity variations demonstrate that both of the 3D models predict the dam-break flow with a reasonable estimation and a root mean square error (RMSE) lower than 0.04, while the MIKE 3 FM had a small memory footprint and the computational time of this model was 24 times faster than that of the Flow-3D. Therefore, the MIKE 3 FM model is recommended for computations involving real-life dam-break problems in large domains, leaving the Flow-3D model for fine calculations in which knowledge of the 3D flow structure is required. The 1D analytical solution was only effective for the dam-break wave propagations along the initially dry bed, and its applicability was fairly limited. 

Keywords: dam breakFlow-3DMIKE 3 FM1D Ritter’s analytical solution

이 연구의 목적은 자유 표면 프로파일, 수심 변화 및 건식 및 댐 파괴에서 평균 속도 변화와 같은 매개 변수를 사용하여 유압 기능 솔루션에서 서로 다른 수의 공간 치수를 가진 유동 모델의 적용 가능성을 평가하는 것이었습니다.

테일 워터 깊이가 다른 습식베드 조건. 2 개의 유사한 3 차원 (3D) 유체 역학 모델 (Flow-3D 및 MIKE 3 FM)이 게시된 실험 데이터와 1 차원 (1D) 분석 솔루션과의 비교를 수행하여 댐 브레이크 시뮬레이션에서 연구되었습니다.

결과는 FLOW-3D 모델이 다른 방법보다 건식 및 습식 베드에 대한 파면의 자유 표면 프로파일을 더 잘 포착함을 나타냅니다. MIKE 3 FM 모델도 자유 표면 프로파일을 잘 복제했지만, 습식 조건에서 초기 단계에서 과소 평가했습니다. 그러나 시간이 지남에 따라 측정에 더 나은 접근 방식을 제공했습니다.

측정 및 시뮬레이션 된 수심 변화와 속도 변화는 두 3D 모델 모두 합리적인 추정치와 0.04보다 낮은 RMSE (root mean square error)로 댐 브레이크 흐름을 예측하는 반면 MIKE 3 FM은 메모리 공간이 적고 이 모델의 계산 시간은 Flow-3D보다 24 배 더 빠릅니다.

따라서 MIKE 3 FM 모델은 대규모 도메인의 실제 댐 브레이크 문제와 관련된 계산에 권장되며 3D 흐름 구조에 대한 지식이 필요한 미세 계산을 위해 Flow-3D 모델을 남겨 둡니다. 1D 분석 솔루션은 초기 건조 층을 따라 전파되는 댐 파괴에만 효과적이었으며 그 적용 가능성은 상당히 제한적이었습니다.

1. Introduction

저수지에 저장된 물의 통제되지 않은 방류[1]로 인해 댐 붕괴와 그로 인해 하류에서 발생할 수 있는 잠재적 홍수로 인해 큰 자연 위험이 발생한다. 이러한 영향을 최대한 완화하기 위해서는 홍수[2]로 인한 위험을 관리하고 감소시키기 위해 홍수의 시간적 및 공간적 진화를 모두 포착하여 댐 붕괴 파동의 움직임을 예측하고 댐 붕괴 파동의 전파 과정 효과를 다운스트림[3]으로 예측하는 것이 중요하다. 

그러나 이러한 수량을 예측하는 것은 어려운 일이며, 댐 붕괴 홍수의 움직임을 정확하게 시뮬레이션하고 유동장에 대한 유용한 정보를 제공하기 위한 적절한 모델을 선택하는 것은 그러므로 필수적인 단계[4]이다.

적절한 수학적 및 수치적 모델의 선택은 댐 붕괴 홍수 분석에서 매우 중요한 것으로 나타났다.분석적 해결책에서 행해진 댐 붕괴 흐름에 대한 연구는 100여 년 전에 시작되었다. 

리터[5]는 먼저 건조한 침대 위에 1D de 생베넌트 방정식의 초기 분석 솔루션을 도출했고, 드레슬러[6,7]와 휘담[8]은 마찰저항의 영향을 받은 파동학을 연구했으며, 스토커[9]는 젖은 침대를 위한 1D 댐 붕괴 문제에 리터의 솔루션을 확장했다. 

마샬과 멩데즈[10]는 고두노프가 가스 역학의 오일러 방정식을 위해 개발한 방법론[11]을 적용하여 젖은 침대 조건에서 리만 문제를 해결하기 위한 일반적인 절차를 고안했다. Toro [12]는 습식 및 건식 침대 조건을 모두 해결하기 위해 완전한 1D 정밀 리만 용해제를 실시했다. 

Chanson [13]은 특성 방법을 사용하여 갑작스러운 댐 붕괴로 인한 홍수에 대한 간단한 분석 솔루션을 연구했다. 그러나 이러한 분석 솔루션은 특히 댐 붕괴 초기 단계에서 젖은 침대의 정확한 결과를 도출하지 못했다[14,15].과거 연구의 발전은 이른바 댐 붕괴 홍수 문제 해결을 위한 여러 수치 모델[16]을 제공했으며, 헥-라스, DAMBRK, MIK 11 등과 같은 1차원 모델을 댐 붕괴 홍수를 모델링하는 데 사용하였다.

[17 2차원(2D) 깊이 평균 방정식도 댐 붕괴 흐름 문제를 시뮬레이션하는 데 널리 사용되어 왔으며[18,19,20,21,22] 그 결과 얕은 물 방정식(SWE)이 유체 흐름을 나타내는 데 적합하다는 것을 알 수 있다. 그러나, 경우에 따라 2D 수치해결기가 제공하는 해결책이 특히 근거리 분야에서 실험과 일관되지 않을 수 있다[23,24]. 더욱이, 1차원 및 2차원 모델은 3차원 현상에 대한 일부 세부사항을 포착하는 데 한계가 있다.

[25]. RANS(Reynolds-averageed Navier-Stok크스 방정식)에 기초한 여러 3차원(3D) 모델이 얕은 물 모델의 일부 단점을 극복하기 위해 적용되었으며, 댐 붕괴 초기 단계에서의 복잡한 흐름의 실제 동작을 이해하기 위해 사용되었다 [26,27,28]장애물이나 바닥 실에 대한 파장의 충격으로 인한 튜디 댐 붕괴 흐름 [19,29] 및 근거리 영역의 난류 댐 붕괴 흐름 거동 [4] 최근 상용화된 수치 모델 중 잘 알려진 유체 방식(VOF) 기반 CFD 모델링 소프트웨어 FLOW-3D는 컴퓨터 기술의 진보에 따른 계산력 증가로 인해 불안정한 자유 표면 흐름을 분석하는 데 널리 사용되고 있다. 

이 소프트웨어는 유한 차이 근사치를 사용하여 RANS 방정식에 대한 수치 해결책을 계산하며, 자유 표면을 추적하기 위해 VOF를 사용한다 [30,31]; 댐 붕괴 흐름을 모델링하는 데 성공적으로 사용되었다 [32,33].그러나, 2D 얕은 물 모델을 사용하여 포착할 수 없는 공간과 시간에 걸친 댐 붕괴 흐름의 특정한 유압적 특성이 있다. 

실생활 현장 척도 시뮬레이션을 위한 완전한 3D Navier-Stokes 방정식의 적용은 더 높은 계산 비용[34]을 가지고 있으며, 원하는 결과는 얕은 물 모델[35]보다 더 정확한 결과를 산출하지 못할 수 있다. 따라서, 본 논문은 3D 모델의 기능과 그 계산 효율을 평가하기 위해 댐 붕괴 흐름 시뮬레이션을 위한 단순화된 3D 모델-MIKE 3 FM을 시도한다. 

