Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device

Fabrication and Experimental Investigation of a Novel 3D Hydrodynamic Focusing Micro Cytometric Device

Yongquan Wang*a , Jingyuan Wangb, Hualing Chenc

School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, 710049, P. R. China
a yqwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,, bwjy2006@stu.xjtu.edu.cn,, c hlchen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn,

Abstract:

This paper presents the fabrication of a novel micro-machined cytometric device, and the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The proposed device is simple in structure, with the uniqueness that the depth of its microchannels is non-uniform. Using the SU-8 soft lithography containing two exposures, as well as micro-molding techniques, the PDMS device is successfully fabricated. Two kinds of experiments, i.e., the red ink fluidity observation experiments and the fluorescent optical experiments, are then performed for the device prototypes with different step heights, or channel depth differences, to explore the influence laws of the feature parameter on the devices hydrodynamic focusing behaviors. The experimental results show that the introducing of the steps can efficiently enhance the vertical focusing performance of the device. At appropriate geometry and operating conditions, good 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be obtained.

Korea Abstract

이 논문은 새로운 마이크로 머신 세포 측정 장치의 제조와 3D 유체 역학적 초점 성능에 대한 실험적 조사를 제시합니다. 제안 된 장치는 구조가 단순하며, 마이크로 채널의 깊이가 균일하지 않다는 독특함이 있습니다. 두 가지 노출이 포함 된 SU-8 소프트 리소그래피와 마이크로 몰딩 기술을 사용하여 PDMS 장치가 성공적으로 제작되었습니다. 그런 다음 두 종류의 실험, 즉 적색 잉크 유동성 관찰 실험과 형광 광학 실험을 단계 높이 또는 채널 깊이 차이가 다른 장치 프로토 타입에 대해 수행하여 장치 유체 역학적 초점에 대한 기능 매개 변수의 영향 법칙을 탐색합니다. 행동. 실험 결과는 단계의 도입이 장치의 수직 초점 성능을 효율적으로 향상시킬 수 있음을 보여줍니다. 적절한 형상과 작동 조건에서 우수한 3D 유체 역학적 초점을 얻을 수 있습니다.

Keywords

Flow cytometer, Hydrodynamic focusing, Three-dimensional (3D), Micro-machined

Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.1 Schematic diagram of the novel cytometric device
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.2 Overview of the cytometric device fabrication process
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig.4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.3 The fabricated micro cytometric device Fig. 4 Experiment setup for focusing performance
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.5 Horizontal focusing images of two devices with and without steps
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights
Fig.6 Channel cross-section fluorescence images for different step heights

References 

Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios
Fig.7 Effect of the step height on the 3D focusing at different velocity ratios

Conclusions

In this paper, we presented a novel micro-machined cytometric device and its fabrication process,
emphasizing on the experimental investigations for its 3D hydrodynamic focusing performance. The
proposed device is simple in structure, low cost, and easy to be batch produced. Besides this, as a
device based on standard micro-fabrication methodology, it can be conveniently integrated with other
micro-fluidic and/or micro-optical units to form a complete detection and analysis system.
The experimental tests for the prototype devices not only verified the design conception, but also
gave us a comprehensive understanding of the device hydro-focusing performance. The experimental
results show that, as the uniqueness of this design, the introducing of the feature steps can
significantly enhance the vertical focusing performance of the devices, which is crucial for the
achievement of 3D focusing. In summary, for the proposed novel device, good 3D hydrodynamic
focusing can be attained at appropriate geometry and operating conditions.
In addition, an improved design can be obtained by replacing the flat cover with an identical
device unit, in other words, the same two device units are bonded together (The channels are inward
and aligned) to form a new device. Then the sample stream can focused to the center of the assembly
outlet channel due to the hydrodynamic forces equally in both horizontal and vertical directions, and
thus avoiding the adsorption or friction issues of cells/particles to the top channel wall.

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Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

1Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander, Spain
2William G. Lowrie Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Ohio State University, 151 W. Woodruff Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, USA
*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 202020(11), 3030; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20113030
Received: 16 April 2020 / Revised: 21 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 27 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lab-on-a-Chip and Microfluidic Sensors)

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresisCFDcross sectionchip fabrication

Korea Abstract

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를위한 기능화 된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드를 자기 적으로 회수하여 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다. 연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 

따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다. 그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는 데있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜주의를 기울였습니다. 

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되고 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 YY 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다. 

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증 된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다. 우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 

따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1. (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

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Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

Numerical Analysis of Bead Magnetophoresis from Flowing Blood in a Continuous-Flow Microchannel: Implications to the Bead-Fluid Interactions

Scientific Reports volume 9, Article number: 7265 (2019) Cite this article

Abstract

이 연구에서는 비드 운동과 유체 흐름에 미치는 영향에 대한 자세한 분석을 제공하기 위해 연속 흐름 마이크로 채널 내부의 비드 자기 영동에 대한 수치 흐름 중심 연구를 보고합니다.

수치 모델은 Lagrangian 접근 방식을 포함하며 영구 자석에 의해 생성 된 자기장의 적용에 의해 혈액에서 비드 분리 및 유동 버퍼로의 수집을 예측합니다.

다음 시나리오가 모델링됩니다. (i) 운동량이 유체에서 점 입자로 처리되는 비드로 전달되는 단방향 커플 링, (ii) 비드가 점 입자로 처리되고 운동량이 다음으로부터 전달되는 양방향 결합 비드를 유체로 또는 그 반대로, (iii) 유체 변위에서 비드 체적의 영향을 고려한 양방향 커플 링.

결과는 세 가지 시나리오에서 비드 궤적에 약간의 차이가 있지만 특히 높은 자기력이 비드에 적용될 때 유동장에 상당한 변화가 있음을 나타냅니다.

따라서 높은 자기력을 사용할 때 비드 운동과 유동장의 체적 효과를 고려한 정확한 전체 유동 중심 모델을 해결해야 합니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 비드가 중간 또는 낮은 자기력을 받을 때 계산적으로 저렴한 모델을 안전하게 사용하여 자기 영동을 모델링 할 수 있습니다.

Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Sketch of the magnetophoresis process in the continuous-flow microdevice.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Schematic view of the microdevice showing the working conditions set in the simulations.
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Bead trajectories for different magnetic field conditions, magnet placed at different distances “d” from the channel: (a) d = 0; (b) d = 1 mm; (c) d = 1.5 mm; (d) d = 2 mm
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
Separation efficacy as a function of the magnet distance. Comparison between one-way and two-way coupling.
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
(a) Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and (b) blood volumetric fraction contours with magnet distance d = 0 mm for scenario 1 (t = 0.25 s).
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
luid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 2: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0 mm at t = 0.4 s; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm at t = 0.4 s.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Fluid velocity magnitude including velocity vectors and blood volumetric fraction contours for scenario 3: (a,b) Magnet distance d = 0; (c,d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.
Blood volumetric fraction contours. Scenario 1: (a) Magnet distance d = 0 and (b) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; Scenario 2: (c) Magnet distance d = 0 and (d) Magnet distance d = 1 mm; and Scenario 3: (e) Magnet distance d = 0 and (f) Magnet distance d = 1 mm.

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Author information

  1. Edward P. Furlani is deceased.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, ETSIIT, University of Cantabria, Avda. Los Castros s/n, 39005, Santander, SpainJenifer Gómez-Pastora, Eugenio Bringas & Inmaculada Ortiz
  2. Flow Science, Inc, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87505, USAIoannis H. Karampelas
  3. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
  4. Department of Electrical Engineering, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, 14260, USAEdward P. Furlani
Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps

통합 관성 펌프를 사용하여 마이크로 채널에서 비접촉식 기포-기포 상호 작용 모델링

Physics of Fluids 33, 042002 (2021); https://doi.org/10.1063/5.0041924 B. Hayesa) G. L. Whitingb), and  R. MacCurdyc)

ABSTRACT

In this study, the nonlinear effect of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in inertial micropumps is characterized via reduced parameter one-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) modeling. A one-dimensional pump model is developed to account for contactless bubble-bubble interactions, and the accuracy of the developed one-dimensional model is assessed via the commercial volume of fluid CFD software, FLOW-3D. The FLOW-3D CFD model is validated against experimental bubble dynamics images as well as experimental pump data. Precollapse and postcollapse bubble and flow dynamics for two resistors in a channel have been successfully explained by the modified one-dimensional model. The net pumping effect design space is characterized as a function of resistor placement and firing time delay. The one-dimensional model accurately predicts cumulative flow for simultaneous resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements (0.2L < x < 0.8L where L is the channel length) as well as delayed resistor firing with inner-channel resistor placements when the time delay is greater than the time required for the vapor bubble to fill the channel cross section. In general, one-dimensional model accuracy suffers at near-reservoir resistor placements and short time delays which we propose is a result of 3D bubble-reservoir interactions and transverse bubble growth interactions, respectively, that are not captured by the one-dimensional model. We find that the one-dimensional model accuracy improves for smaller channel heights. We envision the developed one-dimensional model as a first-order rapid design tool for inertial pump-based microfluidic systems operating in the contactless bubble–bubble interaction nonlinear regime

이 연구에서 관성 마이크로 펌프에서 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용의 비선형 효과는 감소 된 매개 변수 1 차원 및 3 차원 전산 유체 역학 (3D CFD) 모델링을 통해 특성화됩니다. 비접촉식 기포-버블 상호 작용을 설명하기 위해 1 차원 펌프 모델이 개발되었으며, 개발 된 1 차원 모델의 정확도는 유체 CFD 소프트웨어 인 FLOW-3D의 상용 볼륨을 통해 평가됩니다.

