Predicting solid-state phase transformations during metal additive manufacturing: A case study on electron-beam powder bed fusion of Inconel-738

Predicting solid-state phase transformations during metal additive manufacturing: A case study on electron-beam powder bed fusion of Inconel-738

금속 적층 제조 중 고체 상 변형 예측: Inconel-738의 전자빔 분말층 융합에 대한 사례 연구

Nana Kwabena Adomako a, Nima Haghdadi a, James F.L. Dingle bc, Ernst Kozeschnik d, Xiaozhou Liao bc, Simon P. Ringer bc, Sophie Primig a

Abstract

Metal additive manufacturing (AM) has now become the perhaps most desirable technique for producing complex shaped engineering parts. However, to truly take advantage of its capabilities, advanced control of AM microstructures and properties is required, and this is often enabled via modeling. The current work presents a computational modeling approach to studying the solid-state phase transformation kinetics and the microstructural evolution during AM. Our approach combines thermal and thermo-kinetic modelling. A semi-analytical heat transfer model is employed to simulate the thermal history throughout AM builds. Thermal profiles of individual layers are then used as input for the MatCalc thermo-kinetic software. The microstructural evolution (e.g., fractions, morphology, and composition of individual phases) for any region of interest throughout the build is predicted by MatCalc. The simulation is applied to an IN738 part produced by electron beam powder bed fusion to provide insights into how γ′ precipitates evolve during thermal cycling. Our simulations show qualitative agreement with our experimental results in predicting the size distribution of γ′ along the build height, its multimodal size character, as well as the volume fraction of MC carbides. Our findings indicate that our method is suitable for a range of AM processes and alloys, to predict and engineer their microstructures and properties.

Graphical Abstract

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Keywords

Additive manufacturing, Simulation, Thermal cycles, γ′ phase, IN738

1. Introduction

Additive manufacturing (AM) is an advanced manufacturing method that enables engineering parts with intricate shapes to be fabricated with high efficiency and minimal materials waste. AM involves building up 3D components layer-by-layer from feedstocks such as powder [1]. Various alloys, including steel, Ti, Al, and Ni-based superalloys, have been produced using different AM techniques. These techniques include directed energy deposition (DED), electron- and laser powder bed fusion (E-PBF and L-PBF), and have found applications in a variety of industries such as aerospace and power generation [2][3][4]. Despite the growing interest, certain challenges limit broader applications of AM fabricated components in these industries and others. One of such limitations is obtaining a suitable and reproducible microstructure that offers the desired mechanical properties consistently. In fact, the AM as-built microstructure is highly complex and considerably distinctive from its conventionally processed counterparts owing to the complicated thermal cycles arising from the deposition of several layers upon each other [5][6].

Several studies have reported that the solid-state phases and solidification microstructure of AM processed alloys such as CMSX-4, CoCr [7][8], Ti-6Al-4V [9][10][11]IN738 [6]304L stainless steel [12], and IN718 [13][14] exhibit considerable variations along the build direction. For instance, references [9][10] have reported that there is a variation in the distribution of α and β phases along the build direction in Ti-alloys. Similarly, the microstructure of an L-PBF fabricated martensitic steel exhibits variations in the fraction of martensite [15]. Furthermore, some of the present authors and others [6][16][17][18][19][20] have recently reviewed and reported that there is a difference in the morphology and fraction of nanoscale precipitates as a function of build height in Ni-based superalloys. These non-uniformities in the as-built microstructure result in an undesired heterogeneity in mechanical and other important properties such as corrosion and oxidation [19][21][22][23]. To obtain the desired microstructure and properties, additional processing treatments are utilized, but this incurs extra costs and may lead to precipitation of detrimental phases and grain coarsening. Therefore, a through-process understanding of the microstructure evolution under repeated heating and cooling is now needed to further advance 3D printed microstructure and property control.

It is now commonly understood that the microstructure evolution during printing is complex, and most AM studies concentrate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the final build only. Post-printing studies of microstructure characteristics at room temperature miss crucial information on how they evolve. In-situ measurements and modelling approaches are required to better understand the complex microstructural evolution under repeated heating and cooling. Most in-situ measurements in AM focus on monitoring the microstructural changes, such as phase transformations and melt pool dynamics during fabrication using X-ray scattering and high-speed X-ray imaging [24][25][26][27]. For example, Zhao et al. [25] measured the rate of solidification and described the α/β phase transformation during L-PBF of Ti-6Al-4V in-situ. Also, Wahlmann et al. [21] recently used an L-PBF machine coupled with X-ray scattering to investigate the changes in CMSX-4 phase during successive melting processes. Although these techniques provide significant understanding of the basic principles of AM, they are not widely accessible. This is due to the great cost of the instrument, competitive application process, and complexities in terms of the experimental set-up, data collection, and analysis [26][28].

Computational modeling techniques are promising and more widely accessible tools that enable advanced understanding, prediction, and engineering of microstructures and properties during AM. So far, the majority of computational studies have concentrated on physics based process models for metal AM, with the goal of predicting the temperature profile, heat transfer, powder dynamics, and defect formation (e.g., porosity) [29][30]. In recent times, there have been efforts in modeling of the AM microstructure evolution using approaches such as phase-field [31], Monte Carlo (MC) [32], and cellular automata (CA) [33], coupled with finite element simulations for temperature profiles. However, these techniques are often restricted to simulating the evolution of solidification microstructures (e.g., grain and dendrite structure) and defects (e.g., porosity). For example, Zinovieva et al. [33] predicted the grain structure of L-PBF Ti-6Al-4V using finite difference and cellular automata methods. However, studies on the computational modelling of the solid-state phase transformations, which largely determine the resulting properties, remain limited. This can be attributed to the multi-component and multi-phase nature of most engineering alloys in AM, along with the complex transformation kinetics during thermal cycling. This kind of research involves predictions of the thermal cycle in AM builds, and connecting it to essential thermodynamic and kinetic data as inputs for the model. Based on the information provided, the thermokinetic model predicts the history of solid-state phase microstructure evolution during deposition as output. For example, a multi-phase, multi-component mean-field model has been developed to simulate the intermetallic precipitation kinetics in IN718 [34] and IN625 [35] during AM. Also, Basoalto et al. [36] employed a computational framework to examine the contrasting distributions of process-induced microvoids and precipitates in two Ni-based superalloys, namely IN718 and CM247LC. Furthermore, McNamara et al. [37] established a computational model based on the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami model for non-isothermal conditions to predict solid-state phase transformation kinetics in L-PBF IN718 and DED Ti-6Al-4V. These models successfully predicted the size and volume fraction of individual phases and captured the repeated nucleation and dissolution of precipitates that occur during AM.

In the current study, we propose a modeling approach with appreciably short computational time to investigate the detailed microstructural evolution during metal AM. This may include obtaining more detailed information on the morphologies of phases, such as size distribution, phase fraction, dissolution and nucleation kinetics, as well as chemistry during thermal cycling and final cooling to room temperature. We utilize the combination of the MatCalc thermo-kinetic simulator and a semi-analytical heat conduction model. MatCalc is a software suite for simulation of phase transformations, microstructure evolution and certain mechanical properties in engineering alloys. It has successfully been employed to simulate solid-state phase transformations in Ni-based superalloys [38][39], steels [40], and Al alloys [41] during complex thermo-mechanical processes. MatCalc uses the classical nucleation theory as well as the so-called Svoboda-Fischer-Fratzl-Kozeschnik (SFFK) growth model as the basis for simulating precipitation kinetics [42]. Although MatCalc was originally developed for conventional thermo-mechanical processes, we will show that it is also applicable for AM if the detailed time-temperature profile of the AM build is known. The semi-analytical heat transfer code developed by Stump and Plotkowski [43] is used to simulate these profile throughout the AM build.

1.1. Application to IN738

Inconel-738 (IN738) is a precipitation hardening Ni-based superalloy mainly employed in high-temperature components, e.g. in gas turbines and aero-engines owing to its exceptional mechanical properties at temperatures up to 980 °C, coupled with high resistance to oxidation and corrosion [44]. Its superior high-temperature strength (∼1090 MPa tensile strength) is provided by the L12 ordered Ni3(Al,Ti) γ′ phase that precipitates in a face-centered cubic (FCC) γ matrix [45][46]. Despite offering great properties, IN738, like most superalloys with high γ′ fractions, is challenging to process owing to its propensity to hot cracking [47][48]. Further, machining of such alloys is challenging because of their high strength and work-hardening rates. It is therefore difficult to fabricate complex INC738 parts using traditional manufacturing techniques like casting, welding, and forging.

The emergence of AM has now made it possible to fabricate such parts from IN738 and other superalloys. Some of the current authors’ recent research successfully applied E-PBF to fabricate defect-free IN738 containing γ′ throughout the build [16][17]. The precipitated γ′ were heterogeneously distributed. In particular, Haghdadi et al. [16] studied the origin of the multimodal size distribution of γ′, while Lim et al. [17] investigated the gradient in γ′ character with build height and its correlation to mechanical properties. Based on these results, the present study aims to extend the understanding of the complex and site-specific microstructural evolution in E-PBF IN738 by using a computational modelling approach. New experimental evidence (e.g., micrographs not published previously) is presented here to support the computational results.

2. Materials and Methods

2.1. Materials preparation

IN738 Ni-based superalloy (59.61Ni-8.48Co-7.00Al-17.47Cr-3.96Ti-1.01Mo-0.81W-0.56Ta-0.49Nb-0.47C-0.09Zr-0.05B, at%) gas-atomized powder was used as feedstock. The powders, with average size of 60 ± 7 µm, were manufactured by Praxair and distributed by Astro Alloys Inc. An Arcam Q10 machine by GE Additive with an acceleration voltage of 60 kV was used to fabricate a 15 × 15 × 25 mm3 block (XYZ, Z: build direction) on a 316 stainless steel substrate. The block was 3D-printed using a ‘random’ spot melt pattern. The random spot melt pattern involves randomly selecting points in any given layer, with an equal chance of each point being melted. Each spot melt experienced a dwell time of 0.3 ms, and the layer thickness was 50 µm. Some of the current authors have previously characterized the microstructure of the very same and similar builds in more detail [16][17]. A preheat temperature of ∼1000 °C was set and kept during printing to reduce temperature gradients and, in turn, thermal stresses [49][50][51]. Following printing, the build was separated from the substrate through electrical discharge machining. It should be noted that this sample was simultaneously printed with the one used in [17] during the same build process and on the same build plate, under identical conditions.

2.2. Microstructural characterization

The printed sample was longitudinally cut in the direction of the build using a Struers Accutom-50, ground, and then polished to 0.25 µm suspension via standard techniques. The polished x-z surface was electropolished and etched using Struers A2 solution (perchloric acid in ethanol). Specimens for image analysis were polished using a 0.06 µm colloidal silica. Microstructure analyses were carried out across the height of the build using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with focus on the microstructure evolution (γ′ precipitates) in individual layers. The position of each layer being analyzed was determined by multiplying the layer number by the layer thickness (50 µm). It should be noted that the position of the first layer starts where the thermal profile is tracked (in this case, 2 mm from the bottom). SEM images were acquired using a JEOL 7001 field emission microscope. The brightness and contrast settings, acceleration voltage of 15 kV, working distance of 10 mm, and other SEM imaging parameters were all held constant for analysis of the entire build. The ImageJ software was used for automated image analysis to determine the phase fraction and size of γ′ precipitates and carbides. A 2-pixel radius Gaussian blur, following a greyscale thresholding and watershed segmentation was used [52]. Primary γ′ sizes (>50 nm), were measured using equivalent spherical diameters. The phase fractions were considered equal to the measured area fraction. Secondary γ′ particles (<50 nm) were not considered here. The γ′ size in the following refers to the diameter of a precipitate.

2.3. Hardness testing

A Struers DuraScan tester was utilized for Vickers hardness mapping on a polished x-z surface, from top to bottom under a maximum load of 100 mN and 10 s dwell time. 30 micro-indentations were performed per row. According to the ASTM standard [53], the indentations were sufficiently distant (∼500 µm) to assure that strain-hardened areas did not interfere with one another.

2.4. Computational simulation of E-PBF IN738 build

2.4.1. Thermal profile modeling

The thermal history was generated using the semi-analytical heat transfer code (also known as the 3DThesis code) developed by Stump and Plotkowski [43]. This code is an open-source C++ program which provides a way to quickly simulate the conductive heat transfer found in welding and AM. The key use case for the code is the simulation of larger domains than is practicable with Computational Fluid Dynamics/Finite Element Analysis programs like FLOW-3D AM. Although simulating conductive heat transfer will not be an appropriate simplification for some investigations (for example the modelling of keyholding or pore formation), the 3DThesis code does provide fast estimates of temperature, thermal gradient, and solidification rate which can be useful for elucidating microstructure formation across entire layers of an AM build. The mathematics involved in the code is as follows:

In transient thermal conduction during welding and AM, with uniform and constant thermophysical properties and without considering fluid convection and latent heat effects, energy conservation can be expressed as:(1)��∂�∂�=�∇2�+�̇where � is density, � specific heat, � temperature, � time, � thermal conductivity, and �̇ a volumetric heat source. By assuming a semi-infinite domain, Eq. 1 can be analytically solved. The solution for temperature at a given time (t) using a volumetric Gaussian heat source is presented as:(2)��,�,�,�−�0=33�����32∫0�1������exp−3�′�′2��+�′�′2��+�′�′2����′(3)and��=12��−�′+��2for�=�,�,�(4)and�′�′=�−���′Where � is the vector �,�,� and �� is the location of the heat source.

The numerical integration scheme used is an adaptive Gaussian quadrature method based on the following nondimensionalization:(5)�=��xy2�,�′=��xy2�′,�=��xy,�=��xy,�=��xy,�=���xy

A more detailed explanation of the mathematics can be found in reference [43].

The main source of the thermal cycling present within a powder-bed fusion process is the fusion of subsequent layers. Therefore, regions near the top of a build are expected to undergo fewer thermal cycles than those closer to the bottom. For this purpose, data from the single scan’s thermal influence on multiple layers was spliced to represent the thermal cycles experienced at a single location caused by multiple subsequent layers being fused.

The cross-sectional area simulated by this model was kept constant at 1 × 1 mm2, and the depth was dependent on the build location modelled with MatCalc. For a build location 2 mm from the bottom, the maximum number of layers to simulate is 460. Fig. 1a shows a stitched overview OM image of the entire build indicating the region where this thermal cycle is simulated and tracked. To increase similarity with the conditions of the physical build, each thermal history was constructed from the results of two simulations generated with different versions of a random scan path. The parameters used for these thermal simulations can be found in Table 1. It should be noted that the main purpose of the thermal profile modelling was to demonstrate how the conditions at different locations of the build change relative to each other. Accurately predicting the absolute temperature during the build would require validation via a temperature sensor measurement during the build process which is beyond the scope of the study. Nonetheless, to establish the viability of the heat source as a suitable approximation for this study, an additional sensitivity analysis was conducted. This analysis focused on the influence of energy input on γ′ precipitation behavior, the central aim of this paper. This was achieved by employing varying beam absorption energies (0.76, 0.82 – the values utilized in the simulation, and 0.9). The direct impact of beam absorption efficiency on energy input into the material was investigated. Specifically, the initial 20 layers of the build were simulated and subsequently compared to experimental data derived from SEM. While phase fractions were found to be consistent across all conditions, disparities emerged in the mean size of γ′ precipitates. An absorption efficiency of 0.76 yielded a mean size of approximately 70 nm. Conversely, absorption efficiencies of 0.82 and 0.9 exhibited remarkably similar mean sizes of around 130 nm, aligning closely with the outcomes of the experiments.

Fig. 1

Table 1. A list of parameters used in thermal simulation of E-PBF.

ParameterValue
Spatial resolution5 µm
Time step0.5 s
Beam diameter200 µm
Beam penetration depth1 µm
Beam power1200 W
Beam absorption efficiency0.82
Thermal conductivity25.37 W/(m⋅K)
Chamber temperature1000 °C
Specific heat711.756 J/(kg⋅K)
Density8110 kg/m3

2.4.2. Thermo-kinetic simulation

The numerical analyses of the evolution of precipitates was performed using MatCalc version 6.04 (rel 0.011). The thermodynamic (‘mc_ni.tdb’, version 2.034) and diffusion (‘mc_ni.ddb’, version 2.007) databases were used. MatCalc’s basic principles are elaborated as follows:

The nucleation kinetics of precipitates are computed using a computational technique based on a classical nucleation theory [54] that has been modified for systems with multiple components [42][55]. Accordingly, the transient nucleation rate (�), which expresses the rate at which nuclei are formed per unit volume and time, is calculated as:(6)�=�0��*∙�xp−�*�∙�∙exp−��where �0 denotes the number of active nucleation sites, �* the rate of atomic attachment, � the Boltzmann constant, � the temperature, �* the critical energy for nucleus formation, τ the incubation time, and t the time. � (Zeldovich factor) takes into consideration that thermal excitation destabilizes the nucleus as opposed to its inactive state [54]. Z is defined as follows:(7)�=−12�kT∂2∆�∂�2�*12where ∆� is the overall change in free energy due to the formation of a nucleus and n is the nucleus’ number of atoms. ∆�’s derivative is evaluated at n* (critical nucleus size). �* accounts for the long-range diffusion of atoms required for nucleation, provided that the matrix’ and precipitates’ composition differ. Svoboda et al. [42] developed an appropriate multi-component equation for �*, which is given by:(8)�*=4��*2�4�∑�=1��ki−�0�2�0��0�−1where �* denotes the critical radius for nucleation, � represents atomic distance, and � is the molar volume. �ki and �0� represent the concentration of elements in the precipitate and matrix, respectively. The parameter �0� denotes the rate of diffusion of the ith element within the matrix. The expression for the incubation time � is expressed as [54]:(9)�=12�*�2

and �*, which represents the critical energy for nucleation:(10)�*=16�3�3∆�vol2where � is the interfacial energy, and ∆Gvol the change in the volume free energy. The critical nucleus’ composition is similar to the γ′ phase’s equilibrium composition at the same temperature. � is computed based on the precipitate and matrix compositions, using a generalized nearest neighbor broken bond model, with the assumption of interfaces being planar, sharp, and coherent [56][57][58].

In Eq. 7, it is worth noting that �* represents the fundamental variable in the nucleation theory. It contains �3/∆�vol2 and is in the exponent of the nucleation rate. Therefore, even small variations in γ and/or ∆�vol can result in notable changes in �, especially if �* is in the order of �∙�. This is demonstrated in [38] for UDIMET 720 Li during continuous cooling, where these quantities change steadily during precipitation due to their dependence on matrix’ and precipitate’s temperature and composition. In the current work, these changes will be even more significant as the system is exposed to multiple cycles of rapid cooling and heating.

Once nucleated, the growth of a precipitate is assessed using the radius and composition evolution equations developed by Svoboda et al. [42] with a mean-field method that employs the thermodynamic extremal principle. The expression for the total Gibbs free energy of a thermodynamic system G, which consists of n components and m precipitates, is given as follows:(11)�=∑���0��0�+∑�=1�4���33��+∑�=1��ki�ki+∑�=1�4���2��.

The chemical potential of component � in the matrix is denoted as �0�(�=1,…,�), while the chemical potential of component � in the precipitate is represented by �ki(�=1,…,�,�=1,…,�). These chemical potentials are defined as functions of the concentrations �ki(�=1,…,�,�=1,…,�). The interface energy density is denoted as �, and �� incorporates the effects of elastic energy and plastic work resulting from the volume change of each precipitate.

Eq. (12) establishes that the total free energy of the system in its current state relies on the independent state variables: the sizes (radii) of the precipitates �� and the concentrations of each component �ki. The remaining variables can be determined by applying the law of mass conservation to each component �. This can be represented by the equation:(12)��=�0�+∑�=1�4���33�ki,

Furthermore, the global mass conservation can be expressed by equation:(13)�=∑�=1���When a thermodynamic system transitions to a more stable state, the energy difference between the initial and final stages is dissipated. This model considers three distinct forms of dissipation effects [42]. These include dissipations caused by the movement of interfaces, diffusion within the precipitate and diffusion within the matrix.

Consequently, �̇� (growth rate) and �̇ki (chemical composition’s rate of change) of the precipitate with index � are derived from the linear system of equation system:(14)�ij��=��where �� symbolizes the rates �̇� and �̇ki [42]. Index i contains variables for precipitate radius, chemical composition, and stoichiometric boundary conditions suggested by the precipitate’s crystal structure. Eq. (10) is computed separately for every precipitate �. For a more detailed description of the formulae for the coefficients �ij and �� employed in this work please refer to [59].

The MatCalc software was used to perform the numerical time integration of �̇� and �̇ki of precipitates based on the classical numerical method by Kampmann and Wagner [60]. Detailed information on this method can be found in [61]. Using this computational method, calculations for E-PBF thermal cycles (cyclic heating and cooling) were computed and compared to experimental data. The simulation took approximately 2–4 hrs to complete on a standard laptop.

3. Results

3.1. Microstructure

Fig. 1 displays a stitched overview image and selected SEM micrographs of various γ′ morphologies and carbides after observations of the X-Z surface of the build from the top to 2 mm above the bottom. Fig. 2 depicts a graph that charts the average size and phase fraction of the primary γ′, as it changes with distance from the top to the bottom of the build. The SEM micrographs show widespread primary γ′ precipitation throughout the entire build, with the size increasing in the top to bottom direction. Particularly, at the topmost height, representing the 460th layer (Z = 22.95 mm), as seen in Fig. 1b, the average size of γ′ is 110 ± 4 nm, exhibiting spherical shapes. This is representative of the microstructure after it solidifies and cools to room temperature, without experiencing additional thermal cycles. The γ′ size slightly increases to 147 ± 6 nm below this layer and remains constant until 0.4 mm (∼453rd layer) from the top. At this position, the microstructure still closely resembles that of the 460th layer. After the 453rd layer, the γ′ size grows rapidly to ∼503 ± 19 nm until reaching the 437th layer (1.2 mm from top). The γ′ particles here have a cuboidal shape, and a small fraction is coarser than 600 nm. γ′ continue to grow steadily from this position to the bottom (23 mm from the top). A small fraction of γ′ is > 800 nm.

Fig. 2

Besides primary γ′, secondary γ′ with sizes ranging from 5 to 50 nm were also found. These secondary γ′ precipitates, as seen in Fig. 1f, were present only in the bottom and middle regions. A detailed analysis of the multimodal size distribution of γ′ can be found in [16]. There is no significant variation in the phase fraction of the γ′ along the build. The phase fraction is ∼ 52%, as displayed in Fig. 2. It is worth mentioning that the total phase fraction of γ′ was estimated based on the primary γ′ phase fraction because of the small size of secondary γ′. Spherical MC carbides with sizes ranging from 50 to 400 nm and a phase fraction of 0.8% were also observed throughout the build. The carbides are the light grey precipitates in Fig. 1g. The light grey shade of carbides in the SEM images is due to their composition and crystal structure [52]. These carbides are not visible in Fig. 1b-e because they were dissolved during electro-etching carried out after electropolishing. In Fig. 1g, however, the sample was examined directly after electropolishing, without electro-etching.

Table 2 shows the nominal and measured composition of γ′ precipitates throughout the build by atom probe microscopy as determined in our previous study [17]. No build height-dependent composition difference was observed in either of the γ′ precipitate populations. However, there was a slight disparity between the composition of primary and secondary γ′. Among the main γ′ forming elements, the primary γ′ has a high Ti concentration while secondary γ′ has a high Al concentration. A detailed description of the atom distribution maps and the proxigrams of the constituent elements of γ′ throughout the build can be found in [17].

Table 2. Bulk IN738 composition determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Compositions of γ, primary γ′, and secondary γ′ at various locations in the build measured by APT. This information is reproduced from data in Ref. [17] with permission.

at%NiCrCoAlMoWTiNbCBZrTaOthers
Bulk59.1217.478.487.001.010.813.960.490.470.050.090.560.46
γ matrix
Top50.4832.9111.591.941.390.820.440.80.030.030.020.24
Mid50.3732.6111.931.791.540.890.440.10.030.020.020.010.23
Bot48.1034.5712.082.141.430.880.480.080.040.030.010.12
Primary γ′
Top72.172.513.4412.710.250.397.780.560.030.020.050.08
Mid71.602.573.2813.550.420.687.040.730.010.030.040.04
Bot72.342.473.8612.500.260.447.460.500.050.020.020.030.04
Secondary γ′
Mid70.424.203.2314.190.631.035.340.790.030.040.040.05
Bot69.914.063.6814.320.811.045.220.650.050.100.020.11

3.2. Hardness

Fig. 3a shows the Vickers hardness mapping performed along the entire X-Z surface, while Fig. 3b shows the plot of average hardness at different build heights. This hardness distribution is consistent with the γ′ precipitate size gradient across the build direction in Fig. 1Fig. 2. The maximum hardness of ∼530 HV1 is found at ∼0.5 mm away from the top surface (Z = 22.5), where γ′ particles exhibit the smallest observed size in Fig. 2b. Further down the build (∼ 2 mm from the top), the hardness drops to the 440–490 HV1 range. This represents the region where γ′ begins to coarsen. The hardness drops further to 380–430 HV1 at the bottom of the build.

Fig. 3

3.3. Modeling of the microstructural evolution during E-PBF

3.3.1. Thermal profile modeling

Fig. 4 shows the simulated thermal profile of the E-PBF build at a location of 23 mm from the top of the build, using a semi-analytical heat conduction model. This profile consists of the time taken to deposit 460 layers until final cooling, as shown in Fig. 4a. Fig. 4b-d show the magnified regions of Fig. 4a and reveal the first 20 layers from the top, a single layer (first layer from the top), and the time taken for the build to cool after the last layer deposition, respectively.

Fig. 4

The peak temperatures experienced by previous layers decrease progressively as the number of layers increases but never fall below the build preheat temperature (1000 °C). Our simulated thermal cycle may not completely capture the complexity of the actual thermal cycle utilized in the E-PBF build. For instance, the top layer (Fig. 4c), also representing the first deposit’s thermal profile without additional cycles (from powder heating, melting, to solidification), recorded the highest peak temperature of 1390 °C. Although this temperature is above the melting range of the alloy (1230–1360 °C) [62], we believe a much higher temperature was produced by the electron beam to melt the powder. Nevertheless, the solidification temperature and dynamics are outside the scope of this study as our focus is on the solid-state phase transformations during deposition. It takes ∼25 s for each layer to be deposited and cooled to the build temperature. The interlayer dwell time is 125 s. The time taken for the build to cool to room temperature (RT) after final layer deposition is ∼4.7 hrs (17,000 s).

3.3.2. MatCalc simulation

During the MatCalc simulation, the matrix phase is defined as γ. γ′, and MC carbide are included as possible precipitates. The domain of these precipitates is set to be the matrix (γ), and nucleation is assumed to be homogenous. In homogeneous nucleation, all atoms of the unit volume are assumed to be potential nucleation sitesTable 3 shows the computational parameters used in the simulation. All other parameters were set at default values as recommended in the version 6.04.0011 of MatCalc. The values for the interfacial energies are automatically calculated according to the generalized nearest neighbor broken bond model and is one of the most outstanding features in MatCalc [56][57][58]. It should be noted that the elastic misfit strain was not included in the calculation. The output of MatCalc includes phase fraction, size, nucleation rate, and composition of the precipitates. The phase fraction in MatCalc is the volume fraction. Although the experimental phase fraction is the measured area fraction, it is relatively similar to the volume fraction. This is because of the generally larger precipitate size and similar morphology at the various locations along the build [63]. A reliable phase fraction comparison between experiment and simulation can therefore be made.

Table 3. Computational parameters used in the simulation.

Precipitation domainγ
Nucleation site γ′Bulk (homogenous)
Nucleation site MC carbideBulk (Homogenous)
Precipitates class size250
Regular solution critical temperature γ′2500 K[64]
Calculated interfacial energyγ′ = 0.080–0.140 J/m2 and MC carbide = 0.410–0.430 J/m2
3.3.2.1. Precipitate phase fraction

Fig. 5a shows the simulated phase fraction of γ′ and MC carbide during thermal cycling. Fig. 5b is a magnified view of 5a showing the simulated phase fraction at the center points of the top 70 layers, whereas Fig. 5c corresponds to the first two layers from the top. As mentioned earlier, the top layer (460th layer) represents the microstructure after solidification. The microstructure of the layers below is determined by the number of thermal cycles, which increases with distance to the top. For example, layers 459, 458, 457, up to layer 1 (region of interest) experience 1, 2, 3 and 459 thermal cycles, respectively. In the top layer in Fig. 5c, the volume fraction of γ′ and carbides increases with temperature. For γ′, it decreases to zero when the temperature is above the solvus temperature after a few seconds. Carbides, however, remain constant in their volume fraction reaching equilibrium (phase fraction ∼ 0.9%) in a short time. The topmost layer can be compared to the first deposit, and the peak in temperature symbolizes the stage where the electron beam heats the powder until melting. This means γ′ and carbide precipitation might have started in the powder particles during heating from the build temperature and electron beam until the onset of melting, where γ′ dissolves, but carbides remain stable [28].

Fig. 5

During cooling after deposition, γ′ reprecipitates at a temperature of 1085 °C, which is below its solvus temperature. As cooling progresses, the phase fraction increases steadily to ∼27% and remains constant at 1000 °C (elevated build temperature). The calculated equilibrium fraction of phases by MatCalc is used to show the complex precipitation characteristics in this alloy. Fig. 6 shows that MC carbides form during solidification at 1320 °C, followed by γ′, which precipitate when the solidified layer cools to 1140 °C. This indicates that all deposited layers might contain a negligible amount of these precipitates before subsequent layer deposition, while being at the 1000 °C build temperature or during cooling to RT. The phase diagram also shows that the equilibrium fraction of the γ′ increases as temperature decreases. For instance, at 1000, 900, and 800 °C, the phase fractions are ∼30%, 38%, and 42%, respectively.

Fig. 6

Deposition of subsequent layers causes previous layers to undergo phase transformations as they are exposed to several thermal cycles with different peak temperatures. In Fig. 5c, as the subsequent layer is being deposited, γ′ in the previous layer (459th layer) begins to dissolve as the temperature crosses the solvus temperature. This is witnessed by the reduction of the γ′ phase fraction. This graph also shows how this phase dissolves during heating. However, the phase fraction of MC carbide remains stable at high temperatures and no dissolution is seen during thermal cycling. Upon cooling, the γ′ that was dissolved during heating reprecipitates with a surge in the phase fraction until 1000 °C, after which it remains constant. This microstructure is similar to the solidification microstructure (layer 460), with a similar γ′ phase fraction (∼27%).

The complete dissolution and reprecipitation of γ′ continue for several cycles until the 50th layer from the top (layer 411), where the phase fraction does not reach zero during heating to the peak temperature (see Fig. 5d). This indicates the ‘partial’ dissolution of γ′, which continues progressively with additional layers. It should be noted that the peak temperatures for layers that underwent complete dissolution were much higher (1170–1300 °C) than the γ′ solvus.

