The impacts of profile concavity on turbidite deposits: Insights from the submarine canyons on global continental margins

The impacts of profile concavity on turbidite deposits: Insights from the submarine canyons on global continental margins

프로필 오목부가 탁도 퇴적물에 미치는 영향: 전 세계 대륙 경계에 대한 해저 협곡의 통찰력

Kaiqi Yu a, Elda Miramontes bc, Matthieu J.B. Cartigny d, Yuping Yang a, Jingping Xu a
aDepartment of Ocean Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, 1088 Xueyuan Rd., Shenzhen 518055, Guangdong, China
bMARUM-Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germanyc
Faculty of Geosciences, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany
dDepartment of Geography, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK

Received 10 August 2023, Revised 13 March 2024, Accepted 13 March 2024, Available online 17 March 2024, Version of Record 20 March 2024.

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Highlights

  • •The impact of submarine canyon concavity on turbidite deposition was assessed.
  • •Distribution of turbidite deposits varies with changes in canyon concavity.
  • •Three distinct deposition patterns were identified.
  • •The recognized deposition patterns align well with the observed turbidite deposits.

Abstract

Submarine canyons are primary conduits for turbidity currents transporting terrestrial sediments, nutrients, pollutants and organic carbon to the deep sea. The concavity in the longitudinal profile of these canyons (i.e. the downstream flattening rate along the profiles) influences the transport processes and results in variations in turbidite thickness, impacting the transfer and burial of particles. To better understand the controlling mechanisms of canyon concavity on the distribution of turbidite deposits, here we investigate the variation in sediment accumulation as a function of canyon concavity of 20 different modern submarine canyons, distributed on global continental margins. In order to effectively assess the isolated impact of the concavity of 20 different canyons, a series of two-dimensional, depth-resolved numerical simulations are conducted. Simulation results show that the highly concave profile (e.g. Surveyor and Horizon) tends to concentrate the turbidite deposits mainly at the slope break, while nearly straight profiles (e.g. Amazon and Congo) result in deposition focused at the canyon head. Moderately concave profiles with a smoother canyon floor (e.g. Norfolk-Washington and Mukluk) effectively facilitate the downstream transport of suspended sediments in turbidity currents. Furthermore, smooth and steep upper reaches of canyons commonly contribute to sediment bypass (i.e. Mukluk and Chirikof), while low slope angles lead to deposition at upper reaches (i.e. Bounty and Valencia). At lower reaches, the distribution of turbidite deposits is consistent with the occurrence of hydraulic jumps. Under the influence of different canyon concavities, three types of deposition patterns are inferred in this study, and verified by comparison with observed turbidite deposits on the modern or paleo-canyon floor. This study demonstrates a potential difference in sediment transport efficiency of submarine canyons with different concavities, which has potential consequences for sediment and organic carbon transport through submarine canyons.

Introduction

Submarine canyons are pivotal links in source-to-sink systems on continental margins (Sømme et al., 2009; Nyberg et al., 2018; Pope et al., 2022a, Pope et al., 2022b) that provide efficient pathways for moving prodigious volumes of terrestrial materials to the abyssal basin (Spychala et al., 2020; Heijnen et al., 2022). When turbidity currents, the main force that transports the above mentioned sediments (Xu et al., 2004; Xu, 2010; Talling et al., 2013; Stevenson et al., 2015), slow down after entering a flatter and/or wider stretch of the canyon downstream, the laden sediments settle, often rapidly, to form a deposit called turbidite that is known for organic carbon burial, hydrocarbon reserves and the accumulation of microplastics (Galy et al., 2007; Pohl et al., 2020a; Pope et al., 2022b; Pierdomenico et al., 2023). A set of flume experiments by Pohl et al. (2020b) revealed that the variation of bed slope plays a dominant role in controlling the sizes and locations of the deposit: a) a more gently dipping upper slope leads to upstream migration of upslope pinch-out; b) the increase of lower slope results in a decrease of the deposit thickness (Fig. 1a).

From upper continental slopes to deepwater basins, turbidity currents are commonly confined by submarine canyons that facilitate the longer distance transport of sediments (Eggenhuisen et al., 2022; Pope et al., 2022a; Wahab et al., 2022, Li et al., 2023a). The concavity, defined here as the downstream flattening rate of profiles (Covault et al., 2011; Chen et al., 2019; Seybold et al., 2021; Soutter et al., 2021a), of the longitudinal bed profile of the submarine canyons is therefore a key factor that determines hydrodynamic processes of turbidity currents, including the accumulation of sediments along the canyon thalweg (Covault et al., 2014; de Leeuw et al., 2016; Heerema et al., 2022; Heijnen et al., 2022). Due to the comprehensive impacts of sediment supply, grain size, climate change, regional tectonics, associated river and self-incision, the concavity of submarine canyons on global continental margins varies greatly (Parker et al., 1986; Harris and Whiteway, 2011; Casalbore et al., 2018; Nyberg et al., 2018; Soutter et al., 2021a, Li et al., 2023b), which is much more complex than the two constant slope setup of Pohl et al. (2020b)’s flume experiment (Fig. 1a). This raises the question of how the more complex concavity influences the dynamics of turbidity currents and the resultant distribution of turbidite deposits. For instance, the longitudinal profile concavity can also be increased by steepening the upper slope and/or gentling the lower slope of canyons (Fig. 1b). Parameters, known as significant factors influencing flow dynamics, include dip angle (Pohl et al., 2019), bed roughness (Baghalian and Ghodsian, 2020), obstacle presence (Howlett et al., 2019), and confinement conditions (Soutter et al., 2021b). However, the role of channel concavity in determining the downstream evolution of flow dynamics remains poorly understood (Covault et al., 2011; Georgiopoulou and Cartwright, 2013), and it is still unclear whether changes in concavity can result in different locations of pinch-out points and variations in turbidite deposit thicknesses (Pohl et al., 2020b).

In this study, we hypothesize that a more concave profile resulting from a steeper upper slope and a gentler lower slope may lead to a downstream migration of the upslope pinch-out and an increase of deposit thickness (Fig. 1b). This hypothesis is tested in 20 modern submarine canyons (shown in Fig. 2) whose longitudinal profiles are extracted from the GEBCO_2022 grid. Due to the lack of data describing the turbidite thickness trends in these canyons, we used a numerical model (FLOW-3D® software) to simulate the depositional process. The simulation results allow us to address at least two questions: (1) How does the concavity affect the distribution and thickness of turbidite deposits along the canyon thalwegs? (2) What is the impact of canyon concavity on the dynamics of the turbidity currents? Such answers on a global scale are undoubtedly helpful in understanding not only the sediment transport processes but also the efficient transfer and burial of organic carbon along global continental margins.