FLOW-3D CFD 모델은 실험적인 거품 역학 이미지와 실험적인 펌프 데이터에 대해 검증되었습니다. 채널에 있는 두 저항기의 붕괴 전 및 붕괴 후 기포 및 유동 역학은 수정 된 1 차원 모델에 의해 성공적으로 설명되었습니다. 순 펌핑 효과 설계 공간은 저항 배치 및 발사 시간 지연의 기능으로 특징 지어집니다.

1 차원 모델은 내부 채널 저항 배치 (0.2L <x <0.8L, 여기서 L은 채널 길이)로 동시 저항 발생에 대한 누적 흐름과 시간 지연시 내부 채널 저항 배치로 지연된 저항 발생을 정확하게 예측합니다. 증기 방울이 채널 단면을 채우는 데 필요한 시간보다 큽니다.

일반적으로 1 차원 모델 정확도는 저수지 근처의 저항 배치와 1 차원 모델에 의해 포착되지 않는 3D 기포-저수지 상호 작용 및 가로 기포 성장 상호 작용의 결과 인 짧은 시간 지연에서 어려움을 겪습니다. 채널 높이가 작을수록 1 차원 모델 정확도가 향상됩니다. 우리는 개발 된 1 차원 모델을 비접촉 기포-기포 상호 작용 비선형 영역에서 작동하는 관성 펌프 기반 미세 유체 시스템을 위한 1 차 빠른 설계 도구로 생각합니다.

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Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.

Continuous-Flow Separation of Magnetic Particles from Biofluids: How Does the Microdevice Geometry Determine the Separation Performance?

Cristina González Fernández,1 Jenifer Gómez Pastora,2 Arantza Basauri,1 Marcos Fallanza,1 Eugenio Bringas,1 Jeffrey J. Chalmers,2 and Inmaculada Ortiz1,*
Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer

생체 유체에서 자성 입자의 연속 흐름 분리 : 마이크로 장치 형상이 분리 성능을 어떻게 결정합니까?

Abstract

The use of functionalized magnetic particles for the detection or separation of multiple chemicals and biomolecules from biofluids continues to attract significant attention. After their incubation with the targeted substances, the beads can be magnetically recovered to perform analysis or diagnostic tests. Particle recovery with permanent magnets in continuous-flow microdevices has gathered great attention in the last decade due to the multiple advantages of microfluidics. As such, great efforts have been made to determine the magnetic and fluidic conditions for achieving complete particle capture; however, less attention has been paid to the effect of the channel geometry on the system performance, although it is key for designing systems that simultaneously provide high particle recovery and flow rates. Herein, we address the optimization of Y-Y-shaped microchannels, where magnetic beads are separated from blood and collected into a buffer stream by applying an external magnetic field. The influence of several geometrical features (namely cross section shape, thickness, length, and volume) on both bead recovery and system throughput is studied. For that purpose, we employ an experimentally validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical model that considers the dominant forces acting on the beads during separation. Our results indicate that rectangular, long devices display the best performance as they deliver high particle recovery and high throughput. Thus, this methodology could be applied to the rational design of lab-on-a-chip devices for any magnetically driven purification, enrichment or isolation.

생체 유체에서 여러 화학 물질과 생체 분자의 검출 또는 분리를 위한 기능화된 자성 입자의 사용은 계속해서 상당한 관심을 받고 있습니다. 표적 물질과 함께 배양 한 후 비드는 자기적으로 회수되어 분석 또는 진단 테스트를 수행 할 수 있습니다.

연속 흐름 마이크로 장치에서 영구 자석을 사용한 입자 회수는 마이크로 유체의 여러 장점으로 인해 지난 10 년 동안 큰 관심을 모았습니다. 따라서 완전한 입자 포획을 달성하기 위한 자기 및 유체 조건을 결정하기 위해 많은 노력을 기울였습니다.

그러나 높은 입자 회수율과 유속을 동시에 제공하는 시스템을 설계하는데 있어 핵심이기는 하지만 시스템 성능에 대한 채널 형상의 영향에 대해서는 덜 주의를 기울였습니다.

여기에서 우리는 자기 비드가 혈액에서 분리되어 외부 자기장을 적용하여 버퍼 스트림으로 수집되는 Y-Y 모양의 마이크로 채널의 최적화를 다룹니다. 비드 회수 및 시스템 처리량에 대한 여러 기하학적 특징 (즉, 단면 형상, 두께, 길이 및 부피)의 영향을 연구합니다.

이를 위해 분리 중에 비드에 작용하는 지배적인 힘을 고려하는 실험적으로 검증된 CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) 수치 모델을 사용합니다.

우리의 결과는 직사각형의 긴 장치가 높은 입자 회수율과 높은 처리량을 제공하기 때문에 최고의 성능을 보여줍니다. 따라서 이 방법론은 자기 구동 정제, 농축 또는 분리를 위한 랩 온어 칩 장치의 합리적인 설계에 적용될 수 있습니다.

Keywords: particle magnetophoresis, CFD, cross section, chip fabrication

Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 1 (a) Top view of the microfluidic-magnetophoretic device, (b) Schematic representation of the channel cross-sections studied in this work, and (c) the magnet position relative to the channel location (Sepy and Sepz are the magnet separation distances in y and z, respectively).
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 2. (a) Channel-magnet configuration and (b–d) magnetic force distribution in the channel midplane for 2 mm, 5 mm and 10 mm long rectangular (left) and U-shaped (right) devices.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 3. (a) Velocity distribution in a section perpendicular to the flow for rectangular (left) and Ushaped (right) cross section channels, and (b) particle location in these cross sections.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 4. Influence of fluid flow rate on particle recovery when the applied magnetic force is (a) different and (b) equal in U-shaped and rectangular cross section microdevices.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 5. Magnetic bead capture as a function of fluid flow rate for all of the studied geometries.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 6. Influence of (a) magnetic and fluidic forces (J parameter) and (b) channel geometry (θ parameter) on particle recovery. Note that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.
Figure 7. Dependence of bead capture on the (a) functional channel volume, and (b) particle residence time (tres). Note that in the curve fitting expressions V represents the functional channel volume and that U-2mm does not accurately fit a line.

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Figure 2. Simulation of droplet separation by EWOD

Non-Linear Electrohydrodynamics in Microfluidic Devices

미세 유체 장치의 비선형 전기 유체 역학

by Jun ZengHewlett-Packard Laboratories, Hewlett-Packard Company, 1501 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USAInt. J. Mol. Sci.201112(3), 1633-1649; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms12031633Received: 24 January 2011 / Revised: 10 February 2011 / Accepted: 24 February 2011 / Published: 3 March 2011

Abstract

Since the inception of microfluidics, the electric force has been exploited as one of the leading mechanisms for driving and controlling the movement of the operating fluid and the charged suspensions. Electric force has an intrinsic advantage in miniaturized devices. Because the electrodes are placed over a small distance, from sub-millimeter to a few microns, a very high electric field is easy to obtain. The electric force can be highly localized as its strength rapidly decays away from the peak. This makes the electric force an ideal candidate for precise spatial control. The geometry and placement of the electrodes can be used to design electric fields of varying distributions, which can be readily realized by Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication methods. In this paper, we examine several electrically driven liquid handling operations. The emphasis is given to non-linear electrohydrodynamic effects. We discuss the theoretical treatment and related numerical methods. Modeling and simulations are used to unveil the associated electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The modeling based investigation is interwoven with examples of microfluidic devices to illustrate the applications. 

Keywords: dielectrophoresiselectrohydrodynamicselectrowettinglab-on-a-chipmicrofluidicsmodelingnumerical simulationreflective display

요약

미세 유체학이 시작된 이래로 전기력은 작동 유체와 충전 된 서스펜션의 움직임을 제어하고 제어하는 ​​주요 메커니즘 중 하나로 활용되어 왔습니다. 전기력은 소형 장치에서 본질적인 이점이 있습니다. 전극이 밀리미터 미만에서 수 미크론까지 작은 거리에 배치되기 때문에 매우 높은 전기장을 쉽게 얻을 수 있습니다. 