The dissolution and reprecipitation of γ′ during thermal cycling are further confirmed in Fig. 7, which summarizes the nucleation rate, phase fraction, and concentration of major elements that form γ′ in the matrix. Fig. 7b magnifies a single layer (3rd layer from top) within the full dissolution region in Fig. 7a to help identify the nucleation and growth mechanisms. From Fig. 7b, γ′ nucleation begins during cooling whereby the nucleation rate increases to reach a maximum value of approximately 1 × 1020 m−3s−1. This fast kinetics implies that some rearrangement of atoms is required for γ′ precipitates to form in the matrix [65][66]. The matrix at this stage is in a non-equilibrium condition. Its composition is similar to the nominal composition and remains unchanged. The phase fraction remains insignificant at this stage although nucleation has started. The nucleation rate starts declining upon reaching the peak value. Simultaneously, diffusion-controlled growth of existing nuclei occurs, depleting the matrix of γ′ forming elements (Al and Ti). Thus, from (7)(11), ∆�vol continuously decreases until nucleation ceases. The growth of nuclei is witnessed by the increase in phase fraction until a constant level is reached at 27% upon cooling to and holding at build temperature. This nucleation event is repeated several times.

Fig. 7

At the onset of partial dissolution, the nucleation rate jumps to 1 × 1021 m−3s−1, and then reduces sharply at the middle stage of partial dissolution. The nucleation rate reaches 0 at a later stage. Supplementary Fig. S1 shows a magnified view of the nucleation rate, phase fraction, and thermal profile, underpinning this trend. The jump in nucleation rate at the onset is followed by a progressive reduction in the solute content of the matrix. The peak temperatures (∼1130–1160 °C) are lower than those in complete dissolution regions but still above or close to the γ′ solvus. The maximum phase fraction (∼27%) is similar to that of the complete dissolution regions. At the middle stage, the reduction in nucleation rate is accompanied by a sharp drop in the matrix composition. The γ′ fraction drops to ∼24%, where the peak temperatures of the layers are just below or at γ′ solvus. The phase fraction then increases progressively through the later stage of partial dissolution to ∼30% towards the end of thermal cycling. The matrix solute content continues to drop although no nucleation event is seen. The peak temperatures are then far below the γ′ solvus. It should be noted that the matrix concentration after complete dissolution remains constant. Upon cooling to RT after final layer deposition, the nucleation rate increases again, indicating new nucleation events. The phase fraction reaches ∼40%, with a further depletion of the matrix in major γ′ forming elements.

3.3.2.2. γ′ size distribution

Fig. 8 shows histograms of the γ′ precipitate size distributions (PSD) along the build height during deposition. These PSDs are predicted at the end of each layer of interest just before final cooling to room temperature, to separate the role of thermal cycles from final cooling on the evolution of γ′. The PSD for the top layer (layer 460) is shown in Fig. 8a (last solidified region with solidification microstructure). The γ′ size ranges from 120 to 230 nm and is similar to the 44 layers below (2.2 mm from the top).

Fig. 8

Further down the build, γ′ begins to coarsen after layer 417 (44th layer from top). Fig. 8c shows the PSD after the 44th layer, where the γ′ size exhibits two peaks at ∼120–230 and ∼300 nm, with most of the population being in the former range. This is the onset of partial dissolution where simultaneously with the reprecipitation and growth of fresh γ′, the undissolved γ′ grows rapidly through diffusive transport of atoms to the precipitates. This is shown in Fig. 8c, where the precipitate class sizes between 250 and 350 represent the growth of undissolved γ′. Although this continues in the 416th layer, the phase fractions plot indicates that the onset of partial dissolution begins after the 411th layer. This implies that partial dissolution started early, but the fraction of undissolved γ′ was too low to impact the phase fraction. The reprecipitated γ′ are mostly in the 100–220 nm class range and similar to those observed during full dissolution.

As the number of layers increases, coarsening intensifies with continued growth of more undissolved γ′, and reprecipitation and growth of partially dissolved ones. Fig. 8d, e, and f show this sequence. Further down the build, coarsening progresses rapidly, as shown in Figs. 8d, 8e, and 8f. The γ′ size ranges from 120 to 1100 nm, with the peaks at 160, 180, and 220 nm in Figs. 8d, 8e, and 8f, respectively. Coarsening continues until nucleation ends during dissolution, where only the already formed γ′ precipitates continue to grow during further thermal cycling. The γ′ size at this point is much larger, as observed in layers 361 and 261, and continues to increase steadily towards the bottom (layer 1). Two populations in the ranges of ∼380–700 and ∼750–1100 nm, respectively, can be seen. The steady growth of γ′ towards the bottom is confirmed by the gradual decrease in the concentration of solute elements in the matrix (Fig. 7a). It should be noted that for each layer, the γ′ class with the largest size originates from continuous growth of the earliest set of the undissolved precipitates.

Fig. 9Fig. 10 and supplementary Figs. S2 and S3 show the γ′ size evolution during heating and cooling of a single layer in the full dissolution region, and early, middle stages, and later stages of partial dissolution, respectively. In all, the size of γ′ reduces during layer heating. Depending on the peak temperature of the layer which varies with build height, γ′ are either fully or partially dissolved as mentioned earlier. Upon cooling, the dissolved γ′ reprecipitate.

Fig. 9
Fig. 10

In Fig. 9, those layers that underwent complete dissolution (top layers) were held above γ′ solvus temperature for longer. In Fig. 10, layers at the early stage of partial dissolution spend less time in the γ′ solvus temperature region during heating, leading to incomplete dissolution. In such conditions, smaller precipitates are fully dissolved while larger ones shrink [67]. Layers in the middle stages of partial dissolution have peak temperatures just below or at γ′ solvus, not sufficient to achieve significant γ′ dissolution. As seen in supplementary Fig. S2, only a few smaller γ′ are dissolved back into the matrix during heating, i.e., growth of precipitates is more significant than dissolution. This explains the sharp decrease in concentration of Al and Ti in the matrix in this layer.

The previous sections indicate various phenomena such as an increase in phase fraction, further depletion of matrix composition, and new nucleation bursts during cooling. Analysis of the PSD after the final cooling of the build to room temperature allows a direct comparison to post-printing microstructural characterization. Fig. 11 shows the γ′ size distribution of layer 1 (460th layer from the top) after final cooling to room temperature. Precipitation of secondary γ′ is observed, leading to the multimodal size distribution of secondary and primary γ′. The secondary γ′ size falls within the 10–80 nm range. As expected, a further growth of the existing primary γ′ is also observed during cooling.

Fig. 11
3.3.2.3. γ′ chemistry after deposition

Fig. 12 shows the concentration of the major elements that form γ′ (Al, Ti, and Ni) in the primary and secondary γ′ at the bottom of the build, as calculated by MatCalc. The secondary γ′ has a higher Al content (13.5–14.5 at% Al), compared to 13 at% Al in the primary γ′. Additionally, within the secondary γ′, the smallest particles (∼10 nm) have higher Al contents than larger ones (∼70 nm). In contrast, for the primary γ′, there is no significant variation in the Al content as a function of their size. The Ni concentration in secondary γ′ (71.1–72 at%) is also higher in comparison to the primary γ′ (70 at%). The smallest secondary γ′ (∼10 nm) have higher Ni contents than larger ones (∼70 nm), whereas there is no substantial change in the Ni content of primary γ′, based on their size. As expected, Ti shows an opposite size-dependent variation. It ranges from ∼ 7.7–8.7 at% Ti in secondary γ′ to ∼9.2 at% in primary γ′. Similarly, within the secondary γ′, the smallest (∼10 nm) have lower Al contents than the larger ones (∼70 nm). No significant variation is observed for Ti content in primary γ′.

Fig. 12

4. Discussion

A combined modelling method is utilized to study the microstructural evolution during E-PBF of IN738. The presented results are discussed by examining the precipitation and dissolution mechanism of γ′ during thermal cycling. This is followed by a discussion on the phase fraction and size evolution of γ′ during thermal cycling and after final cooling. A brief discussion on carbide morphology is also made. Finally, a comparison is made between the simulation and experimental results to assess their agreement.

4.1. γ′ morphology as a function of build height

4.1.1. Nucleation of γ′

The fast precipitation kinetics of the γ′ phase enables formation of γ′ upon quenching from higher temperatures (above solvus) during thermal cycling [66]. In Fig. 7b, for a single layer in the full dissolution region, during cooling, the initial increase in nucleation rate signifies the first formation of nuclei. The slight increase in nucleation rate during partial dissolution, despite a decrease in the concentration of γ′ forming elements, may be explained by the nucleation kinetics. During partial dissolution and as the precipitates shrink, it is assumed that the regions at the vicinity of partially dissolved precipitates are enriched in γ′ forming elements [68][69]. This differs from the full dissolution region, in which case the chemical composition is evenly distributed in the matrix. Several authors have attributed the solute supersaturation of the matrix around primary γ′ to partial dissolution during isothermal ageing [69][70][71][72]. The enhanced supersaturation in the regions close to the precipitates results in a much higher driving force for nucleation, leading to a higher nucleation rate upon cooling. This phenomenon can be closely related to the several nucleation bursts upon continuous cooling of Ni-based superalloys, where second nucleation bursts exhibit higher nucleation rates [38][68][73][74].

At middle stages of partial dissolution, the reduction in the nucleation rate indicates that the existing composition and low supersaturation did not trigger nucleation as the matrix was closer to the equilibrium state. The end of a nucleation burst means that the supersaturation of Al and Ti has reached a low level, incapable of providing sufficient driving force during cooling to or holding at 1000 °C for further nucleation [73]. Earlier studies on Ni-based superalloys have reported the same phenomenon during ageing or continuous cooling from the solvus temperature to RT [38][73][74].

4.1.2. Dissolution of γ′ during thermal cycling

γ′ dissolution kinetics during heating are fast when compared to nucleation due to exponential increase in phase transformation and diffusion activities with temperature [65]. As shown in Fig. 9Fig. 10, and supplementary Figs. S2 and S3, the reduction in γ′ phase fraction and size during heating indicates γ′ dissolution. This is also revealed in Fig. 5 where phase fraction decreases upon heating. The extent of γ′ dissolution mostly depends on the temperature, time spent above γ′ solvus, and precipitate size [75][76][77]. Smaller γ′ precipitates are first to be dissolved [67][77][78]. This is mainly because more solute elements need to be transported away from large γ′ precipitates than from smaller ones [79]. Also, a high temperature above γ′ solvus temperature leads to a faster dissolution rate [80]. The equilibrium solvus temperature of γ′ in IN738 in our MatCalc simulation (Fig. 6) and as reported by Ojo et al. [47] is 1140 °C and 1130–1180 °C, respectively. This means the peak temperature experienced by previous layers decreases progressively from γ′ supersolvus to subsolvus, near-solvus, and far from solvus as the number of subsequent layers increases. Based on the above, it can be inferred that the degree of dissolution of γ′ contributes to the gradient in precipitate distribution.

Although the peak temperatures during later stages of partial dissolution are much lower than the equilibrium γ′ solvus, γ′ dissolution still occurs but at a significantly lower rate (supplementary Fig. S3). Wahlmann et al. [28] also reported a similar case where they observed the rapid dissolution of γ′ in CMSX-4 during fast heating and cooling cycles at temperatures below the γ′ solvus. They attributed this to the γ′ phase transformation process taking place in conditions far from the equilibrium. While the same reasoning may be valid for our study, we further believe that the greater surface area to volume ratio of the small γ′ precipitates contributed to this. This ratio means a larger area is available for solute atoms to diffuse into the matrix even at temperatures much below the solvus [81].

4.2. γ′ phase fraction and size evolution

4.2.1. During thermal cycling

In the first layer, the steep increase in γ′ phase fraction during heating (Fig. 5), which also represents γ′ precipitation in the powder before melting, has qualitatively been validated in [28]. The maximum phase fraction of 27% during the first few layers of thermal cycling indicates that IN738 theoretically could reach the equilibrium state (∼30%), but the short interlayer time at the build temperature counteracts this. The drop in phase fraction at middle stages of partial dissolution is due to the low number of γ′ nucleation sites [73]. It has been reported that a reduction of γ′ nucleation sites leads to a delay in obtaining the final volume fraction as more time is required for γ′ precipitates to grow and reach equilibrium [82]. This explains why even upon holding for 150 s before subsequent layer deposition, the phase fraction does not increase to those values that were observed in the previous full γ′ dissolution regions. Towards the end of deposition, the increase in phase fraction to the equilibrium value of 30% is as a result of the longer holding at build temperature or close to it [83].

During thermal cycling, γ′ particles begin to grow immediately after they first precipitate upon cooling. This is reflected in the rapid increase in phase fraction and size during cooling in Fig. 5 and supplementary Fig. S2, respectively. The rapid growth is due to the fast diffusion of solute elements at high temperatures [84]. The similar size of γ′ for the first 44 layers from the top can be attributed to the fact that all layers underwent complete dissolution and hence, experienced the same nucleation event and growth during deposition. This corresponds with the findings by Balikci et al. [85], who reported that the degree of γ′ precipitation in IN738LC does not change when a solution heat treatment is conducted above a certain critical temperature.

The increase in coarsening rate (Fig. 8) during thermal cycling can first be ascribed to the high peak temperature of the layers [86]. The coarsening rate of γ′ is known to increase rapidly with temperature due to the exponential growth of diffusion activity. Also, the simultaneous dissolution with coarsening could be another reason for the high coarsening rate, as γ′ coarsening is a diffusion-driven process where large particles grow by consuming smaller ones [78][84][86][87]. The steady growth of γ′ towards the bottom of the build is due to the much lower layer peak temperature, which is almost close to the build temperature, and reduced dissolution activity, as is seen in the much lower solute concentration in γ′ compared to those in the full and partial dissolution regions.

4.2.2. During cooling

The much higher phase fraction of ∼40% upon cooling signifies the tendency of γ′ to reach equilibrium at lower temperatures (Fig. 4). This is due to the precipitation of secondary γ′ and a further increase in the size of existing primary γ′, which leads to a multimodal size distribution of γ′ after cooling [38][73][88][89][90]. The reason for secondary γ′ formation during cooling is as follows: As cooling progresses, it becomes increasingly challenging to redistribute solute elements in the matrix owing to their lower mobility [38][73]. A higher supersaturation level in regions away from or free of the existing γ′ precipitates is achieved, making them suitable sites for additional nucleation bursts. More cooling leads to the growth of these secondary γ′ precipitates, but as the temperature and in turn, the solute diffusivity is low, growth remains slow.

4.3. Carbides

MC carbides in IN738 are known to have a significant impact on the high-temperature strength. They can also act as effective hardening particles and improve the creep resistance [91]. Precipitation of MC carbides in IN738 and several other superalloys is known to occur during solidification or thermal treatments (e.g., hot isostatic pressing) [92]. In our case, this means that the MC carbides within the E-PBF build formed because of the thermal exposure from the E-PBF thermal cycle in addition to initial solidification. Our simulation confirms this as MC carbides appear during layer heating (Fig. 5). The constant and stable phase fraction of MC carbides during thermal cycling can be attributed to their high melting point (∼1360 °C) and the short holding time at peak temperatures [75][93][94]. The solvus temperature for most MC carbides exceeds most of the peak temperatures observed in our simulation, and carbide dissolution kinetics at temperatures above the solvus are known to be comparably slow [95]. The stable phase fraction and random distribution of MC carbides signifies the slight influence on the gradient in hardness.

4.4. Comparison of simulations and experiments

4.4.1. Precipitate phase fraction and morphology as a function of build height

A qualitative agreement is observed for the phase fraction of carbides, i.e. ∼0.8% in the experiment and ∼0.9% in the simulation. The phase fraction of γ′ differs, with the experiment reporting a value of ∼51% and the simulation, 40%. Despite this, the size distribution of primary γ′ along the build shows remarkable consistency between experimental and computational analyses. It is worth noting that the primary γ′ morphology in the experimental analysis is observed in the as-fabricated state, whereas the simulation (Fig. 8) captures it during deposition process. The primary γ′ size in the experiment is expected to experience additional growth during the cooling phase. Regardless, both show similar trends in primary γ′ size increments from the top to the bottom of the build. The larger primary γ’ size in the simulation versus the experiment can be attributed to the fact that experimental and simulation results are based on 2D and 3D data, respectively. The absence of stereological considerations [96] in our analysis could have led to an underestimation of the precipitate sizes from SEM measurements. The early starts of coarsening (8th layer) in the experiment compared to the simulation (45th layer) can be attributed to a higher actual γ′ solvus temperature than considered in our simulation [47]. The solvus temperature of γ′ in a Ni-based superalloy is mainly determined by the detailed composition. A high amount of Cr and Co are known to reduce the solvus temperature, whereas Ta and Mo will increase it [97][98][99]. The elemental composition from our experimental work was used for the simulation except for Ta. It should be noted that Ta is not included in the thermodynamic database in MatCalc used, and this may have reduced the solvus temperature. This could also explain the relatively higher γ′ phase fraction in the experiment than in simulation, as a higher γ′ solvus temperature will cause more γ′ to precipitate and grow early during cooling [99][100].

Another possible cause of this deviation can be attributed to the extent of γ′ dissolution, which is mainly determined by the peak temperature. It can be speculated that individual peak temperatures at different layers in the simulation may have been over-predicted. However, one needs to consider that the true thermal profile is likely more complicated in the actual E-PBF process [101]. For example, the current model assumes that the thermophysical properties of the material are temperature-independent, which is not realistic. Many materials, including IN738, exhibit temperature-dependent properties such as thermal conductivityspecific heat capacity, and density [102]. This means that heat transfer simulations may underestimate or overestimate the temperature gradients and cooling rates within the powder bed and the solidified part. Additionally, the model does not account for the reduced thermal diffusivity through unmelted powder, where gas separating the powder acts as insulation, impeding the heat flow [1]. In E-PBF, the unmelted powder regions with trapped gas have lower thermal diffusivity compared to the fully melted regions, leading to localized temperature variations, and altered solidification behavior. These limitations can impact the predictions, particularly in relation to the carbide dissolution, as the peak temperatures may be underestimated.

While acknowledging these limitations, it is worth emphasizing that achieving a detailed and accurate representation of each layer’s heat source would impose tough computational challenges. Given the substantial layer count in E-PBF, our decision to employ a semi-analytical approximation strikes a balance between computational feasibility and the capture of essential trends in thermal profiles across diverse build layers. In future work, a dual-calibration strategy is proposed to further reduce simulation-experiment disparities. By refining temperature-independent thermophysical property approximations and absorptivity in the heat source model, and by optimizing interfacial energy descriptions in the kinetic model, the predictive precision could be enhanced. Further refining the simulation controls, such as adjusting the precipitate class size may enhance quantitative comparisons between modeling outcomes and experimental data in future work.

4.4.2. Multimodal size distribution of γ′ and concentration

Another interesting feature that sees qualitative agreement between the simulation and the experiment is the multimodal size distribution of γ′. The formation of secondary γ′ particles in the experiment and most E-PBF Ni-based superalloys is suggested to occur at low temperatures, during final cooling to RT [16][73][90]. However, so far, this conclusion has been based on findings from various continuous cooling experiments, as the study of the evolution during AM would require an in-situ approach. Our simulation unambiguously confirms this in an AM context by providing evidence for secondary γ′ precipitation during slow cooling to RT. Additionally, it is possible to speculate that the chemical segregation occurring during solidification, due to the preferential partitioning of certain elements between the solid and liquid phases, can contribute to the multimodal size distribution during deposition [51]. This is because chemical segregation can result in variations in the local composition of superalloys, which subsequently affects the nucleation and growth of γ′. Regions with higher concentrations of alloying elements will encourage the formation of larger γ′ particles, while regions with lower concentrations may favor the nucleation of smaller precipitates. However, it is important to acknowledge that the elevated temperature during the E-PBF process will largely homogenize these compositional differences [103][104].

A good correlation is also shown in the composition of major γ′ forming elements (Al and Ti) in primary and secondary γ′. Both experiment and simulation show an increasing trend for Al content and a decreasing trend for Ti content from primary to secondary γ′. The slight composition differences between primary and secondary γ′ particles are due to the different diffusivity of γ′ stabilizers at different thermal conditions [105][106]. As the formation of multimodal γ′ particles with different sizes occurs over a broad temperature range, the phase chemistry of γ′ will be highly size dependent. The changes in the chemistry of various γ′ (primary, secondary, and tertiary) have received significant attention since they have a direct influence on the performance [68][105][107][108][109]. Chen et al. [108][109], reported a high Al content in the smallest γ′ precipitates compared to the largest, while Ti showed an opposite trend during continuous cooling in a RR1000 Ni-based superalloy. This was attributed to the temperature and cooling rate at which the γ′ precipitates were formed. The smallest precipitates formed last, at the lowest temperature and cooling rate. A comparable observation is evident in the present investigation, where the secondary γ′ forms at a low temperature and cooling rate in comparison to the primary. The temperature dependence of γ′ chemical composition is further evidenced in supplementary Fig. S4, which shows the equilibrium chemical composition of γ′ as a function of temperature.

5. Conclusions

A correlative modelling approach capable of predicting solid-state phase transformations kinetics in metal AM was developed. This approach involves computational simulations with a semi-analytical heat transfer model and the MatCalc thermo-kinetic software. The method was used to predict the phase transformation kinetics and detailed morphology and chemistry of γ′ and MC during E-PBF of IN738 Ni-based superalloy. The main conclusions are:

  • 1.The computational simulations are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. This is particularly true for the γ′ size distribution along the build height, the multimodal size distribution of particles, and the phase fraction of MC carbides.
  • 2.The deviations between simulation and experiment in terms of γ′ phase fraction and location in the build are most likely attributed to a higher γ′ solvus temperature during the experiment than in the simulation, which is argued to be related to the absence of Ta in the MatCalc database.
  • 3.The dissolution and precipitation of γ′ occur fast and under non-equilibrium conditions. The level of γ′ dissolution determines the gradient in γ′ size distribution along the build. After thermal cycling, the final cooling to room temperature has further significant impacts on the final γ′ size, morphology, and distribution.
  • 4.A negligible amount of γ′ forms in the first deposited layer before subsequent layer deposition, and a small amount of γ′ may also form in the powder induced by the 1000 °C elevated build temperature before melting.

Our findings confirm the suitability of MatCalc to predict the microstructural evolution at various positions throughout a build in a Ni-based superalloy during E-PBF. It also showcases the suitability of a tool which was originally developed for traditional thermo-mechanical processing of alloys to the new additive manufacturing context. Our simulation capabilities are likely extendable to other alloy systems that undergo solid-state phase transformations implemented in MatCalc (various steels, Ni-based superalloys, and Al-alloys amongst others) as well as other AM processes such as L-DED and L-PBF which have different thermal cycle characteristics. New tools to predict the microstructural evolution and properties during metal AM are important as they provide new insights into the complexities of AM. This will enable control and design of AM microstructures towards advanced materials properties and performances.

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Primig Sophie: Writing – review & editing, Supervision, Resources, Project administration, Funding acquisition, Conceptualization. Adomako Nana Kwabena: Writing – original draft, Writing – review & editing, Visualization, Software, Investigation, Formal analysis, Conceptualization. Haghdadi Nima: Writing – review & editing, Supervision, Project administration, Methodology, Conceptualization. Dingle James F.L.: Methodology, Conceptualization, Software, Writing – review & editing, Visualization. Kozeschnik Ernst: Writing – review & editing, Software, Methodology. Liao Xiaozhou: Writing – review & editing, Project administration, Funding acquisition. Ringer Simon P: Writing – review & editing, Project administration, Funding acquisition.

Declaration of Competing Interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

Acknowledgements

This research was sponsored by the Department of Industry, Innovation, and Science under the auspices of the AUSMURI program – which is a part of the Commonwealth’s Next Generation Technologies Fund. The authors acknowledge the facilities and the scientific and technical assistance at the Electron Microscope Unit (EMU) within the Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre (MWAC) at UNSW Sydney and Microscopy Australia. Nana Adomako is supported by a UNSW Scientia PhD scholarship. Michael Haines’ (UNSW Sydney) contribution to the revised version of the original manuscript is thankfully acknowledged.

Appendix A. Supplementary material

Download : Download Word document (462KB)

Supplementary material.

Data Availability

Data will be made available on request.

References

Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process

극저온 자체 가압 공정을 위한 인기 있는 액체-증기 상 변화 모델의 타당성 평가

액체-증기 상 변화 모델은 밀폐된 용기의 자체 가압 프로세스 시뮬레이션에 매우 큰 영향을 미칩니다. Hertz-Knudsen 관계, 에너지 점프 모델 및 그 파생물과 같은 널리 사용되는 액체-증기 상 변화 모델은 실온 유체를 기반으로 개발되었습니다. 액체-증기 전이를 통한 극저온 시뮬레이션에 널리 적용되었지만 각 모델의 성능은 극저온 조건에서 명시적으로 조사 및 비교되지 않았습니다. 본 연구에서는 171가지 일반적인 액체-증기 상 변화 모델을 통합한 통합 다상 솔버가 제안되었으며, 이를 통해 이러한 모델을 실험 데이터와 직접 비교할 수 있습니다. 증발 및 응축 모델의 예측 정확도와 계산 속도를 평가하기 위해 총 <>개의 자체 가압 시뮬레이션이 수행되었습니다. 압력 예측은 최적화 전략이 서로 다른 모델 계수에 크게 의존하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 에너지 점프 모델은 극저온 자체 가압 시뮬레이션에 적합하지 않은 것으로 나타났습니다. 평균 편차와 CPU 소비량에 따르면 Lee 모델과 Tanasawa 모델은 다른 모델보다 안정적이고 효율적인 것으로 입증되었습니다.

Elsevier

International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer

Volume 181, December 2021, 121879

International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer

Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process

Author links open overlay panelZhongqi Zuo, Jingyi Wu, Yonghua HuangShow moreAdd to MendeleyShareCite

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2021.121879Get rights and content

Abstract

Liquid-vapor phase change models vitally influence the simulation of self-pressurization processes in closed containers. Popular liquid-vapor phase change models, such as the Hertz-Knudsen relation, energy jump model, and their derivations were developed based on room-temperature fluids. Although they had widely been applied in cryogenic simulations with liquid-vapor transitions, the performance of each model was not explicitly investigated and compared yet under cryogenic conditions. A unified multi-phase solver incorporating four typical liquid-vapor phase change models has been proposed in the present study, which enables direct comparison among those models against experimental data. A total number of 171 self-pressurization simulations were conducted to evaluate the evaporation and condensation models’ prediction accuracy and calculation speed. It was found that the pressure prediction highly depended on the model coefficients, whose optimization strategies differed from each other. The energy jump model was found inadequate for cryogenic self-pressurization simulations. According to the average deviation and CPU consumption, the Lee model and the Tanasawa model were proven to be more stable and more efficient than the others.

Introduction

The liquid-vapor phase change of cryogenic fluids is widely involved in industrial applications, such as the hydrogen transport vehicles [1], shipborne liquid natural gas (LNG) containers [2] and on-orbit cryogenic propellant tanks [3]. These applications require cryogenic fluids to be stored for weeks to months. Although high-performance insulation measures are adopted, heat inevitably enters the tank via radiation and conduction. The self-pressurization in the tank induced by the heat leakage eventually causes the venting loss of the cryogenic fluids and threatens the safety of the craft in long-term missions. To reduce the boil-off loss and extend the cryogenic storage duration, a more comprehensive understanding of the self-pressurization mechanism is needed.

Due to the difficulties and limitations in implementing cryogenic experiments, numerical modeling is a convenient and powerful way to study the self-pressurization process of cryogenic fluids. However, how the phase change models influence the mass and heat transfer under cryogenic conditions is still unsettled [4]. As concluded by Persad and Ward [5], a seemingly slight variation in the liquid-vapor phase change models can lead to erroneous predictions.

Among the liquid-vapor phase change models, the kinetic theory gas (KTG) based models and the energy jump model are the most popular ones used in recent self-pressurization simulations [6]. The KTG based models, also known as the Hertz-Knudsen relation models, were developed on the concept of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of the gas molecular [7]. The Hertz-Knudsen relation has evolved to several models, including the Schrage model [8], the Tanasawa model [9], the Lee model [10] and the statistical rate theory (SRT) [11], which will be described in Section 2.2. Since the Schrage model and the Lee model are embedded and configured as the default ones in the commercial CFD solvers Flow-3D® and Ansys Fluent® respectively, they have been widely used in self-pressurization simulations for liquid nitrogen [12], [13] and liquid hydrogen [14], [15]. The major drawback of the KTG models lies in the difficulty of selecting model coefficients, which were reported in a considerably wide range spanning three magnitudes even for the same working fluid [16], [17], [18], [19], [20], [21]. Studies showed that the liquid level, pressure and mass transfer rate are directly influenced by the model coefficients [16], [22], [23], [24], [25]. Wrong coefficients will lead to deviation or even divergence of the results. The energy jump model is also known as the thermal limitation model. It assumes that the evaporation and condensation at the liquid-vapor interface are induced only by heat conduction. The model is widely adopted in lumped node simulations due to its simplicity [6], [26], [27]. To improve the accuracy of mass flux prediction, the energy jump model was modified by including the convection heat transfer [28], [29]. However, the convection correlations are empirical and developed mainly for room-temperature fluids. Whether the correlation itself can be precisely applied in cryogenic simulations still needs further investigation.

Fig. 1 summarizes the cryogenic simulations involving the modeling of evaporation and condensation processes in recent years. The publication has been increasing rapidly. However, the characteristics of each evaporation and condensation model are not explicitly revealed when simulating self-pressurization. A comparative study of the phase change models is highly needed for cryogenic fluids for a better simulation of the self-pressurization processes.

In the present paper, a unified multi-phase solver incorporating four typical liquid-vapor phase change models, namely the Tanasawa model, the Lee model, the energy jump model, and the modified energy jump model has been proposed, which enables direct comparison among different models. The models are used to simulate the pressure and temperature evolutions in an experimental liquid nitrogen tank in normal gravity, which helps to evaluate themselves in the aspects of accuracy, calculation speed and robustness.

Section snippets

Governing equations for the self-pressurization tank

In the present study, both the fluid domain and the solid wall of the tank are modeled and discretized. The heat transportation at the solid boundaries is considered to be irrelevant with the nearby fluid velocity. Consequently, two sets of the solid and the fluid governing equations can be decoupled and solved separately. The pressures in the cryogenic container are usually from 100 kPa to 300 kPa. Under these conditions, the Knudsen number is far smaller than 0.01, and the fluids are

Self-pressurization results and phase change model comparison

This section compares the simulation results by different phase change models. Section 3.1 compares the pressure and temperature outputs from two KTG based models, namely the Lee model and the Tanasawa model. Section 3.2 presents the pressure predictions from the energy transport models, namely the energy jump model and the modified energy jump model, and compares pressure prediction performances between the KTG based models and the energy transport models. Section 3.3 evaluates the four models 

Conclusion

A unified vapor-liquid-solid multi-phase numerical solver has been accomplished for the self pressurization simulation in cryogenic containers. Compared to the early fluid-only solver, the temperature prediction in the vicinity of the tank wall improves significantly. Four liquid-vapor phase change models were integrated into the solver, which enables fair and effective comparison for performances between each other. The pressure and temperature prediction accuracies, and the calculation speed

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Zhongqi Zuo: Data curation, Formal analysis, Writing – original draft, Validation. Jingyi Wu: Conceptualization, Writing – review & editing, Validation. Yonghua Huang: Conceptualization, Formal analysis, Writing – review & editing, Validation.