Section snippets

Submarine canyons used in this study

The longitudinal profiles of 20 modern submarine canyons are obtained using Global Mapper® from a public domain database GEBCO_2022 (doi:https://doi.org/10.5285/e0f0bb80-ab44-2739-e053-6c86abc0289c). The GEBCO_2022 grid provides elevation data, in meters, on a 15 arc-second interval grid. The 20 selected submarine canyons, which span the typical distance covered by turbidity currents, have been chosen from a diverse range of submarine canyon and channel systems that extend at least 250 km

Concavity of longitudinal canyon profiles

The NCI and α values of all 20 canyon profiles utilized in this study are plotted in Fig. 4, indicating the majority of these submarine canyons typically exhibit a concave profile, characterized by a negative NCI, except for the Amazon. In most of the profiles, the NCI is lower than −0.08, with the most concave point (indicated by the minimum ratio α) located closer to the canyon head than to the profile end, and their upper reaches are steeper than lower reaches, typically observed as the

Validation of the hypothesis

As previously mentioned in this paper, one of the primary objectives of this study is to evaluate the hypothesis inferred from the flume tank experiment of Pohl et al. (2020b): whether a more concave canyon profile can exert a comparable influence on turbidite deposits as the steepness of the lower and upper slopes in a slope-break system (Fig. 1). Shown as the modeling results, the deposition pattern of this study is more ‘irregular’ compared with the flume tank experiment (Pohl et al., 2020b

Conclusion

Based on global bathymetry, this study simulates the depositional behavior of turbidity currents flowing through the 20 different submarine canyons on the margins of open ocean and marginal sea. Influenced by the different concavities, the resulted deposition patterns are characterized by a variable distribution of turbidite deposits.

  • 1)The simulation results demonstrate that the accumulation of turbidite deposits is primarily observed in downstream regions near the slope break for highly concave

CRediT authorship contribution statement

Kaiqi Yu: Writing – review & editing, Writing – original draft, Validation, Software, Methodology, Investigation, Conceptualization. Elda Miramontes: Writing – review & editing, Supervision, Conceptualization. Matthieu J.B. Cartigny: Writing – review & editing, Supervision. Yuping Yang: Software, Methodology. Jingping Xu: Writing – review & editing, Supervision, Funding acquisition, Conceptualization.

Declaration of competing interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

Acknowledgements

This study is supported by the Shenzhen Natural Science Foundation (JCYJ20210324105211031). Matthieu J. B. Cartigny was supported by Royal Society Research Fellowship (DHF/R1/180166). We thank the Chief Editor Zhongyuan Chen, the associate editor and two reviewers for their constructive comments that helped us improve our manuscript.

References (70)

There are more references available in the full text version of this article.

Fig. 3. Free surface and substrate profiles in all Sp and Ls cases at t = 1 s, t = 3 s, and t = 5 s, arranged left to right (note: the colour contours correspond to the horizontal component of the flow velocity (u), expressed in m/s).

Numerical investigation of dam break flow over erodible beds with diverse substrate level variations

다양한 기질 수준 변화를 갖는 침식성 층 위의 댐 파손 흐름에 대한 수치 조사

Alireza Khoshkonesh1, Blaise Nsom2, Saeid Okhravi3*, Fariba Ahmadi Dehrashid4, Payam Heidarian5,
Silvia DiFrancesco6
1 Department of Geography, School of Social Sciences, History, and Philosophy, Birkbeck University of London, London, UK.
2 Université de Bretagne Occidentale. IRDL/UBO UMR CNRS 6027. Rue de Kergoat, 29285 Brest, France.
3 Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, 84104, Bratislava, Slovak Republic.
4Department of Water Science and Engineering, Faculty of Agriculture, Bu-Ali Sina University, 65178-38695, Hamedan, Iran.
5 Department of Civil, Environmental, Architectural Engineering and Mathematics, University of Brescia, 25123 Brescia, Italy.
6Niccol`o Cusano University, via Don C. Gnocchi 3, 00166 Rome, Italy. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +421-944624921. E-mail: saeid.okhravi@savba.sk

Abstract

This study aimed to comprehensively investigate the influence of substrate level difference and material composition on dam break wave evolution over two different erodible beds. Utilizing the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, we tracked free surface advection and reproduced wave evolution using experimental data from the literature. For model validation, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis encompassed mesh resolution, turbulence simulation methods, and bed load transport equations. The implementation of Large Eddy Simulation (LES), non-equilibrium sediment flux, and van Rijn’s (1984) bed load formula yielded higher accuracy compared to alternative approaches. The findings emphasize the significant effect of substrate level difference and material composition on dam break morphodynamic characteristics. Decreasing substrate level disparity led to reduced flow velocity, wavefront progression, free surface height, substrate erosion, and other pertinent parameters. Initial air entrapment proved substantial at the wavefront, illustrating pronounced air-water interaction along the bottom interface. The Shields parameter experienced a one-third reduction as substrate level difference quadrupled, with the highest near-bed concentration observed at the wavefront. This research provides fresh insights into the complex interplay of factors governing dam break wave propagation and morphological changes, advancing our comprehension of this intricate phenomenon.

이 연구는 두 개의 서로 다른 침식층에 대한 댐 파괴파 진화에 대한 기질 수준 차이와 재료 구성의 영향을 종합적으로 조사하는 것을 목표로 했습니다. VOF(유체량) 방법을 활용하여 자유 표면 이류를 추적하고 문헌의 실험 데이터를 사용하여 파동 진화를 재현했습니다.

모델 검증을 위해 메쉬 해상도, 난류 시뮬레이션 방법 및 침대 하중 전달 방정식을 포함하는 포괄적인 민감도 분석을 수행했습니다. LES(Large Eddy Simulation), 비평형 퇴적물 플럭스 및 van Rijn(1984)의 하상 부하 공식의 구현은 대체 접근 방식에 비해 더 높은 정확도를 산출했습니다.

연구 결과는 댐 붕괴 형태역학적 특성에 대한 기질 수준 차이와 재료 구성의 중요한 영향을 강조합니다. 기판 수준 차이가 감소하면 유속, 파면 진행, 자유 표면 높이, 기판 침식 및 기타 관련 매개변수가 감소했습니다.