전기력은 강도가 피크에서 멀어지면서 빠르게 감소하기 때문에 고도로 국부화 될 수 있습니다. 이것은 전기력을 정밀한 공간 제어를 위한 이상적인 후보로 만듭니다.

전극의 기하학적 구조와 배치는 다양한 분포의 전기장을 설계하는 데 사용될 수 있으며, 이는 MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems) 제조 방법으로 쉽게 실현할 수 있습니다. 

이 논문에서 우리는 몇 가지 전기 구동 액체 처리 작업을 검토합니다. 비선형 전기 유체 역학적 효과에 중점을 둡니다. 이론적 처리 및 관련 수치 방법에 대해 논의합니다. 모델링과 시뮬레이션은 관련된 전기 유체 역학 현상을 밝히는 데 사용됩니다. 모델링 기반 조사는 응용 분야를 설명하기 위해 미세 유체 장치의 예와 결합됩니다. 

키워드 : 유전 영동 ; 전기 유체 역학 ; 전기 습윤 ; 랩 온어 칩 ; 미세 유체 ; 모델링 ; 수치 시뮬레이션 ; 반사 디스플레이

Droplet processing array Droplet based BioFlip
igure 1. Example of droplet-based digital microfluidics architecture. Above is an elevation view showing the layered structure of the chip. Below is a diagram illustrating the system (Adapted from [4]).
Figure 2. Simulation of droplet separation by EWOD
Figure 2. Simulation of droplet separation by EWOD. The top two figures illustrate the device configuration. Electric voltages are applied to all four electrodes embedded in the insulating material. The bottom left figure shows transient simulation solution. It illustrates the process of separating one droplet into two via EWOD. The bottom right figure shows the electric potential distribution inside the device. The color indicates the electric potential; the iso-potential surfaces are also drawn. The image shows the electric field is absent within the droplet body indicating the droplet is either conductive or highly polarizable.
Figure 4. Transient sequence of the Taylor cone formation
Figure 4. Transient sequence of the Taylor cone formation: simulation and experiment comparison. Experimental images are shown in the top row. Simulation results are shown in the bottom row. Their correspondence is indicated by the vertical alignment (Adapted from [4]).
Figure 6. Simulation of charge screening effect using a parallel-plate cell
Figure 6. Simulation of charge screening effect using a parallel-plate cell. Top-left image shows the electric current as function of time and driving voltage, top-right image shows the evolution of the species concentration as function of time and space, the bottom image shows the electric current readout after switching the applied voltage.
Figure 7. Transient simulation of electrohydrodynamic instability and the development of the cellular convective flow pattern.
Figure 7. Transient simulation of electrohydrodynamic instability and the development of the cellular convective flow pattern.
Figure 3. Simulation of dielectrophoresis driven axon migration
Figure 3. Simulation of dielectrophoresis driven axon migration. The set of small images on the left shows a transient simulation of single axon migration under an electric field generated by a pin electrode. The image on the right is a snapshot of a simulation where two axons are fused by dielectrophoresis using a pin electrode. Axons are outlined in white. Also shown are the iso-potential curves.

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Electrokinetics

Dielectrophoresis

유전 영동은 분극성 입자에 힘을 생성하여 균일하지 않은 전기장 (일반적으로 AC 전기장)에서 움직임을 유도합니다. 유전 영동력은 마이크로스케일 및 나노스케일 바이오 입자를 특성화, 처리 또는 조작하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 여기에는 세포, 바이러스, 박테리아, DNA 등의 분류, 포획 및 분리가 포함될 수 있습니다. 유전 영동은 FLOW-3D에서 완전히 설명 할 수 있으며 날카로운 인터페이스가 있거나 없는 단일 유체 또는 2 유체 흐름과 같이 코드에서 사용할 수있는 다른 모든 유체 흐름 옵션과 함께 활성화 될 수 있습니다.

Electro-wetting

전도성 액적에서 액체와 전극 사이에 인가되는 얇은 유전체 코팅 전위를 갖는 전극 상에 배치되면, 드롭 평면화와 전극 표면 확산이 일어납니다. 이 현상은 종종electro-wetting라 부릅니다. 현상은 전하 층의 발달과 관련되어 있으므로, 외부 전기장을 그들을 이동, 합체, 깨지거나 하는 원인을 조작하기 위해 사용될 수 있습니다.

 

Lab-On-Chip Electro-wetting Applications

Lab-on-chip 기반electro-wetting 은 분리된 물방울을 조절할 수 있어 설계자들이 복잡한 절차를 전통적인 실험실 장치를 달지만 훨씬 작은 volumes 으로 비슷한 실험을 수행할 수 있습니다. 이러한 기기는 효율적으로 운송, 병합되어 있으며 분리된 물방울들이 요구합니다. FLOW-3D는 사용자가이 장치를 조작하는 데 사용되는 기하학적 파라미터들 및 전압의 영향을 시뮬레이션 할 수 있도록 하여 설계 프로세스에 유용한 도구가 될 수 있습니다.

아래의 애니메이션은 수송 시뮬레이션 병합 및 분할 방울에 FLOW-3D의 기능을 보여줍니다. Lab-on-chip은 약 300 ㎛로 분리 된 두 개의 평행 한 플레이트로 구성됩니다. 바닥 판은 방울을 조작하기 위해 사용되는 그 안에 삽입 된 전극을 보유하고 있습니다. 액 적은 물 (약간 도전성) 실리콘 오일에 의해 둘러싸여 있습니다. 액체 방울의 부피가 800nl 관한 것입니다.

This lab-on-a-chip electrowetting simulation demonstrates an electric field being applied in order to split a small droplet.

Here an electric field is being applied in order to merge two small droplets.

This simulation shows an electric field being applied to a small droplet to control its motion.

Lab-on-a-chip

다양한 표면 장력을 사용하는 패턴화된 표면

마이크로 채널의 패턴화된 표면은 액체 사이의 실제 물리적 벽 없이도 여러 액체가 나란히 흐르는 특정 경로를 따라 한 저장소에서 다른 저장소로 액체를 운반하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 패턴화된 표면은 랩 온어 칩 (lab-on-a-chip), 바이오어세이, 마이크로 리액터 및 화학적 및 생물학적 감지를 통해 유체를 운반하는 데 사용됩니다. 이 경우 표면 장력은 패턴화된 흐름을 생성하기 위해 마이크로 채널의 유체 흐름을 조작하는데 사용됩니다. 고체 표면에서 유체의 친수성 또는 소수성 거동을 이용하여 마이크로 채널을 통한 여러 유체의 움직임을 제어합니다. 마이크로 채널 내부의 유체 흐름은 층상이므로 여러 유체 흐름 (이 경우 2 개)이 난류 혼합없이 나란히 흐를 수 있습니다. 유체 흐름의 측면에는 물리적 벽이 없기 때문에 흐름은 소위 가상 벽에 의해 제한됩니다. 이 벽은 기본적으로 두 유체 사이의 친수성 경계입니다.

Patterned surfaces in micro channels
Experimental results showing the three phases – A, B and C (left to right), Bin Zhao et al.

위 그림은 마이크로 채널의 실험을 보여줍니다. 중앙 수평 채널의 중간 스트립은 친수성이지만 상부 및 하부 수직 채널과 함께 나머지 채널은 소수성의 정도가 다릅니다. 소수성은 접촉각의 몇도 정도만 다릅니다. 상부 채널의 접촉각은 118o이고 하부 채널의 접촉각은 112o입니다. 그러나 접촉각의 작은 차이는 유체가 이러한 영역으로 흐르기 위해 상당히 다른 압력을 필요로합니다.

Numerical Simulation

처음에는 모든 채널이 다른 유체(투명)로 채워집니다. 분홍색 액체가 수평 채널로 밀리면 중앙 영역(단계 A)의 친수성 경로를 사용합니다. 압력이 증가하면 유체는 하부 친수성-수성 장벽을 깨고 하부 친수성 영역(단계 B)으로 흐르기 시작합니다. 압력을 더 높이면 마침내 유체가 상부 친수성-수소성 장벽을 부수고 상부 영역에서도 흐르기 시작합니다(Phase C).

Numerical results - patterned surfaces using varied surface tension
Numerical results showing the three phases – A, B and C.

위의 수치 결과는 둘 사이에 중요한 차이가 있다는 점을 고려할 때 실험에서 패턴화된 표면 연구의 전반적인 아이디어와 합리적인 비교 가능성을 보여줍니다. 위에 표시된 수치 결과는 과도 상태 (압력이 지속적으로 증가)이므로 유체 경계가 실험 결과와 정확히 유사하지 않습니다. 마찬가지로 유체 특성은 실험에 사용 된 특성과 정확히 유사하지 않습니다. 그럼에도 불구하고 유체 1은 실험에서와 같이 압력이 증가함에 따라 단계 A, B 및 C를 통과합니다. 단계 B에서 투명한 유체는 계속해서 위쪽 채널을 통해 흐르지 만 분홍색 유체만 아래쪽 영역으로 흐릅니다. 이것은 실험과 일치합니다. 흥미로운 것은 C 단계에서 나타난 기포 형성입니다. C 단계에서 기포 형성과 같은 흥미로운 물리학에 대한 계시와 연구는 미세 유체 장치의 설계 및 제작 과정에 중요 할 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D Results

아래 애니메이션은 위의 실험에 대한 FLOW-3D의 시뮬레이션 결과를 보여줍니다. 유체 1 (하늘색)은 실험의 분홍색 유체와 동일합니다. 처음에는 전체 도메인이 Fluid 2 (투명 유체)로 채워집니다. 압력은 단계적으로 증가하고 시뮬레이션이 진행됨에 따라 세 단계를 모두 볼 수 있습니다.