MIK 3 모델은 자연 용수 분지의 여러 유체 역학 시뮬레이션 조사에 적용되었다. 보치 외 연구진이 사용해 왔다. [36], 니콜라오스 및 게오르기오스 [37], 고얄과 라토드[38] 등 현장 연구에서 유체역학 시뮬레이션을 위한 것이다. 이러한 저자들의 상당한 연구에도 불구하고, MIK 3 FM을 이용한 댐 붕괴의 모델링에 관한 연구는 거의 없었다. 

또한 댐 붕괴 홍수 전파 문제를 해결하기 위한 3D 얕은 물과 완전한 3D RANS 모델의 성능을 비교한 연구도 아직 보고되지 않았다. 이 공백을 메우기 위해 현재 연구의 주요 목표는 댐 붕괴 흐름을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 단순화된 3D SWE, 상세 RANS 모델 및 분석 솔루션을 평가하여 댐 붕괴 문제에 대한 정확도와 적용 가능성을 평가하는 것이다.실제 댐 붕괴 문제를 해결하기 위해 유체역학 시뮬레이션을 시도하기 전에 수치 모델을 검증할 필요가 있다. 

일련의 실험 벤치마크를 사용하여 수치 모델을 확인하는 것은 용인된 관행이다. 현장 데이터 확보가 어려워 최근 몇 년 동안 제한된 측정 데이터를 취득했다. 

본 논문은 Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman[30] 및 Khankandi 외 연구진이 제안한 두 가지 테스트 사례에 의해 제안된 검증에서 인용한 것이다. [39] 오즈멘-카가테이와 코카만[30]이 수행한 첫 번째 실험에서, 다른 미숫물 수위에 걸쳐 초기 단계 동안 댐 붕괴 홍수파가 발생했으며, 자유 지표면 프로파일의 측정치를 제공했다. Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman[30]은 초기 단계에서 Flow-3D 소프트웨어가 포함된 2D SWE와 3D RANS의 숫자 솔루션에 의해 계산된 자유 표면 프로필만 비교했다. 

Khankandi 등이 고안한 두 번째 실험 동안. [39], 이 실험의 측정은 홍수 전파를 시뮬레이션하고 측정된 데이터를 제공하는 것을 목적으로 하는 수치 모델을 검증하기 위해 사용되었으며, 말기 동안의 자유 표면 프로필, 수위의 시간 진화 및 속도 변화를 포함한다. Khankandi 등의 연구. [39] 주로 실험 조사에 초점을 맞추었으며, 초기 단계에서는 리터의 솔루션과의 수위만을 언급하고 있다.

경계 조건(상류 및 하류 모두 무한 채널 길이를 갖는 1D 분석 솔루션에서는 실험 결과를 리터와 비교하는 것이 타당하지 않기 때문이다(건조 be)d) 또는 스토커(웨트 베드) 솔루션은 벽의 반사가 깊이 프로파일에 영향을 미쳤을 때, 그리고 참조 [39]의 실험에 대한 수치 시뮬레이션과의 추가 비교가 불량할 때. 이 논문은 이러한 문제를 직접 겨냥하여 전체 댐 붕괴 과정에서의 자유 표면 프로필, 수심 변화 및 속도 변화에 대한 완전한 비교 연구를 제시한다. 

여기서 댐 붕괴파의 수치 시뮬레이션은 초기에 건조하고 습한 직사각형 채널을 가진 유한 저장소의 순간 댐 붕괴에 대해 두 개의 3D 모델을 사용하여 개발된다.본 논문은 다음과 같이 정리되어 있다. 두 모델에 대한 통치 방정식은 숫자 체계를 설명하기 전에 먼저 도입된다. 

일반적인 단순화된 시험 사례는 3D 수치 모델과 1D 분석 솔루션을 사용하여 시뮬레이션했다. 모델 결과와 이들이 실험실 실험과 비교하는 방법이 논의되고, 서로 다른 수심비에서 시간에 따른 유압 요소의 변동에 대한 시뮬레이션 결과가 결론을 도출하기 전에 제시된다.

2. Materials and Methods

2.1. Data

첫째, 수평 건조 및 습식 침상에 대한 초기 댐 붕괴 단계 동안의 자유 표면 프로필 측정은 Ozmen-Cagatay와 Kocaman에 의해 수행되었다[30]. 이 시험 동안, 매끄럽고 직사각형의 수평 채널은 그림 1에서 표시한 대로 너비 0.30m, 높이 0.30m, 길이 8.9m이었다. 

채널은 채널 입구에서 4.65m 떨어진 수직 플레이트(담) 즉, 저장소의 길이 L0=4.65mL0에 의해 분리되었다., 및 다운스트림 채널 L1=4.25 mL1. m저수지는 댐의 좌측에 위치하고 처음에는 침수된 것으로 간주되었다; 저수지의 초기 상류 수심 h0 0.25m로 일정했다.

오른쪽의 초기 수심 h1h1 건식침대의 경우 0m, 습식침대의 경우 0.025m, 0.1m이므로 수심비 α=h1/h0α으로 세 가지 상황이 있었다. 0, 0.1, 0.4의 습식침대 조건은 플룸 끝에 낮은 보를 사용함으로써 만들어졌다. 물 표면 프로필은 3개의 고속 디지털 카메라(50프레임/s)를 사용하여 초기에 관찰되었으며, 계측 측정의 정확도는 참고문헌 [30]에서 입증되었다. In the following section, the corresponding numerical results refer to positions x = −1 m (P1), −0.5 m (P2), −0.2 m (P3), +0.2 m (P4), +0.5 m (P5), +1 m (P6), +2 m (P7), and +2.85 m (P8), where the origin of the coordinate system x = 0 is at the dam site. 3수심비 ααα 0, 0.1, 0.4의 경우 x,yx의 경우 좌표는 h0.으로 정규화된다.

<중략> ……

Figure 1. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) α = 0; (b) α = 0.1; and (c) α = 0.4.
Figure 1. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) α = 0; (b) α = 0.1; and (c) α = 0.4.

Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) α = 0 and (b) α = 0.2.
Figure 2. Schematic view of the experimental conditions by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) α = 0 and (b) α = 0.2.
Figure 3. Typical profiles of the dam-break flow regimes for Stoker’s analytical solution [9]: Wet-bed downstream
Figure 3. Typical profiles of the dam-break flow regimes for Stoker’s analytical solution [9]: Wet-bed downstream
Figure 4. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using Flow-3D for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 4. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using Flow-3D for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 5. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using MIKE 3 FM for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 5. Sensitivity analysis of the numerical simulation using MIKE 3 FM for the different mesh sizes of the experiments in Reference [30].
Figure 6. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for dry-bed (α=0). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 6. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for dry-bed (α=0). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 7. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for a wet-bed (α = 0.1). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 7. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for a wet-bed (α = 0.1). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 8. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for the wet-bed (α = 0.4). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 8. Comparison between observed and simulated free surface profiles at dimensionless times T = t(g/h0)1/2 and for the wet-bed (α = 0.4). The experimental data are from Reference [30].
Figure 9. Experimental and numerical comparison of free surface profiles h/h0(x/h0) during late stages at various dimensionless times T after the failure in the dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39].
Figure 9. Experimental and numerical comparison of free surface profiles h/h0(x/h0) during late stages at various dimensionless times T after the failure in the dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39].

Table 2. RMSE values for the free surface profiles observed by Khankandi et al. [39].