Declaration of Competing Interest

Authors declare that they have no financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that can inappropriately influence our work, there is no professional or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service and/or company that could be construed as influencing the position presented in, or the review of, the manuscript entitled, “Validity evaluation of popular liquid-vapor phase change models for cryogenic self-pressurization process”.

Acknowledgement

This project is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51936006).

References (40)

There are more references available in the full text version of this article.

Cited by (7)

Figure 1: Drawing of the experimental set-up, Figure 2: Experimental tank with locations of temperature sensors

실험 및 수치 시뮬레이션에 기반한 극저온 추진제 탱크 가압 분석

Analyses of Cryogenic Propellant Tank Pressurization based upon Experiments and Numerical Simulations
Carina Ludwig? and Michael Dreyer**
*DLR – German Aerospace Center, Space Launcher Systems Analysis (SART),
Institute of Space Systems, 28359 Bremen, Germany, Carina.Ludwig@dlr.de
**ZARM – Center for Applied Space Technology and Microgravity,
University of Bremen, 28359 Bremen, Germany

Abstract

본 연구에서는 발사대 적용을 위한 극저온 추진제 탱크의 능동 가압을 분석하였다. 따라서 지상 실험, 수치 시뮬레이션 및 분석 연구를 수행하여 다음과 같은 중요한 결과를 얻었습니다.

필요한 가압 기체 질량을 최소화하기 위해 더 높은 가압 기체 온도가 유리하거나 헬륨을 가압 기체로 적용하는 것이 좋습니다.

Flow-3D를 사용한 가압 가스 질량의 수치 시뮬레이션은 실험 결과와 잘 일치함을 보여줍니다. 가압 중 지배적인 열 전달은 주입된 가압 가스에서 축방향 탱크 벽으로 나타나고 능동 가압 단계 동안 상 변화의 주된 방식은 가압 가스의 유형에 따라 다릅니다.

가압 단계가 끝나면 상당한 압력 강하가 발생합니다. 이 압력 강하의 분석적 결정을 위해 이론적 모델이 제공됩니다.

The active-pressurization of cryogenic propellant tanks for the launcher application was analyzed in this study. Therefore, ground experiments, numerical simulations and analytical studies were performed with the following important results: In order to minimize the required pressurant gas mass, a higher pressurant gas temperature is advantageous or the application of helium as pressurant gas. Numerical simulations of the pressurant gas mass using Flow-3D show good agreement to the experimental results. The dominating heat transfer during pressurization appears from the injected pressurant gas to the axial tank walls and the predominant way of phase change during the active-pressurization phase depends on the type of the pressurant gas. After the end of the pressurization phase, a significant pressure drop occurs. A theoretical model is presented for the analytical determination of this pressure drop.

Figure 1: Drawing of the experimental set-up, Figure 2: Experimental tank with locations of temperature sensors
Figure 1: Drawing of the experimental set-up, Figure 2: Experimental tank with locations of temperature sensors
Figure 3: Non-dimensional (a) tank pressure, (b) liquid temperatures, (c) vapor temperatures, (d) wall and lid temperatures during pressurization and relaxation of the N300h experiment (for details see Table 2). T14 is the pressurant
gas temperature at the diffuser. Pressurization starts at tp,0 (t
∗ = 0.06·10−4
) and ends at tp, f (t
∗ = 0.84·10−4
). Relaxation
takes place until tp,T (t
∗ = 2.79·10−4
) and ∆p is the characteristic pressure drop
Figure 3: Non-dimensional (a) tank pressure, (b) liquid temperatures, (c) vapor temperatures, (d) wall and lid temperatures during pressurization and relaxation of the N300h experiment (for details see Table 2). T14 is the pressurant gas temperature at the diffuser. Pressurization starts at tp,0 (t ∗ = 0.06·10−4 ) and ends at tp, f (t ∗ = 0.84·10−4 ). Relaxation takes place until tp,T (t ∗ = 2.79·10−4 ) and ∆p is the characteristic pressure drop
Figure 5: Nondimensional vapor mass at pressurization start (m
∗
v,0
), pressurant gas mass (m
∗
pg), condensed vapor mass
from pressurization start to pressurization end (m
∗
cond,0,f
) and condensed vapor mass from pressurization end to relaxation end (m
∗
cond, f,T
) for all GN2 (a) and the GHe (b) pressurized experiments with the relating errors.
Figure 5: Nondimensional vapor mass at pressurization start (m ∗ v,0 ), pressurant gas mass (m ∗ pg), condensed vapor mass from pressurization start to pressurization end (m ∗ cond,0,f ) and condensed vapor mass from pressurization end to relaxation end (m ∗ cond, f,T ) for all GN2 (a) and the GHe (b) pressurized experiments with the relating errors.
Figure 6: Schematical propellant tank with vapor and liquid phase, pressurant gas and condensation mass flow as well as the applied control volumes. ., Figure 7: N300h experiment: wall to fluid heat flux at pressurization end (tp, f) over the tank height.
Figure 6: Schematical propellant tank with vapor and liquid phase, pressurant gas and condensation mass flow as well as the applied control volumes. ., Figure 7: N300h experiment: wall to fluid heat flux at pressurization end (tp, f) over the tank height.

References

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Figure 14. Defects: (a) Unmelt defects(Scheme NO.4);(b) Pores defects(Scheme NO.1); (c); Spattering defect (Scheme NO.3); (d) Low overlapping rate defects(Scheme NO.5).

Molten pool structure, temperature and velocity
flow in selective laser melting AlCu5MnCdVA alloy

용융 풀 구조, 선택적 온도 및 속도 흐름 레이저 용융 AlCu5MnCdVA 합금

Pan Lu1 , Zhang Cheng-Lin2,6,Wang Liang3, Liu Tong4 and Liu Jiang-lin5
1 Aviation and Materials College, Anhui Technical College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Wuhu Anhui 241000, People’s
Republic of China 2 School of Engineering Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026, People’s Republic of China 3 Anhui Top Additive Manufacturing Technology Co., Ltd., Wuhu Anhui 241300, People’s Republic of China 4 Anhui Chungu 3D Printing Institute of Intelligent Equipment and Industrial Technology, Anhui 241300, People’s Republic of China 5 School of Mechanical and Transportation Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan Shanxi 030024, People’s Republic of
China 6 Author to whom any correspondence should be addressed.
E-mail: ahjdpanlu@126.com, jiao__zg@126.com, ahjdjxx001@126.com,tongliu1988@126.com and liujianglin@tyut.edu.cn

Keywords

SLM, molten pool, AlCu5MnCdVA alloy, heat flow, velocity flow, numerical simulation

Abstract

선택적 레이저 용융(SLM)은 열 전달, 용융, 상전이, 기화 및 물질 전달을 포함하는 복잡한 동적 비평형 프로세스인 금속 적층 제조(MAM)에서 가장 유망한 기술 중 하나가 되었습니다. 용융 풀의 특성(구조, 온도 흐름 및 속도 흐름)은 SLM의 최종 성형 품질에 결정적인 영향을 미칩니다. 이 연구에서는 선택적 레이저 용융 AlCu5MnCdVA 합금의 용융 풀 구조, 온도 흐름 및 속도장을 연구하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션과 실험을 모두 사용했습니다.

그 결과 용융풀의 구조는 다양한 형태(깊은 오목 구조, 이중 오목 구조, 평면 구조, 돌출 구조 및 이상적인 평면 구조)를 나타냈으며, 용융 풀의 크기는 약 132 μm × 107 μm × 50 μm였습니다. : 용융풀은 초기에는 여러 구동력에 의해 깊이 15μm의 깊은 오목형상이었으나, 성형 후기에는 장력구배에 의해 높이 10μm의 돌출형상이 되었다. 용융 풀 내부의 금속 흐름은 주로 레이저 충격력, 금속 액체 중력, 표면 장력 및 반동 압력에 의해 구동되었습니다.

AlCu5MnCdVA 합금의 경우, 금속 액체 응고 속도가 매우 빠르며(3.5 × 10-4 S), 가열 속도 및 냉각 속도는 각각 6.5 × 107 K S-1 및 1.6 × 106 K S-1 에 도달했습니다. 시각적 표준으로 표면 거칠기를 선택하고, 낮은 레이저 에너지 AlCu5MnCdVA 합금 최적 공정 매개변수 창을 수치 시뮬레이션으로 얻었습니다: 레이저 출력 250W, 부화 공간 0.11mm, 층 두께 0.03mm, 레이저 스캔 속도 1.5m s-1 .

또한, 실험 프린팅과 수치 시뮬레이션과 비교할 때, 용융 풀의 폭은 각각 약 205um 및 약 210um이었고, 인접한 두 용융 트랙 사이의 중첩은 모두 약 65um이었다. 결과는 수치 시뮬레이션 결과가 실험 인쇄 결과와 기본적으로 일치함을 보여 수치 시뮬레이션 모델의 정확성을 입증했습니다.

Selective Laser Melting (SLM) has become one of the most promising technologies in Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM), which is a complex dynamic non-equilibrium process involving heat transfer, melting, phase transition, vaporization and mass transfer. The characteristics of the molten pool (structure, temperature flow and velocity flow) have a decisive influence on the final forming quality of SLM. In this study, both numerical simulation and experiments were employed to study molten pool structure, temperature flow and velocity field in Selective Laser Melting AlCu5MnCdVA alloy. The results showed the structure of molten pool showed different forms(deep-concave structure, double-concave structure, plane structure, protruding structure and ideal planar structure), and the size of the molten pool was approximately 132 μm × 107 μm × 50 μm: in the early stage, molten pool was in a state of deep-concave shape with a depth of 15 μm due to multiple driving forces, while a protruding shape with a height of 10 μm duo to tension gradient in the later stages of forming. The metal flow inside the molten pool was mainly driven by laser impact force, metal liquid gravity, surface tension and recoil pressure. For AlCu5MnCdVA alloy, metal liquid solidification speed was extremely fast(3.5 × 10−4 S), the heating rate and cooling rate reached 6.5 × 107 K S−1 and 1.6 × 106 K S−1 , respectively. Choosing surface roughness as a visual standard, low-laser energy AlCu5MnCdVA alloy optimum process parameters window was obtained by numerical simulation: laser power 250 W, hatching space 0.11 mm, layer thickness 0.03 mm, laser scanning velocity 1.5 m s−1 . In addition, compared with experimental printing and numerical simulation, the width of the molten pool was about 205 um and about 210 um, respectively, and overlapping between two adjacent molten tracks was all about 65 um. The results showed that the numerical simulation results were basically consistent with the experimental print results, which proved the correctness of the numerical simulation model.

Figure 1. AlCu5MnCdVA powder particle size distribution.
Figure 1. AlCu5MnCdVA powder particle size distribution.
Figure 2. AlCu5MnCdVA powder
Figure 2. AlCu5MnCdVA powder
Figure 3. Finite element model and calculation domains of SLM.
Figure 3. Finite element model and calculation domains of SLM.
Figure 4. SLM heat transfer process.
Figure 4. SLM heat transfer process.
Figure 14. Defects: (a) Unmelt defects(Scheme NO.4);(b) Pores defects(Scheme NO.1); (c); Spattering defect (Scheme NO.3); (d) Low
overlapping rate defects(Scheme NO.5).
Figure 17. Two-pass molten tracks overlapping for Scheme NO.2.
Figure 17. Two-pass molten tracks overlapping for Scheme NO.2.

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Figure 15. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on a wall under different Reynolds numbers.

Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment

by Hongbo Mi 1,2, Chuan Wang 1,3, Xuanwen Jia 3,*, Bo Hu 2, Hongliang Wang 4, Hui Wang 3 and Yong Zhu 5

1College of Mechatronics Engineering, Hainan Vocational University of Science and Technology, Haikou 571126, China

2Department of Energy and Power Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

3College of Hydraulic Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China

4School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering/Flight College, Changzhou Institute of Technology, Changzhou 213032, China

5National Research Center of Pumps, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.Sustainability202315(6), 5159; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

Received: 30 January 2023 / Revised: 4 March 2023 / Accepted: 10 March 2023 / Published: 14 March 2023(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies of Renewable Energy and Water Management for Sustainable Environment

Abstract

Due to their high efficiency, low heat loss and associated sustainability advantages, impinging jets have been used extensively in marine engineering, geotechnical engineering and other engineering practices. In this paper, the flow structure and impact characteristics of impinging jets with different Reynolds numbers and impact distances are systematically studied by Flow-3D based on PIV experiments. In the study, the relevant state parameters of the jets are dimensionlessly treated, obtaining not only the linear relationship between the length of the potential nucleation zone and the impinging distance, but also the linear relationship between the axial velocity and the axial distance in the impinging zone. In addition, after the jet impinges on the flat plate, the vortex action range caused by the wall-attached flow of the jet gradually decreases inward with the increase of the impinging distance. By examining the effect of Reynolds number Re on the hydraulic characteristics of the submerged impact jet, it can be found that the structure of the continuous submerged impact jet is relatively independent of the Reynolds number. At the same time, the final simulation results demonstrate the applicability of the linear relationship between the length of the potential core region and the impact distance. This study provides methodological guidance and theoretical support for relevant engineering practice and subsequent research on impinging jets, which has strong theoretical and practical significance.

Keywords: 

PIVFlow-3Dimpinging jethydraulic characteristicsimpinging distance

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Figure 1. Geometric model.

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Figure 2. Model grid schematic.

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Figure 3. (a) Schematic diagram of the experimental setup; (b) PIV images of vertical impinging jets with velocity fields.

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Figure 4. (a) Velocity distribution verification at the outlet of the jet pipe; (b) Distribution of flow angle in the mid-axis of the jet [39].

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Figure 5. Along-range distribution of the dimensionless axial velocity of the jet at different impact distances.Figure 6 shows the variation of H

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Figure 6. Relationship between the distribution of potential core region and the impact height H/D.

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Figure 7. The relationship between the potential core length 

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Figure 8. Along-range distribution of the flow angle φ of the jet at different impact distances.

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Figure 9. Velocity distribution along the axis of the jet at different impinging regions.

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Figure 10. The absolute value distribution of slope under different impact distances.

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Figure 11. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on wall under different impinging distances.

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Figure 12. Along-range distribution of the dimensionless axial velocity of the jet at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 13. Along-range distribution of the flow angle φ of the jet at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 14. Velocity distribution along the jet axis at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 15. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on a wall under different Reynolds numbers.

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MDPI and ACS Style

Mi, H.; Wang, C.; Jia, X.; Hu, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Y. Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment. Sustainability 202315, 5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

AMA Style

Mi H, Wang C, Jia X, Hu B, Wang H, Wang H, Zhu Y. Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment. Sustainability. 2023; 15(6):5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159Chicago/Turabian Style

Mi, Hongbo, Chuan Wang, Xuanwen Jia, Bo Hu, Hongliang Wang, Hui Wang, and Yong Zhu. 2023. “Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment” Sustainability 15, no. 6: 5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

Nerva-derived reactor coolant channel model for Mars mission applications

화성 임무 적용을 위한 Nerva 파생 원자로 냉각수 채널 모델

Edward W PortaUniversity of Nevada, Las Vegas

Abstract

화성 미션 애플리케이션을 위한 NERVA 파생 원자로 냉각수 채널 모델은 1.3m NERVA 파생 원자로(NDR) 냉각수 채널의 전산유체역학(CFD) 연구 결과를 제시합니다. CFD 코드 FLOW-3D는 NDR 코어를 통과하는 기체 수소의 흐름을 모델링하는 데 사용되었습니다. 수소는 냉각제 채널을 통해 노심을 통과하여 원자로의 냉각제 및 로켓의 추진제 역할을 합니다. 수소는 고밀도/저온 상태로 채널에 들어가고 저밀도/고온 상태로 빠져나오므로 압축성 모델을 사용해야 합니다. 기술 문서의 설계 사양이 모델에 사용되었습니다. 채널 길이에 걸친 압력 강하가 이전에 추정한 것(0.9MPa)보다 높은 것으로 확인되었으며, 이는 더 강력한 냉각수 펌프가 필요하고 설계 사양을 재평가해야 함을 나타냅니다.

NERVA-Derived Reactor Coolant Channel Model for Mars Mission Applications presents the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of a 1.3m NERVA-Derived Reactor (NDR) coolant channel; The CFD code FLOW-3D was used to model the flow of gaseous hydrogen through the core of a NDR. Hydrogen passes through the core by way of coolant channels, acting as the coolant for the reactor as well as the propellant for the rocket. Hydrogen enters the channel in a high density/low temperature state and exits in a low density/high temperature state necessitating the use of a compressible model. Design specifications from a technical paper were used for the model; It was determined that the pressure drop across the length of the channel was higher than previously estimated (0.9 MPa), indicating the possible need for more powerful coolant pumps and a re-evaluation of the design specifications.

Keywords

Application; Channel; Coolant; Derived; Mars; Mission; Model; Nerva; Reactor

Figure 1 Nuclear Rocket Schematic Diagram
Figure 1 Nuclear Rocket Schematic Diagram
Figure 2 Fuel Element - Tip View
Figure 2 Fuel Element – Tip View
Figure 3 Fuel Element - Tie-Tube Structure (Tie-tubes are black)
Figure 3 Fuel Element – Tie-Tube Structure (Tie-tubes are black)
Figure 5 Three-Dimensional Coolant Channel Model
Figure 5 Three-Dimensional Coolant Channel Model
Figure 6 Two-Dimensional Coolant Channel Model
Figure 6 Two-Dimensional Coolant Channel Model

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Figure 4.24 - Model with virtual valves in the extremities of the geometries to simulate the permeability of the mold promoting a more uniformed filling

Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by Flow-3D

Dissertação de Mestrado
Ciclo de Estudos Integrados Conducentes ao
Grau de Mestre em Engenharia Mecânica
Trabalho efectuado sob a orientação do
Doutor Hélder de Jesus Fernades Puga
Professor Doutor José Joaquim Carneiro Barbosa

ABSTRACT

논문의 일부로 튜터 선택 가능성과 해결해야 할 주제가 설정되는 매개변수를 염두에 두고 개발 주제 ‘Flow- 3D ®에 의한 저압 충전 시스템 최적화’가 선택되었습니다. 이를 위해서는 달성해야 할 목표와 이를 달성하기 위한 방법을 정의하는 것이 필요했습니다.

충전 시스템을 시뮬레이션하고 검증할 수 있는 광범위한 소프트웨어에도 불구하고 Flow-3D®는 시장에서 최고의 도구 중 하나로 표시되어 전체 충전 프로세스 및 행동 표현과 관련하여 탁월한 정확도로 시뮬레이션하는 능력을 입증했습니다.

이를 위해 관련 프로세스를 더 잘 이해하고 충진 시스템 시뮬레이션을 위한 탐색적 기반 역할을 하기 위해 이 도구를 탐색하는 것이 중요합니다. 지연 및 재료 낭비에 반영되는 실제적인 측면에서 충전 장치의 치수를 완벽하게 만드는 비용 및 시간 낭비. 이러한 방식으로 저압 주조 공정에서 충진 시스템을 설계하고 물리적 모델을 탐색하여 특성화하는 방법론을 검증하기 위한 것입니다.

이를 위해 다음 주요 단계를 고려하십시오.

시뮬레이션 소프트웨어 Flow 3D® 탐색;
충전 시스템 모델링;
모델의 매개변수를 탐색하여 모델링된 시스템의 시뮬레이션, 검증 및 최적화.

따라서 연구 중인 압력 곡선과 주조 분석에서 가장 관련성이 높은 정보의 최종 마이닝을 검증하기 위한 것입니다.

사용된 압력 곡선은 수집된 문헌과 이전에 수행된 실제 작업을 통해 얻었습니다. 결과를 통해 3단계 압력 곡선이 층류 충진 체계의 의도된 목적과 관련 속도가 0.5 𝑚/𝑠를 초과하지 않는다는 결론을 내릴 수 있었습니다.

충전 수준이 2인 압력 곡선은 0.5 𝑚/𝑠 이상의 속도로 영역을 채우는 더 난류 시스템을 갖습니다. 열전달 매개변수는 이전에 얻은 값이 주물에 대한 소산 거동을 확증하지 않았기 때문에 연구되었습니다.

이러한 방식으로 주조 공정에 더 부합하는 새로운 가치를 얻었습니다. 달성된 결과는 유사한 것으로 나타난 NovaFlow & Solid®에 의해 생성된 결과와 비교되어 시뮬레이션에서 설정된 매개변수를 검증했습니다. Flow 3D®는 주조 부품 시뮬레이션을 위한 강력한 도구로 입증되었습니다.

As part of the dissertation and bearing in mind the parameters in which the possibility of a choice of tutor and the subject to be addressed is established, the subject for development ’Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by Flow 3D ®’ was chosen. For this it was necessary to define the objectives to achieve and the methods to attain them. Despite the wide range of software able to simulate and validate filling systems, Flow 3D® has been shown as one of the best tools in the market, demonstrating its ability to simulate with distinctive accuracy with respect to the entire process of filling and the behavioral representation of the fluid obtained. To this end, it is important to explore this tool for a better understanding of the processes involved and to serve as an exploratory basis for the simulation of filling systems, simulation being one of the great strengths of the current industry due to the need to reduce costs and time waste, in practical terms, that lead to the perfecting of the dimensioning of filling devices, which are reflected in delays and wasted material. In this way it is intended to validate the methodology to design a filling system in lowpressure casting process, exploring their physical models and thus allowing for its characterization. For this, consider the following main phases: The exploration of the simulation software Flow 3D®; modeling of filling systems; simulation, validation and optimization of systems modeled by exploring the parameters of the models. Therefore, it is intended to validate the pressure curves under study and the eventual mining of the most relevant information in a casting analysis. The pressure curves that were used were obtained through the gathered literature and the practical work previously performed. Through the results it was possible to conclude that the pressure curve with 3 levels meets the intended purpose of a laminar filling regime and associated speeds never exceeding 0.5 𝑚/𝑠. The pressure curve with 2 filling levels has a more turbulent system, having filling areas with velocities above 0.5 𝑚/𝑠. The heat transfer parameter was studied due to the values previously obtained didn’t corroborate the behavior of dissipation regarding to the casting. In this way, new values, more in tune with the casting process, were obtained. The achieved results were compared with those generated by NovaFlow & Solid®, which were shown to be similar, validating the parameters established in the simulations. Flow 3D® was proven a powerful tool for the simulation of casting parts.

키워드

저압, Flow 3D®, 시뮬레이션, 파운드리, 압력-시간 관계,Low Pressure, Flow 3D®, Simulation, Foundry, Pressure-time relation

Figure 4.24 - Model with virtual valves in the extremities of the geometries to simulate the permeability of the mold promoting a more uniformed filling
Figure 4.24 – Model with virtual valves in the extremities of the geometries to simulate the permeability of the mold promoting a more uniformed filling
Figure 4.39 - Values of temperature contours using full energy heat transfer parameter for simula
Figure 4.39 – Values of temperature contours using full energy heat transfer parameter for simula
Figure 4.40 – Comparison between software simulations (a) Flow 3D® simulation,
(b) NovaFlow & Solid® simulation
Figure 4.40 – Comparison between software simulations (a) Flow 3D® simulation, (b) NovaFlow & Solid® simulation

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Figure 1: Mold drawings

3D Flow and Temperature Analysis of Filling a Plutonium Mold

플루토늄 주형 충전의 3D 유동 및 온도 분석

Authors: Orenstein, Nicholas P. [1]

Publication Date:2013-07-24
Research Org.: Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.: DOE/LANL
OSTI Identifier: 1088904
Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-25537
DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type: Technical Report
Country of Publication: United States
Language: English
Subject: Engineering(42); Materials Science(36); Radiation Chemistry, Radiochemistry, & Nuclear Chemistry(38)

Introduction

The plutonium foundry at Los Alamos National Laboratory casts products for various special nuclear applications. However, plutonium’s radioactivity, material properties, and security constraints complicate the ability to perform experimental analysis of mold behavior. The Manufacturing Engineering and Technologies (MET-2) group previously developed a graphite mold to vacuum cast small plutonium disks to be used by the Department of Homeland Security as point sources for radiation sensor testing.

A two-stage pouring basin consisting of a funnel and an angled cavity directs the liquid into a vertical runner. A stack of ten disk castings connect to the runner by horizontal gates. Volumetric flow rates were implemented to limit overflow into the funnel and minimize foundry returns. Models using Flow-3D computational fluid dynamics software are employed here to determine liquid Pu flow paths, optimal pour regimes, temperature changes, and pressure variations.

Setup

Hardcopy drawings provided necessary information to create 3D .stl models for import into Flow-3D (Figs. 1 and 2). The mesh was refined over several iterations to isolate the disk cavities, runner, angled cavity, funnel, and input pour. The final flow and mold-filling simulation utilizes a fine mesh with ~5.5 million total cells. For the temperature study, the mesh contained 1/8 as many cells to reduce computational time and set temperatures to 850 °C for the molten plutonium and 500 °C for the solid graphite mold components (Fig. 3).

Flow-3D solves mass continuity and Navier-Stokes momentum equations over the structured rectangular grid model using finite difference and finite volume numerical algorithms. The solver includes terms in the momentum equation for body and viscous accelerations and uses convective heat transfer.

Simulation settings enabled Flow-3D physics calculations for gravity at 980.665 cm/s 2 in the negative Z direction (top of mold to bottom); viscous, turbulent, incompressible flow using dynamically-computed Renormalized Group Model turbulence calculations and no-slip/partial slip wall shear, and; first order, full energy equation heat transfer.

Mesh boundaries were all set to symmetric boundary conditions except for the Zmin boundary set to outflow and the Zmax boundary set to a volume flow. Vacuum casting conditions and the high reactivity of remaining air molecules with Pu validate the assumption of an initially fluidless void.

Results

The flow follows a unique three-dimensional path. The mold fills upwards with two to three disks receiving fluid in a staggered sequence. Figures 5-9 show how the fluid fills the cavity, and Figure 7 includes the color scale for pressure levels in these four figures. The narrow gate causes a high pressure region which forces the fluid to flow down the cavity centerline.

It proceeds to splash against the far wall and then wrap around the circumference back to the gate (Figs. 5 and 6). Flow in the angled region of the pouring basin cascades over the bottom ledge and attaches to the far wall of the runner, as seen in Figure 7.

This channeling becomes less pronounced as fluid volume levels increase. Finally, two similar but non-uniform depressed regions form about the centerline. These regions fill from their perimeter and bottom until completion (Fig. 8). Such a pattern is counter, for example, to a steady scenario in which a circle of molten Pu encompassing the entire bottom surface rises as a growing cylinder.

Cavity pressure becomes uniform when the cavity is full. Pressure levels build in the rising well section of the runner, where impurities were found to settle in actual casting. Early test simulations optimized the flow as three pours so that the fluid would never overflow to the funnel, the cavities would all fill completely, and small amounts of fluid would remain as foundry returns in the angled cavity.

These rates and durations were translated to the single 2.7s pour at 100 cm 3 per second used here. Figure 9 shows anomalous pressure fluctuations which occurred as the cavities became completely filled. Multiple simulations exhibited a rapid change in pressure from positive to negative and back within the newly-full disk and surrounding, already-full disks.

The time required to completely fill each cavity is plotted in Figure 10. Results show negligible temperature change within the molten Pu during mold filling and, as seen in Figure 11, at fill completion.

Figure 1: Mold drawings
Figure 1: Mold drawings
Figure 2: Mold Assembly
Figure 2: Mold Assembly
Figure 4: Actual mold and cast Pu
Figure 4: Actual mold and cast Pu
Figure 5: Bottom cavity filling
from runner
Figure 5: Bottom cavity filling from runner
Figure 6: Pouring and filling
Figure 6: Pouring and filling
Figure 8: Edge detection of cavity fill geometry. Two similar depressed areas form
about the centerline. Top cavity shown; same pressure scale as other figures
Figure 8: Edge detection of cavity fill geometry. Two similar depressed areas form about the centerline. Top cavity shown; same pressure scale as other figures
Figure 10: Cavity fill times,from first fluid contact with pouring basin, Figure 11:Fluid temperature remains essentially constant
Figure 10: Cavity fill times,from first fluid contact with pouring basin, Figure 11:Fluid temperature remains essentially constant

Conclusions

Non-uniform cavity filling could cause crystal microstructure irregularities during solidification. However, the small temperature changes seen – due to large differences in specific heat between Pu and graphite – over a relatively short time make such problems unlikely in this case.

In the actual casting, cooling required approximately ten minutes. This large difference in time scales further reduces the chance for temperature effects in such a superheated scenario. Pouring basin emptying decreases pressure at the gate which extends fill time of the top two cavities.

The bottom cavity takes longer to fill because fluid must first enter the runner and fill the well. Fill times continue linearly until the top two cavities. The anomalous pressure fluctuations may be due to physical attempts by the system to reach equilibrium, but they are more likely due to numerical errors in the Flow3D solver.

Unsuccessful tests were performed to remove them by halving fluid viscosity. The fine mesh reduced, but did not eliminate, the extent of the fluctuations. Future work is planned to study induction and heat transfer in the full Pu furnace system, including quantifying temporal lag of the cavity void temperature to the mold wall temperature during pre-heat and comparing heat flux levels between furnace components during cool-down.

Thanks to Doug Kautz for the opportunity to work with MET-2 and for assigning an interesting unclassified project. Additional thanks to Mike Bange for CFD guidance, insight of the project’s history, and draft review.

Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D

Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D

As part of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) project, the multi-dimensional effects of gravitational force, initial tank pressure, initial ullage temperature, and heat transfer rate on the 2-D temperature profiles were studied. FLOW-3D, a commercial finite difference fluid flow model, was used for the evaluation. These effects were examined on the basis of previous liquid hydrogen experimental data with gaseous hydrogen pressurant. FLOW-3D results were compared against an existing 1-D model. In addition, the effects of mesh size and convergence criteria on the analytical results were investigated. Suggestions for future modifications and uses of FLOW-3D for modeling of a NASP tank are also presented.

Document ID : 19900016844

Document Type : Technical Memorandum (TM)

AuthorsHardy, Terry L.

(NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)Tomsik, Thomas M.
(NASA Lewis Research Center Cleveland, OH, United States)

Date Acquired : September 6, 2013

Publication Date : July 1, 1990

Subject CategoryPropellants And Fuels : Report/Patent NumberNASA-TM-103217E-5629NAS 1.15:103217

Funding Number(s)PROJECT: RTOP 763-01-21

Distribution Limits : Public

Copyright : Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.

Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D
Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D
Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D
Prediction of the ullage gas thermal stratification in a NASP vehicle propellant tank experimental simulation using FLOW-3D

Available Downloads

19900016844.pdf

Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.