Evolution of fluid flow with increasing pressure in patterned micro channels created by varying contact angles.

Ref: Bin Zhao, Jeffrey S. Moore, David J. Beebe, Surface-Directed Liquid Flow Inside Microchannels, Science 291, 1023 (2001)

Learn more about the power and versatility of modeling microfluidic applications with FLOW-3D

Continuous Flow Microfluidics

Continuous Flow Microfluidics

연속 흐름 미세 유체는 연속성을 깨지 않고 제작 된 마이크로 채널을 통해 액체 흐름을 조작하는 것입니다. 유체 흐름은 마이크로 펌프 (예 : 연동 펌프 또는 주사기 펌프)와 같은 외부 소스 또는 전기, 자기 또는 모세관 힘과 같은 내부 메커니즘에 의해 설정됩니다. 연속 유동 미세 유체 학은 미세 및 나노 입자 분리기, 입자 집속, 화학적 분리는 물론 단순한 생화학 적 응용을 포함한 다양한 응용 분야에서 응용 분야를 찾아 내지 만 높은 수준의 제어가 필요한 경우에는 선택 방법이 아닐 수 있습니다.

이 범주에 속하며 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 성공적으로 시뮬레이션한 프로세스 또는 장치로는 Joule 가열, 액체 게이트, 마이크로 유체 회로, 전기-오토믹 밸브, 입자 집중, 분류 및 분리, POC(Point-of-Care) 모세관 유량 장치 및 패턴 있는 표면 장치가 있습니다.

Sketch of cross section of the device
Capillary Flows
Electro osmosis
Electro-osmosis
Simulating joule heating
Joule Heating
Patterned surfaces in micro channels
Lab-on-a-chip
Magnetic fields
Magnetic Fields
Pneumatic valve
Microfluidic Circuits
Hong chamber simulations
Mixing Dynamics
Buoyancy dominant sorting
Particle Sorting

Lab-on-a-chip – Thermocapillary actuation (열 모세관 작동)

Thermocapillary actuation (열 모세관 작동)

  • 열 효과를 사용한 랩온어칩의 미세 액체의 길
    – 온도에 의존하는 표면 장력
    – 외부의 기계적인 힘이 필요하지 않음
    – 프로그래밍이 가능한 마이크로 히터 어레이를 통해 열 효과 추가
  • 유체의 고유한 습윤성으로 인해 유체 손실이 발생
    – 열 모세관 작동 외에도 패턴화 된 (친수성 또는 소수성) 표면을 배치하여 손실을 최소화 할 수 있음

공간의 다양한 표면 장력

  • 차가운 유체에서 표면 장력이 높기 때문에 공간의 변화가 발생함
    – 높은 표면 장력으로 유체를 함께 유지
    – 유체가 따뜻한 곳에서 차가운 곳으로 당겨짐
    – 유체의 움직임은 다음의 식을 통해 알 수 있음

FLOW-3D에서의 시뮬레이션

  • 미세 액체는 인접 구역의 온도에 따라 움직임 (소수성과 친수성)

Micro/Biofluidics with FLOW-3D (미세/생명 유체공학)

미세/생명유체공학에 관한 모델링

  • In-Vitro Diagnostics(IVD) : 체외 진단
  • Drug Delivery : 약물 전달
  • Point of Care Devices : 현장 진료 장비
  • Microarrays : 마이크로어레이
  • Lab-on-a-chip : 랩온어칩
  • MEMS(MicroElectroMechanical Systems) : 미세전자기계시스템

미세/생명유체공학에 관한 개념

  • 대류/확산 효과
  • 표면 장력
  • 자유 표면 역학
  • 점도 효과
  • 관성 효과
  • 다공성 매체
  • 전기 역학
  • 미립자 역학
  • 반응 속도론

Lab-on-a-chip

다양한 표면 장력을 사용하여 도장된 표면

마이크로 채널의 패턴 표면은 액체 사이의 실제 물리적 벽 없이 여러 액체가 나란히 흐르는 특정 경로를 따라 한 저장 장치에서 다른 저장 장치로 액체를 운반하는 데 사용될 수 있습니다. 패턴이 있는 표면은 액체를 lab-on-a-chip, 생물학적 경로, 마이크로 프로세서 및 화학적, 생물학적 감지 장치로 운반하는 데 사용됩니다.

이 경우 표면 장력은 미세 채널의 유체 흐름을 조작하여 패턴이 있는 흐름을 만드는 데 사용됩니다. 고체 표면에 있는 유체의 친수성 또는 소수성 거동은 마이크로 채널을 통해 복수 유체의 움직임을 제어하기 위해 이용됩니다.

마이크로 채널 내부의 유체 흐름은 층류로, 이는 다중 유체 흐름(이 경우 2개)이 난류 혼합 없이 나란히 흐를 수 있음을 의미합니다. 유체 스트림 측면에 물리적 벽이 없기 때문에 스트림은 이른바 가상 벽으로 제한됩니다. 이 벽들은 기본적으로 두 액체 사이의 친수성 경계입니다.

세가지 단계를 보여 주는 실험 결과 – A, B및 C(왼쪽에서 오른쪽으로), Bin Zhao et al.

위의 그림은 실험에서의 마이크로 채널을 보여준다. 중앙 수평 채널의 중간 스트립은 친수성인 반면, 상단 및 하단 수직 채널과 함께 남아 있는 채널은 친수성의 정도가 다릅니다. 그들은 단지 몇도의 접촉점 각도에 의해서만 그들의 친수성이 다릅니다. 상부 채널의 접점 각도는 118o 이고 하부 채널의 접점 각도는 112o입니다. 그러나 이러한 접촉 각도의 작은 차이는 유체가 이러한 영역으로 흐르기 위해 상당히 다른 압력을 필요로 합니다.

수치해석 시뮬레이션

처음에는 모든 채널에 각기 다른 유체가 주입됩니다(투명). 분홍색 유체를 수평 채널로 밀어 넣으면 중앙 영역의 친수성 경로(PhaseA)를 따라 이동합니다. 압력이 증가함에 따라, 유체는 하부 친수성-친수성 장벽을 깨고 바닥 소수성 구역으로 흐르기 시작합니다(상 B). 압력이 더욱 증가하면 유체가 마침내 상부 친수성-친수성 장벽을 깨고 상부 영역에서도 흐르기 시작합니다(단계 C).

A, B, C의 세 단계를 보여주는 수치 결과입니다.

위의 수치해석 결과는 두가지 사이에 중요한 차이가 있다는 점을 고려할 때 실험에서 패턴이 있는 표면 연구의 전반적인 아이디어와 비교할 수 있는 합당한 수준을 보여줍니다. 위에 표시된 수치해석 결과는 과도 상태(압력이 지속적으로 증가함)이므로 유체 경계는 실험 결과와 정확히 동일하지 않습니다. 마찬가지로 유체 특성은 실험에 사용된 특성과 정확히 동일하지 않습니다.

그럼에도 불구하고 유체 1은 실험에서와 같이 압력이 증가함에 따라 A, B, C단계를 거칩니다. B단계에서는 투명한 유체가 상부 채널을 통해 계속 흐르지만, 하부 영역에서는 분홍색 유체만 흐릅니다. 이것은 실험과 일치합니다.

흥미로운 것은 C단계의 거품 형성입니다. C단계의 거품 형성과 같은 흥미로운 물리현상의 재현과 연구는 미세 유체학 장치의 설계와 제작 과정에 중요할 수 있습니다.

FLOW-3D 해석 결과

아래의 애니메이션은 위와 같은 실험에 대한 FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 결과를 보여줍니다. 유체 1( 연한 파란 색)은 실험 중인 분홍색 유체와 같습니다. 처음에는 전체 영역이 Fluid2(투명 유체)로 채워집니다. 압력은 단계적으로 증가하며 시뮬레이션이 진행됨에 따라 세 단계를 모두 볼 수 있습니다.

Evolution of fluid flow with increasing pressure in patterned micro channels created by varying contact angles.