Table 2. RMSE values for the free surface profiles observed by Khankandi et al. [39].
Table 2. RMSE values for the free surface profiles observed by Khankandi et al. [39].
Figure 10. Measured and computed water level hydrograph at various positions for dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) G1 (−0.5 m); (b) G2 (−0.1 m); (c) G3 (0.1 m); (d) G4 (0.8 m); (e) G6 (1.2 m); (f) G8 (5.5 m).
Figure 10. Measured and computed water level hydrograph at various positions for dry-bed by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) G1 (−0.5 m); (b) G2 (−0.1 m); (c) G3 (0.1 m); (d) G4 (0.8 m); (e) G6 (1.2 m); (f) G8 (5.5 m).
Figure 11. Measured and computed water level hydrographs at various positions for the wet-bed by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) G1 (−0.5 m); (b) G2 (−0.1 m); (c) G4 (0.8 m); and (d) G5 (1.0 m).
Figure 11. Measured and computed water level hydrographs at various positions for the wet-bed by Khankandi et al. [39]: (a) G1 (−0.5 m); (b) G2 (−0.1 m); (c) G4 (0.8 m); and (d) G5 (1.0 m).

Table 3. RMSE values for the water depth variations observed by Khankandi et al. [39] at the late stage.

Table 3. RMSE values for the water depth variations observed by Khankandi et al. [39] at the late stage.
Table 3. RMSE values for the water depth variations observed by Khankandi et al. [39] at the late stage.
Figure 13. Comparison of simulated velocity profiles at various locations upstream and downstream of the dam at t = 0.8 s, 2 s, and 5 s for water depth ratios α = 0.1 by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) P1(−1 m); (b) P3 (+0.2 m); (c) P5 (+1 m); and (d) P6 (+2 m).
Figure 13. Comparison of simulated velocity profiles at various locations upstream and downstream of the dam at t = 0.8 s, 2 s, and 5 s for water depth ratios α = 0.1 by Ozmen-Cagatay and Kocaman [30]: (a) P1(−1 m); (b) P3 (+0.2 m); (c) P5 (+1 m); and (d) P6 (+2 m).
Table 5. The required computational time for the two models to address dam break flows in all cases
Table 5. The required computational time for the two models to address dam break flows in all cases

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Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.

On-chip fabrication and in-flow 3D-printing of cellladen microgel constructs: From chip to scaffold materials in one integral process

cellladen 마이크로 겔 구조의 온칩 제작 및 인플 로우 3D 프린팅 : 하나의 통합 프로세스에서 칩에서 스캐폴드 재료까지

Benjamin Reineke 1,2, Ilona Paulus 3, Jonas Hazur 6, Madita Vollmer 4, Gültekin Tamgüney 4,5, Stephan Hauschild1
, Aldo R. Boccacini 6, Jürgen Groll 3, Stephan Förster *1,2
1 Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS-1/IBI-8), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich, Germany
2 Institute of Physical Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3 Department of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry (FMZ) and Bavarian Polymer Institute (BPI),
University of Würzburg, 97070 Würzburg, Germany
4 Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Biological Information Processing – Structural Biochemistry (IBI7), Jülich, Germany
5 Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, Institut für Physikalische Biologie, Düsseldorf, Germany
6 Institute of Biomaterials, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058, Erlangen, Germany

Summary

Bioprinting has evolved into a thriving technology for the fabrication of cell-laden scaffolds. Bioinks are the most critical component for bioprinting. Recently, microgels have been introduced as a very promising bioink enabling cell protection and the control of the cellular microenvironment. However, their microfluidic fabrication inherently seemed to be a limitation. Here we introduce a direct coupling of microfluidics and 3D-printing for the microfluidic production of cell-laden microgels with direct in-flow bioprinting into stable scaffolds. The methodology enables the continuous on-chip encapsulation of cells into monodisperse microdroplets with subsequent in-flow cross-linking to produce cell-laden microgels, which after exiting a microtubing are automatically jammed into thin continuous microgel filaments. The integration into a 3D printhead allows direct in-flow printing of the filaments into free-standing three-dimensional scaffolds. The method is demonstrated for different cross-linking methods and cell lines. With this advancement, microfluidics is no longer a bottleneck for biofabrication.

Bioprinting은 세포가있는 스캐 폴드 제작을 위한 번성하는 기술로 진화했습니다. 바이오 잉크는 바이오 프린팅에 가장 중요한 구성 요소입니다. 최근 마이크로 젤은 세포 보호 및 세포 미세 환경 제어를 가능하게 하는 매우 유망한 바이오 잉크로 도입되었습니다.

그러나 이들의 미세 유체 제작은 본질적으로 한계로 보였습니다. 여기에서 우리는 안정적인 스캐 폴드에 직접 유입 바이오 프린팅을 사용하여 세포가 실린 마이크로 겔의 미세 유체 생산을 위한 미세 유체 및 3D 프린팅의 직접 결합을 소개합니다.

이 방법론은 세포를 단 분산 미세 방울로 연속 온칩 캡슐화하고 후속 유입 교차 연결을 통해 세포가 가득한 마이크로 겔을 생성 할 수 있으며, 이는 마이크로 튜브를 종료 한 후 얇은 연속 마이크로 겔 필라멘트에 자동으로 걸린다. 3D 프린트 헤드에 통합되어 필라멘트를 독립형 3 차원 스캐 폴드로 직접 유입 인쇄 할 수 있습니다.

이 방법은 다양한 가교 방법 및 세포주에 대해 설명됩니다. 이러한 발전으로 미세 유체 학은 더 이상 바이오 패브리 케이션의 병목 현상이 아닙니다.

Bioprinting은 신체 조직을 모방하거나 대체하기위한 3 차원 세포 실장 구조를 제작하는 새로운 기술입니다.

(1) 조직 공학 및 약물 전달뿐만 아니라 질병 연구 및 치료 개발에 중요한 역할을합니다. 바이오 프린팅에서 세포와 물질은 바이오 잉크 (2,3)로 공식화되어 계층 적으로 구조화 된 3D 스캐 폴드로 직접 인쇄됩니다. 바이오 프린팅의 궁극적 인 목표는 3 차원 적으로 제작 된 구조적 배열이 생물학적 성숙을 촉진하고 가속화한다는 근거를 바탕으로 표적 조직 또는 기관의 전체 또는 부분 기능을 나타내는 세포가있는 스캐 폴드를 생산하는 것입니다.

(4) 따라서 바이오 잉크는 바이오 프린팅 기술의 중요한 구성 요소입니다. 그들은 주로 세포와 생물 활성 분자를 캡슐화 할 수있는 물질, 즉 하이드로 겔에 의존하며 압출 인쇄와 같은 적합한 인쇄 기술에 사용하여 원하는 3 차원 스캐 폴드 또는 구조물을 제작할 수 있습니다. 바이오 잉크의 설계는 유동성 및 탄성 특성을 미세 조정하여 압출 중에 충분히 전단 얇게 만들고,이어서 응고 후 원하는 기계적 안정성과 탄성을 빠르게 개발하여 안정적인 스캐 폴드를 형성해야하기 때문에 까다롭습니다.

또한, 바이오 잉크는 생체 적합성이어야하며 세포 생존력과 적절한 제조 후 행동을 촉진 할 수있을만큼 충분히 생체 기능적이어야하며 충분한 영양분과 산소를 ​​공급할 수 있어야합니다. 바이오 잉크로 가장 두드러진 하이드로 겔 전구체 용액이 사용되며, 때로는 약간 사전 가교된 형태로 사용되며, 프린팅 후 가교되어 구조를 안정화합니다.

종종 발생하는 문제는 세포 침강, 불균일 혼합 및 생체 적합성 제형과 인쇄 사이의 상충 관계이며, 세포가 유동 제형에서 전단력을 직접 경험하기 때문에 결과적인 모양 충실도입니다. 이러한 한계를 극복하기 위해 Highley et al.