FLOW-3D Model Development for the Analysis of the Flow Characteristics of Downstream Hydraulic Structures

하류 유압 구조물의 유동 특성 분석을 위한 FLOW-3D 모델 개발

Beom-Jin Kim 1, Jae-Hong Hwang 2 and Byunghyun Kim 3,*
1 Advanced Structures and Seismic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute,
Daejeon 34057, Korea
2 Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-Water), Daejeon 34350, Korea
3 Department of Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea

  • Correspondence: bhkimc@knu.ac.kr; Tel.: +82-53-950-7819

Abstract

Hydraulic structures installed in rivers inevitably create a water level difference between upstream and downstream regions. The potential energy due to this difference in water level is converted into kinetic energy, causing high-velocity flow and hydraulic jumps in the river. As a result, problems such as scouring and sloping downstream may occur around the hydraulic structures. In this study, a FLOW-3D model was constructed to perform a numerical analysis of the ChangnyeongHaman weir in the Republic of Korea. The constructed model was verified based on surface velocity measurements from a field gate operation experiment. In the simulation results, the flow discharge differed from the measured value by 9–15 m3/s, from which the accuracy was evaluated to be 82–87%. The flow velocity was evaluated with an accuracy of 92% from a difference of 0.01 to 0.16 m/s. Following this verification, a flow analysis of the hydraulic structures was performed according to boundary conditions and operation conditions for numerous scenarios. Since 2018, the ChangnyeongHaman weir gate has been fully opened due to the implementation of Korea’s eco-environmental policy; therefore, in this study, the actual gate operation history data prior to 2018 was applied and evaluated. The evaluation conditions were a 50% open gate condition and the flow discharge of two cases with a large difference in water level. As a result of the analysis, the actual operating conditions showed that the velocity and the Froude number were lower than the optimal conditions, confirming that the selected design was appropriate. It was also found that in the bed protection section, the average flow velocity was high when the water level difference was large, whereas the bottom velocity was high when the gate opening was large. Ultimately, through the reviewed status survey data in this study, the downstream flow characteristics of hydraulic structures along with adequacy verification techniques, optimal design techniques such as procedures for design, and important considerations were derived. Based on the current results, the constructed FLOW-3D-based model can be applied to creating or updating flow analysis guidelines for future repair and reinforcement measures as well as hydraulic structure design.

하천에 설치되는 수력구조물은 필연적으로 상류와 하류의 수위차를 발생시킨다. 이러한 수위차로 인한 위치에너지는 운동에너지로 변환되어 하천의 고속유동과 수압점프를 일으킨다. 그 결과 수력구조물 주변에서 하류의 세굴, 경사 등의 문제가 발생할 수 있다.

본 연구에서는 대한민국 창녕함안보의 수치해석을 위해 FLOW-3D 모델을 구축하였다. 구축된 모델은 현장 게이트 작동 실험에서 표면 속도 측정을 기반으로 검증되었습니다.

시뮬레이션 결과에서 유량은 측정값과 9~15 m3/s 차이가 나고 정확도는 82~87%로 평가되었다. 유속은 0.01~0.16m/s의 차이에서 92%의 정확도로 평가되었습니다.

검증 후 다양한 시나리오에 대한 경계조건 및 운전조건에 따른 수리구조물의 유동해석을 수행하였다. 2018년부터 창녕함안보 문은 한국의 친환경 정책 시행으로 전면 개방되었습니다.

따라서 본 연구에서는 2018년 이전의 실제 게이트 운영 이력 데이터를 적용하여 평가하였다. 평가조건은 50% open gate 조건과 수위차가 큰 2가지 경우의 유수방류로 하였다. 해석 결과 실제 운전조건은 속도와 Froude수가 최적조건보다 낮아 선정된 설계가 적합함을 확인하였다.

또한 베드보호구간에서는 수위차가 크면 평균유속이 높고, 수문개구가 크면 저저유속이 높은 것으로 나타났다. 최종적으로 본 연구에서 검토한 실태조사 자료를 통해 적정성 검증기법과 함께 수력구조물의 하류 유동특성, 설계절차 등 최적 설계기법 및 중요 고려사항을 도출하였다.

현재의 결과를 바탕으로 구축된 FLOW-3D 기반 모델은 수력구조 설계뿐만 아니라 향후 보수 및 보강 조치를 위한 유동해석 가이드라인 생성 또는 업데이트에 적용할 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. Effect of downstream riverbed erosion according to the type of weir foundation.
Figure 1. Effect of downstream riverbed erosion according to the type of weir foundation.
Figure 2. Changnyeong-Haman weir depth survey results (June 2015)
Figure 2. Changnyeong-Haman weir depth survey results (June 2015)
Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.
Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.
Figure 16. Analysis results for Case 7 and Case 8
Figure 16. Analysis results for Case 7 and Case 8

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Fig. 1. Schematic of lap welding for 6061/5182 aluminum alloys.

알루미늄 합금 겹침 용접 중 용접 형성, 용융 흐름 및 입자 구조에 대한 사인파 발진 레이저 빔의 영향

린 첸 가오 양 미시 옹 장 춘밍 왕
Lin Chen , Gaoyang Mi , Xiong Zhang , Chunming Wang *
중국 우한시 화중과학기술대학 재료공학부, 430074

Effects of sinusoidal oscillating laser beam on weld formation, melt flow and grain structure during aluminum alloys lap welding

Abstract

A numerical model of 1.5 mm 6061/5182 aluminum alloys thin sheets lap joints under laser sinusoidal oscillation (sine) welding and laser welding (SLW) weld was developed to simulate temperature distribution and melt flow. Unlike the common energy distribution of SLW, the sinusoidal oscillation of laser beam greatly homogenized the energy distribution and reduced the energy peak. The energy peaks were located at both sides of the sine weld, resulting in the tooth-shaped sectional formation. This paper illustrated the effect of the temperature gradient (G) and solidification rate (R) on the solidification microstructure by simulation. Results indicated that the center of the sine weld had a wider area with low G/R, promoting the formation of a wider equiaxed grain zone, and the columnar grains were slenderer because of greater GR. The porosity-free and non-penetration welds were obtained by the laser sinusoidal oscillation. The reasons were that the molten pool volume was enlarged, the volume proportion of keyhole was reduced and the turbulence in the molten pool was gentled, which was observed by the high-speed imaging and simulation results of melt flow. The tensile test of both welds showed a tensile fracture form along the fusion line, and the tensile strength of sine weld was significantly better than that of the SLW weld. This was because that the wider equiaxed grain area reduced the tendency of cracks and the finer grain size close to the fracture location. Defect-free and excellent welds are of great significance to the new energy vehicles industry.

온도 분포 및 용융 흐름을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 레이저 사인파 진동 (사인) 용접 및 레이저 용접 (SLW) 용접에서 1.5mm 6061/5182 알루미늄 합금 박판 랩 조인트 의 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. SLW의 일반적인 에너지 분포와 달리 레이저 빔의 사인파 진동은 에너지 분포를 크게 균질화하고 에너지 피크를 줄였습니다. 에너지 피크는 사인 용접의 양쪽에 위치하여 톱니 모양의 단면이 형성되었습니다. 이 논문은 온도 구배(G)와 응고 속도 의 영향을 설명했습니다.(R) 시뮬레이션에 의한 응고 미세 구조. 결과는 사인 용접의 중심이 낮은 G/R로 더 넓은 영역을 가짐으로써 더 넓은 등축 결정립 영역의 형성을 촉진하고 더 큰 GR로 인해 주상 결정립 이 더 가늘다는 것을 나타냅니다. 다공성 및 비관통 용접은 레이저 사인파 진동에 의해 얻어졌습니다. 그 이유는 용융 풀의 부피가 확대되고 열쇠 구멍의 부피 비율이 감소하며 용융 풀의 난류가 완만해졌기 때문이며, 이는 용융 흐름의 고속 이미징 및 시뮬레이션 결과에서 관찰되었습니다. 두 용접부 의 인장시험 은 융착선을 따라 인장파괴형태를인장강도사인 용접의 경우 SLW 용접보다 훨씬 우수했습니다. 이는 등축 결정립 영역이 넓을수록 균열 경향이 감소하고 파단 위치에 근접한 입자 크기가 미세 하기 때문입니다. 결함이 없고 우수한 용접은 신에너지 자동차 산업에 매우 중요합니다.

Fig. 1. Schematic of lap welding for 6061/5182 aluminum alloys.
Fig. 1. Schematic of lap welding for 6061/5182 aluminum alloys.
Fig. 2. Finite element mesh.
Fig. 2. Finite element mesh.
Fig. 3. Weld morphologies of cross-section and upper surface for the two welds: (a) sine pattern weld; (b) SLW weld.
Fig. 3. Weld morphologies of cross-section and upper surface for the two welds: (a) sine pattern weld; (b) SLW weld.
Fig. 4. Calculation of laser energy distribution: (a)-(c) sine pattern weld; (d)-(f) SLW weld.
Fig. 4. Calculation of laser energy distribution: (a)-(c) sine pattern weld; (d)-(f) SLW weld.
Fig. 5. The partially melted region of zone A.
Fig. 5. The partially melted region of zone A.
Fig. 6. The simulated profiles of melted region for the two welds: (a) SLW weld; (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 6. The simulated profiles of melted region for the two welds: (a) SLW weld; (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 7. The temperature field simulation results of cross section for sine pattern weld.
Fig. 7. The temperature field simulation results of cross section for sine pattern weld.
Fig. 8. Dynamic behavior of the molten pool at the same time interval of 0.004 s within one oscillating period: (a) SLW weld; (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 8. Dynamic behavior of the molten pool at the same time interval of 0.004 s within one oscillating period: (a) SLW weld; (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 9. The temperature field and flow field of the molten pool for the SLW weld: (a)~(f) t = 80 ms~100 ms.
Fig. 9. The temperature field and flow field of the molten pool for the SLW weld: (a)~(f) t = 80 ms~100 ms.
Fig. 10. The temperature field and flow field of the molten pool for the sine pattern weld: (a)~(f) t = 151 ms~171 ms.
Fig. 10. The temperature field and flow field of the molten pool for the sine pattern weld: (a)~(f) t = 151 ms~171 ms.
Fig. 11. The evolution of the molten pool volume and keyhole depth within one period.
Fig. 11. The evolution of the molten pool volume and keyhole depth within one period.
Fig. 12. The X-ray inspection results for the two welds: (a) SLW weld, (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 12. The X-ray inspection results for the two welds: (a) SLW weld, (b) sine pattern weld.
Fig. 13. Comparison of the solidification parameters for sine and SLW patterns: (a) the temperature field simulated results of the molten pool upper surfaces; (b) temperature gradient G and solidification rate R along the molten pool boundary isotherm from weld centerline to the fusion boundary; (c) G/R; (d) GR.
Fig. 13. Comparison of the solidification parameters for sine and SLW patterns: (a) the temperature field simulated results of the molten pool upper surfaces; (b) temperature gradient G and solidification rate R along the molten pool boundary isotherm from weld centerline to the fusion boundary; (c) G/R; (d) GR.
Fig. 14. The EBSD results of equiaxed grain zone in the weld center of: (a) sine pattern weld; (b) SLW weld; (c) grain size.
Fig. 14. The EBSD results of equiaxed grain zone in the weld center of: (a) sine pattern weld; (b) SLW weld; (c) grain size.
Fig. 15. (a) EBSD results of horizontal sections of SLW weld and sine pattern weld; (b) The columnar crystal widths of SLW weld and sine pattern weld.
Fig. 15. (a) EBSD results of horizontal sections of SLW weld and sine pattern weld; (b) The columnar crystal widths of SLW weld and sine pattern weld.
Fig. 16. (a) The tensile test results of the two welds; (b) Fracture location of SLW weld; (b) Fracture location of sine pattern weld.
Fig. 16. (a) The tensile test results of the two welds; (b) Fracture location of SLW weld; (b) Fracture location of sine pattern weld.

Keywords

Laser welding, Sinusoidal oscillating, Energy distribution, Numerical simulation, Molten pool flow, Grain structure

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Fig. 6. Experiment of waves passing through a single block of porous medium.

Generalization of a three-layer model for wave attenuation in n-block submerged porous breakwater

NadhiraKarimaaIkhaMagdalenaabIndrianaMarcelaaMohammadFaridbaFaculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, 40132, IndonesiabCenter for Coastal and Marine Development, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia

Highlights

•A new three-layer model for n-block submerged porous breakwaters is developed.

•New analytical approach in finding the wave transmission coefficient is presented.

•A finite volume method successfully simulates the wave attenuation process.

•Porous media blocks characteristics and configuration can optimize wave reduction.

Abstract

높은 파도 진폭은 해안선에 위험한 영향을 미치고 해안 복원력을 약화시킬 수 있습니다. 그러나 다중 다공성 매체는 해양 생태계의 환경 친화적인 해안 보호 역할을 할 수 있습니다.

이 논문에서 우리는 n개의 잠긴 다공성 미디어 블록이 있는 영역에서 파동 진폭 감소를 계산하기 위해 3층 깊이 통합 방정식을 사용합니다. 수학적 모델은 파동 전달 계수를 얻기 위해 여러 행렬 방정식을 포함하는 변수 분리 방법을 사용하여 해석적으로 해결됩니다.

이 계수는 진폭 감소의 크기에 대한 정보를 제공합니다. 또한 모델을 수치적으로 풀기 위해 지그재그 유한 체적 방법이 적용됩니다.

수치 시뮬레이션을 통해 다공성 매질 블록의 구성과 특성이 투과파 진폭을 줄이는 데 중요하다는 결론을 내렸습니다.

High wave amplitudes may cause dangerous effects on the shoreline and weaken coastal resilience. However, multiple porous media can act as environmental friendly coastal protectors of the marine ecosystem. In this paper, we use three-layer depth-integrated equations to calculate wave amplitude reduction in a domain with n submerged porous media blocks. The mathematical model is solved analytically using the separation of variables method involving several matrix equations to obtain the wave transmission coefficient. This coefficient provides information about the magnitude of amplitude reduction. Additionally, a staggered finite volume method is applied to solve the model numerically. By conducting numerical simulations, we conclude that porous media blocks’ configuration and characteristics are crucial in reducing transmitted wave amplitude.

Keywords

Three-layer equations, Submerged porous media, Wave transmission coefficient, Finite volume method

Fig. 1. Sketch of the problem configuration.
Fig. 1. Sketch of the problem configuration.
Fig. 6. Experiment of waves passing through a single block of porous medium.
Fig. 6. Experiment of waves passing through a single block of porous medium.

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Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation

Understanding dry-out mechanism in rod bundles of boiling water reactor

끓는 물 원자로 봉 다발의 건조 메커니즘 이해

Liril D.SilviaDinesh K.ChandrakercSumanaGhoshaArup KDasb
aDepartment of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India
bDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee, India
cReactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India

Abstract

Present work reports numerical understanding of interfacial dynamics during co-flow of vapor and liquid phases of water inside a typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), consisting of a nuclear fuel rod bundle assembly of 7 pins in a circular array. Two representative spacings between rods in a circular array are used to carry out the simulation. In literature, flow boiling in a nuclear reactor is dealt with mechanistic models or averaged equations. Hence, in the present study using the Volume of Fluid (VOF) based multiphase model, a detailed numerical understanding of breaking and making in interfaces during flow boiling in BWR is targeted. Our work will portray near realistic vapor bubble and liquid flow dynamics in rod bundle scenario. Constant wall heat flux for fuel rod and uniform velocity of the liquid at the inlet patch is applied as a boundary condition. The saturation properties of water are taken at 30 bar pressure. Flow boiling stages involving bubble nucleation, growth, merging, local dry-out, rewetting with liquid patches, and complete dry-out are illustrated. The dry-out phenomenon with no liquid presence is numerically observed with phase fraction contours at various axial cut-sections. The quantification of the liquid phase fraction at different axial planes is plotted over time, emphasizing the progressive dry-out mechanism. A comparison of liquid-vapor distribution for inner and outer rods reveals that the inner rod’s dry-out occurs sooner than that of the outer rod. The heat transfer coefficient to identify the heat dissipation capacity of each case is also reported.

현재 작업은 원형 배열에 있는 7개의 핀으로 구성된 핵연료봉 다발 어셈블리로 구성된 일반적인 끓는 물 원자로(BWR) 내부의 물의 증기 및 액체상의 동시 흐름 동안 계면 역학에 대한 수치적 이해를 보고합니다.

원형 배열의 막대 사이에 두 개의 대표적인 간격이 시뮬레이션을 수행하는 데 사용됩니다. 문헌에서 원자로의 유동 비등은 기계론적 모델 또는 평균 방정식으로 처리됩니다.

따라서 VOF(Volume of Fluid) 기반 다상 모델을 사용하는 본 연구에서는 BWR에서 유동 비등 동안 계면의 파괴 및 생성에 대한 자세한 수치적 이해를 목표로 합니다.

우리의 작업은 막대 번들 시나리오에서 거의 사실적인 증기 기포 및 액체 흐름 역학을 묘사합니다. 연료봉에 대한 일정한 벽 열유속과 입구 패치에서 액체의 균일한 속도가 경계 조건으로 적용됩니다. 물의 포화 특성은 30bar 압력에서 취합니다.

기포 핵 생성, 성장, 병합, 국소 건조, 액체 패치로 재습윤 및 완전한 건조를 포함하는 유동 비등 단계가 설명됩니다. 액체가 존재하지 않는 건조 현상은 다양한 축 단면에서 위상 분율 윤곽으로 수치적으로 관찰됩니다.

다른 축 평면에서 액상 분율의 정량화는 점진적인 건조 메커니즘을 강조하면서 시간이 지남에 따라 표시됩니다. 내부 막대와 외부 막대의 액-증기 분포를 비교하면 내부 막대의 건조가 외부 막대보다 더 빨리 발생함을 알 수 있습니다. 각 경우의 방열 용량을 식별하기 위한 열 전달 계수도 보고됩니다.

Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation
Fig. 1. A typical Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and selected segment of study for simulation
Fig. 2. (a-c) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 6 mm; (d-f) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 0.6 mm
Fig. 2. (a-c) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 6 mm; (d-f) dimensions and mesh configuration for G = 0.6 mm
Fig. 3. Simulating the effect of spacer (a) Spacer configuration around rod bundle (b) Mesh structure in spacer zone (c) Distribution of vapor bubbles in a rod bundle with spacer (d) Liquid phase fraction comparison for geometry with and without spacer (e,f,g) Wall temperature comparison for geometry with and without spacer; WS: With Spacer, WOS: Without Spacer; Temperature in the y-axis is in (f) and (g) is same as (e).
Fig. 3. Simulating the effect of spacer (a) Spacer configuration around rod bundle (b) Mesh structure in spacer zone (c) Distribution of vapor bubbles in a rod bundle with spacer (d) Liquid phase fraction comparison for geometry with and without spacer (e,f,g) Wall temperature comparison for geometry with and without spacer; WS: With Spacer, WOS: Without Spacer; Temperature in the y-axis is in (f) and (g) is same as (e).
Fig. 4. Validation of the present numerical model with crossflow boiling over a heated cylindrical rod [40]
Fig. 4. Validation of the present numerical model with crossflow boiling over a heated cylindrical rod [40]
Fig. 5. Grid-Independent study in terms of vapor volume in 1/4th of computational domain
Fig. 5. Grid-Independent study in terms of vapor volume in 1/4th of computational domain
Fig. 6. Interface contour for G = 6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; they are showing nucleation, growth, merging, and pseudo-steady-state condition.
Fig. 6. Interface contour for G = 6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; they are showing nucleation, growth, merging, and pseudo-steady-state condition.
Fig. 7. Interface contours for G = 0.6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; It shows dry-out at pseudo-steady-state near the exit
Fig. 7. Interface contours for G = 0.6 mm; ul = 1.2 m/s; q˙ w = 396 kW/m2; It shows dry-out at pseudo-steady-state near the exit
Fig. 8. Vapor-liquid distribution across various distant cross-sections (Black color indicates liquid; Gray color indicates vapor); Magnification factor: 1 × (for a and b), 1.5 × (for c and d)
Fig. 8. Vapor-liquid distribution across various distant cross-sections (Black color indicates liquid; Gray color indicates vapor); Magnification factor: 1 × (for a and b), 1.5 × (for c and d)
Fig. 21. Two-phase flow mixture velocity (u¯z); for G = 6 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 25 means location at outer adiabatic wall; for G = 0.66 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 16.6 mm means location at outer adiabatic wall.
Fig. 21. Two-phase flow mixture velocity (u¯z); for G = 6 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 25 means location at outer adiabatic wall; for G = 0.66 mm, r = 5 means location at inner heated wall and r = 16.6 mm means location at outer adiabatic wall.

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Fig. 5. The predicted shapes of initial breach (a) Rectangular (b) V-notch. Fig. 6. Dam breaching stages.

Investigating the peak outflow through a spatial embankment dam breach

공간적 제방댐 붕괴를 통한 최대 유출량 조사

Mahmoud T.GhonimMagdy H.MowafyMohamed N.SalemAshrafJatwaryFaculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519, Egypt

Abstract

Investigating the breach outflow hydrograph is an essential task to conduct mitigation plans and flood warnings. In the present study, the spatial dam breach is simulated by using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model, FLOW-3D. The model parameters were adjusted by making a comparison with a previous experimental model. The different parameters (initial breach shape, dimensions, location, and dam slopes) are studied to investigate their effects on dam breaching. The results indicate that these parameters have a significant impact. The maximum erosion rate and peak outflow for the rectangular shape are higher than those for the V-notch by 8.85% and 5%, respectively. Increasing breach width or decreasing depth by 5% leads to increasing maximum erosion rate by 11% and 15%, respectively. Increasing the downstream slope angle by 4° leads to an increase in both peak outflow and maximum erosion rate by 2.0% and 6.0%, respectively.

유출 유출 수문곡선을 조사하는 것은 완화 계획 및 홍수 경보를 수행하는 데 필수적인 작업입니다. 본 연구에서는 3차원 전산유체역학 모델인 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 공간 댐 붕괴를 시뮬레이션합니다. 이전 실험 모델과 비교하여 모델 매개변수를 조정했습니다.

다양한 매개변수(초기 붕괴 형태, 치수, 위치 및 댐 경사)가 댐 붕괴에 미치는 영향을 조사하기 위해 연구됩니다. 결과는 이러한 매개변수가 상당한 영향을 미친다는 것을 나타냅니다. 직사각형 형태의 최대 침식율과 최대 유출량은 V-notch보다 각각 8.85%, 5% 높게 나타났습니다.

위반 폭을 늘리거나 깊이를 5% 줄이면 최대 침식률이 각각 11% 및 15% 증가합니다. 하류 경사각을 4° 증가시키면 최대 유출량과 최대 침식률이 각각 2.0% 및 6.0% 증가합니다.

Keywords

Spatial dam breach; FLOW-3D; Overtopping erosion; Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

1. Introduction

There are many purposes for dam construction, such as protection from flood disasters, water storage, and power generationEmbankment failures may have a catastrophic impact on lives and infrastructure in the downstream regions. One of the most common causes of embankment dam failure is overtopping. Once the overtopping of the dam begins, the breach formation will start in the dam body then end with the dam failure. This failure occurs within a very short time, which threatens to be very dangerous. Therefore, understanding and modeling the embankment breaching processes is essential for conducting mitigation plans, flood warnings, and forecasting flood damage.

The analysis of the dam breaching process is implemented by different techniques: comparative methods, empirical models with dimensional and dimensionless solutions, physical-based models, and parametric models. These models were described in detail [1]Parametric modeling is commonly used to simulate breach growth as a time-dependent linear process and calculate outflow discharge from the breach using hydraulics principles [2]. Alhasan et al. [3] presented a simple one-dimensional mathematical model and a computer code to simulate the dam breaching process. These models were validated by small dams breaching during the floods in 2002 in the Czech Republic. Fread [4] developed an erosion model (BREACH) based on hydraulics principles, sediment transport, and soil mechanics to estimate breach size, time of formation, and outflow discharge. Říha et al. [5] investigated the dam break process for a cascade of small dams using a simple parametric model for piping and overtopping erosion, as well as a 2D shallow-water flow model for the flood in downstream areas. Goodarzi et al. [6] implemented mathematical and statistical methods to assess the effect of inflows and wind speeds on the dam’s overtopping failure.

Dam breaching studies can be divided into two main modes of erosion. The first mode is called “planar dam breach” where the flow overtops the whole dam width. While the second mode is called “spatial dam breach” where the flow overtops through the initial pilot channel (i.e., a channel created in the dam body). Therefore, the erosion will be in both vertical and horizontal directions [7].

The erosion process through the embankment dams occurs due to the shear stress applied by water flows. The dam breaching evolution can be divided into three stages [8][9], but Y. Yang et al. [10] divided the breach development into five stages: Stage I, the seepage erosion; Stage II, the initial breach formation; Stage III, the head erosion; Stage IV, the breach expansion; and Stage V, the re-equilibrium of the river channel through the breach. Many experimental tests have been carried out on non-cohesive embankment dams with an initial breach to examine the effect of upstream inflow discharges on the longitudinal profile evolution and the time to inflection point [11].

Zhang et al. [12] studied the effect of changing downstream slope angle, sediment grain size, and dam crest length on erosion rates. They noticed that increasing dam crest length and decreasing downstream slope angle lead to decreasing sediment transport rate. While the increase in sediment grain size leads to an increased sediment transport rate at the initial stages. Höeg et al. [13] presented a series of field tests to investigate the stability of embankment dams made of various materials. Overtopping and piping were among the failure tests carried out for the dams composed of homogeneous rock-fill, clay, or gravel with a height of up to 6.0 m. Hakimzadeh et al. [14] constructed 40 homogeneous cohesive and non-cohesive embankment dams to study the effect of changing sediment diameter and dam height on the breaching process. They also used genetic programming (GP) to estimate the breach outflow. Refaiy et al. [15] studied different scenarios for the downstream drain geometry, such as length, height, and angle, to minimize the effect of piping phenomena and therefore increase dam safety.

Zhu et al. [16] examined the effect of headcut erosion on dam breach growth, especially in the case of cohesive dams. They found that the breach growth in non-cohesive embankments is slower than cohesive embankments due to the little effect of headcut. Schmocker and Hager [7] proposed a relationship for estimating peak outflow from the dam breach process.(1)QpQin-1=1.7exp-20hc23d5013H0

where: Qp = peak outflow discharge.

Qin = inflow discharge.

hc = critical flow depth.

d50 = mean sediment diameter.

Ho = initial dam height.

Yu et al. [17] carried out an experimental study for homogeneous non-cohesive embankment dams in a 180° bending rectangular flume to determine the effect of overtopping flows on breaching formation. They found that the main factors influencing breach formation are water level, river discharge, and embankment material diameter.

Wu et al. [18] carried out a series of experiments to investigate the effect of breaching geometry on both non-cohesive and cohesive embankment dams in a U-bend flume due to overtopping flows. In the case of non-cohesive embankments, the non-symmetrical lateral expansion was noticed during the breach formation. This expansion was described by a coefficient ranging from 2.7 to 3.3.

The numerical models of the dam breach can be categorized according to different parameters, such as flow dimensions (1D, 2D, or 3D), flow governing equations, and solution methods. The 1D models are mainly used to predict the outflow hydrograph from the dam breach. Saberi et al. [19] applied the 1D Saint-Venant equation, which is solved by the finite difference method to investigate the outflow hydrograph during dam overtopping failure. Because of the ability to study dam profile evolution and breach formation, 2D models are more applicable than 1D models. Guan et al. [20] and Wu et al. [21] employed both 2D shallow water equations (SWEs) and sediment erosion equations, which are solved by the finite volume method to study the effect of the dam’s geometry parameters on outflow hydrograph and dam profile evolution. Wang et al. [22] also proposed a second-order hybrid-type of total variation diminishing (TVD) finite-difference to estimate the breach outflow by solving the 2D (SWEs). The accuracy of (SWEs) for both vertical flow contraction and surface roughness has been assessed [23]. They noted that the accuracy of (SWEs) is acceptable for milder slopes, but in the case of steeper slopes, modelers should be more careful. Generally, the accuracy of 2D models is still low, especially with velocity distribution over the flow depth, lateral momentum exchange, density-driven flows, and bottom friction [24]. Therefore, 3D models are preferred. Larocque et al. [25] and Yang et al. [26] started to use three-dimensional (3D) models that depend on the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations.

Previous experimental studies concluded that there is no clear relationship between the peak outflow from the dam breach and the initial breach characteristics. Some of these studies depend on the sharp-crested weir fixed at the end of the flume to determine the peak outflow from the breach, which leads to a decrease in the accuracy of outflow calculations at the microscale. The main goals of this study are to carry out a numerical simulation for a spatial dam breach due to overtopping flows by using (FLOW-3D) software to find an empirical equation for the peak outflow discharge from the breach and determine the worst-case that leads to accelerating the dam breaching process.

2. Numerical simulation

The current study for spatial dam breach is simulated by using (FLOW-3D) software [27], which is a powerful computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program.

2.1. Geometric presentations

A stereolithographic (STL) file is prepared for each change in the initial breach geometry and dimensions. The CAD program is useful for creating solid objects and converting them to STL format, as shown in Fig. 1.

2.2. Governing equations

The governing equations for water flow are three-dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS).

The continuity equation:(2)∂ui∂xi=0

The momentum equation:(3)∂ui∂t+1VFuj∂ui∂xj=1ρ∂∂xj-pδij+ν∂ui∂xj+∂uj∂xi-ρu`iu`j¯

where u is time-averaged velocity,ν is kinematic viscosity, VF is fractional volume open to flow, p is averaged pressure and -u`iu`j¯ are components of Reynold’s stress. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique is used to simulate the free surface profile. Hirt et al. [28] presented the VOF algorithm, which employs the function (F) to express the occupancy of each grid cell with fluid. The value of (F) varies from zero to unity. Zero value refers to no fluid in the grid cell, while the unity value refers to the grid cell being fully occupied with fluid. The free surface is formed in the grid cells having (F) values between zero and unity.(4)∂F∂t+1VF∂∂xFAxu+∂∂yFAyv+∂∂zFAzw=0

where (u, v, w) are the velocity components in (x, y, z) coordinates, respectively, and (AxAyAz) are the area fractions.

2.3. Boundary and initial conditions

To improve the accuracy of the results, the boundary conditions should be carefully determined. In this study, two mesh blocks are used to minimize the time consumed in the simulation. The boundary conditions for mesh block 1 are as follows: The inlet and sides boundaries are defined as a wall boundary condition (wall boundary condition is usually used for bound fluid by solid regions. In the case of viscous flows, no-slip means that the tangential velocity is equal to the wall velocity and the normal velocity is zero), the outlet is defined as a symmetry boundary condition (symmetry boundary condition is usually used to reduce computational effort during CFD simulation. This condition allows the flow to be transferred from one mesh block to another. No inputs are required for this boundary condition except that its location should be defined accurately), the bottom boundary is defined as a uniform flow rate boundary condition, and the top boundary is defined as a specific pressure boundary condition with assigned atmospheric pressure. The boundary conditions for mesh block 2 are as follows: The inlet is defined as a symmetry boundary condition, the outlet is defined as a free flow boundary condition, the bottom and sides boundaries are defined as a wall boundary condition, and the top boundary is defined as a specific pressure boundary condition with assigned atmospheric pressure as shown in Fig. 2. The initial conditions required to be set for the fluid (i.e., water) inside of the domain include configuration, temperature, velocities, and pressure distribution. The configuration of water depends on the dimensions and shape of the dam reservoir. While the other conditions have been assigned as follows: temperature is normal water temperature (25 °c) and pressure distribution is hydrostatic with no initial velocity.