Ref: Bin Zhao, Jeffrey S. Moore, David J. Beebe, Surface-Directed Liquid Flow Inside Microchannels, Science 291, 1023 (2001)

Learn more about the power and versatility of modeling microfluidic applications with FLOW-3D

Microfluidics Bibliography

Microfluidics Bibliography

다음은 Microfluidics Bibliography의 기술 문서 모음입니다.
이 모든 논문은 FLOW-3D  결과를 특징으로  합니다. 미세 유체 공정 및 장치 를 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D 를 사용 하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오  .

2021년 8월 26일 Update

45-21   Navid Tonekaboni, Mahdi Feizbahr, Nima Tonekaboni, Guang-Jun Jiang, Hong-Xia Chen, Optimization of solar CCHP systems with collector enhanced by porous media and nanofluid, Mathematical Problems in Engineering, 2021; 9984940, 2021. doi.org/10.1155/2021/9984840

40-21   B. Hayes, G.L. Whiting, R. MacCurdy, Modeling of contactless bubble–bubble interactions in microchannels with integrated inertial pumps, Physics of Fluids, 33.4; 042002, 2021. doi.org/10.1063/5.0041924

Below is a collection of technical papers in our Microfluidics Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D can be used to successfully simulate microfluidic processes and devices.

14-21   Jian-Chiun Liou, Chih-Wei Peng, Philippe Basset, Zhen-Xi Chen, DNA printing integrated multiplexer driver microelectronic mechanical system head (IDMH) and microfluidic flow estimation, Micromachines, 12.1; 25, 2021. doi.org/10.3390/mi12010025

08-20   Li Yong-Qiang, Dong Jun-Yan and Rui Wei, Numerical simulation for capillary driven flow in capsule-type vane tank with clearances under microgravity, Microgravity Science and Technology, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s12217-019-09773-z

89-19   Tim Dreckmann, Julien Boeuf, Imke-Sonja Ludwig, Jorg Lumkemann, and Jorg Huwyler, Low volume aseptic filling: impact of pump systems on shear stress, European Journal of Pharmeceutics and Biopharmeceutics, in press, 2019. doi:10.1016/j.ejpb.2019.12.006

88-19   V. Amiri Roodan, J. Gomez-Pastora, C. Gonzalez-Fernandez, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani, and I. Ortiz, CFD analysis of the generation and manipulation of ferrofluid droplets, TechConnect Briefs, pp. 182-185, 2019. TechConnect World Innovation Conference & Expo, Boston, Massachussetts, USA, June 17-19, 2019.

55-19     Julio Aleman, Sunil K. George, Samuel Herberg, Mahesh Devarasetty, Christopher D. Porada, Aleksander Skardal, and Graça Almeida‐Porada, Deconstructed microfluidic bone marrow on‐a‐chip to study normal and malignant hemopoietic cell–niche interactions, Small, 2019. doi: 10.1002/smll.201902971

37-19     Feng Lin Ng, Miniaturized 3D fibrous scaffold on stereolithography-printed microfluidic perfusion culture, Doctoral Thesis, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 2019.

32-19     Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Ioannis H. Karampelas, Eugenio Bringas, Edward P. Furlani, and Inmaculada Ortiz, Numerical analysis of bead magnetophoresis from flowing blood in a continuous-flow microchannel: Implications to the bead-fluid interactions, Nature: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, No. 7265, 2019. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-43827-x

01-19  Jelena Dinic and Vivek Sharma, Computational analysis of self-similar capillary-driven thinning and pinch-off dynamics during dripping using the volume-of-fluid method, Physics of Fluids, Vol. 31, 2019. doi: 10.1063/1.5061715

75-18   Tobias Ladner, Sebastian Odenwald, Kevin Kerls, Gerald Zieres, Adeline Boillon and Julien Bœuf, CFD supported investigation of shear induced by bottom-mounted magnetic stirrer in monoclonal antibody formulation, Pharmaceutical Research, Vol. 35, 2018. doi: 10.1007/s11095-018-2492-4

53-18   Venoos Amiri Roodan, Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Aditi Verma, Eugenio Bringas, Inmaculada Ortiz and Edward P. Furlani, Computational analysis of magnetic droplet generation and manipulation in microfluidic devices, Proceedings of the 5th International Conference of Fluid Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer, Niagara Falls, Canada, June 7 – 9, 2018; Paper no. 154, 2018.  doi: 10.11159/ffhmt18.154

35-18   Jenifer Gómez-Pastora, Cristina González Fernández, Marcos Fallanza, Eugenio Bringas and Inmaculada Ortiz, Flow patterns and mass transfer performance of miscible liquid-liquid flows in various microchannels: Numerical and experimental studies, Chemical Engineering Journal, vol. 344, pp. 487-497, 2018. doi: 10.1016/j.cej.2018.03.110

16-18   P. Schneider, V. Sukhotskiy, T. Siskar, L. Christie and I.H. Karampelas, Additive Manufacturing of Microfluidic Components via Wax Extrusion, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 162 – 165, 2018.

15-18   J. Gómez-Pastora, I.H. Karampelas, A.Q. Alorabi, M.D. Tarn, E. Bringas, A. Iles, V.N. Paunov, N. Pamme, E.P. Furlani, I. Ortiz, CFD analysis and experimental validation of magnetic droplet generation and deflection across multilaminar flow streams, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 182-185, 2018.

14-18   J. Gómez-Pastora, C. González-Fernández, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani, and I. Ortiz, Design of Magnetic Blood Cleansing Microdevices through Experimentally Validated CFD Modeling, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, vol. 3, pp. 170-173, 2018.

10-18   A. Gupta, I.H. Karampelas, J. Kitting, Numerical modeling of the formation of dynamically configurable L2 lens in a microchannel, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs, Vol. 3, pp. 186 – 189, 2018.

17-17   I.H. Karampelas, J. Gómez-Pastora, M.J. Cowan, E. Bringas, I. Ortiz and E.P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Acoustophoretic Discrete Particle Focusing in Microchannels, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 3

16-17   J. Gómez-Pastora, I.H. Karampelas, E. Bringas, E.P. Furlani and I. Ortiz, CFD analysis of particle magnetophoresis in multiphase continuous-flow bioseparators, Biotech, Biomaterials and Biomedical TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 3

15-17   I.H. Karampelas, S. Vader, Z. Vader, V. Sukhotskiy, A. Verma, G. Garg, M. Tong and E.P. Furlani, Drop-on-Demand 3D Metal Printing, Informatics, Electronics and Microsystems TechConnect Briefs 2017, Vol. 4

102-16   J. Brindha, RA.G. Privita Edwina, P.K. Rajesh and P.Rani, “Influence of rheological properties of protein bio-inks on printability: A simulation and validation study,” Materials Today: Proceedings, vol. 3, no.10, pp. 3285-3295, 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.matpr.2016.10.010

99-16   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Kai Liu, Fatema Alali, and Edward P. Furlani, Plasmonic Nanoframes for Photothermal Energy Conversion, J. Phys. Chem. C, 2016, 120 (13), pp 7256–7264

98-16   Jelena Dinic and Vivek Sharma, Drop formation, pinch-off dynamics and liquid transfer of simple and complex fluidshttp://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2016.MAR.B53.12, APS March Meeting 2016, Volume 61, Number 2, March 14–18, 2016, Baltimore, Maryland

67-16  Vahid Bazargan and Boris Stoeber, Effect of substrate conductivity on the evaporation of small sessile droplets, PHYSICAL REVIEW E 94, 033103 (2016), doi: 10.1103/PhysRevE.94.033103

57-16   Ioannis Karampelas, Computational analysis of pulsed-laser plasmon-enhanced photothermal energy conversion and nanobubble generation in the nanoscale, PhD Dissertation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, July 2016

44-16   Takeshi Sawada et al., Prognostic impact of circulating tumor cell detected using a novel fluidic cell microarray chip system in patients with breast cancer, EBioMedicine, Available online 27 July 2016, doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.07.027.

39-16   Chien-Hsun Wang, Ho-Lin Tsai, Yu-Che Wu and Weng-Sing Hwang, Investigation of molten metal droplet deposition and solidification for 3D printing techniques, IOP Publishing, J. Micromech. Microeng. 26 (2016) 095012 (14pp), doi: 10.1088/0960-1317/26/9/095012, July 8, 2016

30-16   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Kai Liu and Edward P. Furlani, Plasmonic Nanocages as Photothermal Transducers for Nanobubble Cancer Therapy, Nanotech 2016 Conference & Expo, May 22-25, Washington, DC.

29-16   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Advances in Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, Nanotech 2016 Conference & Expo, May 22-25, Washington, DC.

02-16  Stephen D. Hoath (Editor), Fundamentals of Inkjet Printing: The Science of Inkjet and Droplets, ISBN: 978-3-527-33785-9, 472 pages, February 2016 (see chapters 2 and 3 for FLOW-3D results)

125-15   J. Berthier, K.A. Brakke, E.P. Furlani, I.H. Karampelas, V. Poher, D. Gosselin, M. Cubinzolles and P. Pouteau, Whole blood spontaneous capillary flow in narrow V-groove microchannels, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 206, pp. 258-267, 2015.