초기 공기 포집은 파면에서 상당한 것으로 입증되었으며, 이는 바닥 경계면을 따라 뚜렷한 공기-물 상호 작용을 보여줍니다. 기판 레벨 차이가 4배로 증가함에 따라 Shields 매개변수는 1/3로 감소했으며, 파면에서 가장 높은 베드 근처 농도가 관찰되었습니다.

이 연구는 댐 파괴파 전파와 형태학적 변화를 지배하는 요인들의 복잡한 상호 작용에 대한 새로운 통찰력을 제공하여 이 복잡한 현상에 대한 이해를 향상시킵니다.

Keywords

Dam break; Substrate level difference; Erodible bed; Sediment transport; Computational fluid dynamics CFD.

Fig. 3. Free surface and substrate profiles in all Sp and Ls cases at t = 1 s, t = 3 s, and t = 5 s, arranged left to right (note: the colour contours
correspond to the horizontal component of the flow velocity (u), expressed in m/s).
Fig. 3. Free surface and substrate profiles in all Sp and Ls cases at t = 1 s, t = 3 s, and t = 5 s, arranged left to right (note: the colour contours correspond to the horizontal component of the flow velocity (u), expressed in m/s).

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FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 이용한 유입구 및 배플 위치가 침전조 제거 효율에 미치는 영향

Ali Poorkarimi1
Khaled Mafakheri2
Shahrzad Maleki2

Journal of Hydraulic Structures
J. Hydraul. Struct., 2023; 9(4): 76-87
DOI: 10.22055/jhs.2024.44817.1265

Abstract

중력에 의한 침전은 부유 물질을 제거하기 위해 물과 폐수 처리 공정에 널리 적용됩니다. 이 연구에서는 침전조의 제거 효율에 대한 입구 및 배플 위치의 영향을 간략하게 설명합니다. 실험은 CCD(중심복합설계) 방법론을 기반으로 수행되었습니다. 전산유체역학(CFD)은 유압 설계, 미래 발전소에 대한 계획 연구, 토목 유지 관리 및 공급 효율성과 관련된 복잡한 문제를 모델링하고 분석하는 데 광범위하게 사용됩니다. 본 연구에서는 입구 높이, 입구로부터 배플까지의 거리, 배플 높이의 다양한 조건에 따른 영향을 조사하였다. CCD 접근 방식을 사용하여 얻은 데이터를 분석하면 축소된 2차 모델이 R2 = 0.77의 결정 계수로 부유 물질 제거를 예측할 수 있음이 나타났습니다. 연구 결과, 유입구와 배플의 부적절한 위치는 침전조의 효율에 부정적인 영향을 미칠 수 있음을 보여주었습니다. 입구 높이, 배플 거리, 배플 높이의 최적 값은 각각 0.87m, 0.77m, 0.56m였으며 제거 효율은 80.6%였습니다.

Sedimentation due to gravitation is applied widely in water and wastewater treatment processes to remove suspended solids. This study outlines the effect of the inlet and baffle position on the removal efficiency of sedimentation tanks. Experiments were carried out based on the central composite design (CCD) methodology. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used extensively to model and analyze complex issues related to hydraulic design, planning studies for future generating stations, civil maintenance, and supply efficiency. In this study, the effect of different conditions of inlet elevation, baffle’s distance from the inlet, and baffle height were investigated. Analysis of the obtained data with a CCD approach illustrated that the reduced quadratic model can predict the suspended solids removal with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.77. The results showed that the inappropriate position of the inlet and the baffle can have a negative effect on the efficiency of the sedimentation tank. The optimal values of inlet elevation, baffle distance, and baffle height were 0.87 m, 0.77 m, and 0.56 m respectively with 80.6% removal efficiency.

Keywords

Sedimentation tank, Particle removal, Central Composite Design, Computational
Fluid Dynamics, Flow-3D

Figure 3. Computed contour of velocity magnitude (m/s) for Run 1 to Run 15.
Figure 3. Computed contour of velocity magnitude (m/s) for Run 1 to Run 15.

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Figure 1 | Schematic of the present research model with dimensions and macro-roughnesses installed.

On the hydraulic performance of the inclined drops: the effect of downstreammacro-roughness elements

경사 낙하의 수력학적 성능: 하류 거시 거칠기 요소의 영향

Farhoud Kalateh a,*, Ehsan Aminvash a and Rasoul Daneshfaraz b
a Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran
b Faculty of Engineering, University of Maragheh, Maragheh, Iran
*Corresponding author. E-mail: f.kalateh@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

The main goal of the present study is to investigate the effects of macro-roughnesses downstream of the inclined drop through numerical models. Due to the vital importance of geometrical properties of the macro-roughnesses in the hydraulic performance and efficient energy dissipation downstream of inclined drops, two different geometries of macro-roughnesses, i.e., semi-circular and triangular geometries, have been investigated using the Flow-3D model. Numerical simulation showed that with the flow rate increase and relative critical depth, the flow energy consumption has decreased. Also, relative energy dissipation increases with the increase in height and slope angle, so that this amount of increase in energy loss compared to the smooth bed in semi-circular and triangular elements is 86.39 and 76.80%, respectively, in the inclined drop with a height of 15 cm and 86.99 and 65.78% in the drop with a height of 20 cm. The Froude number downstream on the uneven bed has been dramatically reduced, so this amount of reduction has been approximately 47 and 54% compared to the control condition. The relative depth of the downstream has also increased due to the turbulence of the flow on the uneven bed with the increase in the flow rate.

본 연구의 주요 목표는 수치 모델을 통해 경사 낙하 하류의 거시 거칠기 효과를 조사하는 것입니다. 수력학적 성능과 경사 낙하 하류의 효율적인 에너지 소산에서 거시 거칠기의 기하학적 특성이 매우 중요하기 때문에 두 가지 서로 다른 거시 거칠기 형상, 즉 반원형 및 삼각형 형상이 Flow를 사용하여 조사되었습니다.

3D 모델 수치 시뮬레이션을 통해 유량이 증가하고 상대 임계 깊이가 증가함에 따라 유동 에너지 소비가 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다. 또한, 높이와 경사각이 증가함에 따라 상대적인 에너지 소산도 증가하는데, 반원형 요소와 삼각형 요소에서 평활층에 비해 에너지 손실의 증가량은 경사낙하에서 각각 86.39%와 76.80%입니다.