2.4. Numerical method

FLOW-3D uses the finite volume method (FVM) to solve the governing equation (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) over the computational domain. A finite-volume method is an Eulerian approach for representing and evaluating partial differential equations in algebraic equations form [29]. At discrete points on the mesh geometry, values are determined. Finite volume expresses a small volume surrounding each node point on a mesh. In this method, the divergence theorem is used to convert volume integrals with a divergence term to surface integrals. After that, these terms are evaluated as fluxes at each finite volume’s surfaces.

2.5. Turbulent models

Turbulence is the chaotic, unstable motion of fluids that occurs when there are insufficient stabilizing viscous forces. In FLOW-3D, there are six turbulence models available: the Prandtl mixing length model, the one-equation turbulent energy model, the two-equation (k – ε) model, the Renormalization-Group (RNG) model, the two-equation (k – ω) models, and a large eddy simulation (LES) model. For simulating flow motion, the RNG model is adopted to simulate the motion behavior better than the k – ε and k – ω.

models [30]. The RNG model consists of two main equations for the turbulent kinetic energy KT and its dissipation.εT(5)∂kT∂t+1VFuAx∂kT∂x+vAy∂kT∂y+wAz∂kT∂z=PT+GT+DiffKT-εT(6)∂εT∂t+1VFuAx∂εT∂x+vAy∂εT∂y+wAz∂εT∂z=C1.εTKTPT+c3.GT+Diffε-c2εT2kT

where KT is the turbulent kinetic energy, PT is the turbulent kinetic energy production, GT is the buoyancy turbulence energy, εT is the turbulent energy dissipation rate, DiffKT and Diffε are terms of diffusion, c1, c2 and c3 are dimensionless parameters, in which c1 and c3 have a constant value of 1.42 and 0.2, respectively, c2 is computed from the turbulent kinetic energy (KT) and turbulent production (PT) terms.

2.6. Sediment scour model

The sediment scour model available in FLOW-3D can calculate all the sediment transport processes including Entrainment transport, Bedload transport, Suspended transport, and Deposition. The erosion process starts once the water flows remove the grains from the packed bed and carry them into suspension. It happens when the applied shear stress by water flows exceeds critical shear stress. This process is represented by entrainment transport in the numerical model. After entrained, the grains carried by water flow are represented by suspended load transport. After that, some suspended grains resort to settling because of the combined effect of gravity, buoyancy, and friction. This process is described through a deposition. Finally, the grains sliding motions are represented by bedload transport in the model. For the entrainment process, the shear stress applied by the fluid motion on the packed bed surface is calculated using the standard wall function as shown in Eq.7.(7)ks,i=Cs,i∗d50

where ks,i is the Nikuradse roughness and Cs,i is a user-defined coefficient. The critical bed shear stress is defined by a dimensionless parameter called the critical shields number as expressed in Eq.8.(8)θcr,i=τcr,i‖g‖diρi-ρf

where θcr,i is the critical shields number, τcr,i is the critical bed shear stress, g is the absolute value of gravity acceleration, di is the diameter of the sediment grain, ρi is the density of the sediment species (i) and ρf is the density of the fluid. The value of the critical shields number is determined according to the Soulsby-Whitehouse equation.(9)θcr,i=0.31+1.2d∗,i+0.0551-exp-0.02d∗,i

where d∗,i is the dimensionless diameter of the sediment, given by Eq.10.(10)d∗,i=diρfρi-ρf‖g‖μf213

where μf is the fluid dynamic viscosity. For the sloping bed interface, the value of the critical shields number is modified according to Eq.11.(11)θ`cr,i=θcr,icosψsinβ+cos2βtan2φi-sin2ψsin2βtanφi

where θ`cr,i is the modified critical shields number, φi is the angle of repose for the sediment, β is the angle of bed slope and ψ is the angle between the flow and the upslope direction. The effects of the rolling, hopping, and sliding motions of grains along the packed bed surface are taken by the bedload transport process. The volumetric bedload transport rate (qb,i) per width of the bed is expressed in Eq.12.(12)qb,i=Φi‖g‖ρi-ρfρfdi312

where Φi is the dimensionless bedload transport rate is calculated by using Meyer Peter and Müller equation.(13)Φi=βMPM,iθi-θ`cr,i1.5cb,i

where βMPM,i is the Meyer Peter and Müller user-defined coefficient and cb,i is the volume fraction of species i in the bed material. The suspended load transport is calculated as shown in Eq.14.(14)∂Cs,i∂t+∇∙Cs,ius,i=∇∙∇DCs,i

where Cs,i is the suspended sediment mass concentration, D is the diffusivity, and us,i is the grain velocity of species i. Entrainment and deposition are two opposing processes that take place at the same time. The lifting and settling velocities for both entrainment and deposition processes are calculated according to Eq.15 and Eq.16, respectively.(15)ulifting,i=αid∗,i0.3θi-θ`cr,igdiρiρf-1(16)usettling,i=υfdi10.362+1.049d∗,i3-10.36

where αi is the entrainment coefficient of species i and υf is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid.

2.7. Grid type

Using simple rectangular orthogonal elements in planes and hexahedral in volumes in the (FLOW-3D) program makes the mesh generation process easier, decreases the required memory, and improves numerical accuracy. Two mesh blocks were used in a joined form with a size ratio of 2:1. The first mesh block is coarser, which contains the reservoir water, and the second mesh block is finer, which contains the dam. For achieving accuracy and efficiency in results, the mesh size is determined by using a grid convergence test. The optimum uniform cell size for the first mesh block is 0.012 m and for the second mesh block is 0.006 m.

2.8. Time step

The maximum time step size is determined by using a Courant number, which controls the distance that the flow will travel during the simulation time step. In this study, the Courant number was taken equal to 0.25 to prevent the flow from traveling through more than one cell in the time step. Based on the Courant number, a maximum time step value of 0.00075 s was determined.

2.9. Numerical model validation

The numerical model accuracy was achieved by comparing the numerical model results with previous experimental results. The experimental study of Schmocker and Hager [7] was based on 31 tests with changes in six parameters (d50, Ho, Bo, Lk, XD, and Qin). All experimental tests were conducted in a straight open glass-sided flume. The horizontal flume has a rectangular cross-section with a width of 0.4 m and a height of 0.7 m. The flume was provided with a flow straightener and an intake with a length of 0.66 m. All tested dams were inserted at various distances (XD) from the intake. Test No.1 from this experimental program was chosen to validate the numerical model. The different parameters used in test No.1 are as follows:

(1) uniform sediment with a mean diameter (d50 = 0.31 mm), (2) Ho = 0.2 m, (3) Bo = 0.2 m, (4) Lk = 0.1 m,

(5) XD = 1.0 m, (6) Qin = 6.0 lit/s, (7) Su and Sd = 2:1, (8) mass density (ρs = 2650 kg/m3(9) Homogenous and non-cohesive embankment dam. As shown in Fig. 2, the simulation is contained within a rectangular grid with dimensions: 3.56 m in the x-direction (where 0.66 m is used as inlet, 0.9 m as dam base width, and 1.0 m as outlet), in y-direction 0.2 m (dam length), and in the z-direction 0.3 m, which represents the dam height (0.2 m) with a free distance (0.1 m) above the dam. There are two main reasons that this experimental program is preferred for the validation process. The first reason is that this program deals with homogenous, non-cohesive soil, which is available in FLOW-3D. The second reason is that this program deals with small-scale models which saves time for numerical simulation. Finally, some important assumptions were considered during the validation process. The flow is assumed to be incompressible, viscous, turbulent, and three-dimensional.

By comparing dam profiles at different time instants for the experimental test with the current numerical model, it appears that the numerical model gives good agreement as shown in Fig. 3 and Fig. 4, with an average error percentage of 9% between the experimental results and the numerical model.

3. Analysis and discussions

The current model is used to study the effects of different parameters such as (initial breach shapes, dimensions, locations, upstream and downstream dam slopes) on the peak outflow discharge, QP, time of peak outflow, tP, and rate of erosion, E.

This study consists of a group of scenarios. The first scenario is changing the shapes of the initial breach according to Singh [1], the most predicted shapes are rectangular and V-notch as shown in Fig. 5. The second scenario is changing the initial breach dimensions (i.e., width and depth). While the third scenario is changing the location of the initial breach. Eventually, the last scenario is changing the upstream and downstream dam slopes.

All scenarios of this study were carried out under the same conditions such as inflow discharge value (Qin=1.0lit/s), dimensions of the tested dam, where dam height (Ho=0.20m), crest width.

(Lk=0.1m), dam length (Bo=0.20m), and homogenous & non-cohesive soil with a mean diameter (d50=0.31mm).

3.1. Dam breaching process evolution

The dam breaching process is a very complex process due to the quick changes in hydrodynamic conditions during dam failure. The dam breaching process starts once water flows reach the downstream face of the dam. During the initial stage of dam breaching, the erosion process is relatively quiet due to low velocities of flow. As water flows continuously, erosion rates increase, especially in two main zones: the crest and the downstream face. As soon as the dam crest is totally eroded, the water levels in the dam reservoir decrease rapidly, accompanied by excessive erosion in the dam body. The erosion process continues until the water levels in the dam reservoir equal the remaining height of the dam.

According to Zhou et al. [11], the breaching process consists of three main stages. The first stage starts with beginning overtopping flow, then ends when the erosion point directed upstream and reached the inflection point at the inflection time (ti). The second stage starts from the end of the stage1 until the occurrence of peak outflow discharge at the peak outflow time (tP). The third stage starts from the end of the stage2 until the value of outflow discharge becomes the same as the value of inflow discharge at the final time (tf). The outflow discharge from the dam breach increases rapidly during stage1 and stage2 because of the large dam storage capacity (i.e., the dam reservoir is totally full of water) and excessive erosion. While at stage3, the outflow values start to decrease slowly because most of the dam’s storage capacity was run out. The end of stage3 indicates that the dam storage capacity was totally run out, so the outflow equalized with the inflow discharge as shown in Fig. 6 and Fig. 7.

3.2. The effect of initial breach shape

To identify the effect of the initial breach shape on the evolution of the dam breaching process. Three tests were carried out with different cross-section areas for each shape. The initial breach is created at the center of the dam crest. Each test had an ID to make the process of arranging data easier. The rectangular shape had an ID (Rec5h & 5b), which means that its depth and width are equal to 5% of the dam height, and the V-notch shape had an ID (V-noch5h & 1:1) which means that its depth is equal to 5% of the dam height and its side slope is equal to 1:1. The comparison between rectangular and V-notch shapes is done by calculating the ratio between maximum dam height at different times (ZMax) to the initial dam height (Ho), rate of erosion, and hydrograph of outflow discharge for each test. The rectangular shape achieves maximum erosion rate and minimum inflection time, in addition to a rapid decrease in the dam reservoir levels. Therefore, the dam breaching is faster in the case of a rectangular shape than in a V-notch shape, which has the same cross-section area as shown in Fig. 8.

Also, by comparing the hydrograph for each test, the peak outflow discharge value in the case of a rectangular shape is higher than the V-notch shape by 5% and the time of peak outflow for the rectangular shape is shorter than the V-notch shape by 9% as shown in Fig. 9.

3.3. The effect of initial breach dimensions

The results of the comparison between the different initial breach shapes indicate that the worst initial breach shape is rectangular, so the second scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the initial rectangular breach dimensions. Groups of tests were carried out with different depths and widths for the rectangular initial breach. The first group had a depth of 5% from the dam height and with three different widths of 5,10, and 15% from the dam height, the second group had a depth of 10% with three different widths of 5,10, and 15%, the third group had a depth of 15% with three different widths of 5,10, and 15% and the final group had a width of 15% with three different heights of 5, 10, and 15% for a rectangular breach shape. The comparison was made as in the previous section to determine the worst case that leads to the quick dam failure as shown in Fig. 10.

The results show that the (Rec 5 h&15b) test achieves a maximum erosion rate for a shorter period of time and a minimum ratio for (Zmax / Ho) as shown in Fig. 10, which leads to accelerating the dam failure process. The dam breaching process is faster with the minimum initial breach depth and maximum initial breach width. In the case of a minimum initial breach depth, the retained head of water in the dam reservoir is high and the crest width at the bottom of the initial breach (L`K) is small, so the erosion point reaches the inflection point rapidly. While in the case of the maximum initial breach width, the erosion perimeter is large.

3.4. The effect of initial breach location

The results of the comparison between the different initial rectangular breach dimensions indicate that the worst initial breach dimension is (Rec 5 h&15b), so the third scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the initial breach location. Three locations were checked to determine the worst case for the dam failure process. The first location is at the center of the dam crest, which was named “Center”, the second location is at mid-distance between the dam center and dam edge, which was named “Mid”, and the third location is at the dam edge, which was named “Edge” as shown in Fig. 11. According to this scenario, the results indicate that the time of peak outflow discharge (tP) is the same in the three cases, but the maximum value of the peak outflow discharge occurs at the center location. The difference in the peak outflow values between the three cases is relatively small as shown in Fig. 12.

The rates of erosion were also studied for the three cases. The results show that the maximum erosion rate occurs at the center location as shown in Fig. 13. By making a comparison between the three cases for the dam storage volume. The results show that the center location had the minimum values for the dam storage volume, which means that a large amount of water has passed to the downstream area as shown in Fig. 14. According to these results, the center location leads to increased erosion rate and accelerated dam failure process compared with the two other cases. Because the erosion occurs on both sides, but in the case of edge location, the erosion occurs on one side.

3.5. The effect of upstream and downstream dam slopes

The results of the comparison between the different initial rectangular breach locations indicate that the worst initial breach location is the center location, so the fourth scenario from this study concentrated on studying the effect of a change in the upstream (Su) and downstream (Sd) dam slopes. Three slopes were checked individually for both upstream and downstream slopes to determine the worst case for the dam failure process. The first slope value is (2H:1V), the second slope value is (2.5H:1V), and the third slope value is (3H:1V). According to this scenario, the results show that the decreasing downstream slope angle leads to increasing time of peak outflow discharge (tP) and decreasing value of peak outflow discharge. The difference in the peak outflow values between the three cases for the downstream slope is 2%, as shown in Fig. 15, but changing the upstream slope has a negligible impact on the peak outflow discharge and its time as shown in Fig. 16.

The rates of erosion were also studied in the three cases for both upstream and downstream slopes. The results show that the maximum erosion rate increases by 6.0% with an increasing downstream slope angle by 4°, as shown in Fig. 17. The results also indicate that the erosion rates aren’t affected by increasing or decreasing the upstream slope angle, as shown in Fig. 18. According to these results, increasing the downstream slope angle leads to increased erosion rate and accelerated dam failure process compared with the upstream slope angle. Because of increasing shear stress applied by water flows in case of increasing downstream slope.

According to all previous scenarios, the dimensionless peak outflow discharge QPQin is presented for a fixed dam height (Ho) and inflow discharge (Qin). Fig. 19 illustrates the relationship between QP∗=QPQin and.

Lr=ho2/3∗bo2/3Ho. The deduced relationship achieves R2=0.96.(17)QP∗=2.2807exp-2.804∗Lr

4. Conclusions

A spatial dam breaching process was simulated by using FLOW-3D Software. The validation process was performed by making a comparison between the simulated results of dam profiles and the dam profiles obtained by Schmocker and Hager [7] in their experimental study. And also, the peak outflow value recorded an error percentage of 12% between the numerical model and the experimental study. This model was used to study the effect of initial breach shape, dimensions, location, and dam slopes on peak outflow discharge, time of peak outflow, and the erosion process. By using the parameters obtained from the validation process, the results of this study can be summarized in eight points as follows.1.

The rectangular initial breach shape leads to an accelerating dam failure process compared with the V-notch.2.

The value of peak outflow discharge in the case of a rectangular initial breach is higher than the V-notch shape by 5%.3.

The time of peak outflow discharge for a rectangular initial breach is shorter than the V-notch shape by 9%.4.

The minimum depth and maximum width for the initial breach achieve maximum erosion rates (increasing breach width, b0, or decreasing breach depth, h0, by 5% from the dam height leads to an increase in the maximum rate of erosion by 11% and 15%, respectively), so the dam failure is rapid.5.

The center location of the initial breach leads to an accelerating dam failure compared with the edge location.6.

The initial breach location has a negligible effect on the peak outflow discharge value and its time.7.

Increasing the downstream slope angle by 4° leads to an increase in both peak outflow discharge and maximum rate of erosion by 2.0% and 6.0%, respectively.8.

The upstream slope has a negligible effect on the dam breaching process.

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Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.

MULTI-PHYSICS NUMERICAL MODELLING OF 316L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS AT MESO-SCALE

W.E. Alphonso1, M.Bayat1,*, M. Baier 2, S. Carmignato2, J.H. Hattel1
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Lyngby, Denmark
2Department of Management and Engineering – University of Padova, Padova, Italy

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 레이저 열원을 사용하여 선택적으로 통합되는 분말 층으로 복잡한 3D 금속 부품을 만드는 금속 적층 제조(MAM) 기술입니다. 처리 영역은 수십 마이크로미터 정도이므로 L-PBF를 다중 규모 제조 공정으로 만듭니다.

기체 기공의 형성 및 성장 및 용융되지 않은 분말 영역의 생성은 다중물리 모델에 의해 예측할 수 있습니다. 또한 이러한 모델을 사용하여 용융 풀 모양 및 크기, 온도 분포, 용융 풀 유체 흐름 및 입자 크기 및 형태와 같은 미세 구조 특성을 계산할 수 있습니다.

이 작업에서는 용융, 응고, 유체 흐름, 표면 장력, 열 모세관, 증발 및 광선 추적을 통한 다중 반사를 포함하는 스테인리스 스틸 316-L에 대한 충실도 다중 물리학 중간 규모 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. 완전한 실험 설계(DoE) 방법을 사용하는 통계 연구가 수행되었으며, 여기서 불확실한 재료 특성 및 공정 매개변수, 즉 흡수율, 반동 압력(기화) 및 레이저 빔 크기가 용융수지 모양 및 크기에 미치는 영향을 분석했습니다.

또한 용융 풀 역학에 대한 위에서 언급한 불확실한 입력 매개변수의 중요성을 강조하기 위해 흡수율이 가장 큰 영향을 미치고 레이저 빔 크기가 그 뒤를 잇는 주요 효과 플롯이 생성되었습니다. 용융 풀 크기에 대한 반동 압력의 중요성은 흡수율에 따라 달라지는 용융 풀 부피와 함께 증가합니다.

모델의 예측 정확도는 유사한 공정 매개변수로 생성된 단일 트랙 실험과 시뮬레이션의 용융 풀 모양 및 크기를 비교하여 검증됩니다.

더욱이, 열 렌즈 효과는 레이저 빔 크기를 증가시켜 수치 모델에서 고려되었으며 나중에 결과적인 용융 풀 프로파일은 모델의 견고성을 보여주기 위한 실험과 비교되었습니다.

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) is a Metal Additive Manufacturing (MAM) technology where a complex 3D metal part is built from powder layers, which are selectively consolidated using a laser heat source. The processing zone is in the order of a few tenths of micrometer, making L-PBF a multi-scale manufacturing process. The formation and growth of gas pores and the creation of un-melted powder zones can be predicted by multiphysics models. Also, with these models, the melt pool shape and size, temperature distribution, melt pool fluid flow and its microstructural features like grain size and morphology can be calculated. In this work, a high fidelity multi-physics meso-scale numerical model is developed for stainless steel 316-L which includes melting, solidification, fluid flow, surface tension, thermo-capillarity, evaporation and multiple reflection with ray-tracing. A statistical study using a full Design of Experiments (DoE) method was conducted, wherein the impact of uncertain material properties and process parameters namely absorptivity, recoil pressure (vaporization) and laser beam size on the melt pool shape and size was analysed. Furthermore, to emphasize on the significance of the above mentioned uncertain input parameters on the melt pool dynamics, a main effects plot was created which showed that absorptivity had the highest impact followed by laser beam size. The significance of recoil pressure on the melt pool size increases with melt pool volume which is dependent on absorptivity. The prediction accuracy of the model is validated by comparing the melt pool shape and size from the simulation with single track experiments that were produced with similar process parameters. Moreover, the effect of thermal lensing was considered in the numerical model by increasing the laser beam size and later on the resultant melt pool profile was compared with experiments to show the robustness of the model.

Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 1: a) Computational domain for single track L-PBF which includes a 200 μm thick substrate and 45 μm powder layer thickness b) 3D temperature contour plot after scanning a single track with melt pool contours at two locations along the scanning direction where the green region indicates the melted regions.
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 2: Main effects plot of uncertain parameters: absorptivity, recoil pressure coefficient and laser beam radius on the melt pool dimensions (width and depth)
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 3: 3D temperature contours and 2D melt pool cross-sections where the melt pool is stabilized at x=500 µm from the start of the laser initial location for cases where (a) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (b) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (c) absorptivity = 0.1, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (d) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 1 and laser beam radius = 18 µm, (e) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 12 µm, (f) absorptivity = 0.45, Recoil pressure coefficient B = 20 and laser beam radius = 18 µm.
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm
Figure 4: Validation of Numerical model with Recoil pressure coefficient B= 20, absorptivity = 0.45 and a) laser beam radius = 15 µm b) laser beam radius = 20 µm

CONCLUSION

In this work, a high-fidelity multi-physics numerical model was developed for L-PBF using the FVM method in Flow-3D. The impact of uncertainty in the input parameters including absorptivity, recoil pressure and laser beam size on the melt pool is addressed using a DoE method. The DoE analysis shows that absorptivity has the highest impact on the melt pool. The recoil pressure and laser beam size only become significant once absorptivity is 0.45. Furthermore, the numerical model is validated by comparing the predicted melt pool shape and size with experiments conducted with similar process parameters wherein a high prediction accuracy is achieved by the model. In addition, the impact of thermal lensing on the melt pool dimensions by increasing the laser beam spot size is considered in the validated numerical model and the resultant melt pool is compared with experiments.

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Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.

MULTIPHYSICS SIMULATION OF THEMRAL AND FLUID DYNAMICS PHENOMENA DURING THE PULSED LASER POWDER BED FUSION PROCESS OF 316-L STEEL

M. Bayat* , V. K. Nadimpalli, J. H. Hattel
1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Produktionstorvet
425, Kgs. 2800, Lyngby, Denmark

ABSTRACT

L-PBF(Laser Powder Bed Fusion)는 다양한 산업 분야에서 많은 관심을 받았으며, 주로 기존 제조 기술을 사용하여 만들 수 없었던 복잡한 토폴로지 최적화 구성 요소를 구현하는 잘 알려진 능력 덕분입니다. . 펄스 L-PBF(PL-PBF)에서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 주기 지속 시간과 듀티 주기 중 하나 또는 둘 다를 수정하여 변조할 수 있습니다. 따라서 레이저의 시간적 프로파일은 향후 적용을 위해 이 프로세스를 더 잘 제어할 수 있는 길을 열어주는 새로운 프로세스 매개변수로 간주될 수 있습니다. 따라서 이 작업에서 우리는 레이저의 시간적 프로파일을 변경하는 것이 PL-PBF 공정에서 용융 풀 조건과 트랙의 최종 모양 및 형상에 어떻게 영향을 미칠 수 있는지 조사하는 것을 목표로 합니다. 이와 관련하여 본 논문에서는 CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) 소프트웨어 패키지인 Flow-3D를 기반으로 하는 316-L 스테인리스강 PL-PBF 공정의 다중물리 수치 모델을 개발하고 이 모델을 사용하여 열과 유체를 시뮬레이션합니다. 다양한 펄스 모드에서 공정 과정 중 용융 풀 내부에서 발생하는 유동 조건. 따라서 고정된 레이저 듀티 사이클(50%)이 있는 레이저 주기 지속 시간이 용융 풀의 모양과 크기 및 최종 트랙 형태에 미치는 영향을 연구하기 위해 매개변수 연구가 수행됩니다. 더 긴 주기 기간에서 더 많은 재료가 더 큰 용융 풀 내에서 변위됨에 따라 용융 풀의 후류에 더 눈에 띄는 혹이 형성되며, 동시에 더 심각한 반동 압력을 받습니다. 또한 시뮬레이션에서 50% 듀티 사이클에서 1000μs에서 형성된 보다 대칭적인 용융 풀과 비교하여 400μs 사이클 주기에서 더 긴 용융 풀이 형성된다는 것이 관찰되었습니다. 풀 볼륨은 1000μs의 경우 더 큽니다. 매개변수 연구는 연속 트랙과 파손된 트랙 PL-PBF 사이의 경계를 설명하며, 여기서 연속 트랙은 항상 소량의 용융 재료를 유지함으로써 유지됩니다.

English Abstract

Laser Powder Bed Fusion (L-PBF) has attracted a lot of attention from various industrial sectors and mainly thanks to its well-proven well-known capacity of realizing complex topology-optimized components that have so far been impossible to make using conventional manufacturing techniques. In Pulsed L-PBF (PL-PBF), the laser’s temporal profile can be modulated via modifying either or both the cycle duration and the duty cycle. Thus, the laser’s temporal profile could be considered as a new process parameter that paves the way for a better control of this process for future applications. Therefore, in this work we aim to investigate how changing the laser’s temporal profile can affect the melt pool conditions and the final shape and geometry of a track in the PL-PBF process. In this respect, in this paper a multiphysics numerical model of the PL-PBF process of 316-L stainless steel is developed based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package Flow-3D and the model is used to simulate the heat and fluid flow conditions occurring inside the melt pool during the course of the process at different pulsing modes. Thus, a parametric study is carried out to study the influence of the laser’s cycle duration with a fixed laser duty cycle (50 %) on the shape and size of the melt pool and the final track morphology. It is noticed that at longer cycle periods, more noticeable humps form at the wake of the melt pool as more material is displaced within bigger melt pools, which are at the same time subjected to more significant recoil pressures. It is also observed in the simulations that at 50 % duty cycle, longer melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period compared to the more symmetrical melt pools formed at 1000 μs, primarily because of shorter laser off-times in the former, even though melt pool volume is bigger for the 1000 μs case. The parameteric study illustrates the boundary between a continuous track and a broken track PL-PBF wherein the continuous track is retained by always maintaining a small volume of molten material.

Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 1: Front and side views of the computational domain. Note that the region along z and from -100 μm to +50 μm is void.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) - (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 2: Temperature contours and melt pool border lines at different times for the 50 % duty cycle case: (a) – (c) Δtcycle = 400 μs, (d) – (f) Δtcycle = 1000 μs and (g) – (i) Δtcycle = 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.
Figure 3: Plot of melt pool volume versus time for four cases including continuous wave laser as well as 50 % duty cycle at 400 μs, 1000 μs and 3000 μs.

CONCLUSIONS

In this work a CFD model of the modulated PL-PBF process of stainless steel 316-L is developed in the commercial software package Flow-3D. The model involves physics such as solidification, melting, evaporation, convection, laser-material interaction, capillarity, Marangoni effect and the recoil pressure effect. In the current study, a parametric study is carried out to understand how the change in the cycle period duration affects the melt pool’s thermo-fluid conditions during the modulated PL-PBF process. It is observed that at the pulse mode with 50 % duty cycle and 400 μs cycle period, an overlapped chain of humps form at the wake of the melt pool and at a spatial frequency of occurrence of about 78 μm. Furthermore and as expected, it is noted that the melt pool volume, the size of the hump as well as the crater size at the end of the track, increase with increase in the cycle period duration, as more material is re-deposited at the back of the melt pool and that itself is caused by more pronounced recoil pressures. Moreover, it is noticed that due to the short off-time period of the laser in the 400 μs cycle period case, there is always an amount of liquid metal left from the previous cycle, at the time the new cycle starts. This is found to be the main reason why longer and elongated melt pools form at 400 μs cycle period, compared to the bigger, shorter and more symmetrical-like melt pools forming at the 1000 μs case. In this study PL-PBF single tracks including the broken track and the continuous track examples were studied to illustrate the boundary of this transition at a given laser scan parameter setting. At higher scan speeds, it is expected that the Plateau–Rayleigh instability will compete with the pulsing behavior to change the transition boundary between a broken and continuous track, which is suggested as future work from this study.

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Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition

Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition

Xiang WangLin-Jie ZhangJie Ning, and Suck-Joo Na
Published Online:8 Apr 2022https://doi.org/10.1089/3dp.2021.0159

Abstract

A 3D numerical model of heat transfer and fluid flow of molten pool in the process of laser wire deposition was presented by computational fluid dynamics technique. The simulation results of the deposition morphology were also compared with the experimental results under the condition of liquid bridge transfer mode. Moreover, they showed a good agreement. Considering the effect of recoil pressure, the morphology of the deposit metal obtained by the simulation was similar to the experiment result. Molten metal at the wire tip was peeled off and flowed into the molten pool, and then spread to both sides of the deposition layer under the recoil pressure. In addition, the results of simulation and high-speed charge-coupled device presented that a wedge transition zone, with a length of ∼6 mm, was formed behind the keyhole in the liquid bridge transfer process, where the height of deposited metal decreased gradually. After solidification, metal in the transition zone retained the original melt morphology, resulting in a decrease in the height of the tail of the deposition layer.

Keywords

LWD, CFD, liquid bridge transfer, fluid dynamics, wedge transition zone

Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition
Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition
Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition
Fluid Thermodynamic Simulation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy in Laser Wire Deposition

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Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C

Multiscale Process Modeling of Residual Deformation and Defect Formation for Laser Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

Qian Chen, PhD
University of Pittsburgh, 2021

레이저 분말 베드 퓨전(L-PBF) 적층 제조(AM)는 우수한 기계적 특성으로 그물 모양에 가까운 복잡한 부품을 생산할 수 있습니다. 그러나 빌드 실패 및 다공성과 같은 결함으로 이어지는 원치 않는 잔류 응력 및 왜곡이 L-PBF의 광범위한 적용을 방해하고 있습니다.

L-PBF의 잠재력을 최대한 실현하기 위해 잔류 변형, 용융 풀 및 다공성 형성을 예측하는 다중 규모 모델링 방법론이 개발되었습니다. L-PBF의 잔류 변형 및 응력을 부품 규모에서 예측하기 위해 고유 변형 ​​방법을 기반으로 하는 다중 규모 프로세스 모델링 프레임워크가 제안됩니다.