86-15   Yousub Lee and Dave F. Farson, Simulation of transport phenomena and melt pool shape for multiple layer additive manufacturing, J. Laser Appl. 28, 012006 (2016). doi: 10.2351/1.4935711, published online 2015.

77-15   Ho-Lin Tsai, Weng-Sing Hwang, Jhih-Kai Wang, Wen-Chih Peng and Shin-Hau Chen, Fabrication of Microdots Using Piezoelectric Dispensing Technique for Viscous Fluids, Materials 2015, 8(10), 7006-7016. doi: 10.3390/ma8105355

63-15   Scott Vader, Zachary Vader, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Edward P. Furlani, Magnetohydrodynamic Liquid Metal Jet Printing, TechConnect World Innovation Conference & Expo, Washington, D.C., June 14-17, 2015

46-15   Adwaith Gupta, 3D Printing Multi-Material, Single Printhead Simulation, Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop, July 20 – 21, 2015, Santa Fe, NM

28-15   Yongqiang Li, Mingzhu Hu, Ling Liu, Yin-Yin Su, Li Duan, and Qi Kang, Study of Capillary Driven Flow in an Interior Corner of Rounded Wall Under MicrogravityMicrogravity Science and Technology, June 2015

20-15   Pamela J. Waterman, Diversity in Medical Simulation Applications, Desktop Engineering, May 2015, pp 22-26,

16-15   Saurabh Singh, Ann Junghans, Erik Watkins, Yash Kapoor, Ryan Toomey, and Jaroslaw Majewski, Effects of Fluid Shear Stress on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers by Neutron Scattering Studies, © 2015 American Chemical Society, DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00037, Langmuir 2015, 31, 2870−2878, February 17, 2015

11-15   Cheng-Han Wu and Weng-Sing Hwang, The effect of process condition of the ink-jet printing process on the molten metallic droplet formation through the analysis of fluid propagation direction, Canadian Journal of Physics, 2015. doi: 10.1139/cjp-2014-0259

03-15 Hanchul Cho, Sivasubramanian Somu, Jin Young Lee, Hobin Jeong and Ahmed Busnaina, High-Rate Nanoscale Offset Printing Process Using Directed Assembly and Transfer of Nanomaterials, Adv. Materials, doi: 10.1002/adma.201404769, February 2015

122-14  Albert Chi, Sebastian Curi, Kevin Clayton, David Luciano, Kameron Klauber, Alfredo Alexander-Katz, Sebastián D’hers and Noel M Elman, Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics, Research Gate, doi: 10.1007/s13346-014-0198-7, July 2014

113-14 Cihan Yilmaz, Arif E. Cetin, Georgia Goutzamanidis, Jun Huang, Sivasubramanian Somu, Hatice Altug, Dongguang Wei and Ahmed Busnaina, Three-Dimensional Crystalline and Homogeneous Metallic Nanostructures Using Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles, 10.1021/nn500084g, © 2014 American Chemical Society, April 2014

110-14 Koushik Ponnuru, Jincheng Wu, Preeti Ashok, Emmanuel S. Tzanakakis and Edward P. Furlani, Analysis of Stem Cell Culture Performance in a Microcarrier Bioreactor System, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

109-14   Ioannis H. Karampelas, Young Hwa Kim and Edward P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Laser Induced Photothermal Effects using Colloidal Plasmonic Nanostructures, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

108-14   Chenxu Liu, Xiaozheng Xue and Edward P. Furlani, Numerical Analysis of Fully-Coupled Particle-Fluid Transport and Free-Flow Magnetophoretic Sorting in Microfluidic Systems, Nanotech, Washington, D.C., June 15-18, 2014

95-14   Cheng-Han Wu, Weng-Sing Hwang, The effect of the echo-time of a bipolar pulse waveform on molten metallic droplet formation by squeeze mode piezoelectric inkjet printing, Accepted November 2014, Microelectronics Reliability (2014) , © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

85-14   Sudhir Srivastava, Lattice Boltzmann method for contact line dynamics, ISBN: 978-90-386-3608-5, Copyright © 2014 S. Srivastava

61-14   Chenxu Liu, A Computational Model for Predicting Fully-Coupled Particle-Fluid Dynamics and Self-Assembly for Magnetic Particle Applications, Master’s Thesis: State University of New York at Buffalo, 2014, 75 pages; 1561583, http://gradworks.umi.com/15/61/1561583.html

41-14 Albert Chi, Sebastian Curi, Kevin Clayton, David Luciano, Kameron Klauber, Alfredo Alexander-Katz, Sebastian D’hers, and Noel M. Elman, Rapid Reconstitution Packages (RRPs) implemented by integration of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and 3D printed microfluidics, Drug Deliv. and Transl. Res., DOI 10.1007/s13346-014-0198-7, # Controlled Release Society 2014. Available for purchase online at SpringerLink.

21-14  Suk-Hee Park, Ung Hyun Koh, Mina Kim, Dong-Yol Yang, Kahp-Yang Suh and Jennifer Hyunjong Shin, Hierarchical multilayer assembly of an ordered nanofibrous scaffold via thermal fusion bonding, Biofabrication 6 (2014) 024107 (10pp), doi:10.1088/1758-5082/6/2/024107, IOP Publishing, 2014. Available for purchase online at IOP.

17-14   Vahid Bazargan, Effect of substrate cooling and droplet shape and composition on the droplet evaporation and the deposition of particles, Ph.D. Thesis: Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of British Columbia, March 2014, © Vahid Bazargan, 2014

73-13  Oliver G. Harlen, J. Rafael Castrejón-Pita, and Arturo Castrejon-Pita, Asymmetric Detachment from Angled Nozzles Plates in Drop-on Demand Inkjet Printing, NIP & Digital Fabrication Conference, 2013 International Conference on Digital Printing Technologies. Pages 253-549, pp. 277-280(4)

63-13  Fatema Alali, Ioannis H. Karampelas, Young Hwa Kim, and Edward P. Furlani, Photonic and Thermofluidic Analysis of Colloidal Plasmonic Nanorings and Nanotori for Pulsed-Laser Photothermal ApplicationsJ. Phys. Chem. C, Article ASAP, DOI: 10.1021/jp406986y, Copyright © 2013 American Chemical Society, September 2013.

25-13  Sudhir Srivastava, Theo Driessen, Roger Jeurissen, Herma Wijshoff, and Federico Toschi, Lattice Boltzmann Method to Study the Contraction of a Viscous Ligament, International Journal of Modern Physics © World Scientific Publishing Company, May 2013.

11-13  Li-Chieh Hsu, Yong-Jhih Chen, Jia-Huang Liou, Numerical Investigation in the Factors on the Pool Boiling, Applied Mechanics and Materials Vol. 311 (2013) pp 456-461, © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.311.456. Available for purchase online at Scientific.Net.

10-13 Pamela J. Waterman, CFD: Shaping the Medical World, Desktop Engineering, April 2013. Full article available online at Desktop Engineering.

90-12 Charles R. Ortloff and Martin Vogel, Spray Cooling Heat Transfer- Test and CFD Analysis, Electronics Cooling, June 2012. Available online at Electronics Cooling.

79-12    Daniel Parsaoran Siregar, Numerical simulation of evaporation and absorption of inkjet printed droplets, Ph.D. Thesis: Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, September 18, 2012, Copyright 2012 by D.P. Siregar, ISBN: 978-90-386-3190-5.

71-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Kyu-Dong Jung, Eunsung Lee, Minseog Choi, Seungwan Lee, and Woonbae Kim, Varifocal liquid lens based on microelectrofluidic technology, Optics Letters, Vol. 37, Issue 21, pp. 4377-4379 (2012) http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.37.004377

70-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Kyu-Dong Jung, Eunsung Lee, Minseog Choi, and Seunwan Lee, Microelectrofluidic Iris for Variable ApertureProc. SPIE 8252, MOEMS and Miniaturized Systems XI, 82520O (February 9, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.906587

69-12   Jong-hyeon Chang, Eunsung Lee, Kyu-Dong Jung, Seungwan Lee, Minseog Choi, and  Woonbae Kim, Microelectrofluidic Lens for Variable CurvatureProc. SPIE 8486, Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XIII, 84860X (October 11, 2012); doi:10.1117/12.925852.

61-12  Biddut Bhattacharjee, Study of Droplet Splitting in an Electrowetting Based Digital Microfluidic System, Thesis: Doctor of Philosophy in the College of Graduate Studies (Applied Sciences), The University of British Columbia, September 2012, © Biddut Bhattacharjee.

55-12 Hejun Li, Pengyun Wang, Lehua Qi, Hansong Zuo, Songyi Zhong, Xianghui Hou, 3D numerical simulation of successive deposition of uniform molten Al droplets on a moving substrate and experimental validation, Computational Materials Science, Volume 65, December 2012, Pages 291–301. Available for purchase online at SciVerse.