(5) 최근 microgel bioinks의 사용을 제안했습니다. 콜로이드 특성으로 인해 마이크로 겔 바이오 잉크는 전단 얇아지고 정지 상태에서 빠르게 응고되는 반면 부드러운 콜로이드에로드 된 세포는 전단 보호됩니다. 인쇄 된 마이크로 겔 스캐 폴드는 계면 중합체 얽힘이 충분하지 않은 경우 2 차 가교에 의해 추가로 안정화 될 수 있습니다.

Microgels는 세포 미세 환경을 조정하는 이점을 더 제공합니다. 따라서, 세포가 가득 찬 마이크로 겔을 제조하는 방법은 이미 개발되었으며, 특히 매우 균일 한 크기의 마이크로 겔을 연속 공정으로 제작할 수있는 마이크로 유체 학 분야에서 이미 개발되었습니다. (6-8) 마이크로 겔은 EDTA- 복합체 (11,12) 또는 열 유도에 의해 조절 될 수있는 알기 네이트 / Ca2 + 이온 복합체 형성 (9,10)과 같은 물리적 가교에 의해 형성 될 수 있음이 입증되었습니다. 젤라틴 용액을 20 ° C 이하로 냉각하는 것과 같은 겔화. (9,13) 화학적 가교 반응은 마이크로 겔의 더 큰 안정성과 더 나은 기계적 특성을 제공합니다.

예를 들면 기능화 된 젤라틴, 히알루 노 레이트, 폴리에틸렌 글리콜 또는 폴리 글리세롤 (12, 14-16)에 대한 마이클 유형 반응, 폴리 글리세롤 (17) 및 광 가교 (18)에 대한 아 지드-알킨 클릭 반응은 다음과 같은 광개시제 및 가교기를 필요로 합니다. 폴리에틸렌 글리콜에 대해 나타났습니다.

캡슐화된 세포에는 줄기 세포 (9,12,14,15), 크립트 및 페 이어 세포 (10), 간 세포 (HepG2) 및 내피 세포 (HUVEC) (18), NIH 3T3 섬유 아세포 (6)가 포함됩니다. 지금까지 Fan et al.에 의해 세포가 실린 마이크로 겔을 기반으로하는 기능성 스캐 폴드의 제작이 보여졌습니다.

(19) 겔 -MA 마이크로 겔의 에멀젼 기반 제조 및 Compaan et al. (20) 젤라틴 마이크로 겔 충전제 입자. 미세 유체 생성 마이크로 겔의 경우 이것은 최근 Highley et al.에 의해 처음으로 입증되었습니다. (5). 마이크로 겔 기반 바이오 잉크 및 스캐 폴드에 대한 바이오 프린팅에 대한 지금까지 제한된 수의 연구에 대한 이유는 소량의 마이크로 겔을 생성하는 마이크로 유체의 필수 조합과 교차 결합, 준비를 포함하는 여러 포스트 칩 배치 공정 단계가 뒤 따르기 때문입니다. bioink의, 그리고 원하는 스캐 폴드에 후속 bioprinting.

이것은 현재 microgel biofabrication을 시간 소모적이고 생산성이 낮은 다단계 공정으로 만듭니다. 따라서 원하는 스캐 폴드의 제조를위한 마이크로 겔 및 바이오 프린팅을위한 미세 유체가 하나의 연속적이고 자동화 가능한 프로세스에 통합 될 수 있다면 매우 바람직 할 것입니다.

여기에서 우리는 미세 유체 칩이 세포를 방울로 온칩 캡슐화하도록 설계 될 수 있음을 보여줍니다. 이는 마이크로 겔을 생성하기 위해 흐름에서 광 가교 결합 된 다음 다운 스트림 마이크로 튜브에서 자동으로 잼되어 얇은 마이크로 겔 필라멘트를 지속적으로 형성합니다. 마이크로 튜브는 3D 프린터의 프린트 헤드에 통합되어 필라멘트를 독립형 3 차원으로 직접 유입 인쇄합니다.

Results and discussion

Microfluidic device and controlled droplet production

우리의 목표는 (i) 낮은 전단 응력 세포 캡슐화, (ii) 물리적 또는 화학적 가교에 대한 가변성, (iii) 미세 액적 직경의 큰 변화, (iv)이를 결합 할 수 있는 기능을 위한 미세 유체 칩을 3D 프린터로 설계하는 것이었습니다.

따라서 디자인은 높은 세포 생존력을 위해 좁은 채널 섹션 내의 세포에 대한 전단력을 최소화해야 합니다. 다양한 물리적 및 화학적 가교 반응을 수행 할 수 있도록 입구 채널 설계는 세포, 폴리머, 가교 및 추가 제제를 포함하는 용액의 순차적 혼합을 허용해야 합니다. 단일 세포 캡슐화가 필요한 경우 미세 방울은 300 µm에서 50 µm까지 제어 가능한 직경을 가져야 106 / ml의 세포 밀도에 도달 할 수 있습니다.

Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.
Fig. 1: Three-dimensional schematic view of the multilayer double 3D-focusing microfluidic channel system, (b) control of droplet diameter via the Capiilary number Ca, and accessible hydrodynamic regimes for droplet production: squeezing (c), dripping (d) and jetting (e). The scale bars are 200 µm.

따라서 우리는 두 개의 후속 혼합 교차로 3 차원 흐름 초점을 허용 한 다음 제어 된 액적 형성을위한 하류 좁은 오리피스가 뒤 따르는 채널 설계를 사용했습니다. 디자인은 그림 1에 개략적으로 표시되어 있습니다. 여기에는 세포와 전구체 폴리머를 포함하는 중앙 스트림 용액을위한 입구 채널과 완충 용액, 배양 배지, 생리 활성 물질 또는 가교제를 포함 할 수있는 두 개의 측면 채널이 있습니다. 측면 채널 흐름은 입구 채널 흐름을 세포에 대한 전단력이 최소 인 채널의 중앙에 3 차원 적으로 집중시킵니다. 그 후, 수성 스트림은 액적 형성을 제어하는 ​​좁은 오리피스 섹션으로 들어가기 위해 오일 상으로 3 차원 적으로 집중됩니다. 좁은 섹션은 다양한 유체 역학 체제에 액세스하여 다양한 범위에 걸쳐 액적 크기를 변경할 수 있습니다. 다운 스트림 채널은 방울이 채널 중심 유선에서 안정적인 방울 트레인을 형성하도록 충분히 좁게 유지됩니다. 3D 이중 초점 칩은 다층 기술을 사용하는 소프트 리소그래피로 제작되었으며 지원 정보 (그림 S2-S4, S7)에 설명 된대로 흐름이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 액적 분해는 외부 유체에 의해 가해지는 점성 전단력 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar 표면 장력에서 발생하는 고정 계면 력 𝐹𝐹𝛾𝛾을 초과 할 때 발생합니다. 두 힘은 직접 연속 유상 η 평균 유입 흐름 속도 (V)의 점도 환산 수 무차 모세관 수가 CA = 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar/𝐹γ, 그리고 CA = 𝐹𝑠ℎ𝑒ar/𝐹γ = 같은 표면 장력 γ가 관련 𝜂𝜂 𝛾. 캐 필러 리 수에 따라 액적 생성을위한 다양한 유체 역학 체제를 구별 할 수 있습니다. c) 분사 체제 (Ca> 1). (21-25) 그림 1에서 볼 수 있듯이 가변 3D 수축 설계를 사용하면 액적 생산을위한 세 가지 유체 역학 체제에 모두 액세스 할 수 있으며 모세관 수는 액적 생산을위한 주요 제어 매개 변수입니다. 체적 유량, 오일 점도 및 계면 장력을 조정하여 50 ~ 300 µm 범위의 목표 범위에서 액적 직경을 정밀하게 제어 할 수 있습니다. 각 점도 및 계면 장력은 지원 정보의 표 SI에 요약되어 있습니다.

Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 2: Scheme of the LED photo-crosslinking and 3D-printing section of the microfluidic/3D-printing device. The droplet train is transferred from the chip microchannel into a microtubing in a straight section with nearly identical inner channel and inner microtubing diameter. Further downstream, the microtubing passes an LED-section for fast photo cross-linking to generate the microgels. This section is contained in an aluminum encasing to avoid premature crosslinking of polymer precursor in upstream channel sections by stray light. Subsequently, the microtubing is integrated into a 3D-printhead, where the microgels are jammed into a filament that is directly 3D-printed into the scaffold.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 3: a) Photograph of a standard meander-shaped layer fabricated by microgel filament deposition printing. The lines have a thickness of 300 µm. b) photograph of a cross-bar pattern obtained by on-top deposition of several microgel filaments. The average linewidth is 1 mm. c) photograph of a donut-shaped microgel construct. The microgels have been fluorescently labelled by FITC-dextran to demonstrate the intrinsic microporosity corresponding to the black non-fluorescent regions, d) light microscopy image of a construct edge showing that fused adhesive microgels form a continuous, three-dimensional selfsupporting scaffold with intrinsic micropores.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 4: a) Scheme of the perfusion chamber consisting of an upstream and downstream chamber, perfusion ports, and removable scaffolds to stabilize the microgel construct during 3D-printing, b) photograph of a microgel construct in the perfusion chamber directly after printing and removal of the scaffolds, c) confocal microscopy image of the permeation front of a fluorescent dye, where the high dye concentration in the micropores can be clearly seen, d) confocal microscopy image of YFP-labelled HEK-cells within a microgel construct.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 5: a) Layer-by-layer printing of microgel construct with integrated perfusion channel. After printing of the first layer, a hollow perfusion channel is inserted. Subsequently, the second and third layers are printed. b) The construct is directly printed into a perfusion chamber. The perfusion chamber provides whole construct permeation via flows cin and cout, as well as independent flow through the perfusion channel via flows vin and vout. c) Photograph of a perfusion chamber containing the construct directly after printing. The flow of the fluorescein solution through the integrated PVA hollow channel is clearly visible.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.
Fig. 6: a) Photograph of an alginate capsule fiber formed after exiting the microtube. b) Confocal fluorescence microscopy image of part of a 3D-printed alginate capsule construct. The fluorescence arises from encapsulated fluorescently labelled polystyrene microbeads to demonstrate the integrity and stability of the alginate capsules.

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Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).

Numerical Modelling of Semi-Solid Flow under Processing Conditions

처리조건에서의 반고체유동의 수치모델링

David H. Kirkwood and Philip J. Ward
Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield I UK

Keywords: semi-solid alloys, thixotropy, flow modelling.

Abstract

During the industrial process of semi-solid forming (or thixoforming) of alloy slurries, typically the operation of die filling takes around 0.1s.
During this time period the alloy slug is transformed from a solid-like structure capable of maintaining its shape, into a liquid-like slurry able
to fill a complex die cavity: this involves a decrease in viscosity of some 6 orders of magnitUde. Many attempts to measure thixotropic breakdown experimentally in alloy slurries have relied on the use of concentric cylindrical viscometers in which viscosity changes have been followed after shear rate changes over times above 1s to in excess of 1000 s, which have little relevance to actual processing conditions and therefore to modelling of flow in industrial practice. The present paper is an attempt to abstract thixotropic breakdown rates from rapid compression tests between parallel plates moving together at velocities of around 1mis, similar to industrial conditions. From this analysis, a model of slurry flow has been developed in which rapid thixotropic breakdown of the slurry occurs at high shear rates.

합금 슬러리의 반고체 성형 (또는 틱소 성형)의 산업 공정 동안, 일반적으로 다이 충진 작업은 약 0.1 초가 걸립니다.
이 기간 동안 합금 슬러그는 모양을 유지할 수있는 고체와 같은 구조에서 액체와 같은 슬러리로 변형됩니다.
복잡한 다이 캐비티를 채우기 위해 : 이것은 약 6 차의 마그 니트 점도 감소를 포함합니다. 합금 슬러리에서 실험적으로 요 변성 파괴를 측정하려는 많은 시도는 전단 속도가 1 초 이상에서 1000 초 이상으로 변화 한 후 점도 변화가 뒤 따르는 동심원 원통형 점도계의 사용에 의존하여 실제 가공 조건과는 거의 관련이 없습니다. 따라서 산업 현장에서 흐름 모델링에. 본 논문은 산업 조건과 유사하게 약 1mis의 속도로 함께 이동하는 평행 판 사이의 빠른 압축 테스트에서 요 변성 파괴 율을 추상화하려는 시도입니다. 이 분석으로부터 슬러리의 급속한 요 변성 분해가 높은 전단 속도에서 발생하는 슬러리 흐름 모델이 개발되었습니다.

Introduction

기존의 다이캐스팅을 위한 다이 설계는 과거에 예비 테스트 및 조정과 함께 축적 된 실무 경험의 문제였으며, 단기 실행, 랩, 다공성 등과 같은 결함을 제거하기 위해 다이 캐스트 제품을 검사했습니다. 이것은 모두 비용이 많이 드는 절차입니다.

시간과 비용, 그리고 프로세스의 컴퓨터 모델링은 이를 줄이거 나 없애기 위해 많은 운영자에 의해 개발되었습니다. 반고체 가공 (thixoforming)에서는 반고체 합금 슬러리의 전단이 내부 구조를 파괴하여 충전 작업 중 시간이 지남에 따라 점도가 낮아짐으로 발생하는 비 뉴턴 점도로 인해 모델링 문제가 더욱 어려워집니다.

시스템 전체에서 균일하지 않습니다. 충전 중에 발생하는 추가 응고로 인해 문제가 더욱 복잡해집니다. 빠른 충전으로 인해 이 단계에서 매우 작은 것으로 간주되기 때문에 현재 분석에서는 무시되었습니다.

우리 모델의 또 다른 한계는 슬러리가 균질한 물질로 거동 한다는 가정이며, 이는 어느 지점에서나 단일 점도로 설명될 수 있습니다. 이것은 빠른 전단의 고려 사항과 정상적인 요 변형성 조건 내에서 0.6 미만의 고형분을 분별하는 것으로 제한합니다.

<중략>……

Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).
Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).
Figure 2. Equilibrium viscosity as a function of shear rate in Sn-Pb alloy, fraction solid:0.36, fitted to Cross Model.
Figure 2. Equilibrium viscosity as a function of shear rate in Sn-Pb alloy, fraction solid:0.36, fitted to Cross Model.
Figure 3. Cheng Diagram: shear stress vs. shear rate.
Figure 3. Cheng Diagram: shear stress vs. shear rate.
Figure 4. Reciprocal of experimental breakdown time vs. y 1.3 for Sn-Pb alloy
Figure 4. Reciprocal of experimental breakdown time vs. y 1.3 for Sn-Pb alloy
Figure 5. Relaxation time, T, as a function of shear rate; see also figure 4, Fs =0.36.
Figure 5. Relaxation time, T, as a function of shear rate; see also figure 4, Fs =0.36.
Figure 6. Experimental and modelled results for compression test on AI-A356 alloy at two temperatures.
Figure 6. Experimental and modelled results for compression test on AI-A356 alloy at two temperatures.
Table 1. Calculated parameters for the breakdown in compression tests [20].
Table 1. Calculated parameters for the breakdown in compression tests [20].
Figure 7. Drop-forge results from Yurko and Flemings [7].
Figure 7. Drop-forge results from Yurko and Flemings [7].
Figure 8. Prediction of FLOW-3D®.
Figure 8. Prediction of FLOW-3D®.