고유한 변형 벡터는 마이크로 스케일에서 충실도가 높은 상세한 다층 프로세스 시뮬레이션에서 추출됩니다. 균일하지만 이방성인 변형은 잔류 왜곡 및 응력을 예측하기 위해 준 정적 평형 유한 요소 분석(FEA)에서 레이어별로 L-PBF 부품에 적용됩니다.

부품 규모에서의 잔류 변형 및 응력 예측 외에도 분말 규모의 다중물리 모델링을 수행하여 공정 매개변수, 예열 온도 및 스패터링 입자에 의해 유도된 용융 풀 변동 및 결함 형성을 연구합니다. 이러한 요인과 관련된 용융 풀 역학 및 다공성 형성 메커니즘은 시뮬레이션 및 실험을 통해 밝혀졌습니다.

제안된 부품 규모 잔류 응력 및 왜곡 모델을 기반으로 경로 계획 방법은 큰 잔류 변형 및 건물 파손을 방지하기 위해 주어진 형상에 대한 레이저 스캐닝 경로를 조정하기 위해 개발되었습니다.

연속 및 아일랜드 스캐닝 전략을 위한 기울기 기반 경로 계획이 공식화되고 공식화된 컴플라이언스 및 스트레스 최소화 문제에 대한 전체 감도 분석이 수행됩니다. 이 제안된 경로 계획 방법의 타당성과 효율성은 AconityONE L-PBF 시스템을 사용하여 실험적으로 입증되었습니다.

또한 기계 학습을 활용한 데이터 기반 프레임워크를 개발하여 L-PBF에 대한 부품 규모의 열 이력을 예측합니다. 본 연구에서는 실시간 열 이력 예측을 위해 CNN(Convolutional Neural Network)과 RNN(Recurrent Neural Network)을 포함하는 순차적 기계 학습 모델을 제안합니다.

유한 요소 해석과 비교하여 100배의 예측 속도 향상이 달성되어 실제 제작 프로세스보다 빠른 예측이 가능하고 실시간 온도 프로파일을 사용할 수 있습니다.

Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) additive manufacturing (AM) is capable of producing complex parts near net shape with good mechanical properties. However, undesired residual stress and distortion that lead to build failure and defects such as porosity are preventing broader applications of L-PBF. To realize the full potential of L-PBF, a multiscale modeling methodology is developed to predict residual deformation, melt pool, and porosity formation. To predict the residual deformation and stress in L-PBF at part-scale, a multiscale process modeling framework based on inherent strain method is proposed.

Inherent strain vectors are extracted from detailed multi-layer process simulation with high fidelity at micro-scale. Uniform but anisotropic strains are then applied to L-PBF part in a layer-by-layer fashion in a quasi-static equilibrium finite element analysis (FEA) to predict residual distortion and stress. Besides residual distortion and stress prediction at part scale, multiphysics modeling at powder scale is performed to study the melt pool variation and defect formation induced by process parameters, preheating temperature and spattering particles. Melt pool dynamics and porosity formation mechanisms associated with these factors are revealed through simulation and experiments.

Based on the proposed part-scale residual stress and distortion model, path planning method is developed to tailor the laser scanning path for a given geometry to prevent large residual deformation and building failures. Gradient based path planning for continuous and island scanning strategy is formulated and full sensitivity analysis for the formulated compliance- and stress-minimization problem is performed.

The feasibility and effectiveness of this proposed path planning method is demonstrated experimentally using the AconityONE L-PBF system. In addition, a data-driven framework utilizing machine learning is developed to predict the thermal history at part-scale for L-PBF.

In this work, a sequential machine learning model including convolutional neural network (CNN) and recurrent neural network (RNN), long shortterm memory unit, is proposed for real-time thermal history prediction. A 100x prediction speed improvement is achieved compared to the finite element analysis which makes the prediction faster than real fabrication process and real-time temperature profile available.

Figure 1.1: Schematic Overview of Metal Laser Powder Bed Fusion Process [2]
Figure 1.1: Schematic Overview of Metal Laser Powder Bed Fusion Process [2]
Figure 1.2: Commercial Powder Bed Fusion Systems
Figure 1.2: Commercial Powder Bed Fusion Systems
Figure 1.3: Commercial Metal Components Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: (a) GE Fuel Nozzle; (b) Stryker Hip Biomedical Implant.
Figure 1.3: Commercial Metal Components Fabricated by Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing: (a) GE Fuel Nozzle; (b) Stryker Hip Biomedical Implant.
Figure 2.1: Proposed Multiscale Process Simulation Framework
Figure 2.1: Proposed Multiscale Process Simulation Framework
Figure 2.2: (a) Experimental Setup for In-situ Thermocouple Measurement in the EOS M290 Build Chamber; (b) Themocouple Locations on the Bottom Side of the Substrate.
Figure 2.2: (a) Experimental Setup for In-situ Thermocouple Measurement in the EOS M290 Build Chamber; (b) Themocouple Locations on the Bottom Side of the Substrate.
Figure 2.3: (a) Finite Element Model for Single Layer Thermal Analysis; (b) Deposition Layer
Figure 2.3: (a) Finite Element Model for Single Layer Thermal Analysis; (b) Deposition Layer
Figure 2.4: Core-skin layer: (a) Surface Morphology; (b) Scanning Strategy; (c) Transient Temperature Distribution and Temperature History at (d) Point 1; (e) Point 2 and (f) Point 3
Figure 2.4: Core-skin layer: (a) Surface Morphology; (b) Scanning Strategy; (c) Transient Temperature Distribution and Temperature History at (d) Point 1; (e) Point 2 and (f) Point 3
Figure 2.5: (a) Scanning Orientation of Each Layer; (b) Finite Element Model for Micro-scale Representative Volume
Figure 2.5: (a) Scanning Orientation of Each Layer; (b) Finite Element Model for Micro-scale Representative Volume
Figure 2.6: Bottom Layer (a) Thermal History; (b) Plastic Strain and (c) Elastic Strain Evolution History
Figure 2.6: Bottom Layer (a) Thermal History; (b) Plastic Strain and (c) Elastic Strain Evolution History
Figure 2.7: Bottom Layer Inherent Strain under Default Process Parameters along Horizontal Scanning Path
Figure 2.7: Bottom Layer Inherent Strain under Default Process Parameters along Horizontal Scanning Path
Figure 2.8: Snapshots of the Element Activation Process
Figure 2.8: Snapshots of the Element Activation Process
Figure 2.9: Double Cantilever Beam Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process (a) Before and (b) After Cutting off; (c) Faro Laser ScanArm V3 for Distortion Measurement
Figure 2.9: Double Cantilever Beam Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process (a) Before and (b) After Cutting off; (c) Faro Laser ScanArm V3 for Distortion Measurement
Figure 2.10: Square Canonical Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process
Figure 2.10: Square Canonical Structure Built by the EOS M290 DMLM Process
Figure 2.11: Finite Element Mesh for the Square Canonical and Snapshots of Element Activation Process
Figure 2.11: Finite Element Mesh for the Square Canonical and Snapshots of Element Activation Process
Figure 2.12: Simulated Distortion Field for the Double Cantilever Beam before Cutting off the Supports: (a) Inherent Strain Method; (b) Simufact Additive 3.1
Figure 2.12: Simulated Distortion Field for the Double Cantilever Beam before Cutting off the Supports: (a) Inherent Strain Method; (b) Simufact Additive 3.1
Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C
Figure 3.10: Snapshots of Temperature Profile for Single Track in Keyhole Regime (P = 250W and V = 0.5m/s) at the Preheating Temperature of 100 °C
s) at the Preheating Temperature of 500 °C
s) at the Preheating Temperature of 500 °C
Figure 3.15: Melt Pool Cross Section Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment for Single Track
Figure 3.15: Melt Pool Cross Section Comparison Between Simulation and Experiment for Single Track

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Figure 3 Simulation PTC pipes enhanced with copper foam and nanoparticles in FLOW-3D software.

다공성 미디어 및 나노유체에 의해 강화된 수집기로 태양광 CCHP 시스템의 최적화

Optimization of Solar CCHP Systems with Collector Enhanced by Porous Media and Nanofluid


Navid Tonekaboni,1Mahdi Feizbahr,2 Nima Tonekaboni,1Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4

Abstract

태양열 집열기의 낮은 효율은 CCHP(Solar Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power) 사이클의 문제점 중 하나로 언급될 수 있습니다. 태양계를 개선하기 위해 나노유체와 다공성 매체가 태양열 집열기에 사용됩니다.

다공성 매질과 나노입자를 사용하는 장점 중 하나는 동일한 조건에서 더 많은 에너지를 흡수할 수 있다는 것입니다. 이 연구에서는 평균 일사량이 1b인 따뜻하고 건조한 지역의 600 m2 건물의 전기, 냉방 및 난방을 생성하기 위해 다공성 매질과 나노유체를 사용하여 태양열 냉난방 복합 발전(SCCHP) 시스템을 최적화했습니다.

본 논문에서는 침전물이 형성되지 않는 lb = 820 w/m2(이란) 정도까지 다공성 물질에서 나노유체의 최적량을 계산하였다. 이 연구에서 태양열 집열기는 구리 다공성 매체(95% 다공성)와 CuO 및 Al2O3 나노 유체로 향상되었습니다.

나노유체의 0.1%-0.6%가 작동 유체로 물에 추가되었습니다. 나노유체의 0.5%가 태양열 집열기 및 SCCHP 시스템에서 가장 높은 에너지 및 엑서지 효율 향상으로 이어지는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다.

본 연구에서 포물선형 집열기(PTC)의 최대 에너지 및 엑서지 효율은 각각 74.19% 및 32.6%입니다. 그림 1은 태양 CCHP의 주기를 정확하게 설명하기 위한 그래픽 초록으로 언급될 수 있습니다.

The low efficiency of solar collectors can be mentioned as one of the problems in solar combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) cycles. For improving solar systems, nanofluid and porous media are used in solar collectors. One of the advantages of using porous media and nanoparticles is to absorb more energy under the same conditions. In this research, a solar combined cooling, heating, and power (SCCHP) system has been optimized by porous media and nanofluid for generating electricity, cooling, and heating of a 600 m2 building in a warm and dry region with average solar radiation of Ib = 820 w/m2 in Iran. In this paper, the optimal amount of nanofluid in porous materials has been calculated to the extent that no sediment is formed. In this study, solar collectors were enhanced with copper porous media (95% porosity) and CuO and Al2O3 nanofluids. 0.1%–0.6% of the nanofluids were added to water as working fluids; it is found that 0.5% of the nanofluids lead to the highest energy and exergy efficiency enhancement in solar collectors and SCCHP systems. Maximum energy and exergy efficiency of parabolic thermal collector (PTC) riches in this study are 74.19% and 32.6%, respectively. Figure 1 can be mentioned as a graphical abstract for accurately describing the cycle of solar CCHP.

1. Introduction

Due to the increase in energy consumption, the use of clean energy is one of the important goals of human societies. In the last four decades, the use of cogeneration cycles has increased significantly due to high efficiency. Among clean energy, the use of solar energy has become more popular due to its greater availability [1]. Low efficiency of energy production, transmission, and distribution system makes a new system to generate simultaneously electricity, heating, and cooling as an essential solution to be widely used. The low efficiency of the electricity generation, transmission, and distribution system makes the CCHP system a basic solution to eliminate waste of energy. CCHP system consists of a prime mover (PM), a power generator, a heat recovery system (produce extra heating/cooling/power), and thermal energy storage (TES) [2]. Solar combined cooling, heating, and power (SCCHP) has been started three decades ago. SCCHP is a system that receives its propulsive force from solar energy; in this cycle, solar collectors play the role of propulsive for generating power in this system [3].

Increasing the rate of energy consumption in the whole world because of the low efficiency of energy production, transmission, and distribution system causes a new cogeneration system to generate electricity, heating, and cooling energy as an essential solution to be widely used. Building energy utilization fundamentally includes power required for lighting, home electrical appliances, warming and cooling of building inside, and boiling water. Domestic usage contributes to an average of 35% of the world’s total energy consumption [4].

Due to the availability of solar energy in all areas, solar collectors can be used to obtain the propulsive power required for the CCHP cycle. Solar energy is the main source of energy in renewable applications. For selecting a suitable area to use solar collectors, annual sunshine hours, the number of sunny days, minus temperature and frosty days, and the windy status of the region are essentially considered [5]. Iran, with an average of more than 300 sunny days, is one of the suitable countries to use solar energy. Due to the fact that most of the solar radiation is in the southern regions of Iran, also the concentration of cities is low in these areas, and transmission lines are far apart, one of the best options is to use CCHP cycles based on solar collectors [6]. One of the major problems of solar collectors is their low efficiency [7]. Low efficiency increases the area of collectors, which increases the initial cost of solar systems and of course increases the initial payback period. To increase the efficiency of solar collectors and improve their performance, porous materials and nanofluids are used to increase their workability.

There are two ways to increase the efficiency of solar collectors and mechanical and fluid improvement. In the first method, using porous materials or helical filaments inside the collector pipes causes turbulence of the flow and increases heat transfer. In the second method, using nanofluids or salt and other materials increases the heat transfer of water. The use of porous materials has grown up immensely over the past twenty years. Porous materials, especially copper porous foam, are widely used in solar collectors. Due to the high contact surface area, porous media are appropriate candidates for solar collectors [8]. A number of researchers investigated Solar System performance in accordance with energy and exergy analyses. Zhai et al. [9] reviewed the performance of a small solar-powered system in which the energy efficiency was 44.7% and the electrical efficiency was 16.9%.

Abbasi et al. [10] proposed an innovative multiobjective optimization to optimize the design of a cogeneration system. Results showed the CCHP system based on an internal diesel combustion engine was the applicable alternative at all regions with different climates. The diesel engine can supply the electrical requirement of 31.0% and heating demand of 3.8% for building.

Jiang et al. [11] combined the experiment and simulation together to analyze the performance of a cogeneration system. Moreover, some research focused on CCHP systems using solar energy. It integrated sustainable and renewable technologies in the CCHP, like PV, Stirling engine, and parabolic trough collector (PTC) [21215].

Wang et al. [16] optimized a cogeneration solar cooling system with a Rankine cycle and ejector to reach the maximum total system efficiency of 55.9%. Jing et al. analyzed a big-scale building with the SCCHP system and auxiliary heaters to produced electrical, cooling, and heating power. The maximum energy efficiency reported in their work is 46.6% [17]. Various optimization methods have been used to improve the cogeneration system, minimum system size, and performance, such as genetic algorithm [1819].

Hirasawa et al. [20] investigated the effect of using porous media to reduce thermal waste in solar systems. They used the high-porosity metal foam on top of the flat plate solar collector and observed that thermal waste decreased by 7% due to natural heat transfer. Many researchers study the efficiency improvement of the solar collector by changing the collector’s shapes or working fluids. However, the most effective method is the use of nanofluids in the solar collector as working fluid [21]. In the experimental study done by Jouybari et al. [22], the efficiency enhancement up to 8.1% was achieved by adding nanofluid in a flat plate collector. In this research, by adding porous materials to the solar collector, collector efficiency increased up to 92% in a low flow regime. Subramani et al. [23] analyzed the thermal performance of the parabolic solar collector with Al2O3 nanofluid. They conducted their experiments with Reynolds number range 2401 to 7202 and mass flow rate 0.0083 to 0.05 kg/s. The maximum efficiency improvement in this experiment was 56% at 0.05 kg/s mass flow rate.

Shojaeizadeh et al. [24] investigated the analysis of the second law of thermodynamic on the flat plate solar collector using Al2O3/water nanofluid. Their research showed that energy efficiency rose up to 1.9% and the exergy efficiency increased by a maximum of 0.72% compared to pure water. Tiwari et al. [25] researched on the thermal performance of solar flat plate collectors for working fluid water with different nanofluids. The result showed that using 1.5% (optimum) particle volume fraction of Al2O3 nanofluid as an absorbing medium causes the thermal efficiency to enhance up to 31.64%.

The effect of porous media and nanofluids on solar collectors has already been investigated in the literature but the SCCHP system with a collector embedded by both porous media and nanofluid for enhancing the ratio of nanoparticle in nanofluid for preventing sedimentation was not discussed. In this research, the amount of energy and exergy of the solar CCHP cycles with parabolic solar collectors in both base and improved modes with a porous material (copper foam with 95% porosity) and nanofluid with different ratios of nanoparticles was calculated. In the first step, it is planned to design a CCHP system based on the required load, and, in the next step, it will analyze the energy and exergy of the system in a basic and optimize mode. In the optimize mode, enhanced solar collectors with porous material and nanofluid in different ratios (0.1%–0.7%) were used to optimize the ratio of nanofluids to prevent sedimentation.

2. Cycle Description

CCHP is one of the methods to enhance energy efficiency and reduce energy loss and costs. The SCCHP system used a solar collector as a prime mover of the cogeneration system and assisted the boiler to generate vapor for the turbine. Hot water flows from the expander to the absorption chiller in summer or to the radiator or fan coil in winter. Finally, before the hot water wants to flow back to the storage tank, it flows inside a heat exchanger for generating domestic hot water [26].

For designing of solar cogeneration system and its analysis, it is necessary to calculate the electrical, heating (heating load is the load required for the production of warm water and space heating), and cooling load required for the case study considered in a residential building with an area of 600 m2 in the warm region of Iran (Zahedan). In Table 1, the average of the required loads is shown for the different months of a year (average of electrical, heating, and cooling load calculated with CARRIER software).Table 1 The average amount of electric charges, heating load, and cooling load used in the different months of the year in the city of Zahedan for a residential building with 600 m2.

According to Table 1, the maximum magnitude of heating, cooling, and electrical loads is used to calculate the cogeneration system. The maximum electric load is 96 kW, the maximum amount of heating load is 62 kW, and the maximum cooling load is 118 kW. Since the calculated loads are average, all loads increased up to 10% for the confidence coefficient. With the obtained values, the solar collector area and other cogeneration system components are calculated. The cogeneration cycle is capable of producing 105 kW electric power, 140 kW cooling capacity, and 100 kW heating power.

2.1. System Analysis Equations

An analysis is done by considering the following assumptions:(1)The system operates under steady-state conditions(2)The system is designed for the warm region of Iran (Zahedan) with average solar radiation Ib = 820 w/m2(3)The pressure drops in heat exchangers, separators, storage tanks, and pipes are ignored(4)The pressure drop is negligible in all processes and no expectable chemical reactions occurred in the processes(5)Potential, kinetic, and chemical exergy are not considered due to their insignificance(6)Pumps have been discontinued due to insignificance throughout the process(7)All components are assumed adiabatic

Schematic shape of the cogeneration cycle is shown in Figure 1 and all data are given in Table 2.

Figure 1 Schematic shape of the cogeneration cycle.Table 2 Temperature and humidity of different points of system.

Based on the first law of thermodynamic, energy analysis is based on the following steps.

First of all, the estimated solar radiation energy on collector has been calculated:where α is the heat transfer enhancement coefficient based on porous materials added to the collector’s pipes. The coefficient α is increased by the porosity percentage, the type of porous material (in this case, copper with a porosity percentage of 95), and the flow of fluid to the collector equation.

Collector efficiency is going to be calculated by the following equation [9]:

Total energy received by the collector is given by [9]

Also, the auxiliary boiler heat load is [2]

Energy consumed from vapor to expander is calculated by [2]

The power output form by the screw expander [9]:

The efficiency of the expander is 80% in this case [11].

In this step, cooling and heating loads were calculated and then, the required heating load to reach sanitary hot water will be calculated as follows:

First step: calculating the cooling load with the following equation [9]:

Second step: calculating heating loads [9]:

Then, calculating the required loud for sanitary hot water will be [9]

According to the above-mentioned equations, efficiency is [9]

In the third step, calculated exergy analysis as follows.

First, the received exergy collector from the sun is calculated [9]:

In the previous equation, f is the constant of air dilution.

The received exergy from the collector is [9]

In the case of using natural gas in an auxiliary heater, the gas exergy is calculated from the following equation [12]:

Delivering exergy from vapor to expander is calculated with the following equation [9]:

In the fourth step, the exergy in cooling and heating is calculated by the following equation:

Cooling exergy in summer is calculated [9]:

Heating exergy in winter is calculated [9]:

In the last step based on thermodynamic second law, exergy efficiency has been calculated from the following equation and the above-mentioned calculated loads [9]:

3. Porous Media

The porous medium that filled the test section is copper foam with a porosity of 95%. The foams are determined in Figure 2 and also detailed thermophysical parameters and dimensions are shown in Table 3.

Figure 2 Copper foam with a porosity of 95%.Table 3 Thermophysical parameters and dimensions of copper foam.

In solar collectors, copper porous materials are suitable for use at low temperatures and have an easier and faster manufacturing process than ceramic porous materials. Due to the high coefficient conductivity of copper, the use of copper metallic foam to increase heat transfer is certainly more efficient in solar collectors.

Porous media and nanofluid in solar collector’s pipes were simulated in FLOW-3D software using the finite-difference method [27]. Nanoparticles Al2O3 and CUO are mostly used in solar collector enhancement. In this research, different concentrations of nanofluid are added to the parabolic solar collectors with porous materials (copper foam with porosity of 95%) to achieve maximum heat transfer in the porous materials before sedimentation. After analyzing PTC pipes with the nanofluid flow in FLOW-3D software, for energy and exergy efficiency analysis, Carrier software results were used as EES software input. Simulation PTC with porous media inside collector pipe and nanofluids sedimentation is shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3 Simulation PTC pipes enhanced with copper foam and nanoparticles in FLOW-3D software.

3.1. Nano Fluid

In this research, copper and silver nanofluids (Al2O3, CuO) have been added with percentages of 0.1%–0.7% as the working fluids. The nanoparticle properties are given in Table 4. Also, system constant parameters are presented in Table 4, which are available as default input in the EES software.Table 4 Properties of the nanoparticles [9].

System constant parameters for input in the software are shown in Table 5.Table 5 System constant parameters.

The thermal properties of the nanofluid can be obtained from equations (18)–(21). The basic fluid properties are indicated by the index (bf) and the properties of the nanoparticle silver with the index (np).

The density of the mixture is shown in the following equation [28]:where ρ is density and ϕ is the nanoparticles volume fraction.

The specific heat capacity is calculated from the following equation [29]:

The thermal conductivity of the nanofluid is calculated from the following equation [29]:

The parameter β is the ratio of the nanolayer thickness to the original particle radius and, usually, this parameter is taken equal to 0.1 for the calculated thermal conductivity of the nanofluids.

The mixture viscosity is calculated as follows [30]:

In all equations, instead of water properties, working fluids with nanofluid are used. All of the above equations and parameters are entered in the EES software for calculating the energy and exergy of solar collectors and the SCCHP cycle. All calculation repeats for both nanofluids with different concentrations of nanofluid in the solar collector’s pipe.

4. Results and Discussion

In the present study, relations were written according to Wang et al. [16] and the system analysis was performed to ensure the correctness of the code. The energy and exergy charts are plotted based on the main values of the paper and are shown in Figures 4 and 5. The error rate in this simulation is 1.07%.

Figure 4 Verification charts of energy analysis results.

Figure 5 Verification charts of exergy analysis results.

We may also investigate the application of machine learning paradigms [3141] and various hybrid, advanced optimization approaches that are enhanced in terms of exploration and intensification [4255], and intelligent model studies [5661] as well, for example, methods such as particle swarm optimizer (PSO) [6062], differential search (DS) [63], ant colony optimizer (ACO) [616465], Harris hawks optimizer (HHO) [66], grey wolf optimizer (GWO) [5367], differential evolution (DE) [6869], and other fusion and boosted systems [4146485054557071].

At the first step, the collector is modified with porous copper foam material. 14 cases have been considered for the analysis of the SCCHP system (Table 6). It should be noted that the adding of porous media causes an additional pressure drop inside the collector [922263072]. All fourteen cases use copper foam with a porosity of 95 percent. To simulate the effect of porous materials and nanofluids, the first solar PTC pipes have been simulated in the FLOW-3D software and then porous media (copper foam with porosity of 95%) and fluid flow with nanoparticles (AL2O3 and CUO) are generated in the software. After analyzing PTC pipes in FLOW-3D software, for analyzing energy and exergy efficiency, software outputs were used as EES software input for optimization ratio of sedimentation and calculating energy and exergy analyses.Table 6 Collectors with different percentages of nanofluids and porous media.

In this research, an enhanced solar collector with both porous media and Nanofluid is investigated. In the present study, 0.1–0.5% CuO and Al2O3 concentration were added to the collector fully filled by porous media to achieve maximum energy and exergy efficiencies of solar CCHP systems. All steps of the investigation are shown in Table 6.

Energy and exergy analyses of parabolic solar collectors and SCCHP systems are shown in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 6 Energy and exergy efficiencies of the PTC with porous media and nanofluid.

Figure 7 Energy and exergy efficiency of the SCCHP.

Results show that the highest energy and exergy efficiencies are 74.19% and 32.6%, respectively, that is achieved in Step 12 (parabolic collectors with filled porous media and 0.5% Al2O3). In the second step, the maximum energy efficiency of SCCHP systems with fourteen steps of simulation are shown in Figure 7.

In the second step, where 0.1, −0.6% of the nanofluids were added, it is found that 0.5% leads to the highest energy and exergy efficiency enhancement in solar collectors and SCCHP systems. Using concentrations more than 0.5% leads to sediment in the solar collector’s pipe and a decrease of porosity in the pipe [73]. According to Figure 7, maximum energy and exergy efficiencies of SCCHP are achieved in Step 12. In this step energy efficiency is 54.49% and exergy efficiency is 18.29%. In steps 13 and 14, with increasing concentration of CUO and Al2O3 nanofluid solution in porous materials, decreasing of energy and exergy efficiency of PTC and SCCHP system at the same time happened. This decrease in efficiency is due to the formation of sediment in the porous material. Calculations and simulations have shown that porous materials more than 0.5% nanofluids inside the collector pipe cause sediment and disturb the porosity of porous materials and pressure drop and reduce the coefficient of performance of the cogeneration system. Most experience showed that CUO and AL2O3 nanofluids with less than 0.6% percent solution are used in the investigation on the solar collectors at low temperatures and discharges [74]. One of the important points of this research is that the best ratio of nanofluids in the solar collector with a low temperature is 0.5% (AL2O3 and CUO); with this replacement, the cost of solar collectors and SCCHP cycle is reduced.

5. Conclusion and Future Directions

In the present study, ways for increasing the efficiency of solar collectors in order to enhance the efficiency of the SCCHP cycle are examined. The research is aimed at adding both porous materials and nanofluids for estimating the best ratio of nanofluid for enhanced solar collector and protecting sedimentation in porous media. By adding porous materials (copper foam with porosity of 95%) and 0.5% nanofluids together, high efficiency in solar parabolic collectors can be achieved. The novelty in this research is the addition of both nanofluids and porous materials and calculating the best ratio for preventing sedimentation and pressure drop in solar collector’s pipe. In this study, it was observed that, by adding 0.5% of AL2O3 nanofluid in working fluids, the energy efficiency of PTC rises to 74.19% and exergy efficiency is grown up to 32.6%. In SCCHP cycle, energy efficiency is 54.49% and exergy efficiency is 18.29%.

In this research, parabolic solar collectors fully filled by porous media (copper foam with a porosity of 95) are investigated. In the next step, parabolic solar collectors in the SCCHP cycle were simultaneously filled by porous media and different percentages of Al2O3 and CuO nanofluid. At this step, values of 0.1% to 0.6% of each nanofluid were added to the working fluid, and the efficiency of the energy and exergy of the collectors and the SCCHP cycle were determined. In this case, nanofluid and the porous media were used together in the solar collector and maximum efficiency achieved. 0.5% of both nanofluids were used to achieve the biggest efficiency enhancement.

In the present study, as expected, the highest efficiency is for the parabolic solar collector fully filled by porous material (copper foam with a porosity of 95%) and 0.5% Al2O3. Results of the present study are as follows:(1)The average enhancement of collectors’ efficiency using porous media and nanofluids is 28%.(2)Solutions with 0.1 to 0.5% of nanofluids (CuO and Al2O3) are used to prevent collectors from sediment occurrence in porous media.(3)Collector of solar cogeneration cycles that is enhanced by both porous media and nanofluid has higher efficiency, and the stability of output temperature is more as well.(4)By using 0.6% of the nanofluids in the enhanced parabolic solar collectors with copper porous materials, sedimentation occurs and makes a high-pressure drop in the solar collector’s pipe which causes decrease in energy efficiency.(5)Average enhancement of SCCHP cycle efficiency is enhanced by both porous media and nanofluid 13%.

Nomenclature

:Solar radiation
a:Heat transfer augmentation coefficient
A:Solar collector area
Bf:Basic fluid
:Specific heat capacity of the nanofluid
F:Constant of air dilution
:Thermal conductivity of the nanofluid
:Thermal conductivity of the basic fluid
:Viscosity of the nanofluid
:Viscosity of the basic fluid
:Collector efficiency
:Collector energy receives
:Auxiliary boiler heat
:Expander energy
:Gas energy
:Screw expander work
:Cooling load, in kilowatts
:Heating load, in kilowatts
:Solar radiation energy on collector, in Joule
:Sanitary hot water load
Np:Nanoparticle
:Energy efficiency
:Heat exchanger efficiency
:Sun exergy
:Collector exergy
:Natural gas exergy
:Expander exergy
:Cooling exergy
:Heating exergy
:Exergy efficiency
:Steam mass flow rate
:Hot water mass flow rate
:Specific heat capacity of water
:Power output form by the screw expander
Tam:Average ambient temperature
:Density of the mixture.

Greek symbols

ρ:Density
ϕ:Nanoparticles volume fraction
β:Ratio of the nanolayer thickness.

Abbreviations

CCHP:Combined cooling, heating, and power
EES:Engineering equation solver.

Data Availability

For this study, data were generated by CARRIER software for the average electrical, heating, and cooling load of a residential building with 600 m2 in the city of Zahedan, Iran.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

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Energy and exergy analysis of an enhanced solar CCHP system with a collector embedded by porous media and nano fluid

Energy and exergy analysis of an enhanced solar CCHP system with a collector embedded by porous media and nano fluid

Year 2021, Volume 7, Issue 6, 1489 – 1505, 02.09.2021

N. TONEKABONI  H. SALARIAN  M. Eshagh NIMVARI  J. KHALEGHINIA https://doi.org/10.18186/thermal.990897

Abstract

The low efficiency of Collectors that absorb energy can be mentioned as one of the drawbacks in solar cogeneration cycles. In the present study, solar systems have been improved by adding porous media and Nanofluid to collectors. One advantage of using porous media and nanomaterials is to absorb more energy while the surface area is reduced. In this study, first, solar collectors are enhanced using 90% porosity copper in solar combined cooling, heating and power systems (SCCHP). Second, different percentages of CuO and Al2O3 nano-fluids are added to a flat plate and parabolic collectors to enhance thermal properties. Simulations are performed in different modes (simple parabolic collectors, simple flat plate collectors, improved flat plate collectors, parabolic collectors with porous media, and flat plate and parabolic collectors with different density of CuO and Al2O3 nanofluids). A case study is investigated for warm and dry regions with mean solar radiation Ib = 820 w / m2 in Iran. The maximum energy and exergy efficiencies are 60.12% and 18.84%, respectively, that is related to enhanced parabolic solar collectors with porous media and nanofluids. Adding porous media and nano-fluids increases an average 14.4% collector energy efficiency and 8.08% collector exergy efficiency.