높이 15cm, 높이 20cm의 드롭에서 86.99%, 65.78%입니다. 고르지 못한 베드 하류의 프루드 수가 극적으로 감소하여 이 감소량은 대조 조건에 비해 약 47%와 54%였습니다. 유속이 증가함에 따라 고르지 못한 층에서의 흐름의 난류로 인해 하류의 상대적 깊이도 증가했습니다.

Key words

flow energy dissipation, Froude number, inclined drop, numerical simulation

Figure 1 | Schematic of the present research model with dimensions and macro-roughnesses installed.
Figure 1 | Schematic of the present research model with dimensions and macro-roughnesses installed.
Figure 2 | Meshing, boundary condition, and solution field network
Figure 2 | Meshing, boundary condition, and solution field network

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Figura 1 – Mapa de localização da PCH Salto Paraopeba

하천 저수지 물리적 모델의 침적 과정에 대한 전산 유체 역학 모델링(CFD) 기준

Natália Melo da Silva1 1; Jorge Luis Zegarra Tarqui2,Edna Maria de Faria Viana 3

Abstract

저수지 침전은 수력 발전의 지속 가능한 발전을 위한 주요 문제 중 하나이며 브라질에 매우 중요합니다. 브라질의 주요 에너지원은 수력발전소에서 나옵니다. 소규모 수력 발전소(SHP)는 재생 에너지의 보완적 발전을 위한 중요한 대안입니다.

이들의 설계, 건설, 운영 및 재동력을 최적화하기 위해 저수지 내 퇴적물의 유체 역학 및 이동을 연구하는 것이 매우 중요합니다.

3차원 전산유체역학 – CFD 3D 모델링은 복잡한 흐름 문제에 가장 적합한 방법입니다. 제안된 방법은 MG Jeceaba 자치구에 위치한 PCH Salto Paraopeba의 유체 역학 및 퇴적물 이동 현상을 재현하고 평가하는 것을 목표로 하며, 취수구의 완전한 침전으로 인해 작동이 중단되었습니다.

모델의 검증은 미나스제라이스 연방대학교의 수력학 연구 센터(CPH)에 구축된 축소된 물리적 모델의 실험 데이터를 사용하여 수행됩니다.

Abstract: The reservoir silting is one of the main problems for sustainable development in the
generation of hydroelectric energy and it is of great significance for Brazil. The main source of energy
in Brazil comes from hydroelectric power plant. The Small Hydroelectric Power Plant (SHP) are an
important alternative for complementary generation of renewable energy.
Seeking to optimize the design, construction, operation, and repowering of these, it is extremely
important to study the hydrodynamics and transport of sediments in their reservoirs. Threedimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics – CFD 3D modeling is the most appropriate method for
complex flow problems. The proposed method aims to reproduce and evaluate the hydrodynamic and
sediment transport phenomena of the PCH Salto Paraopeba, located in the municipality of Jeceaba,
MG, which stopped working due to the complete silting up of its water intake. The validation of the
model will be done using experimental data from the reduced physical model, built at the Hydraulic
Research Center (CPH) at the Federal University of Minas Gerais.

Keywords

퇴적물 수송, 물리적 모델, 소규모 수력 발전소, Sediment transport, physical model, Small Hydroelectric Power Plant.

Figura 1 – Mapa de localização da PCH Salto Paraopeba
Figura 1 – Mapa de localização da PCH Salto Paraopeba
Figura 2 – PCH Salto Paraopeba e modelo reduzido.
Figura 2 – PCH Salto Paraopeba e modelo reduzido.

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Dissertação de Mestrado. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Tecnologias e Inovações Ambientais.
UFLA, Lavras/MG, 2015.

Open Channels Flow에서의 콘크리트 캔버스 거동 연구

Study of Concrete Canvas Behavior in Open Channels Flow

Document Type : Research Paper

Authors

1 Imam Hosein Uni

2 Researcher of Imam Hossein University, Faculty of Engineering and Passive Defense

3 Ivanki University, Iran.

 10.22124/JCR.2023.24324.1618

Abstract

개방 수로의 심한 수력 구배는 침전으로 인한 심각한 침식과 문제를 일으킵니다. 패브릭 콘크리트는 기존의 콘크리트 표면을 대체할 수 있는 높은 실행 속도를 가진 독특한 제품입니다. 이 제품의 기계적 저항 매개변수에 따르면 부식 요인에 대한 우수한 내구성 외에도 직물 콘크리트의 응용 분야 중 하나는 운하 및 수로 암거 표면에 사용하는 것입니다. 이 연구에서는 먼저 사다리꼴 단면의 개방 채널 흐름을 직선 경로 상태의 3가지 공통 채널 형상, 굴곡 및 편차가 있는 경로, 마지막으로 채널 하단의 높이가 변경된 채널 경로를 포함하는 9가지 시나리오에서 시뮬레이션합니다. 각 주에서 flow-3d 소프트웨어를 사용한 흐름 난류 모델링과 함께 3개의 서로 다른 흐름 체제가 조사되었습니다.

FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용한 유동 난류 모델링과 함께 다양한 유동 체제가 조사되었습니다. ABAQUS 소프트웨어를 사용하여 패브릭 콘크리트 구성요소와 연결 영역을 모델링하고, 콘크리트 표면과 취약한 연결 영역에 동일한 힘을 가하여 생성된 응력의 양을 확인했습니다. 결과는 생성된 응력이 직물 콘크리트의 인장 및 압축 응력 용량에 비해 매우 낮다는 것을 보여줍니다. 흐름과 콘크리트의 수력 연구를 검증하기 위해 관련 실험실 결과가 사용되었습니다.

Severe hydraulic gradients in open channels cause severe bed erosion and problems caused by sedimentation. Fabric concrete is a unique product with high execution speed that can replace traditional concrete surfaces. According to the mechanical resistance parameters of this product, in addition to its good durability against corrosive factors, one of the applications of fabric concrete is its use on the surface of canals and water course culverts. In this research, first, the flow of open channels in trapezoidal section is simulated under 9 scenarios, which include 3 common channel geometries in the state of a straight path, a path with bends and deviations, and finally, a channel path with a change in height at the bottom of the channel. In each of the states, 3 different flow regimes have been investigated along with flow turbulence modeling using flow-3d software.

Different flow regimes have been investigated along with flow turbulence modeling using flow-3d software. Using ABAQUS software, fabric concrete components and their connection areas have been modeled, and by applying forces equated to the concrete surface and vulnerable connection areas, the amount of created stresses has been checked. The results show that the created stresses are very low compared to the tensile and compressive stress capacity of fabric concrete. In order to validate the hydraulic studies of flow and concrete, the relevant laboratory results have been used.