54-12   Edward P. Furlani, Anthony Nunez, Gianmarco Vizzeri, Modeling Fluid Structure-Interactions for Biomechanical Analysis of the Human Eye, Nanotech Conference & Expo, June 18-21, 2012, Santa Clara, CA.

53-12   Xinyun Wu, Richard D. Oleschuk and Natalie M. Cann, Characterization of microstructured fibre emitters in pursuit of improved nano electrospray ionization performance, The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012, http://pubs.rsc.org, DOI: 10.1039/c2an35249d, May 2012

25-12    Edward P. Furlani, Ioannis H. Karampelas and Qian Xie, Analysis of Pulsed Laser Plasmon-assisted Photothermal Heating and Bubble Generation at the Nanoscale, Lab on a Chip, 10.1039/C2LC40495H, Received 01 May 2012, Accepted 07 Jun 2012. First published on the web 13 Jun 2012.

22-12  R.A. Sultanov, D. Guster, Numerical Modeling and Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flow in Different 3D-Geometries, Book chapter #21 in Fluid Dynamics, Computational Modeling and Applications (2012), ISBN: 978-953-51-0052-2, p. 475 [18 pages]. Available online at INTECH.

21-12  Guo-Wei Huang, Tzu-Yi Hung, and Chin-Tai Chen, Design, Simulation, and Verification of Fluidic Light-Guide Chips with Various Geometries of Micro Polymer Channels, NEMS 2012, Kyoto, Japan, March 5-8, 2012. Available for purchase online at IEEE.

103-11   Suk-Hee Park, Development of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds containing Electrospun Nanofibers and their Applications to Tissue Regeneration, Ph.D. Thesis: School of Mechanical, Aersospace and Systems Engineering, Division of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, 2011.

81-11   Xinyun Wu, Modeling and Characterization of Microfabricated Emitters-In Pursuit of Improved ESI-MS Performance, thesis: Department of Chemistry, Queen’s University, December 2011, Copyright © Xinyun Wu, 2011

79-11  Cong Lu, A Cell Preparation Stage for Automatic Cell Injection, thesis: Graduate Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Copyright © Cong Lu, 2011

77-11 Ge Bai, W. Thomas Leach, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development, International Journal of Pharmaceutics, Available online 8 December 2011, ISSN 0378-5173, 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2011.11.044. Available online at SciVerse.

72-11  M.R. Barkhudarov, C.W. Hirt, D. Milano, and G. Wei, Comments on a Comparison of CFD Software for Microfluidic Applications, Flow Science Technical Note #93, FSI-11-TN93, December 2011

45-11  Chang-Wei Kang, Jiak Kwang Tan, Lunsheng Pan, Cheng Yee Low and Ahmed Jaffar, Numerical and experimental investigations of splat geometric characteristics during oblique impact of plasma spraying, Applied Surface Science, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 20 July 2011, ISSN 0169-4332, DOI: 10.1016/j.apsusc.2011.06.081. Available to purchase online at SciVers

33-11  Edward P. Furlani, Mark T. Swihart, Natalia Litchinitser, Christopher N. Delametter and Melissa Carter, Modeling Nanoscale Plasmon-assisted Bubble Nucleation and Applications, Nanotech Conference and Expo 2011, Boston, MA, June 13-16, 2011

32-11  Lu, Cong and Mills, James K., Three cell separation design for realizing automatic cell injection, Complex Medical Engineering (CME), 2011 IEEE/ICME, pp: 599 – 603, Harbin, China, 10.1109/ICCME.2011.5876811, June 2011. Available online at IEEEXplore.

25-11 Issam M. Bahadur, James K. Mills, Fluidic vacuum-based biological cell holding device with piezoelectrically induced vibration, Complex Medical Engineering (CME), 2011 IEEE/ICME International Conference on, 22-25 May 2011, pp: 85 – 90, Harbin, China. Available online at: IEEE Xplore.

14-11  Edward P. Furlani, Roshni Biswas, Alexander N. Cartwright and Natalia M. Litchinitser, Antiresonant guiding optofluidic biosensor, doi:10.1016/j.optcom.2011.04.014, Optics Communication, April 2011

05-11 Hyeju Eom and Keun Park, Integrated numerical analysis to evaluate replication characteristics of micro channels in a locally heated mold by selective induction, International Journal of Precision Engineering and Manufacturing, Volume 12, Number 1, 53-60, DOI: 10.1007/s12541-011-0007-x, 2011. Available online at: SpringerLink.

70-10  I.N. Volnov, V.S. Nagornyi, Modeling Processes for Generation of Streams of Monodispersed Fluid Droplets in Electro-inkjet Applications, Science and Technology News, St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University, 4, pp 294-300, 2010. In Russian.

62-10  F. Mobadersani, M. Eskandarzade, S. Azizi and S. Abbasnezhad, Effect of Ambient Pressure on Bubble Growth in Micro-Channel and Its Pumping Effect, ESDA2010-24436, pp. 577-584, doi:10.1115/ESDA2010-24436, ASME 2010 10th Biennial Conference on Engineering Systems Design and Analysis (ESDA2010), Istanbul, Turkey, July 12–14, 2010. Available online at the ASME Digital Library.

58-10 Tsung-Yi Ho, Jun Zeng, and Chakrabarty, K, Digital microfluidic biochips: A vision for functional diversity and more than moore, Computer-Aided Design (ICCAD), 2010 IEEE/ACM International Conference on, DOI: 10.1109/ICCAD.2010.5654199, © IEEE, November 2010. Available online at IEEE Explore.

51-10  Regina Bleul, Marion Ritzi-Lehnert, Julian Höth, Nico Scharpfenecker, Ines Frese, Dominik Düchs, Sabine Brunklaus, Thomas E. Hansen-Hagge, Franz-Josef Meyer-Almes, Klaus S. Drese, Compact, cost-efficient microfluidics-based stopped-flow device, Anal Bioanal Chem, DOI 10.1007/s00216-010-4446-5, Available online at Springer, November 2010

22-10    Krishendu Chakrabarty, Richard B. Fair and Jun Zeng, Design Tools for Digital Microfluidic Biochips Toward Functional Diversification and More than Moore, IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, Vol. 29, No. 7, July 2010

14-10 E. P. Furlani and M. S. Hanchak, Nonlinear analysis of the deformation and breakup of viscous microjets using the method of lines, International Journal for Numerical Methods in Fluids (2010), © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Published online in Wiley InterScience. DOI: 10.1002/fld.2205

55-09 R.A. Sultanov, and D. Guster, Computer simulations of  pulsatile human blood flow through 3D models of the human aortic arch, vessels of simple geometry and a bifurcated artery, Proceedings of the 31st Annual International Conference of the IEEE EMBS (Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society), Minneapolis, September 2-6, 2009, p.p. 4704-4710.

30-09 Anurag Chandorkar and Shayan Palit, Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method, Sensors & Transducers journal, ISSN 1726-5479 © 2009 by IFSA, Vol.7, Special Issue “MEMS: From Micro Devices to Wireless Systems,” October 2009, pp. 136-149.

13-09 E.P. Furlani, M.C. Carter, Analysis of an Electrostatically Actuated MEMS Drop Ejector, Presented at Nanotech Conference & Expo 2009, Houston, Texas, USA, May 3-7, 2009

12-09 A. Chandorkar, S. Palit, Simulation of Droplet-Based Microfluidics Devices Using a Volume-of-Fluid Approach, Presented at Nanotech Conference & Expo 2009, Houston, Texas, USA, May 3-7, 2009

3-09 Christopher N. Delametter, FLOW-3D Speeds MEMS Inkjet Development, Desktop Engineering, January 2009

42-08  Tien-Li Chang, Jung-Chang Wang, Chun-Chi Chen, Ya-Wei Lee, Ta-Hsin Chou, A non-fluorine mold release agent for Ni stamp in nanoimprint process, Microelectronic Engineering 85 (2008) 1608–1612

26-08 Pamela J. Waterman, First-Pass CFD Analyses – Part 2, Desktop Engineering, November 2008

09-08 M. Ren and H. Wijshoff, Thermal effect on the penetration of an ink droplet onto a porous medium, Proc. Eurotherm2008 MNH, 1 (2008)

04-08 Delametter, Christopher N., MEMS development in less than half the time, Small Times, Online Edition, May 2008

02-08 Renat A. Sultanov, Dennis Guster, Brent Engelbrekt and Richard Blankenbecler, 3D Computer Simulations of Pulsatile Human Blood Flows in Vessels and in the Aortic Arch – Investigation of Non-Newtonian Characteristics of Human Blood, The Journal of Computational Physics, arXiv:0802.2362v1 [physics.comp-ph], February 2008

01-08 Herman Wijshoff, thesis: University of Twente, Structure- and fluid dynamics in piezo inkjet printheads, ISBN 978-90-365-2582-4, Venlo, The Netherlands January 2008.