Keywords

Exergy analysisSolar cogeneration systemPorous mediaNanofluid

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Details

Primary LanguageEnglish
SubjectsEngineering
Journal SectionArticles
AuthorsN. TONEKABONI  This is me
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0002-1563-4407
IranH. SALARIAN  This is me (Primary Author)
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0002-2161-0276
IranM. Eshagh NIMVARI  This is me
Amol University of Special Modern Technologies
0000-0002-7401-315X
IranJ. KHALEGHINIA  This is me
Islamic Azad University Nour Branch
0000-0001-5357-193X
Iran
Publication DateSeptember 2, 2021
Application DateDecember 28, 2020
Acceptance DateMay 9, 2020
Published in IssueYear 2021, Volume 7, Issue 6
Fig. 2. Schematic indication of the separate parts comprising the rotary kiln model, together with the energy fluxes from Eq. (1).

화염 모델링, 열 전달 및 클링커 화학을 포함한 시멘트 가마에 대한 CFD 예측

E Mastorakos Massias 1C.D Tsakiroglou D.A Goussis V.N Burganos A.C Payatakes 2

Abstract

실제 작동 조건에서 석탄 연소 회전 시멘트 가마의 클링커 형성은 방사선에 대한 Monte Carlo 방법, 가마 벽의 에너지 방정식에 대한 유한 체적 코드 및 클링커에 대한 화학 반응을 포함한 에너지 보존 방정식 및 종에 대한 새로운 코드. 기상의 온도 장, 벽으로의 복사 열유속, 가마 및 클링커 온도에 대한 예측 간의 반복적인 절차는 내부 벽 온도의 분포를 명시적으로 예측하는 데 사용됩니다. 여기에는 열 흐름 계산이 포함됩니다. 수갑. 가스와 가마 벽 사이의 주요 열 전달 모드는 복사에 의한 것이며 내화물을 통해 환경으로 손실되는 열은 입력 열의 약 10%이고 추가로 40%는 장입 가열 및 클링커 형성. 예측은 실제 규모의 시멘트 가마에서 경험과 제한된 측정을 기반으로 한 경향과 일치합니다.

키워드

산업용 CFD, 로타리 가마, 클링커 형성, 복사 열전달, Industrial CFD, Rotary kilns, Clinker formation, Radiative heat transfer

1 . 소개

시멘트 산업은 에너지의 주요 소비자이며, 미국에서 산업 사용자의 총 화석 연료 소비량의 약 1.4%를 차지하며 [1] 일반적인 비에너지 사용량은 제조된 클링커 1kg당 약 3.2MJ [2] 입니다. CaCO 3  →  CaO  +  CO 2 반응이 일어나기 때문입니다., 클링커 형성의 첫 번째 단계는 높은 흡열성입니다. 시멘트 가마에서 에너지를 절약하기 위한 현재의 경향은 일반적으로 길이가 약 100m이고 직경이 약 5m인 회전 실린더인 가마를 떠나는 배기 가스로부터 에너지를 보다 효율적으로 회수하는 것과 저열량 연료의 사용에 중점을 둡니다. 값. 2-5초 정도의 화염 체류 시간을 허용하고 2200K의 높은 온도에 도달하는 회전 가마의 특성은 또한 시멘트 가마를 유기 폐기물 및 용제에 대한 상업용 소각로에 대한 경쟁력 있는 대안으로 만듭니다 [3]. 클링커의 형성이 이러한 2차 액체 연료의 사용으로 인한 화염의 변화로부터 어떤 식으로든 영향을 받지 않도록 하고, 대기 중으로 방출되는 오염 물질의 양에 대한 현재 및 미래 제한을 준수할 수 있도록, 화염 구조의 세부 사항과 화염에서 고체 충전물로의 열 전달을 더 잘 이해할 필요가 있습니다.

최근 시멘트 가마 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 에서 유동장 및 석탄 연소의 이론적 모델링복사 열 전달을 포함한 전산 유체 역학(CFD) 코드를 사용하여 달성되었습니다. 이러한 결과는 시멘트 가마에 대한 최초의 결과였으며 화염 길이, 산소 소비 등과 관련하여 실험적으로 관찰된 경향을 재현했기 때문에 그러한 코드가 수용 가능한 정확도로 대규모 산업용 용광로에 사용될 수 있음을 보여주었습니다. 킬른과 클링커는 포함하지 않았고, 벽온도의 경계조건은 가스온도와 용액영역의 열유속에 영향을 미치므로 계산에 필요한 경계조건은 예측하지 않고 실험적 측정에 기초하였다. 기상에 대한 CFD 솔루션은 앞으로의 주요 단계이지만 회전 가마를 포괄적으로 모델링하는 데만으로는 충분하지 않습니다.

내화물의 열 전달과 전하에 대한 세부 사항은 다양한 저자 8 , 9 , 10 , 11에 의해 조사되었습니다 . 충전물(보통 잘 혼합된 것으로 가정)은 노출된 표면에 직접 복사되는 열 외에도 전도에 의해 가마 벽에서 가열됩니다. 가장 완전한 이론적 노력에서, 가마 벽 (내화물)에 대한 3 차원 열전도 방정식을 해결하고, 두 개 또는 세 개의 인접하는 영역으로 한정 한 좌표 축 방향에서 어느 방사선 방사선 열전달 영역 모델과 결합 [ 10] 또는 자세히 해결 [11]. 그러나 클링커 형성 중에 일어나는 화학 반응은 고려되지 않았고 기체 상이 균일한 온도로 고정되어 필요한 수준의 정확도로 처리되지 않았습니다.

최종적으로 연소에 의해 방출되는 에너지(일부)를 받는 고체 전하가 화학 반응을 거쳐 최종 제품인 클링커를 형성합니다. 이것들은 [12]에 설명된 주요 특징에 대한 단순화된 모델과 함께 시멘트 화학 문헌에서 광범위한 조사의 주제였습니다 . 그 작업에서, 고체 온도 및 조성의 축 방향 전개를 설명하는 odes가 공식화되고 해결되었지만, 전하에 대한 열유속 및 따라서 클링커 형성 속도를 결정하는 가스 및 벽 온도는 1차원으로 근사되었습니다. 자세한 화염 계산이 없는 모델.

화염, 벽 및 장입물에 대한 위의 이론적 모델 중 어느 것도 회전식 가마 작동을 위한 진정한 예측 도구로 충분하지 않다는 것이 분명합니다. 국부 가스 온도(CFD 계산 결과 중 하나)는 벽 온도에 크게 의존합니다. 클링커 형성은 에너지를 흡수하므로 지역 가스 및 벽 온도에 따라 달라지며 둘 다 화염에 의존합니다. 벽은 화염에서 클링커로의 순 열 전달에서 “중개자” 역할을 하며, 내화재 두께에 따라 환경으로 피할 수 없는 열 손실이 발생합니다. 이러한 상호 의존성은 가마의 거동에 중요하며 개별 프로세스를 개별적으로 계산하는 데 중점을 두었기 때문에 문헌에서 발견된 수학적 모델로는 다루기 어렵습니다.

본 논문에서 우리는 위에 설명된 유형의 세 가지 개별 모델을 결합하여 수행되는 회전식 시멘트 가마에서 발생하는 대부분의 공정에 대한 포괄적인 모듈식 모델을 제시합니다. 우리 작업은 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 에서와 같이 석탄 연소를 위한 다차원 CFD 코드로 기체 상태를 처리합니다 . 10 , 11 에서와 같이 가마 벽의 3차원 열전도 방정식을 풉니다 . 9 , 12 와 유사한 모델로 잘 혼합된 전하 온도 및 조성을 해결합니다.. 3개의 모듈(화염, 벽, 전하)은 내화물에 입사하는 열유속의 축 분포에 대해 수렴이 달성될 때까지 반복적으로 계산됩니다. 충전 온도 및 구성. 따라서 이전 작업에 비해 현재의 주요 이점은 완전성에 있습니다. 이는 가스-킬른-클링커 시스템의 다양한 부분에서 에너지 흐름의 정량화를 통해 킬른 작동에 대한 더 나은 이해를 가능하게 하고 여기에서 사용된 방법을 건조 및 소각과 같은 다른 회전 킬른 응용 분야에 적용할 수 있게 합니다.

이 문서의 특정 목적은 회전식 시멘트 가마에 대한 포괄적인 모델을 제시하고 화염에서 클링커로의 에너지 플럭스와 가마에서 열 손실을 정량화하는 것입니다. 이 문서의 나머지 부분은 다음과 같이 구성됩니다. 2장 에서는 다양한 모델과 해법을 제시하고 3장 에서는 그 결과를 제시하고 논의한다 . 여기에는 본격적인 회전식 시멘트 가마의 제한된 측정값과의 비교가 포함됩니다. 이 논문은 가장 중요한 결론의 요약으로 끝납니다.

2 . 모델 공식화

2.1 . 개요

Fig. 1 은 시멘트 로터리 킬른의 단면을 보여준다. 가마의 회전은 전하의 움직임을 유도하여 후자를 대략적으로 잘 혼합되도록 합니다 [10] , 여기에서 채택할 가정입니다. 우리는 이 코팅을 클링커와 유사한 물리적 특성의 고체 재료로 모델링하여 가마 내화물에 부착된 클링커의 존재를 허용할 것입니다. 우리는 이 층의 두께가 가마를 따라 균일하다고 가정합니다. 이것은 아마도 지나치게 단순화한 것일 수 있지만 관련 데이터를 사용할 수 없습니다. 모델 설명을 진행하기 전에 그림 2 에 개략적으로 표시된 회전식 가마의 다양한 에너지 흐름을 이해하는 것이 중요합니다 .

석탄 연소에 의해 방출되는 에너지(단위 시간당)( 석탄 )는 배기 가스(Δ 가스 )와 함께 가마 밖으로 흘러 가마 벽에 직접 복사( rad ) 및 대류( conv )됩니다. 공급 및 배기 덕트( rad,1  + rad,2 ) 에 대한 축 방향의 복사에 의해 작은 부분이 손실됩니다 . 전하 가마 시스템은 복사( rad ) 및 대류( conv )에 의해 가스로부터 에너지(Δ cl )를 흡수 하고 주변으로 열을 잃습니다( Q 손실 ). 전체 에너지 균형에서 개별 항의 계산, 즉(1a)큐석탄=ΔH가스-Q라드-Q전환-Q일, 1-Q일, 2,(1b)큐라드+Q전환=ΔH클+Q손실여기에서 다음 섹션에 설명된 대로 가스, 가마 및 클링커에 대한 이산화 에너지를 국부적으로 해결함으로써 수행됩니다.

2.2 . CFD 코드

가스 운동량, 종 농도 및 에너지의 Favre 평균 방정식은 표준 k – ε 모델을 사용하여 방사 모듈(RAD-3D)과 함께 상업적으로 이용 가능한 축대칭 CFD 코드(FLOW-3D)에 의해 해결됩니다. [13] . 기하학이 실제로 3차원이고 벽 온도의 각도 분포가 존재하지만 합리적인 시간과 현재 워크스테이션에서 완전한 3으로 솔루션을 얻을 수 있도록 기체상을 축대칭으로 취급합니다. -D를 요구하는 해상도로 계산하려면 슈퍼컴퓨터에 의존해야 합니다. FLOW-3D에서 사용되는 다양한 하위 모델의 일부 기능과 벽 경계 조건에 대한 특수 처리는 다음과 같습니다.

2.2.1 . 석탄 연소

Rossin-Rammler 크기 분포(45μm 평균 직경, 1.3 지수 [6] )를 따르는 석탄 입자 는 CPU 시간을 줄이기 위해 솔루션 영역(즉, 확률적 구성 요소 없이)에서 결정론적으로 추적되었지만 분산을 과소 평가하는 단점이 있습니다 . 14] . 입자는 2-반응 모델에 따라 휘발되도록 허용되었고 휘발성 연소는 무한히 빠른 것으로 간주되었습니다. 석탄 연소에 대한 설명의 세부 사항은 FLOW-3D에서 석탄 휘발 및 열분해의 “표준” 상수 집합이 합리적인 결과를 제공하고 Ref. [5] .

2.2.2 . 복사와 대류

가스의 복사 강도는 RAD-3D 모듈을 사용하여 80,000개의 입자로 Monte-Carlo 방법으로 계산되었습니다. 가마는 반경 방향으로 7개, 축 방향으로 19개(크기가 0.1  ×  1.0 m와 0.2  ×  5.0 m 사이)로 불균일한 구역으로 나뉘었으며 각 구역 에서 방사선 강도가 균일하다고 가정했습니다. 방사선 모듈의 출력은 내부적으로 FLOW-3D에 대한 유체 계산에 인터페이스되고 외부적으로 벽 및 클링커에 대한 코드에 인터페이스되었습니다( 섹션 2.3 섹션 2.4 참조). 방사선 패키지의 이산화된 구역은 CFD 그리드의 셀보다 훨씬 커야 하므로 구역에 온도 평균이 형성될 수 있는 많은 셀이 포함될 수 있다는 점을 이해하는 것이 중요합니다. 상대적으로 조잡한 복사 구역의 분해능과 Monte-Carlo 방법의 통계적 특성은 구역의 복사 열유속이 더 미세한 구역화 및 더 많은 입자로 몇 번의 실행에 의해 결정된 바와 같이 최대 약 10%까지 부정확할 수 있음을 의미합니다. 또한 경계면에 입사하는 열유속은 영역 크기보다 미세한 분해능으로 결정할 수 없으므로 복사 열유속은 벽에 인접한 19개 영역 각각의 중심에서만 계산됩니다. 0.15m -1 의 흡수 계수는 Ref.[11] . 엄밀히 말하면, 흡수 계수는 국부적 가스 조성과 온도의 함수이므로 균일하지 않아야 합니다. 그러나 가스 조성은 가마의 일부만 차지하는 화염 내에서만 변 하므로( 3절 참조 ) 균일한 흡수 계수를 가정하는 것이 합리적입니다. 또한, 현재 버전의 소프트웨어는 FLOW-3D의 반복 프로세스 동안 이 요소의 자동 재조정을 허용하지 않습니다. 여기서 로컬 가스 특성이 계산되므로 일정하고 균일한 흡수 계수가 필요합니다.

최종적으로, 벽에서 대류 열전달이 플로우 3D 패키지에서 표준 출력 표준 “벽 기능”제형에 혼입 난류 경계층에 대한 식에 기초하고,의 속도 경계 조건과 유사한 K – ε 모델. FLOW-3D 및 RAD-3D에서 입력으로 사용하고 출력으로 계산된 다양한 양은 그림 3에 개략적으로 표시 됩니다.

2.2.3 . 그리드

반경 방향 47개, 축 방향 155개 노드를 갖는 불균일한 격자를 사용하였으며 격자 독립성 연구를 수행한 결과 충분하다고 판단하였다. 유사한 크기의 그리드도 Refs에서 적절한 것으로 밝혀졌습니다. 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 . 매우 높은 축 방향 및 소용돌이 속도로 인해 석탄 버너 유정에 가까운 지역을 해결하기 위해 특별한 주의를 기울였습니다. HP 715/100MHz 워크스테이션에서 이 그리드의 일반적인 CPU 시간은 10시간이었습니다.

2.2.4 . 경계 조건

벽 온도에 대한 경계 조건은 기체상 및 복사 솔버 모두에 필요하다는 것을 인식하는 것이 중요합니다. 아래에서는 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 을 규정하기 보다는 축대칭 그리드에 대한 이 온도 분포를 예측하는 대략적인 방법을 설명합니다 .

내벽 온도 w ( in , x , ϕ ) 의 각도 분포 가 알려져 있다고 가정합니다 . 그런 다음 전체 3차원 문제를 “동등한” 축대칭 문제로 줄이기 위해 가상의 내벽 온도 RAD ( x )는(2)2πε에티4라드(x) = ε클∫0ㄷ티4클(엑스)디ϕ + ε에∫ㄷ2π티4에(아르 자형~에, x, ϕ)디ϕ”효과적인” 경계 조건으로 사용할 수 있습니다. RAD ( x )는 방위각으로 평균화된 “복사 가중” 온도입니다. 필요한 경계 조건으로 이 온도를 사용하는 것은 복사가 열 전달을 지배한다는 기대에 의해 동기가 부여됩니다(후반부 확인, 섹션 3.4 ). 따라서 전체 3차원 문제와 이 “유효한” 축대칭 문제에서 가스에서 가마로의 전체 에너지 흐름은 거의 동일할 것으로 예상됩니다.  의 사용 (2) 축대칭 코드로 기체상 및 복사장을 계산할 수 있으므로 엔지니어링 워크스테이션을 사용하여 문제를 다루기 쉽습니다.

고려되는 가마의 규모와 온도에서 가스는 광학적으로 두꺼운 것으로 간주될 수 있습니다. 솔루션(나중에 제시됨)은 평균 경로 길이(즉, “광자”의 모든 에너지가 흡수되기 전의 평균 길이)가 약 3.2m임을 보여주며, 이는 가마 내경 4.1m보다 작습니다. 이것은 내벽에 입사하는 복사 플럭스가 국부적 벽과 가스 온도에 강하게 의존하고 더 먼 축 또는 방위각 위치에서 벽의 온도에 약하게만 의존함을 의미합니다. 이것은 기체상에 사용된 축대칭 근사에 대한 신뢰를 줍니다. 그것은 또한 Refs의 “구역 방법”을 의미합니다. 8 , 9 , 10표면에 입사하는 방사선이 1-2 구역 길이보다 더 먼 축 위치와 무관한 것으로 간주되는 경우에는 충분했을 것입니다.

2.3 . 가마 온도

내부 소성로 표면 온도 w ( in , x , ϕ )는 Eq. 에서 필요합니다 (2) 및 가마 벽 에너지 방정식의 솔루션 결과의 일부입니다. 각속도 ω로 회전하는 좌표계 에서 후자는 [10] 이 됩니다 .(3)ω∂(ϱ에씨피티에)∂ϕ=1아르 자형∂∂아르 자형에게에아르 자형∂티에∂아르 자형+1아르 자형2∂∂ϕ에게에∂티에∂ϕ+∂∂엑스에게에∂티에∂엑스경계 조건에 따라(3a)r=R~에,Θ<ϕ⩽2π:에게∂티에∂아르 자형=q라드(x)+q전환(엑스),(3b)r=R~에, 0 <ϕ⩽Θ:에게∂티에∂아르 자형=qw–cl(x, ϕ) = hw–cl티클(x)-T에(아르 자형~에, x, ϕ),(3c)r=R밖, 0 <ϕ⩽2π:.케이∂티에∂아르 자형=h쉿티쉿-T∞+ ε쉿티4쉿-T4∞.

전도도, 밀도 및 비열용량에 대한 값은 실제 가마에 사용되는 내화물 재료에 대한 제조업체 정보에서 가져옵니다 [15] . 외부 쉘 온도 sh = w ( out , x , ϕ )는 x 및 ϕ 에 따라 달라질 수 있습니다 .

위 방정식에 대한 몇 가지 의견이 있습니다. 에서는 식. (3a) 에서 열유속의 방위각 의존성이 제거되었습니다. 이전에 언급했듯이 흐름은 광학적으로 두꺼운 것으로 간주됩니다. 즉, 화염이 너무 방사되고 너무 넓기 때문에 벽면 요소가 화염을 가로질러 반대쪽 벽을 “보지” 않습니다. 따라서 rad ( x , ϕ ) 의 계산은 다른 각도 위치로부터의 복사를 포함할 필요 없이 가스 ( r , x ) 및 로컬 w ( in , x , ϕ )를 기반으로 할 수 있습니다. 여기부터 qrad ( x )는 Eq. 의 방위각 평균 온도를 기반으로 하는 축대칭 RAD-3D 솔루션에서 가져옵니다 (2) , 결과적인 rad ( x )는 어떤 의미에서 방위각으로 평균된 열유속입니다. 식 따라서 (3a) 는 우리가 이 열유속을 모든 ϕ 에 등분포한다는 것을 의미합니다 . Eq 에서 rad 의 각도 변화를 무시한다는 점에 유의하십시오 . (3a) 는 Refs. [10] 또는 [11] 이 우선되어야 합니다.

소성로와 장입물 사이의 열전달 계수 w-cl 은 소성로의 에너지 흐름과 온도를 정확하게 예측하는 데 중요하지만 잘 알려져 있지 않습니다. 500 W / m의 전형적인 값  K는 여기에 제시된 결과 사용되고있다 [8] . 계산된 w ( r , x , ϕ ) 및 RAD ( x) 이 계수의 선택에 따라 달라지지만 예측은 질적으로 변하지 않습니다. 껍질에서 대기로의 열 전달은 복사와 별도로 강제 및 자연 대류를 통해 발생합니다. 자연 대류에 대한 열전달 계수는 Ref. [11] , 현재 조건에서 약 5 W/m 2 K의 일반적인 값 을 사용합니다. 그러나 쉘에 불어오는 외부 팬은 과열을 피하기 위해 산업에서 종종 사용되며 이러한 효과는 총 sh =30 W/m 2 K 를 사용하여 여기에서 모델링 되었습니다. 방사율에는 다음 값이 사용되었습니다. ε w = ε cl = 0.9 및 ε sh = 0.8.

식 (3) 은 가마의 방사형 기울기가 훨씬 더 가파르기 때문에 방위각 및 축 전도를 무시한 후 명시적 유한 체적 방법으로 해결되었습니다. 방사형으로 50개 노드와 축 방향으로 19개 노드가 있는 균일하지 않은 그리드가 사용되었으며 회전으로 인한 화염에 주기적으로 노출되는 표면으로 인해 발생하는 빠른 온도 변화를 따르기 위해 내부 표면에서 적절한 방사형 분해능이 사용되었습니다. 동일한 이유로 사용 된 작은 단계(Δ ϕ = π /100)는 가마의 큰 열 관성과 함께 가마 벽 온도가 수렴되도록 하기 위해 2시간 정도의 CPU 시간이 필요했습니다.

2.4 . 수갑

가마에 대한 모델의 마지막 부분은 클링커 온도 및 조성 보존 방정식에 관한 것으로, 축 방향 기울기만 고려하고 전도는 무시합니다.(4)씨피V클디(ϱ클티클)디엑스=−엘wclㄷㅏ클∫0ㄷ큐w–cl(x, ϕ)디ϕ +엘gclㅏ클큐라드(x)+q전환(엑스)−∑나Nsp아르 자형나시간0, 나는에프+씨피티,(5)V클디(ϱ클와이나)디엑스=r나,(6)V클디ϱ클디엑스=−r무엇2,여기서 cl 은 속도 cl 로 흐르는 전하가 덮는 단면적 이며 둘 다 일정하다고 가정하고 gcl =2 in sin( Θ /2) 전하로 덮인 섹터의 현( 그림 1 ) , WCL = Θ 에서는 , SP 화학 종의 수와 r에 난을 (kg / m의 형성 속도 순 3 종의) I를 . 전하의 밀도는 Eq를 감소시킵니다 (6) CO 2 에 대한 질량 손실로 인한하소하는 동안 초기 값은 총 질량 유량이 ϱ cl cl cl 과 같도록 선택되었습니다 . 참고 ρ (CL)이 있다 하지 전하 느슨하게 포장 된 입자로 이루어지는 것으로 생각 될 수있는 바와 같이, 충전 재료 밀도하지만 벌크 밀도. 우리는 또한 전하의 실제 입상 흐름 패턴을 조사하는 것보다 적은 것은 모델의 신뢰성에 크게 추가되지 않는 임시 설명 [10] 이라고 믿기 때문에 전하의 전도를 무시 합니다. 전하는 CaCO 3 , CaO, SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 로 구성된 것으로 가정합니다.2 O 3 , C2S, C3S, C3A 및 C4AF로, 마지막 4종은 클링커화 중에 형성된 복합 염에 대해 시멘트 화학자가 사용하는 특수 표기법으로 표시됩니다. 다음과 같은 화학 반응을 가정합니다 [12] .

(나)CaCO3→높은+무엇2k = 108특급(−175728/RT)
(Ⅱ)높은+2SiO2→C2Sk = 107특급(−240000/RT)
(Ⅲ)높은+C2S→C3Sk = 109특급(−420000/RT)
(IV)3높은+로2그만큼3→C3Ak = 108특급(−310000/RT)
(V)4높은+로2그만큼3+철2그만큼3→Q4AFk = 108특급(−330000/RT)

상기 시행 착오에 의해 선택되는 아 레니 우스 식에 사용되는 사전 지수 인자 및 활성화 온도는 카코에 대한 활성화 에너지를 제외하고, 가마의 출구에서의 전하의 예상 조성물을 얻었다 (3) 에서 촬영 한 분해 참조 [16] . 우리는 이러한 반응이 임시 모델임을 강조합니다. 실제로 고체상의 화학반응은 다양한 종의 결정들 사이의 계면에서 일어나며 확산이 제한적 이지만 [17] , 클링커 화학에 대한 상세한 처리는 본 연구의 범위를 벗어난다.

클링커 형성의 마지막 단계로 간주되는 반응 (III)은 고온에서 액상이 존재할 때만 발생합니다. 클링커의 용융은 액체 분획 fus 에 대해서도 해결함으로써 모델링되었습니다 .(7)엘소란V클디(ϱ클와이소란)디엑스=RHS의식(4)만약 T의 CL이 융해 온도와 같거나보다 커진다 T의 FUS 와 T의 FUS 의 = 1560 K. 상한 Y의 FUS = 0.3 수행 하였다 [17] 상기 식을. (7) 무시되었다.

상미분 방정식, , Gear 방식과 통합되었습니다. 가마 온도에 대한 유한 체적 코드( 2.3절 )와 클링커에 대한 코드는 반복적으로 해결되었으며( 그림 4 ), 이는 벽 클링커 열유속 w–cl ( x , ϕ ).

2.5 . 최종 커플링

전체 문제(가스, 가마, 장입)는 반복 방식으로 해결되었습니다. RAD 의 균일한 분포에서 시작 하여 기체상은 rad ( x ) 및 conv ( x ) 의 축 분포를 제공하도록 해결되었습니다 . 이것들은 다음에서 사용되었습니다., 그 솔루션의 새로운 추정 결과 RAD ( X 통해) 식. (2) . 그런 다음 FLOW3D-RAD3D 실행이 6차 다항식 피팅의 계수 형태로 프로그램에 도입된 새로운 경계 조건으로 반복되었습니다. 의 연속 추정치 사이에 0.5 미만의 밑에 이완 인자 RAD ( X)는 벽 온도에 대한 복사 열유속의 민감도가 크기 때문에 필요한 것으로 밝혀졌습니다. 일반적으로 HP 715 워크스테이션에서 10일 정도의 총 CPU 시간에 해당하는 내벽 온도(연속 반복이 40K 이상 변하지 않을 때 정의됨)의 수렴을 달성하기 위해 이러한 단계 사이에 약 10번의 반복이 필요했습니다. . 그림 5 는 균일한 값(1600K)에서 시작하여 최종 프로파일까지 RAD ( x ) 의 수렴 이력을 보여줍니다 .

2.6 . 가마 조건

사용된 일부 매개변수에 대한 작동 조건 및 값은 표 1 표 2 표 3에 나와 있습니다. 이 값은 시멘트 회전 가마의 전형입니다.

표 1 . 공기 및 석탄 입자 입구 조건

수송소용돌이중고등 학년석탄
m (kg/s)2.2531.7592.91045.9304.0
 (m/s)77.136.576.112.7336.5
V (m/s)−20.7063.900
W (m/s)00112.800
 (케이)3183833181273383

표 2 . 클링커 조성(질량 분율)

밀가루가마 입구가마 출구
m (kg/s)50.37439.81532.775
 (케이)11001785
CACO 30.79470.402180
높은00.338010.0229
그런가 20.14340.181430
알 2 O 30.03490.04420
철 2 O 30.02700.034160
C2S000.1808
C3S000.5981
C3A000.0731
Q4AF000.1242
소성 인자00.61.0

소성 계수 카코의 비율을 3 의 CaO로 변환 된 FARINE있다.

표 3 . 재료 속성 및 기타 매개변수

ω (래드/초)0.5
V의 CL (m / s)0.035
 (K)300
sh (W/m 2 K)30
w–cl (W/m 2 K)500
ε w , ε cl0.9
ε 0.8
C의 P (클링커) (킬로 / kg K)1.5
ϱ cl (kg/m 3 )1200
fus (kJ/kg)418.4
p (벽) (kJ/kg K)1.5
ϱ w (kg/m 3 )1600–3000
k는 w (W / m K)0.6–3.0
석탄 열 방출(kJ/kg)25475

3 . 결과 및 토론

이 섹션에서는 먼저 화염 구조에 대한 정보와 함께 예측된 공기역학적 패턴의 세부사항을 제시합니다. 소성로 내화물의 온도 분포와 클링커 조성의 변화를 설명합니다. 이 섹션은 가마의 전체 에너지 균형과 가능한 모델 개선에 대한 논의로 끝납니다.

3.1 . 화염 구조

그림 6 은 명확성을 위해 방사상 좌표가 과장된 온도의 등고선 플롯을 보여줍니다. 석탄은 주입 지점에서 약 1m 지점에서 약간 축에서 벗어나 점화되며 최대 화염 온도(약 2400K)는 경험에 따라 약 40m 하류에서 도달합니다 [15] . 완전한 입자 소진에 대한 가장 긴 시간은 버너에서 45m에 해당하는 약 1.4초였습니다. 방사형 온도 프로파일( 그림 7 ) 은 온도의 상당한 불균일성이 있음을 보여주지만 출구 프로파일이 본질적으로 평평해짐에 따라 하류에서 감소합니다. 또한 벽에 인접한 가스가 더 차가운 열 경계층이 존재한다는 것이 분명합니다.석탄 노즐에서 최대 30m까지 벽보다 이것은 이 영역에서 대류에 의한 열 전달이 음(즉, 기체 쪽으로)임을 의미하며, 3.4절 에서 더 자세히 논의된 지점 입니다.

버너 출구 바로 하류에 길이가 약 1 버너 직경인 재순환 구역이 있는데( 그림 8 ), 여기에서 화염이 더 하류에서 발화하기 때문에 소용돌이 안정화 화염 [7] 에서와 같이 화염 안정화에 기여하지 않습니다 . 그러나 액체 연료를 사용할 때는 중요할 수 있으므로 버너에 가까운 그리드의 세부 사항을 강조해야 합니다. 버너에서 처음 몇 미터는 매우 높은 전단력과 높은 난류 에너지 생산을 포함하며 이것이 그리드 미세 조정을 강조하는 또 다른 이유입니다. 휘발성 물질 연소 영역( x =10m, r =1m) 에서 k 및 ε 의 일반적인 예측 값 은 24.3 및 142m 2 /s입니다.3 , 각각. 대규모 난류 시간은 171ms이고 Kolmogorov 시간 규모는 1.1ms입니다. 휘발성 물질의 연소는 0.1ms(일반적인 탄화수소 연료) 정도의 시간 규모에서 발생하며, 이는 가마의 소규모 난류 시간보다 10배 더 짧습니다. 따라서 이 흐름에서 연소에 대한 유한 속도 동역학을 포함할 필요는 없으며 “혼합 연소” 근사가 합리적입니다.