Conclusions

y에서 전단 된 반고체 슬러리의 틱소 트로픽 분해에 대한 속도 방정식은 다음과 같은 형식으로 제안됩니다. T = l / (a ​​+ uym), 여기서 T는 급속 분해 또는 유사 정상 상태 구조에 대한 특성 시간이며, 밴드 m은 상수입니다. 이 관계는 제한된 범위의 전단 속도에서 Sn-Pb 합금의 전단 속도 점프에 의해 실험적으로 확인되었습니다.

이 파괴율 방정식은 AI-Si 합금의 반고체 슬러그에 대한 빠른 압축 테스트에서 실험적으로 얻은 힘-변위 곡선을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D® (버전 8.2 : FlowScience Inc.)에 도입되었습니다. 담금 시간과 다른 압축 속도에서. 이 분석의 결과는 모든 경우에 요 변성 거동이 관련되어 있음을 나타내지만, 5 분 동안 담근 후 (산업 관행에서와 같이) 구조가 크게 분해되었으며 초기에는 낮은 전단 속도 영역에서 흐름이 뉴턴에 가깝습니다.

파괴율은 100 S-I 이상의 전단율에서 극적으로 증가하는 것으로 가정 됩니다. 이 예측은 높은 전단 속도에서 더 세심한 작업에 의해 테스트되어야 하지만 평균 전단 속도가 1300 sol까지 생성된 드롭 단조 실험에 의해 뒷받침되는 것으로 보입니다 [7].

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Review on the evolution and technology of State-of-the-Art metal additive manufacturing processes

Review on the evolution and technology of State-of-the-Art metal additive manufacturing processes

최첨단 금속 적층 제조 공정의 진화 및 기술 검토

S.Pratheesh Kumar
S.ElangovanR.Mohanraj
J.R.Ramakrishna

Abstract

Nowadays, the requirements of customers undergo dynamic changes and industries are heading towards the manufacturing of customized end-user products, making market fluctuations extremely unpredictable. This demands the production industries to shift towards instantaneous product development strategies that can deliver products on the shortest lead time without compromise in the quality and accuracy. Direct metal deposition is one such evolving additive manufacturing (AM) technique that has found its application from rapid prototyping to production of real-time industrial components. In addition, the process is ideal for just-in-time manufacturing, producing parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. The evolution of this advanced manufacturing technique had drastically reduced the manufacturing constraints and greatly improved the product versatility. This review provides insight into the evolution, current status, and challenges of metal additive manufacturing (MAM) techniques, starting from powder bed fusion and direct metal deposition. In addition to this, the review explores the variants of metal additive manufacturing with its process mechanism, merits, demerits, and applications. The efficiency of the processes is finally analysed using a time–cost triangle and the mechanical properties are comprehensively compared. The review will enhance the basic understanding of MAM and thus broaden the scope of research and development.

오늘날 고객의 요구 사항은 역동적 인 변화를 겪고 있으며 산업은 맞춤형 최종 사용자 제품의 제조로 향하고있어 시장 변동을 예측할 수 없게 만듭니다. 따라서 생산 산업은 품질과 정확성을 타협하지 않고 최단 리드 타임에 제품을 제공 할 수있는 즉각적인 제품 개발 전략으로 전환해야합니다. 직접 금속 증착은 쾌속 프로토 타이핑에서 실시간 산업 부품 생산에 이르기까지 응용 분야를 발견 한 진화하는 적층 제조 (AM) 기술 중 하나입니다. 또한이 프로세스는 적시 제조에 이상적이며 주문형 부품을 생산하는 동시에 비용, 에너지 소비 및 탄소 발자국을 줄일 수있는 잠재력을 제공합니다. 이 고급 제조 기술의 발전으로 제조 제약이 크게 줄어들고 제품의 다양성이 크게 향상되었습니다. 이 리뷰는 분말 베드 융합 및 직접 금속 증착에서 시작하여 금속 적층 제조 (MAM) 기술의 발전, 현재 상태 및 과제에 대한 통찰력을 제공합니다. 이 외에도이 리뷰에서는 프로세스 메커니즘, 장점, 단점 및 응용 프로그램과 함께 금속 적층 제조의 변형을 탐색합니다. 프로세스의 효율성은 마지막으로 시간-비용 삼각형을 사용하여 분석되고 기계적 특성이 포괄적으로 비교됩니다. 검토는 MAM에 대한 기본적인 이해를 높이고 연구 개발 범위를 넓힐 것입니다.

Keywords: Metal additive manufacturing, 3D Printing, Direct energy deposition, Electron beam meltingRapid prototyping

Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

통합 관성 펌프를 사용하여 마이크로 채널에서 비접촉식 기포-기포 상호 작용 모델링

Physics of Fluids 33, 042002 (2021); https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0041924 B. Hayesa) G. L. Whitingb), and  R. MacCurdyc)

ABSTRACT

In this study, the nonlinear effect of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in inertial micropumps is characterized via reduced parameter one-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling. A one-dimensional pump model is developed to account for contactless bubble-bubble interactions, and the accuracy of the developed one-dimensional model is assessed via the commercial volume of fluid CFD software, FLOW-3D. The FLOW-3D CFD model is validated against experimental bubble dynamics images as well as experimental pump data. Precollapse and postcollapse bubble and flow dynamics for two resistors in a channel have been successfully explained by the modified one-dimensional model. The net pumping effect design space is characterized as a function of resistor placement and firing time delay. The one-dimensional model accurately predicts cumulative flow for simultaneous resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements (0.2L < x < 0.8L where L is the channel length) as well as delayed resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements when the time delay is greater than the time required for the vapor bubble to fill the channel cross section. In general, one-dimensional model accuracy suffers at near-reservoir resistor placements and short time delays which we propose is a result of 3D bubble-reservoir interactions and transverse bubble growth interactions, respectively, that are not captured by the one-dimensional model. We find that the one-dimensional model accuracy improves for smaller channel heights. We envision the developed one-dimensional model as a first-order rapid design tool for inertial pump-based microfluidic systems operating in the contactless bubble–bubble interaction nonlinear regime

이 연구에서 관성 마이크로 펌프에서 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용의 비선형 효과는 감소 된 매개 변수 1 차원 및 3 차원 전산 유체 역학 (3D CFD) 모델링을 통해 특성화됩니다. 비접촉식 기포-버블 상호 작용을 설명하기 위해 1 차원 펌프 모델이 개발되었으며, 개발 된 1 차원 모델의 정확도는 유체 CFD 소프트웨어 인 FLOW-3D의 상용 볼륨을 통해 평가됩니다.

FLOW-3D CFD 모델은 실험적인 거품 역학 이미지와 실험적인 펌프 데이터에 대해 검증되었습니다. 채널에 있는 두 저항기의 붕괴 전 및 붕괴 후 기포 및 유동 역학은 수정 된 1 차원 모델에 의해 성공적으로 설명되었습니다. 순 펌핑 효과 설계 공간은 저항 배치 및 발사 시간 지연의 기능으로 특징 지어집니다.

1 차원 모델은 내부 채널 저항 배치 (0.2L <x <0.8L, 여기서 L은 채널 길이)로 동시 저항 발생에 대한 누적 흐름과 시간 지연시 내부 채널 저항 배치로 지연된 저항 발생을 정확하게 예측합니다. 증기 방울이 채널 단면을 채우는 데 필요한 시간보다 큽니다.