Keywords

Main Subjects

Schematic view of the experimental set-up

Short-time numerical simulation of ultrasonically assisted electrochemical removal of strontium from water

  • September 2023

DOI:10.30955/gnc2023.00436

  • Conference: 18th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology CEST2023, 30 August to 2 September 2023, Athens, Greece
  • At: Athens, Greece

Authors:

Katarina Licht

  • University of Zagreb Faculty of Civil Engineering
Ivan Halkijevic at University of Zagreb

Ivan Halkijevic

Hana Posavcic at University of Zagreb

Hana Posavcic

Goran Loncar at University of Zagreb

Goran Loncar

Abstract and Figures

3D numerical simulations and measurements on an electrochemical reactor were used to analyze the efficiency of strontium removal from water, with and without simultaneous ultrasound treatment. Ultrasound was generated using 4 ultrasonic transducers with an operating frequency of 25 kHz. The reactor used 8 aluminum electrodes arranged in two blocks. Strontium ions in water are modeled as particles characterized by a charge of 3.2•10-19 C and a diameter of 1.2•10-8 m. The numerical model was created in Flow-3D software using the basic hydrodynamic module, electrostatic module, and general moving objects module. The performance of the studied reactor variants by numerical simulations is defined by the ratio of the number of model strontium particles permanently retained on the electrodes at the end of the simulation period to the initial number of particles in the water. For the laboratory reactor, the effect of strontium removal is defined by the ratio of the homogeneous strontium concentration in the water at the end and at the beginning of the experiments. The results show that the use of ultrasound increases the effect of strontium removal from 10.3% to 11.2% after 180 seconds of water treatment. The results of numerical simulations agree with the results of measurements on a reactor with the same geometrical characteristics.

Keywords:

numerical model, electrochemical reactor, strontium

1. Introduction

Strontium (Sr) is a naturally occurring element found in many sedimentary rocks and some calcite minerals. Significant anthropogenic sources include industrial activities, fertilizers, and nuclear fallout (Scott et al., 2020). Sr concentrations greater than 1.5 mg L-1 in water can cause strontium rickets and other health problems in humans, especially in children (Epa et al., n.d.; Peng et al., 2021; Scott et al., 2020). Elevated Sr concentrations have been reported in drinking water worldwide, with concentrations as high as 52 mg L-1 in groundwater in the northern USA (Luczaj and Masarik, 2015; Peng et al., 2021; Scott et al., 2020). One of the possible remediation technologies for Sr is an electrochemical process (Kamaraj and Vasudevan, 2015). These processes are based on in-situ coagulant formation through the application of electric current to metal electrodes. The process consists of dissolution of the sacrificial anode, formation of hydroxide ions and hydrogen at the cathode, electrolyte reactions at the electrode surface, adsorption of coagulants on colloidal impurities and electrodes, and removal of the resulting flocs by precipitation or flotation (Mollah et al., 2001). One of the main drawbacks of the process is the polarization and passivation of the electrodes, which can be minimized by combining it with ultrasonication (Dong et al., 2016; Ince, 2018; Moradi et al., 2021). Ultrasonic cavitation can result in solute thermolysis and the formation of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (Mohapatra and Kirpalani, 2019). It also increases the mass transfer rates of solutes and enhances the surface properties of solid particles (Fu et al., 2016; Ziylan et al., 2013). The aim of this research is to evaluate the efficiency of the electrochemical (EC) batch reactor with and without the additional use of ultrasound (US), which is intended for the purification of water mainly contaminated with an increased concentration of Sr. The results of the 3D numerical simulations are verified by measurements in the laboratory EC reactor.

References

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https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JHAZMAT.2016.07.007

EPA. (2014), Announcement of Final Regulatory Determinations for Contaminants on the Third Drinking

Water Contaminant Candidate List. Retrieved from http://fdsys.gpo.gov/fdsys/search/home.action

Fu, F., Lu, J., Cheng, Z. and Tang, B. (2016), Removal of selenite by zero-valent iron combined with ultrasound:

Se(IV) concentration changes, Se(VI) generation, and reaction mechanism, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 29,

328–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2015.10.007 Ince, N.H. (2018), Ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation processes for water decontamination, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 40, 97–103.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ultsonch.2017.04.009

Kamaraj, R. and Vasudevan, S. (2015), Evaluation of electrocoagulation processfor the removal of strontium and cesium from aqueous solution, Chemical Engineering Research and Design, 93, 522–530.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cherd.2014.03.021

Luczaj, J. and Masarik, K. (2015), Groundwater Quantity and Quality Issues in a Water-Rich Region: Examples from Wisconsin, USA, Resources, 4(2), 323–357.

https://doi.org/10.3390/resources4020323

Mohapatra, D.P. and Kirpalani, D.M. (2019), Selenium in wastewater: fast analysis method development and advanced oxidation treatment applications, Water Science and Technology: A Journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research, 79(5), 842–849. https://doi.org/10.2166/wst.2019.010

Mollah, M.Y.A., Schennach, R., Parga, J.R. and Cocke, D.L. (2001), Electrocoagulation (EC)- Science and

applications, Journal of Hazardous Materials, 84(1), 29–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0304-3894(01)00176-5 Moradi, M., Vasseghian, Y., Arabzade, H. and Khaneghah, A.M. (2021), Various wastewaters treatment by sono-electrocoagulation process: A comprehensive review of operational parameters and future outlook, Chemosphere, 263, 128314.https://doi.org/10.1016/J.CHEMOSPHERE.2020.128314

Peng, H., Yao, F., Xiong, S., Wu, Z., Niu, G. and Lu, T. (2021), Strontium in public drinking water and associated public health risks in Chinese cities, Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 28(18), 23048.

https://doi.org/10.1007/S11356-021-12378-Y

Scott, V., Juran, L., Ling, E.J., Benham, B. and Spiller, A. (2020), Assessing strontium and vulnerability to

strontium in private drinking water systems in Virginia, Water, 12(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041053

Ziylan, A., Koltypin, Y., Gedanken, A. and Ince, N.H. (2013), More on sonolytic and sonocatalytic decomposition of Diclofenac using zero-valent iron, Ultrasonics Sonochemistry, 20(1), 580–586.