30-07 A. K. Sen, J. Darabi, and D. R. Knapp, Simulation and parametric study of a novel multi-spray emitter for ESI–MS applications, Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, Volume 3, Number 3, June 2007, pp. 283-298(16)

28-07 Dan Soltman and Vivek Subramanian, Inkjet-Printed Line Morphologies and Temperature Control of the Coffee Ring Effect, Langmuir; 2008; ASAP Web Release Date: 16-Jan-2008; (Research Article) DOI: 10.1021/la7026847

23-07 A K Sen and J Darabi, Droplet ejection performance of a monolithic thermal inkjet print head, Journal of Micromechanical and Microengineering,vol.17, pp.1420-1427 (2007) doi:10.1088/0960-1317/17/8/002; Abstract only.

18-07 Herman Wisjhoff, Better Printheads Via Simulation, Desktop Engineering, October 2007, Vol. 13, Issue 2

17-07 Jos de Jong, Ph.D. Thesis: University of Twente, Air entrapment in piezo inkjet printing, ISBN 978-90-365-2483-4, April 2007

15-07 Krishnendu Chakrabarty and Jun Zeng, (Ed.), Design Automation Methods and Tools for Microfluidics-Based Biochips, Springer, September 2006.

14-07 Fei Su and Jun Zeng, Computer-aided design and test for digital microfluidics, IEEE Design & Test of Computers, 24(1), 2007, 60-70.

13-07 Jun Zeng, Modeling and simulation of electrified droplets and its application to computer-aided design of digital microfluidics, IEEE Transactions on Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits and Systems, 25(2), 2006, 224-233.

12-07 Krishnendu Chakrabarty and Jun Zeng, (2005), Automated top-down design for microfluidic biochips, ACM Journal on Emerging Technologies in Computing Systems, 1(3), 2005, 186–223.

01-07 Wijshoff, Herman, Drop formation mechanisms in piezo-acoustic inkjet, NSTI-Nanotech 2007, ISBN 1420061844 Vol. 3, 2007)

23-06 John J. Uebbing, Stephan Hengstler, Dale Schroeder, Shalini Venkatesh, and Rick Haven, Heat and Fluid Flow in an Optical Switch Bubble, Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, Vol. 15, No. 6, December 2006

21-06 Wijshoff, Herman, Manipulating Drop Formation in Piezo Acoustic Inkjet, Proc. IS&T’s NIP22, 79 (2006)

20-06 J. de Jong, H. Reinten, M. van den Berg, H. Wijshoff, M. Versluis, G. de Bruin, A. Prosperetti and D. Lohse, Air entrapment in piezo-driven inkjet printheads, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120(3), 1257 (2006)

11-06 A. K. Sen, J. Darabi, D. R. Knapp and J. Liu, Modeling and Characterization of a Carbon Fiber Emitter for Electrospray Ionization, 1 MEMS and Microsystems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, USA, 2 Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

5-06 E. P. Furlani, B. G. Price, G. Hawkins, and A. G. Lopez, Thermally Induced Marangoni Instability of Liquid Microjets with Application to Continuous Inkjet Printing, Proceedings of NSTI Nanotech Conference 2006, Vol. 2, pp 534-537.

28-05 O B Fawehinmi, P H Gaskell, P K Jimack, N Kapur, and H M Thompson, A combined experimental and computational fluid dynamics analysis of the dynamics of drop formation, May 2005. DOI: 10.1243/095440605X31788

5-05 E. P. Furlani, Thermal Modulation and Instability of Newtonian Liquid Microjets, presented at Nanotech 2005, Anaheim, CA, May 8-12, 2005.

1-05 C.W. Hirt, Electro-Hydrodynamics of Semi-Conductive Fluids: With Application to Electro-Spraying, Flow Science Technical Note #70, FSI-05-TN70

19-04 G. F. Yao, Modeling of Electroosmosis Without Resolving Physics Inside a Electric Double Layer, Flow Science Technical Note (FSI-04-TN69)

12-04 Jun Zeng and Tom Korsmeyer, Principles of Droplet Electrohydrodynamics for Lab-on-a-Chip, Lab. Chip. Journal, 2004, 4(4), 265-277

9-04 Constantine N. Anagnostopoulos, James M. Chwalek, Christopher N. Delametter, Gilbert A. Hawkins, David L. Jeanmaire, John A. Lebens, Ali Lopez, and David P. Trauernicht, Micro-Jet Nozzle Array for Precise Droplet Metering and Steering Having Increased Droplet Deflection, Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Solid State Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems, sponsored by IEEE, Boston, June 8-12, 2003, pp. 368-71

8-04 Christopher N. Delametter, David P. Trauernicht, James M. Chwalek, Novel Microfluidic Jet Deflection – Significant Modeling Challenge with Great Application Potential, Technical Proceedings of the 2002 International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems sponsored by NSTI, San Juan, Puerto Rico, April 21-25, 2002, pp. 44-47

6-04 D. Vadillo*, G. Desie**, A Soucemarianadin*, Spreading Behavior of Single and Multiple Drops, *Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), and **AGFA-Gevaert Group N.V., XXI ICTAM, 15-21 August 2004, Warsaw, Poland

2-04 Herman Wijshoff, Free Surface Flow and Acousto-Elastic Interaction in Piezo Inkjet, Nanotech 2004, sponsored by the Nano Science & Technology Institute, Boston, MA, March 2004

30-03 D Souders, I Khan and GF Yao, Alessandro Incognito, and Matteo Corrado, A Numerical Model for Simulation of Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow in Microdevices, 7th International Symposium on Fluid Control, Measurement and Visualization

27-03 Jun Zeng, Daniel Sobek and Tom Korsmeyer, Electro-Hydrodynamic Modeling of Electrospray Ionization – CAD for a µFluidic Device-Mass Spectrometer Interface, Agilent Technologies Inc, paper presented at Transducers 2003, June 03 Boston (note: Reference #10 is to FLOW-3D)

17-03 John Uebbing, Switching Fiber-optic Circuits with Microscopic Bubbles, Sensors Magazine, May 2003, Vol 20, No 5, p 36-42

16-03 CFD Speeds Development of MEMS-based Printing Technology, MicroNano Magazine, June 2003, Vol 8, No 6, p 16

3-03 Simulation Speeds Design of Microfluidic Medical Devices, R&D Magazine, March 2003, pp 18-19

1-03 Simulations Help Microscopic Bubbles Switch Fiber-Optic Circuits, Agilent Technologies, Fiberoptic Product News, January 2003, pp 22-23

27-02 Feng, James Q., A General Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Drop Ejection in Drop-on-Demand Ink Jet Devices, Journal of Imaging Science and Technology®, Volume 46, Number 5, September/October 2002

1-02 Feixia Pan, Joel Kubby, and Jingkuang Chen, Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interaction in a MEMS Diaphragm Drop Ejector, Xerox Wilson Research Center, Institute of Physics Publishing, Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, 12 (2002), PII: SO960-1317(02)27439-2, pp. 70-76

48-01   Rainer Gruber, Radial Mass Transfer Enhancement in Bubble-Train Flow, PhD thesis in Engineering Sciences, Rheinisch- Westf alischen Technische Hochschule Aachen, December 2001.

34-01 Furlani, E.P., Delametter, C.N., Chwalek, J.M., and Trauernicht, D., Surface Tension Induced Instability of Viscous Liquid Jets, Fourth International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, April 2001

12-01 C. N. Delametter, Eastman Kodak Company, Micro Resolution, Mechanical Engineering, Col 123/No 7, July 2001, pp 70-72

11-01 C. N. Delametter, Eastman Kodak Company, Surface Tension Induced Instability of Viscous Liquid Jets, Technical Proceeding of the Fourth International Conference on Modeling and Simulation of Microsystems, April 2001

9-01 Aman Khan, Unipath Limited Research and Development, Effects of Reynolds Number on Surface Rolling in Small Drops, PVP-Col 431, Emerging Technologies for Fluids, Structures and Fluids, Structures and Fluid Structure Interaction — 2001

2-00 Narayan V. Deshpande, Significance of Inertance and Resistance in Fluidics of Thermal Ink-Jet Transducers, Journal of Imaging Science and Technology, Volume 40, Number 5, Sept./Oct. 1996, pp.457-461

4-98 D. Deitz, Connecting the Dots with CFD, Mechanical Engineering Magazine, pp. 90-91, March 1998

14-94 M. P. O’Hare, N. V. Deshpande, and D. J. Drake, Drop Generation Processes in TIJ Printheads, Xerox Corporation, Adv. Imaging Business Unit, IS&T’s Tenth International Congress on Advances in Non-Impact Printing, Tech. 1994

14-92 Asai, A.,Three-Dimensional Calculation of Bubble Growth and Drop Ejection in a Bubble Jet Printer, Journal of Fluids Engineering Vol. 114 December 1992:638-641