일반적으로 1 차원 모델 정확도는 저수지 근처의 저항 배치와 1 차원 모델에 의해 포착되지 않는 3D 기포-저수지 상호 작용 및 가로 기포 성장 상호 작용의 결과 인 짧은 시간 지연에서 어려움을 겪습니다. 채널 높이가 작을수록 1 차원 모델 정확도가 향상됩니다. 우리는 개발 된 1 차원 모델을 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용 비선형 영역에서 작동하는 관성 펌프 기반 미세 유체 시스템을 위한 1 차 빠른 설계 도구로 생각합니다.

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Figure 4. Calculate and simulate the injection of water in a single-channel injection chamber with a nozzle diameter of 60 μm and a thickness of 50 μm, at an operating frequency of 5 KHz, in the X-Y two-dimensional cross-sectional view, at 10, 20, 30, 40 and 200 μs.

DNA Printing Integrated Multiplexer Driver Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) and Microfluidic Flow Estimation

DNA 프린팅 통합 멀티플렉서 드라이버 Microelectronic Mechanical System Head (IDMH) 및 Microfluidic Flow Estimation

by Jian-Chiun Liou 1,*,Chih-Wei Peng 1,Philippe Basset 2 andZhen-Xi Chen 11School of Biomedical Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan2ESYCOM, Université Gustave Eiffel, CNRS, CNAM, ESIEE Paris, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Abstract

The system designed in this study involves a three-dimensional (3D) microelectronic mechanical system chip structure using DNA printing technology. We employed diverse diameters and cavity thickness for the heater. DNA beads were placed in this rapid array, and the spray flow rate was assessed. Because DNA cannot be obtained easily, rapidly deploying DNA while estimating the total amount of DNA being sprayed is imperative. DNA printings were collected in a multiplexer driver microelectronic mechanical system head, and microflow estimation was conducted. Flow-3D was used to simulate the internal flow field and flow distribution of the 3D spray room. The simulation was used to calculate the time and pressure required to generate heat bubbles as well as the corresponding mean outlet speed of the fluid. The “outlet speed status” function in Flow-3D was used as a power source for simulating the ejection of fluid by the chip nozzle. The actual chip generation process was measured, and the starting voltage curve was analyzed. Finally, experiments on flow rate were conducted, and the results were discussed. The density of the injection nozzle was 50, the size of the heater was 105 μm × 105 μm, and the size of the injection nozzle hole was 80 μm. The maximum flow rate was limited to approximately 3.5 cc. The maximum flow rate per minute required a power between 3.5 W and 4.5 W. The number of injection nozzles was multiplied by 100. On chips with enlarged injection nozzle density, experiments were conducted under a fixed driving voltage of 25 V. The flow curve obtained from various pulse widths and operating frequencies was observed. The operating frequency was 2 KHz, and the pulse width was 4 μs. At a pulse width of 5 μs and within the power range of 4.3–5.7 W, the monomer was injected at a flow rate of 5.5 cc/min. The results of this study may be applied to estimate the flow rate and the total amount of the ejection liquid of a DNA liquid.

이 연구에서 설계된 시스템은 DNA 프린팅 기술을 사용하는 3 차원 (3D) 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 칩 구조를 포함합니다. 히터에는 다양한 직경과 캐비티 두께를 사용했습니다. DNA 비드를 빠른 어레이에 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가했습니다.

DNA를 쉽게 얻을 수 없기 때문에 DNA를 빠르게 배치하면서 스프레이 되는 총 DNA 양을 추정하는 것이 필수적입니다. DNA 프린팅은 멀티플렉서 드라이버 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 헤드에 수집되었고 마이크로 플로우 추정이 수행되었습니다.

Flow-3D는 3D 스프레이 룸의 내부 유동장과 유동 분포를 시뮬레이션 하는데 사용되었습니다. 시뮬레이션은 열 거품을 생성하는데 필요한 시간과 압력뿐만 아니라 유체의 해당 평균 출구 속도를 계산하는데 사용되었습니다.

Flow-3D의 “출구 속도 상태”기능은 칩 노즐에 의한 유체 배출 시뮬레이션을 위한 전원으로 사용되었습니다. 실제 칩 생성 프로세스를 측정하고 시작 전압 곡선을 분석했습니다. 마지막으로 유속 실험을 하고 그 결과를 논의했습니다. 분사 노즐의 밀도는 50, 히터의 크기는 105μm × 105μm, 분사 노즐 구멍의 크기는 80μm였다. 최대 유량은 약 3.5cc로 제한되었습니다. 분당 최대 유량은 3.5W에서 4.5W 사이의 전력이 필요했습니다. 분사 노즐의 수에 100을 곱했습니다. 분사 노즐 밀도가 확대 된 칩에 대해 25V의 고정 구동 전압에서 실험을 수행했습니다. 얻은 유동 곡선 다양한 펄스 폭과 작동 주파수에서 관찰되었습니다. 작동 주파수는 2KHz이고 펄스 폭은 4μs입니다. 5μs의 펄스 폭과 4.3–5.7W의 전력 범위 내에서 단량체는 5.5cc / min의 유속으로 주입되었습니다. 이 연구의 결과는 DNA 액체의 토 출액의 유량과 총량을 추정하는 데 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: DNA printingflow estimationMEMS

Introduction

잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술은 매우 중요하며, 잉크젯 기술의 거대한 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 원리 개발에서 시작되었습니다. 잉크젯 인쇄 연구를 위한 대규모 액적 생성기 포함 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8]. 연속 식 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점이 있습니다. 그러나이 방법의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드의 구조는 더 복잡하고 양산이 어려운 가압 장치, 대전 전극, 편향 전계가 필요하다. 주문형 잉크젯 시스템의 잉크젯 프린트 헤드는 구조가 간단하고 잉크젯 헤드의 다중 노즐을 쉽게 구현할 수 있으며 디지털화 및 색상 지정이 쉽고 이미지 품질은 비교적 좋지만 일반적인 잉크 방울 토출 속도는 낮음 [ 9 , 10 , 11 ].

핫 버블 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있습니다. 노즐은 매우 미세하여 풍부한 조화 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다. 잉크 카트리지와 노즐이 일체형 구조를 이루고 있으며, 잉크 카트리지 교체시 잉크젯 헤드가 동시에 업데이트되므로 노즐 막힘에 대한 걱정은 없지만 소모품 낭비가 발생하고 상대적으로 높음 비용. 주문형 잉크젯 기술은 배출해야 하는 그래픽 및 텍스트 부분에만 잉크 방울을 배출하고 빈 영역에는 잉크 방울이 배출되지 않습니다. 이 분사 방법은 잉크 방울을 충전할 필요가 없으며 전극 및 편향 전기장을 충전할 필요도 없습니다. 노즐 구조가 간단하고 노즐의 멀티 노즐 구현이 용이하며, 출력 품질이 더욱 개선되었습니다. 펄스 제어를 통해 디지털화가 쉽습니다. 그러나 잉크 방울의 토출 속도는 일반적으로 낮습니다. 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전기 잉크젯의 세 가지 일반적인 유형이 있습니다. 물론 다른 유형이 있습니다.

압전 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 인쇄 헤드의 노즐 근처에 많은 소형 압전 세라믹을 배치하면 압전 크리스탈이 전기장의 작용으로 변형됩니다. 잉크 캐비티에서 돌출되어 노즐에서 분사되는 패턴 데이터 신호는 압전 크리스탈의 변형을 제어한 다음 잉크 분사량을 제어합니다. 압전 MEMS 프린트 헤드를 사용한 주문형 드롭 하이브리드 인쇄 [ 12]. 열 거품 잉크젯 기술의 실현 원리는 가열 펄스 (기록 신호)의 작용으로 노즐의 발열체 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매가 증발하여 많은 수의 핵 형성 작은 거품을 생성하는 것입니다. 내부 거품의 부피는 계속 증가합니다. 일정 수준에 도달하면 생성된 압력으로 인해 잉크가 노즐에서 분사되고 최종적으로 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴 정보가 재생됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

“3D 제품 프린팅”및 “증분 빠른 제조”의 의미는 진화했으며 모든 증분 제품 제조 기술을 나타냅니다. 이는 이전 제작과는 다른 의미를 가지고 있지만, 자동 제어 하에 소재를 쌓아 올리는 3D 작업 제작 과정의 공통적 인 특징을 여전히 반영하고 있습니다 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ].