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Study on the critical sediment concentration determining the optimal transport capability of submarine sediment flows with different particle size composition

Study on the critical sediment concentration determining the optimal transport capability of submarine sediment flows with different particle size composition

Yupeng Ren abc, Huiguang Zhou cd, Houjie Wang ab, Xiao Wu ab, Guohui Xu cd, Qingsheng Meng cd

Abstract

해저 퇴적물 흐름은 퇴적물을 심해로 운반하는 주요 수단 중 하나이며, 종종 장거리를 이동하고 수십 또는 수백 킬로미터에 걸쳐 상당한 양의 퇴적물을 운반합니다. 그것의 강력한 파괴력은 종종 이동 과정에서 잠수함 유틸리티에 심각한 손상을 초래합니다.

퇴적물 흐름의 퇴적물 농도는 주변 해수와의 밀도차를 결정하며, 이 밀도 차이는 퇴적물 흐름의 흐름 능력을 결정하여 이송된 퇴적물의 최종 퇴적 위치에 영향을 미칩니다. 본 논문에서는 다양한 미사 및 점토 중량비(미사/점토 비율이라고 함)를 갖는 다양한 퇴적물 농도의 퇴적물 흐름을 수로 테스트를 통해 연구합니다.

우리의 테스트 결과는 특정 퇴적물 구성에 대해 퇴적물 흐름이 가장 빠르게 이동하는 임계 퇴적물 농도가 있음을 나타냅니다. 4가지 미사/점토 비율 각각에 대한 임계 퇴적물 농도와 이에 상응하는 최대 속도가 구해집니다. 결과는 점토 함량이 임계 퇴적물 농도와 선형적으로 음의 상관 관계가 있음을 나타냅니다.

퇴적물 농도가 증가함에 따라 퇴적물의 흐름 거동은 흐름 상태에서 붕괴된 상태로 변환되고 흐름 거동이 변화하는 두 탁한 현탁액의 유체 특성은 모두 Bingham 유체입니다.

또한 본 논문에서는 퇴적물 흐름 내 입자 배열을 분석하여 위에서 언급한 결과에 대한 미시적 설명도 제공합니다.

Submarine sediment flows is one of the main means for transporting sediment to the deep sea, often traveling long-distance and transporting significant volumes of sediment for tens or even hundreds of kilometers. Its strong destructive force often causes serious damage to submarine utilities on its course of movement. The sediment concentration of the sediment flow determines its density difference with the ambient seawater, and this density difference determines the flow ability of the sediment flow, and thus affects the final deposition locations of the transported sediment. In this paper, sediment flows of different sediment concentration with various silt and clay weight ratios (referred to as silt/clay ratio) are studied using flume tests. Our test results indicate that there is a critical sediment concentration at which sediment flows travel the fastest for a specific sediment composition. The critical sediment concentrations and their corresponding maximum velocities for each of the four silt/clay ratios are obtained. The results further indicate that the clay content is linearly negatively correlated with the critical sediment concentration. As the sediment concentration increases, the flow behaviors of sediment flows transform from the flow state to the collapsed state, and the fluid properties of the two turbid suspensions with changing flow behaviors are both Bingham fluids. Additionally, this paper also provides a microscopic explanation of the above-mentioned results by analyzing the arrangement of particles within the sediment flow.

Introduction

Submarine sediment flows are important carriers for sea floor sediment movement and may carry and transport significant volumes of sediment for tens or even hundreds of kilometers (Prior et al., 1987; Pirmez and Imran, 2003; Zhang et al., 2018). Earthquakes, storms, and floods may all trigger submarine sediment flow events (Hsu et al., 2008; Piper and Normark, 2009; Pope et al., 2017b; Gavey et al., 2017). Sediment flows have strong forces during the movement, which will cause great harm to submarine structures such as cables and pipelines (Pope et al., 2017a). It was first confirmed that the cable breaking event caused by the sediment flow occurred in 1929. The sediment flow triggered by the Grand Banks earthquake damaged 12 cables. According to the time sequence of the cable breaking, the maximum velocity of the sediment flow is as high as 28 m/s (Heezen and Ewing, 1952; Kuenen, 1952; Heezen et al., 1954). Subsequent research shows that the lowest turbidity velocity that can break the cable also needs to reach 19 m/s (Piper et al., 1988). Since then, there have been many damage events of submarine cables and oil and gas pipelines caused by sediment flows in the world (Hsu et al., 2008; Carter et al., 2012; Cattaneo et al., 2012; Carter et al., 2014). During its movement, the sediment flow will gradually deposit a large amount of sediment carried by it along the way, that is, the deposition process of the sediment flow. On the one hand, this process brings a large amount of terrestrial nutrients and other materials to the ocean, while on the other hand, it causes damage and burial to benthic organisms, thus forming the largest sedimentary accumulation on Earth – submarine fans, which are highly likely to become good reservoirs for oil and gas resources (Daly, 1936; Yuan et al., 2010; Wu et al., 2022). The study on sediment flows (such as, the study of flow velocity and the forces acting on seabed structures) can provide important references for the safe design of seabed structures, the protection of submarine ecosystems, and exploration of turbidity sediments related oil and gas deposits. Therefore, it is of great significance to study the movement of sediment flows.

The sediment flow, as a highly sediment-concentrated fluid flowing on the sea floor, has a dense bottom layer and a dilute turbulent cloud. Observations at the Monterey Canyon indicated that the sediment flow can maintain its movement over long distances if its bottom has a relatively high sediment concentration. This dense bottom layer can be very destructive along its movement path to any facilities on the sea floor (Paull et al., 2018; Heerema et al., 2020; Wang et al., 2020). The sediment flow mentioned in this research paper is the general term of sediment density flow.