3.2 . 가마 온도 분포

중심선에서 계산된 가스 온도, 온도 RAD ( x ) 및 클링커 온도는 그림 9 에서 비교됩니다 . 최고 가스 온도는 25~40m 사이에 위치하며 내화 내부 표면 온도도 최고점입니다. 클링커는 놀랍게도 가마에서 나오기 전 마지막 몇 미터 동안 벽보다 뜨겁 습니다. 복사에 의해 내화물에 입사하는 열유속은 대류에 의한 것보다 1-2 배 더 높으며( 그림 10 ) 가마의 처음 10m에 대한 총 열 전달 은 가스를  합니다. 이 관찰의 중요성은 나중에 논의됩니다.

대류로 인한 에너지 플럭스는 화염에서 가마까지의 전체 에너지 플럭스의 매우 작은 부분인 것으로 밝혀졌습니다( 그림 10 ). 여기서 예측된 대류의 작은 기여는 Ref. [11] . 그 작업에서 대류 열 전달 계산에 사용된 가스 온도는 가마 단면의 평균이었고 따라서 축 근처에 있는 화염의 기여로 인해 벽 부근의 온도보다 훨씬 높았습니다. . 여기에서 우리는 온도와 가스 속도 및 난류 운동 에너지의 국부적 값을 기반으로 하는 보다 정확한 열전달 계수를 사용했기 때문에 보다 정확한 결과를 기대합니다.

예측된 벽 온도는 모든 방향에서 불균일합니다. Fig. 11 은 가마가 회전함에 따라 화염에 노출되었을 때 벽이 가스에 의해 연속적으로 가열되고 클링커에 열을 공급하여 냉각되는 것을 보여준다. 이것은 약 100K의 일반적인 각도 온도 변화를 갖는 대부분의 가마 길이에 해당됩니다. 대조적으로 버너에 가까우면 벽 은 (0 < ϕ < π /2) 동안 클링커에서 열을 얻고 다음으로 열을  습니다. 노출될 때의 가스( π /2 < ϕ < 2 π ). 벽과 클링커 온도가 같으면서 방위각 변화가 없는 경우가 발생할 수 있습니다( 그림 11 ,        x = 17.5m). 이 온도 변화가 작은 것으로 간주될 수 있지만 벽에서 클링커까지의 열유속을 계산하는 위치에 있으려면 전체 3차원 내벽 온도 분포를 계산해야 합니다(0  < ϕ 범위에서 발생 < π /2).   

그림 12 는 ϕ에 독립적인 외부(쉘) 온도와 함께 고체의 큰 비열로 인해 각도 방향의 변화 영역이 벽으로 약 1cm만 확장됨을 보여줍니다( 그림 12b) .. 벽 온도 방사 분포는 가스 온도, 입사 방사선 및 내화 재료의 특성이 변하기 때문에 축 방향 거리에 따라 달라집니다. 정확한 예측을 위해서는 내화물에 부착된 클링커 코팅의 두께에 대한 정확한 지식이 필요합니다. 여기에서 우리는 이 코팅을 클링커와 유사한 물성을 가진 균일한 두께의 재료로 취급했습니다. 그러나 이 코팅층의 실제 물리적 특성과 두께 분포에 관한 실험 데이터를 사용하여 예측의 신뢰성이 향상될 것입니다.

마지막으로, 그림 13 은 외부 쉘 온도가 화염 영역에서 최고조에 달하고 대략적으로 실험 경향을 따른다는 것을 보여줍니다 [15] . 외부 가마 외피는 다양한 강철 두께, 방사율(외피 착색으로 인한) 및 열 전달 계수(송풍기 간격으로 인한)를 갖고 가마는 가변 내화 두께(에 의한 침식으로 인해)를 갖기 때문에 정확한 비교는 의미가 없습니다. 클링커), 여기에 사용된 가정과 반대입니다. 전체 규모 가마는 또한 차등 코팅 및 내화 침식으로 인한 최대 ±100K의 쉘 온도 각도 변동을 보여줍니다 [15] . 따라서 우리는 그림 13 의 일치 가 실제 가마의 복잡성을 고려할 때 예상할 수 있는 만큼 우수 하다고 믿습니다 .

이 섹션에 제시된 예측은 가마 내부의 열 전달 경로에 대한 다음 그림을 뒷받침합니다. 대부분의 가마 길이에서 장입물은 화염으로부터의 복사와 벽으로부터의 열 전도에 의해 가열되고 있습니다. 장입물이 내화물보다 더 차갑기 때문입니다. 가마가 회전함에 따라 내화물은 화염에 노출될 때 열을 얻고 이를 클링커에 공급합니다( 그림 11 ). 벽의 이 “재생” 작용은 Refs. 9 , 10 및 현재 결과에서 재현되었습니다. 그러나 버너 근처에서 반대 에너지 흐름이 발생합니다( 그림 11 , 작은 x). 여기의 가스는 아직 충분히 뜨겁지 않아 내화물이나 장입물에 에너지를 공급하지 않습니다. 이 영역에서 벽은 다가오는 전하에 의해 열을 얻으므로 고체가 없을 때보다 더 뜨겁게 유지됩니다. 벽과 전하가 대류와 복사에 의해 가스에 열을 공급합니다. 우리는 이것을 “음의 재생” 작용으로 식별할 수 있으며 가마의 더 높은 온도 영역( x  >  15m) 에서 클링커에 의해 흡수된 에너지에 의해 유지됩니다 . 전반적으로 클링커는 x  >  15 m 에서 열을 흡수 하고 0  < x < 15 m 에서 일부를 가스로 되돌려 줍니다.   

이 상호 작용은 간단하지 않으며 쉽게 예상할 수 없습니다. 이는 예를 들어 고체를 액체 연료로 대체하여 화염을 수정하면 열유속 분포를 변경하여 최종 클링커 온도에 중대한 영향을 미칠 수 있음을 의미합니다. 현재의 포괄적인 모델이 제공하는 세부 사항은 가마에서 이러한 변화를 평가하는 데 도움이 될 것입니다.

3.3 . 클링커 온도 및 조성

클링커 온도( 그림 9 )는 가장 높은 화염 온도에 도달하는 축 방향 위치에서 거의 최고조에 달하며 클링커는 약 1780K에서 킬른에 존재하며 이는 시멘트 킬른에서 실험 측정값에 가까운 값입니다 [15] . 초기 및 최종 클링커 조성은 표 2 에 나와 있으며 실제 가마에서 작동 값에 가깝습니다 [15] . 다양한 클링커 성분의 축방향 분포( 그림 14 )는 완전한 하소를 위해 고체 유입구에서 약 25m, C2S, C3A 및 C4AF 생성을 위해 추가로 10m가 소요됨을 보여줍니다. 첫 번째 액체상은 x 에서 발견됩니다.=50m이고 액화는 경험과 일치하는 예측인 매우 직후에 완료됩니다 [17] . 클링커화 반응(R-III)은 모델에서 액체가 나타날 때 시작되는 것으로 가정되었으며, 그림 14 에서 클링커화에는 나머지 길이의 거의 전체가 완료되어야 한다는 것이 분명 합니다. 예측은 전체적으로 시멘트 가마 운영의 경험과 일치하며 여기에 사용된 화학적 및 물리적 매개변수가 현실적인 값을 가지고 있음을 의미합니다.

3.4 . 글로벌 에너지 균형

전지구적 에너지 균형은 기체상(FLOW-3D 및 RAD-3D에 의한)과 소성로 장입 시스템에 대한 솔루션에서 쉽게 계산할 수 있으며 표 4 에 나와 있습니다. CFD 코드는 방사 모듈과 함께 에너지를 약 2%까지 절약합니다. 작은 것으로 간주되는 이 오류는 주로 RAD-3D의 영역 이산화와 Monte-Carlo 계산의 유한한 입자 수로 인해 발생하는 오류에 기인하며 CPU 시간을 희생하여 개선할 수 있습니다. 소성로-클링커 계산의 정확도는 더 나쁩니다. 소성로-클링커 시스템에 입력되는 에너지의 약 10% 오류( rad  + conv )입니다. 이는 수렴된 솔루션이 식 (3) , 그리고 보다 정확한 암시적 솔버에 의해 개선될 수 있습니다.

표 4 . CFD 그리드 및 가마-클링커 조합에 대한 글로벌 에너지 균형

가스(MW)
라드 , 1−2.47
라드 , 2−2.72
큐 라드−57.12
전환0.04
석탄101.2
Δ 가스41.25
균형2.32
가마 클링커
큐 라드57.12
전환−0.04
손실−10.45
Δ H의 CL40.99
균형5.64

에너지 흐름의 정의는 그림 2 를 참조하십시오 .

시멘트 회전식 가마의 에너지 사용에 관한 몇 가지 흥미로운 결론은 표 4 의 결과를 통해 얻을 수 있습니다 . 연소에 의해 방출되는 에너지의 약 40%는 전하 가열 및 클링커 형성에 필요하고 약 10%는 내화물을 통해 대기로 손실됩니다. 나머지의 대부분은 본질적으로 배기 가스와 함께 소성로 밖으로 흐릅니다. 이 중 일부는 소성로 외부의 예비 하소기 및 사이클론에서 회수됩니다. 내부 가마 벽과 장입 온도를 자세히 다루는 여기에 제시된 포괄적인 모델에 의존하지 않고는 국지적 가스 온도를 정확하게 예측하고 이에 따라 향후 연구에서 오염 물질 형성을 예측하는 것이 불가능하다는 것이 분명합니다.

3.5 . 논의

여기에 제시된 회전식 시멘트 가마 작동에 대한 포괄적인 모델의 결과는 합리적이며 실험적으로 관찰된 경향을 재현합니다. 이전 모델링 작업에 비해 이 작업의 주요 이점은 가마에서 발생하는 대부분의 물리적 프로세스를 포함한다는 점입니다. 특히, 가스 온도와 클링커로의 열유속 및 이에 따른 클링커 형성을 결정하는 데 가장 중요한 양인 내벽 온도는 실험 데이터를 사용하여 규정된 것이 아니라 예측되었습니다. 이 특정 기능은 현재 모델을 진정한 예측형으로 만듭니다.

우리는 전체 3차원 문제를 공기역학에 대한 “동등한” 축대칭 문제로 줄이는 방법을 포함했습니다( 식 (2) ). 이를 통해 현재 워크스테이션에서 솔루션을 얻을 수 있습니다. 모델의 모듈식 특성, 즉 공기역학, 복사, 가마 및 장입에 대한 별도의 코드는 해당 모듈만 수정하면 다른 회전 가마 응용 프로그램(예: 소각 및 건조)에도 사용할 수 있음을 의미합니다. 예를 들어, 고형 폐기물의 소각은 현재 코드로 모델링할 수 있지만 적절한 화학.

실험 데이터와의 상세한 비교는 이용 가능한 측정이 거의 없고 현지 시멘트 회사에서 제공한 경험적 데이터로 제한되어 매우 어렵습니다 [15] . 비교는 앞서 지적한 바와 같이 출구 클링커 조성과 온도가 산업적 경험( 표 2 ) 이내 이고, 배기 가스 조성은 공장 굴뚝에서 측정된 값에 가깝고(“가짜 공기” 희석을 허용한 후), 가마 외피 온도는 측정 범위 내에 있습니다( 그림 13 ). 이 동의는 모델이 프로세스의 정확한 표현임을 시사합니다.

더 높은 정확도의 예측을 달성하려면 모델의 다양한 부분에서 개선이 필요합니다. 내화물의 정확한 두께(즉, 내화물과 부착된 클링커)를 설정해야 합니다. 이는 가마 벽을 통해 주변으로 열 손실이 발생하여 외부 쉘 온도에 영향을 미치기 때문입니다. 새 내화물이 있는 가마에서 쉘 온도 측정과 자세한 비교가 이루어져야 합니다(불균일한 코팅 두께가 방지되도록). 벽 재료의 물리적 특성(열용량, 밀도, 전도도)의 적절한 값을 사용해야 합니다. 가장 큰 불확실성은 클링커 코팅의 가정된 특성에 관한 것입니다. 내벽 표면의 방사율과 가스의 흡수 계수를 더 자세히 조사해야 합니다. 가마에 입사하는 복사 열유속에 영향을 미치므로 벽 온도에 영향을 줄 수 있습니다. 클링커의 온도는 사용된 비열 용량에 따라 달라지므로 정확한 평가에 각별한 주의가 필요합니다. 화염의 국지적 온도와 종 구성에 대한 지식은 CFD 코드를 검증하는 데 매우 유용할 것이지만 그러한 적대적인 환경에서 측정은 분명히 달성하기 매우 어렵습니다. 마지막으로 클링커 화학 및 전하 이동은 개선할 수 있는 영역입니다. 그러한 적대적인 환경에서의 측정은 분명히 달성하기 매우 어렵습니다. 마지막으로 클링커 화학 및 전하 이동은 개선할 수 있는 영역입니다. 그러한 적대적인 환경에서의 측정은 분명히 달성하기 매우 어렵습니다. 마지막으로 클링커 화학 및 전하 이동은 개선할 수 있는 영역입니다.

이러한 모든 잠재적 개선과 모델과 관련된 불확실성에도 불구하고 가마의 모든 에너지 경로가 적절한 세부 사항으로 모델링되었기 때문에 전체 동작은 최소한 질적으로 정확합니다. 클링커 출구 구성, 쉘 온도 및 배기 가스 구성과 같은 중요한 양은 허용 가능한 정확도로 예측됩니다. 이 모델은 버너, 연료 유형, 품질 및 수량, 예비 하소 수준( 표 2 ) 또는 고형물 유량 등의 변경과 같은 많은 상황에서 산업계에 매우 유용할 것으로 예상됩니다 . 소성로 운영자는 최종 클링커 구성이 여전히 허용 가능하고 현재의 포괄적인 모델이 이 방향에 도움이 될 수 있는지 확인해야 합니다.

4 . 결론

실제 작동 조건에서 석탄 연소 회전 시멘트 가마의 클링커 형성은 석탄 화염과 가마 사이의 열 교환, 가마와 역류 고체 사이의 열 교환, 고형물을 최종 제품(클링커)으로 변환합니다. 방사선에 대한 Monte-Carlo 방법을 포함하는 축대칭 CFD 코드(상용 패키지 FLOW-3D)가 기상에 사용되었습니다. 가마 벽의 온도는 유한 체적 열전도 코드로 계산되었으며 클링커에 대한 종 및 에너지 보존 방정식도 공식화 및 해결되었습니다. 기체 온도 필드에 대한 예측 사이의 반복적인 절차, 벽에 대한 복사 열 유속, 가마 및 클링커 온도는 실험에서 이러한 정보를 사용한 이전 모델링 노력과 달리 내벽 온도 분포를 명시적으로 계산하는 데 사용되었습니다. 접선 좌표에 대한 통합은 CFD 코드에 필요한 경계 조건으로 사용되는 “유효” 내벽 온도의 축 분포를 초래했습니다. 이 절차를 통해 클링커로의 열 흐름 계산이 가능하고 축대칭 CFD 코드로 3차원 문제를 대략적으로 처리할 수 있습니다. CFD 코드에 필요한 경계 조건으로 사용됩니다. 이 절차를 통해 클링커로의 열 흐름 계산이 가능하고 축대칭 CFD 코드로 3차원 문제를 대략적으로 처리할 수 있습니다. CFD 코드에 필요한 경계 조건으로 사용됩니다. 이 절차를 통해 클링커로의 열 흐름 계산이 가능하고 축대칭 CFD 코드로 3차원 문제를 대략적으로 처리할 수 있습니다.

결과는 복사가 가스와 가마 벽 사이의 대부분의 열 전달을 설명하는 반면 내화물을 통한 환경으로의 열 손실은 입력 열의 약 10%를 설명한다는 것을 보여줍니다. 화학 반응과 충전물의 가열은 연소 에너지의 약 40%를 흡수합니다. 따라서 이러한 사항을 반드시 고려해야 합니다. 예측은 실제 규모의 시멘트 가마에서 얻은 경험과 측정값을 기반으로 한 경향과 일치합니다.

감사의 말

이 작업은 과학 및 기술을 위한 그리스 사무국 프로젝트 EPET-II/649의 자금 지원을 받았습니다. Mr.P에게 진심으로 감사드립니다. 시멘트 가마에 관한 지침 및 데이터는 그리스 TITAN SA의 Panagiotopoulos에게 문의하십시오.

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2 Also at Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Greece.

Forming characteristics and control method of weld bead for GMAW on curved surface

곡면에 GMAW용 용접 비드의 형성 특성 및 제어 방법

Forming characteristics and control method of weld bead for GMAW on curved surface

The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology (2021)Cite this article

Abstract

곡면에서 GMAW 기반 적층 가공의 용접 성형 특성은 중력의 영향을 크게 받습니다. 성형면의 경사각이 크면 혹 비드(hump bead)와 같은 심각한 결함이 발생합니다.

본 논문에서는 양생면에서 용접 비드 형성의 형성 특성과 제어 방법을 연구하기 위해 용접 용융 풀 유동 역학의 전산 모델을 수립하고 제안된 모델을 검증하기 위해 증착 실험을 수행하였습니다.

결과는 용접 비드 경사각(α)이 증가함에 따라 역류의 속도가 증가하고 상향 용접의 경우 α > 60°일 때 불규칙한 험프 결함이 나타나는 것으로 나타났습니다.

상부 과잉 액체의 하향 압착력과 하부 상향 유동의 반동력과 표면장력 사이의 상호작용은 용접 혹 형성의 주요 요인이었다. 하향 용접의 경우 양호한 형태를 얻을 수 있었으며, 용접 비드 경사각이 증가함에 따라 용접 높이는 감소하고 용접 폭은 증가하였습니다.

하향 및 상향 용접을 위한 곡면의 용융 거동 및 성형 특성을 기반으로 험프 결함을 제어하기 위해 위브 용접을 통한 증착 방법을 제안하였습니다.

성형 궤적의 변화로 인해 용접 방향의 중력 성분이 크게 감소하여 용융 풀 흐름의 안정성이 향상되었으며 복잡한 표면에서 안정적이고 일관된 용접 비드를 얻는 데 유리했습니다.

하향 용접과 상향 용접 사이의 단일 비드의 치수 편차는 7% 이내였으며 하향 및 상향 혼합 혼합 비드 중첩 증착에서 비드의 변동 편차는 0.45로 GMAW 기반 적층 제조 공정에서 허용될 수 있었습니다.

이러한 발견은 GMAW를 기반으로 하는 곡선 적층 적층 제조의 용접 비드 형성 제어에 기여했습니다.

The weld forming characteristics of GMAW-based additive manufacturing on curved surface are dramatically influenced by gravity. Large inclined angle of the forming surface would lead to severe defects such as hump bead. In this paper, a computational model of welding molten pool flow dynamics was established to research the forming characteristic and control method of weld bead forming on cured surface, and deposition experiments were conducted to verify the proposed model. Results indicated that the velocity of backward flows increased with the increase of weld bead tilt angle (α) and irregular hump defects appeared when α > 60° for upward welding. The interaction between the downward squeezing force of the excess liquid at the top and the recoil force of the upward flow at the bottom and the surface tension were primary factors for welding hump formation. For downward welding, a good morphology shape could be obtained, and the weld height decreased and the weld width increased with the increase of weld bead tilt angle. Based on the molten behaviors and forming characteristics on curved surface for downward and upward welding, the method of deposition with weave welding was proposed to control hump defects. Gravity component in the welding direction was significantly reduced due to the change of forming trajectory, which improved the stability of the molten pool flow and was beneficial to obtain stable and consistent weld bead on complex surface. The dimensional deviations of the single bead between downward and upward welding were within 7% and the fluctuation deviation of the bead in multi-bead overlapping deposition with mixing downward and upward welding was 0.45, which could be acceptable in GMAW-based additive manufacturing process. These findings contributed to the weld bead forming control of curve layered additive manufacturing based on GMAW.

Keywords

  • Molten pool behaviors
  • GMAW-based WAAM
  • Deposition with weave welding
  • Welding on curved surface
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Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling

Laser Powder Bed에서 Laser Drilling에 의한 Keyhole 형성 Ti6Al4V 생체 의학 합금의 융합: 메조스코픽 전산유체역학 시뮬레이션 대 경험적 검증을 사용한 수학적 모델링

Keyhole Formation by Laser Drilling in Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Ti6Al4V Biomedical Alloy: Mesoscopic Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation versus Mathematical Modelling Using Empirical Validation

Asif Ur Rehman 1,2,3,*
,† , Muhammad Arif Mahmood 4,*
,† , Fatih Pitir 1
, Metin Uymaz Salamci 2,3
,
Andrei C. Popescu 4 and Ion N. Mihailescu 4

Abstract

LPBF(Laser Powder Bed fusion) 공정에서 작동 조건은 열 분포를 기반으로 레이저 유도 키홀 영역을 결정하는 데 필수적입니다. 얕은 구멍과 깊은 구멍으로 분류되는 이러한 영역은 LPBF 프로세스에서 확률과 결함 형성 강도를 제어합니다.

LPBF 프로세스의 핵심 구멍을 연구하고 제어하기 위해 수학적 및 CFD(전산 유체 역학) 모델이 제공됩니다. CFD의 경우 이산 요소 모델링 기법을 사용한 유체 체적 방법이 사용되었으며, 분말 베드 보이드 및 표면에 의한 레이저 빔 흡수를 포함하여 수학적 모델이 개발되었습니다.

동적 용융 풀 거동을 자세히 살펴봅니다. 실험적, CFD 시뮬레이션 및 분석적 컴퓨팅 결과 간에 정량적 비교가 수행되어 좋은 일치를 얻습니다.

LPBF에서 레이저 조사 영역 주변의 온도는 높은 내열성과 분말 입자 사이의 공기로 인해 분말층 주변에 비해 급격히 상승하여 레이저 횡방향 열파의 이동이 느려집니다. LPBF에서 키홀은 에너지 밀도에 의해 제어되는 얕고 깊은 키홀 모드로 분류될 수 있습니다. 에너지 밀도를 높이면 얕은 키홀 구멍 모드가 깊은 키홀 구멍 모드로 바뀝니다.

깊은 키홀 구멍의 에너지 밀도는 다중 반사와 키홀 구멍 내의 2차 반사 빔의 집중으로 인해 더 높아져 재료가 빠르게 기화됩니다.

깊은 키홀 구멍 모드에서는 온도 분포가 높기 때문에 액체 재료가 기화 온도에 가까우므로 얕은 키홀 구멍보다 구멍이 형성될 확률이 훨씬 높습니다. 온도가 급격히 상승하면 재료 밀도가 급격히 떨어지므로 비열과 융해 잠열로 인해 유체 부피가 증가합니다.

그 대가로 표면 장력을 낮추고 용융 풀 균일성에 영향을 미칩니다.

In the laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) process, the operating conditions are essential in determining laser-induced keyhole regimes based on the thermal distribution. These regimes, classified into shallow and deep keyholes, control the probability and defects formation intensity in the LPBF process. To study and control the keyhole in the LPBF process, mathematical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are presented. For CFD, the volume of fluid method with the discrete element modeling technique was used, while a mathematical model was developed by including the laser beam absorption by the powder bed voids and surface. The dynamic melt pool behavior is explored in detail. Quantitative comparisons are made among experimental, CFD simulation and analytical computing results leading to a good correspondence. In LPBF, the temperature around the laser irradiation zone rises rapidly compared to the surroundings in the powder layer due to the high thermal resistance and the air between the powder particles, resulting in a slow travel of laser transverse heat waves. In LPBF, the keyhole can be classified into shallow and deep keyhole mode, controlled by the energy density. Increasing the energy density, the shallow keyhole mode transforms into the deep keyhole mode. The energy density in a deep keyhole is higher due to the multiple reflections and concentrations of secondary reflected beams within the keyhole, causing the material to vaporize quickly. Due to an elevated temperature distribution in deep keyhole mode, the probability of pores forming is much higher than in a shallow keyhole as the liquid material is close to the vaporization temperature. When the temperature increases rapidly, the material density drops quickly, thus, raising the fluid volume due to the specific heat and fusion latent heat. In return, this lowers the surface tension and affects the melt pool uniformity.

Keywords: laser powder bed fusion; computational fluid dynamics; analytical modelling; shallow
and deep keyhole modes; experimental correlation

Figure 1. Powder bed schematic with voids.
Figure 1. Powder bed schematic with voids.
Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling
Figure 2. (a) Scanning electron microscopy images of Ti6Al4V powder particles and (b) simulated powder bed using discrete element modelling
Figure 3. Temperature field contour formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 3. Temperature field contour formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 4. Detailed view of shallow depth melt mode with temperature field at 0.695 ms
Figure 4. Detailed view of shallow depth melt mode with temperature field at 0.695 ms
Figure 5. Melt flow stream traces formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 5. Melt flow stream traces formation at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 6. Density evolution of the melt pool at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 6. Density evolution of the melt pool at various time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms.
Figure 7. Un-melted and melted regions at different time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 7. Un-melted and melted regions at different time intervals (a) 0.695 ms, (b) 0.795 ms, (c) 0.995 ms and (d) 1.3 ms
Figure 8. Transformation from shallow depth melt flow to deep keyhole formation when laser power increased from (a) 170 W to (b) 200 W
Figure 8. Transformation from shallow depth melt flow to deep keyhole formation when laser power increased from (a) 170 W to (b) 200 W
Figure 9. Stream traces and laser beam multiple reflections in deep keyhole melt flow mode
Figure 9. Stream traces and laser beam multiple reflections in deep keyhole melt flow mode
Figure 10. A comparison between analytical and CFD simulation results for peak thermal distribution value in the deep keyhole formation
Figure 10. A comparison between analytical and CFD simulation results for peak thermal distribution value in the deep keyhole formation
Figure 11. A comparison among experiments [49], CFD and analytical simulations for deep keyhole top width and bottom width
Figure 11. A comparison among experiments [49], CFD and analytical simulations for deep keyhole top width and bottom width

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Multiphysics Modeling of Thermal Behavior of Commercial Pure Titanium Powder During Selective Laser Melting

Multiphysics Modeling of Thermal Behavior of Commercial Pure Titanium Powder During Selective Laser Melting

Metals and Materials International (2021)Cite this article

Abstract

선택적 레이저 용융 동안 CP-Ti의 열 거동을 연구하기 위해 무작위 패킹 분말 베드 모델을 기반으로 하는 메조스코프 시뮬레이션이 설정되었습니다. 레이저와 분말의 상호 작용에 따른 용융 풀의 특성과 레이저 출력이 용융 풀의 열 거동, 유체 역학 및 표면 형태 변화에 미치는 영향을 연구했습니다.

결과는 레이저 출력이 증가함에 따라 최대 온도, 온도 변화율, 용융 풀의 수명 및 크기가 크게 향상되었음을 보여줍니다. 또한 본 연구에서는 이중궤도 하의 용융지의 특성과 열거동을 주로 연구하였다.

두 번째 트랙의 용융 풀의 최대 온도, 수명 및 길이와 너비는 첫 번째 트랙보다 더 높고 레이저 출력이 증가함에 따라 용융 풀에서 두 번째 트랙의 길이 너비 비율이 증가함을 알 수 있습니다. 더 커집니다.

A mesoscopic simulation based on random packing powder bed model was established to study the heat behavior of CP-Ti during selective laser melting. The characteristics of the molten pool under the interaction of laser and powder, and the influence of laser power on the thermal behavior, hydrodynamics and surface morphology evolution of the molten pool were studied. The results show that with the increase of laser power, the maximum temperature, temperature change rate, lifetime of molten pool and size are greatly improved. In addition, the characteristics and heat behavior of the molten pool under the double track are mainly studied in this study. It is found that the maximum temperature, lifetime, and the length and width of the molten pool of the second track are higher than those in the first, and with the increase of laser power, the length width ratio of the second track in molten pool becomes larger.

Multiphysics Modeling of Thermal Behavior of Commercial Pure Titanium Powder During Selective Laser Melting
Multiphysics Modeling of Thermal Behavior of Commercial Pure Titanium Powder During Selective Laser Melting

Keywords

  • Additive manufacturing
  • Selective laser melting
  • Numerical simulation
  • Thermal behavior

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Fig. 1  Layout of spillway tunnel

Experimental study and numerical simulation of hydraulic characteristics of ogee spillway tunnel

WU Jingxia1
, ZHANG Chunjin2,3
(1. Xi’an Water Conservancy Survey Design Institute, Xi’an  710054, Shaanxi, China; 2. Key Laboratory of
Yellow River Sediment Research, M. W. R. , Yellow River Institute of Hydraulic Research, Zhengzhou 
450003, Henan, China; 3. State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic
Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing  210098, Jiangsu, China)

수치 시뮬레이션을 통해 오지 여수로 터널의 수리적 특성 연구의 타당성을 탐색하기 위해 황하 Xiaolangdi 수질 관리 프로젝트의 2번 오지 여수로 터널을 연구 대상으로 취한 다음 오지의 수리 특성 설계 및 점검 홍수 수준 조건에서 여수로 터널은 RNG k-ε 난류 모델을 사용하여 배출 용량, 터널 크라운 잔류 공간, 단면 유속, 압전 수두, 유동 캐비테이션 수, 제트 흐름 범위 및 1 ∶ 40의 일반 수리 모델과 결합된 세굴 구덩이 깊이, 시뮬레이션 값과 실험 값 모두 비교됩니다.

연구결과 모의실험값이 실험값과 일치하여 오지 여수로터널의 수리적 특성을 수치모사를 통해 탐색할 수 있음을 확인하였다. 여수로터널 내부의 흐름은 안정적이고 터널 크라운 잔류 공간은 개방 흐름과 완전 흐름의 교대 흐름 패턴이 없는 25% 이상입니다.

체크 홍수 수위에서 시뮬레이션 값과 유량 계수의 실험 값은 모두 설계에서보다 높으므로 배출 용량은 홍수 제어 관련 설계 요구 사항을 충족할 수 있습니다. 오지 단면과 플립 단면의 유동 캐비테이션 수는 캐비테이션 손상이 발생할 가능성이 작기 때문에 캐비테이션 침식을 줄이기 위한 적절한 적절한 조치가 채택될 필요가 있습니다.

유압 모델의 고르지 않은 표면에 부압이 발생하면 표면 구조에 관련주의를 기울일 필요가 있습니다. 연구 결과는 여수로 터널의 설계 및 건설에 대한 관련 참고 및 이론적 근거를 제공할 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Xiaolangdi Water Control Project; ogee spillway tunnel; simulative calculation; hydraulic characteristics; turbulent
model

Fig. 1  Layout of spillway tunnel
Fig. 1  Layout of spillway tunnel