이 개발 시스템은 열 거품 분사 기술입니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하고 스프레이 유속을 평가하기 위해 다른 히터 직경과 캐비티 두께를 설계하는 것입니다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목적은 분사되는 DNA 용액의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 변환해야 하는 경우 부스트 컨버터가 유일한 선택입니다. 부스트 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 통해 전압을 충전하여 부스트 출력의 목적을 달성하고, MOSFET이 꺼지면 인덕터는 부하 정류를 통해 방전됩니다.

인덕터의 충전과 방전 사이의 변환 프로세스는 인덕터를 통한 전압의 방향을 반대로 한 다음 점차적으로 입력 작동 전압보다 높은 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET의 스위칭 듀티 사이클은 확실히 부스트 비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류와 부스트 컨버터의 부스트 비율은 부스트 ​​컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전압은 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 부스트 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정확한 제로 전류 턴 오프를 달성하여 부스트 변압기를 보다 효율적으로 만듭니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치를 통해 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링합니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 부스트 컨버터가 작동하기 시작하여 부스트 컨버터가 최대 전력 출력 지점으로 유리 기판에 DNA 인쇄를 하는 데 적합합니다. 일정한 온 타임 생성 회로를 통해 온 타임이 온도 및 칩의 코너 각도에 영향을 받지 않아 시스템의 안정성이 향상됩니다.

잉크젯 프린트 헤드에 사용되는 기술은 매우 중요합니다. 잉크젯 기술의 엄청난 발전은 주로 잉크젯 프린팅에 사용되는 대형 액적 이젝터 [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 ]를 포함하여 잉크젯 프린트 헤드 기술의 이론 개발에서 시작되었습니다 . 연속 잉크젯 시스템은 고주파 응답과 고속 인쇄의 장점을 가지고 있습니다. 잉크젯 헤드의 총 노즐 수는 수백 또는 수천에 달할 수 있으며 이러한 노즐은 매우 복잡합니다. 노즐은 풍부하고 조화로운 색상과 부드러운 메쉬 톤을 생성할 수 있습니다 [ 9 , 10 ,11 ]. 잉크젯은 열 거품 잉크젯, 압전 잉크젯 및 정전 식 잉크젯의 세 가지 주요 유형으로 분류할 수 있습니다. 다른 유형도 사용 중입니다. 압전 잉크젯의 기능은 다음과 같습니다. 많은 소형 압전 세라믹이 잉크젯 헤드 노즐 근처에 배치됩니다. 압전 결정은 전기장 아래에서 변형됩니다. 그 후, 잉크는 잉크 캐비티에서 압착되어 노즐에서 배출됩니다. 패턴의 데이터 신호는 압전 결정의 변형을 제어한 다음 분사되는 잉크의 양을 제어합니다. 압전 마이크로 전자 기계 시스템 (MEMS) 잉크젯 헤드는 하이브리드 인쇄에 사용됩니다. [ 12]. 열 버블 잉크젯 기술은 다음과 같이 작동합니다. 가열 펄스 (즉, 기록 신호) 하에서 노즐의 가열 구성 요소의 온도가 상승하여 근처의 잉크 용매를 증발시켜 많은 양의 작은 핵 기포를 생성합니다. 내부 기포의 부피가 지속적으로 증가합니다. 압력이 일정 수준에 도달하면 노즐에서 잉크가 분출되고 잉크가 기판 표면에 도달하여 패턴과 메시지가 표시됩니다 [ 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 18 ].

3 차원 (3D) 제품 프린팅 및 빠른 프로토 타입 기술의 발전에는 모든 빠른 프로토 타입의 생산 기술이 포함됩니다. 래피드 프로토 타입 기술은 기존 생산 방식과는 다르지만 3D 제품 프린팅 생산 과정의 일부 특성을 공유합니다. 구체적으로 자동 제어 [ 19 , 20 , 21 , 22 , 23 , 24 ] 하에서 자재를 쌓아 올립니다 .

이 연구에서 개발된 시스템은 열 기포 방출 기술을 사용했습니다. 이 빠른 어레이에 DNA 비드를 배치하기 위해 히터에 대해 다른 직경과 다른 공동 두께가 사용되었습니다. 그 후, 스프레이 유속을 평가했다. DNA 제트 칩의 부스트 회로 시스템은 큰 흐름을 구동하기위한 신호 소스입니다. 목표는 분사되는 DNA 액체의 양과 출력을 조정하는 것입니다. 입력 전압을 더 높은 출력 전압으로 수정해야하는 경우 승압 컨버터가 유일한 옵션입니다. 승압 컨버터는 내부 금속 산화물 반도체 전계 효과 트랜지스터 (MOSFET)를 충전하여 출력 전압을 증가시킵니다. MOSFET이 꺼지면 부하 정류를 통해 인덕턴스가 방전됩니다. 충전과 방전 사이에서 인덕터를 변경하는 과정은 인덕터를 통과하는 전압의 방향을 변경합니다. 전압은 입력 작동 전압을 초과하는 지점까지 점차적으로 증가합니다. MOSFET 스위치의 듀티 사이클은 부스트 ​​비율을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 승압 컨버터의 정격 전류와 부스트 비율은 승압 컨버터의 부하 전류의 상한을 결정합니다. MOSFET의 정격 전류는 출력 전압의 상한을 결정합니다. 일부 승압 컨버터는 정류기와 MOSFET을 통합하여 동기식 정류를 제공합니다. 통합 MOSFET은 정밀한 제로 전류 셧다운을 실현할 수 있으므로 셋업 컨버터의 효율성을 높일 수 있습니다. 최대 전력 점 추적 장치는 입력 전력을 실시간으로 모니터링하는 데 사용되었습니다. 입력 전압이 최대 입력 전력 지점에 도달하면 승압 컨버터가 작동을 시작합니다. 스텝 업 컨버터는 DNA 프린팅을 위한 최대 전력 출력 포인트가 있는 유리 기판에 사용됩니다.

MEMS Chip Design for Bubble Jet

이 연구는 히터 크기, 히터 번호 및 루프 저항과 같은 특정 매개 변수를 조작하여 5 가지 유형의 액체 배출 챔버 구조를 설계했습니다. 표 1 은 측정 결과를 나열합니다. 이 시스템은 다양한 히터의 루프 저항을 분석했습니다. 100 개 히터 설계를 완료하기 위해 2 세트의 히터를 사용하여 각 단일 회로 시리즈를 통과하기 때문에 100 개의 히터를 설계할 때 총 루프 저항은 히터 50 개의 총 루프 저항보다 하나 더 커야 합니다. 이 연구에서 MEMS 칩에서 기포를 배출하는 과정에서 저항 층의 면저항은 29 Ω / m 2입니다. 따라서 모델 A의 총 루프 저항이 가장 컸습니다. 일반 사이즈 모델 (모델 B1, C, D, E)의 두 배였습니다. 모델 B1, C, D 및 E의 총 루프 저항은 약 29 Ω / m 2 입니다. 표 1 에 따르면 오류 범위는 허용된 설계 값 이내였습니다. 따라서야 연구에서 설계된 각 유형의 단일 칩은 동일한 생산 절차 결과를 가지며 후속 유량 측정에 사용되었습니다.

Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circuit resistance.
Table 1. List of resistance measurement of single circu