The sediment flow, which occurs on the seafloor, has the potential to cause erosion along its path. In this process, the suspended sediment is replenished, allowing the sediment flow to maintain its continuous flow capacity (Zhao et al., 2018). The dynamic force of sediment flow movement stem from its own gravity and density difference with surrounding water. In cases that the gravity drive of the slope is absent (on a flat sea floor), the flow velocity and distance of sediment flows are essentially determined by the sediment composition and concentration of the sediment flows as previous studies have demonstrated. Ilstad et al. (2004) conducted underwater flow tests in a sloped tank and employed high speed video camera to perform particle tracking. The results indicated that the premixed sand-rich and clay-rich slurries demonstrated different flow velocity and flow behavior. Using mixed kaolinite(d50 = 6 μm) and silica flour(d50 = 9 μm) in three compositions with total volumetric concentration ranged 22% or 28%, Felix and Peakall (2006) carried out underwater flow tests in a 5° slope Perspex channel and found that the flow ability of sediment flows is different depending on sediment compositions and concentrations. Sumner et al. (2009) used annular flume experiments to investigate the depositional dynamics and deposits of waning sediment-laden flows, finding that decelerating fast flows with fixed sand content and variable mud content resulted in four different deposit types. Chowdhury and Testik (2011) used lock-exchange tank, and experimented the kaolin clay sediment flows in the concentration range of 25–350 g/L, and predicted the fluid mud sediment flows propagation characteristics, but this study focused on giving sediment flows propagate phase transition time parameters, and is limited to clay. Lv et al. (2017) found through experiments that the rheological properties and flow behavior of kaolin clay (d50 = 3.7 μm) sediment flows were correlated to clay concentrations. In the field monitoring conducted by Liu et al. (2023) at the Manila Trench in the South China Sea in 2021, significant differences in the velocity, movement distance, and flow morphology of turbidity currents were observed. These differences may be attributed to variations in the particle composition of the turbidity currents.

On low and gentle slopes, although sediment flow with sand as the main sediment composition moves faster, it is difficult to propagate over long distances because sand has greater settling velocity and subaqueous angle of repose. Whereas the sediment flows with silt and clay as main composition may maintain relatively stable currents. Although its movement speed is slow, it has the ability to propagate over long distances because of the low settling rate of the fine particles (Ilstad et al., 2004; Liu et al., 2023). In a field observation at the Gaoping submarine canyon, the sediments collected from the sediment flows exhibited grain size gradation and the sediment was mostly composed of silt and clay (Liu et al., 2012). At the largest deltas in the world, for instance, the Mississippi River Delta, the sediments are mainly composed of silt and clay, which generally distributed along the coast in a wide range and provided the sediment sources for further distribution. The sediment flows originated and transported sediment from the coast to the deep sea are therefore share the same sediment compositions as delta sediments. To study the sediment flows composed of silt and clay is of great importance.

The sediment concentration of the sediment flows determines the density difference between the sediment flows and the ambient water and plays a key role in its flow ability. For the sediment flow with sediment composed of silt and clay, low sediment concentration means low density and therefore leads to low flow ability; however, although high sediment concentration results in high density, since there is cohesion between fine particles, it changes fluid properties and leads to low flow ability as well. Therefore, there should be a critical sediment concentration with mixed composition of silt and clay, at which the sediment flow maintains its strongest flow capacity and have the highest movement speed. In other words, the two characteristics of particle diameter and concentration of the sediment flow determine its own motion ability, which, if occurs, may become the most destructive force to submarine structures.

The objectives of this work was to study how the sediment composition (measured in relative weight of silt and clay, and referred as silt/clay ratio) and sediment concentration affect flow ability and behavior of the sediment flows, and to quantify the critical sediment concentration at which the sediment flows reached the greatest flow velocity under the experiment setting. We used straight flume without slope and conducted a series of flume tests with varying sediment compositions (silt-rich or clay-rich) and concentrations (96 to 1212 g/L). Each sediment flow sample was tested and analyzed for rheological properties using a rheometer, in order to characterize the relationship between flow behavior and rheological properties. Combined with the particle diameter, density and viscosity characteristics of the sediment flows measured in the experiment, a numerical modeling study is conducted, which are mutually validated with the experimental results.

The sediment concentration determines the arrangements of the sediment particles in the turbid suspension, and the arrangement impacts the fluid properties of the turbid suspension. The microscopic mode of particle arrangement in the turbid suspension can be constructed to further analyze the relationship between the fluid properties of turbid suspension and the flow behaviors of the sediment flow, and then characterize the critical sediment concentration at which the sediment flow runs the fastest. A simplified microscopic model of particle arrangement in turbid suspension was constructed to analyze the microscopic arrangement characteristics of sediment particles in turbid suspension with the fastest velocity.

Section snippets

Equipment and materials

The sediment flows flow experiments were performed in a Perspex channel with smooth transparent walls. The layout and dimensions of the experimental set-up were shown in Fig. 1. The bottom of the channel was flat and straight, and a gate was arranged to separate the two tanks. In order to study the flow capacity of turbidity currents from the perspective of their own composition (particle size distribution and concentration), we used a straight channel instead of an inclined one, to avoid any

Relationship between sediment flow flow velocity and sediment concentration

After the sediment flow is generated, its movement in the first half (50 cm) of the channel is relatively stable, and there is obvious shock diffusion in the second half. The reason is that the excitation wave (similar to the surge) will be formed during the sediment flow movement, and its speed is much faster than the speed of the sediment flow head. When the excitation wave reaches the tail of the channel, it will be reflected, thus affecting the subsequent flow of the sediment flow.

Sediment flows motion simulation based on FLOW-3D

As a relatively mature 3D fluid simulation software, FLOW-3D can accurately predict the free surface flow, and has been used to simulate the movement process of sediment flows for many times (Heimsund, 2007). The model adopted in this paper is RNG turbulence model, which can better deal with the flow with high strain rate and is suitable for the simulation of sediment flows with variable shape during movement. The governing equations of the numerical model involved include continuity equation,

Conclusions

In this study, we conducted a series of sediment flow flume tests with mixed silt and clay sediment samples in four silt/clay ratios on a flat slope. Rheological measurements were carried out on turbid suspension samples and microstructure analysis of the sediment particle arrangements was conducted, we concluded that:

  • (1)The flow velocity of the sediment flow is controlled by the sediment concentration and its own particle diameter composition, the flow velocity increased with the increase of the

Declaration of Competing Interest

The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant no. 42206055]; the National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant no. 41976049]; and the National Natural Science Foundation of China [Grant no. 42272327].

References (39)

There are more references available in the full text version of this article.

Figure 2-15: Système expérimental du plan incliné

새로운 콘크리트의 유체 흐름 모델링

Sous la direction de :
Marc Jolin, directeur de recherche
Benoit Bissonnette, codirecteur de recherche

Modélisation de l’écoulement du béton frais

Abstract

현재의 기후 비상 사태와 기후 변화에 관한 다양한 과학적 보고서를 고려할 때 인간이 만든 오염을 대폭 줄이는 것은 필수적이며 심지어 중요합니다. 최신 IPCC(기후변화에 관한 정부 간 패널) 보고서(2022)는 2030년까지 배출량을 절반으로 줄여야 함을 나타내며, 지구 보존을 위해 즉각적인 조치를 취해야 한다고 강력히 강조합니다.

이러한 의미에서 콘크리트 생산 산업은 전체 인간 이산화탄소 배출량의 4~8%를 담당하고 있으므로 환경에 미치는 영향을 줄이기 위한 진화가 시급히 필요합니다.

본 연구의 주요 목적은 이미 사용 가능한 기술적 품질 관리 도구를 사용하여 생산을 최적화하고 혼합 시간을 단축하며 콘크리트 폐기물을 줄이기 위한 신뢰할 수 있고 활용 가능한 수치 모델을 개발함으로써 이러한 산업 전환에 참여하는 것입니다.

실제로, 혼합 트럭 내부의 신선한 콘크리트의 거동과 흐름 프로파일을 더 잘 이해할 수 있는 수치 시뮬레이션을 개발하면 혼합 시간과 비용을 더욱 최적화할 수 있으므로 매우 유망합니다. 이러한 복잡한 수치 도구를 활용할 수 있으려면 수치 시뮬레이션을 검증, 특성화 및 보정하기 위해 기본 신 콘크리트 흐름 모델의 구현이 필수적입니다.

이 논문에서는 세 가지 단순 유동 모델의 개발이 논의되고 얻은 결과는 신선한 콘크리트 유동의 수치적 거동을 검증하는 데 사용됩니다. 이러한 각 모델은 강점과 약점을 갖고 있으며, 신선한 콘크리트의 유변학과 유동 거동을 훨씬 더 잘 이해할 수 있는 수치 작업 환경을 만드는 데 기여합니다.

따라서 이 연구 프로젝트는 새로운 콘크리트 생산의 완전한 모델링을 위한 진정한 관문입니다.

In view of the current climate emergency and the various scientific reports on climate change, it is essential and even vital to drastically reduce man-made pollution. The latest IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) report (2022) indicates that emissions must be halved by 2030 and strongly emphasizes the need to act immediately to preserve the planet. In this sense, the concrete production industry is responsible for 4-8% of total human carbon dioxide emissions and therefore urgently needs to evolve to reduce its environmental impact. The main objective of this study is to participate in this industrial transition by developing a reliable and exploitable numerical model to optimize the production, reduce mixing time and also reduce concrete waste by using technological quality control tools already available. Indeed, developing a numerical simulation allowing to better understand the behavior and flow profiles of fresh concrete inside a mixing-truck is extremely promising as it allows for further optimization of mixing times and costs. In order to be able to exploit such a complex numerical tool, the implementation of elementary fresh concrete flow models is essential to validate, characterize and calibrate the numerical simulations. In this thesis, the development of three simple flow models is discussed and the results obtained are used to validate the numerical behavior of fresh concrete flow. Each of these models has strengths and weaknesses and contributes to the creation of a numerical working environment that provides a much better understanding of the rheology and flow behavior of fresh concrete. This research project is therefore a real gateway to a full modelling of fresh concrete production.


Key words

fresh concrete, rheology, numerical simulation, mixer-truck, rheological probe.

Figure 2-15: Système expérimental du plan incliné
Figure 2-15: Système expérimental du plan incliné
Figure 2-19: Essai d'affaissement au cône d'Abrams
Figure 2-19: Essai d’affaissement au cône d’Abrams

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Fig. 7.Simulation results by single external force (left: rainfall, right: storm surge)

연안 지역의 복합 외력에 의한 침수 특성 분석

Analysis on inundation characteristics by compound external forces in coastal areas

연안 지역의 복합 외력에 의한 침수 특성 분석

Taeuk Kanga, Dongkyun Sunb, Sangho Leec*
강 태욱a, 선 동균b, 이 상호c*

aResearch Professor, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea
bResearcher, Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea
cProfessor, Department of Civil Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea
a부경대학교 방재연구소 전임연구교수
b부경대학교 방재연구소 연구원
c부경대학교 공과대학 토목공학과 교수
*Corresponding Author

ABSTRACT

연안 지역은 강우, 조위, 월파 등 여러가지 외력에 의해 침수가 발생될 수 있다. 이에 이 연구에서는 연안 지역에서 발생될 수 있는 단일 및 복합 외력에 의한 지역별 침수 특성을 분석하였다. 연구에서 고려한 외력은 강우와 폭풍 해일에 의한 조위 및 월파이고, 분석 대상지역은 남해안 및 서해안의 4개 지역이다. 유역의 강우-유출 및 2차원 지표면 침수 분석에는 XP-SWMM이 사용되었고, 폭풍 해일에 의한 외력인 조위 및 월파량 산정에는 ADCSWAN (ADCIRC와 UnSWAN) 모형과 FLOW-3D 모형이 각각 활용되었다. 단일 외력을 이용한 분석 결과, 대부분의 연안 지역에서는 강우에 의한 침수 영향보다 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 영향이 크게 나타났다. 복합 외력에 의한 침수 분석 결과는 대체로 단일 외력에 의한 침수 모의 결과를 중첩시켜 나타낸 결과와 유사하였다. 다만, 특정 지역에서는 복합 외력을 고려함에 따라 단일 외력만을 고려한 침수모의에서 나타나지 않았던 새로운 침수 영역이 발생하기도 하였다. 이러한 지역의 침수 피해 저감을 위해서는 복합 외력을 고려한 분석이 요구되는 것으로 판단되었다.

키워드

연안 지역

침수 분석

강우

폭풍 해일

복합 외력

The various external forces can cause inundation in coastal areas. This study is to analyze regional characteristics caused by single or compound external forces that can occur in coastal areas. Storm surge (tide level and wave overtopping) and rainfall were considered as the external forces in this study. The inundation analysis were applied to four coastal areas, located on the west and south coast in Republic of Korea. XP-SWMM was used to simulate rainfall-runoff phenomena and 2D ground surface inundation for watershed. A coupled model of ADCIRC and SWAN (ADCSWAN) was used to analyze tide level by storm surge and the FLOW-3D model was used to estimate wave overtopping. As a result of using a single external force, the inundation influence due to storm surge in most of the coastal areas was greater than rainfall. The results of using compound external forces were quite similar to those combined using one external force independently. However, a case of considering compound external forces sometimes created new inundation areas that didn’t appear when considering only a single external force. The analysis considering compound external forces was required to reduce inundation damage in these areas.

Keywords

Coastal area

Inundation analysis

Rainfall

Storm surge

Compound external forces

MAIN

1. 서 론

우리나라는 반도에 위치하여 삼면이 바다로 둘러싸여 있는 지리적 특성을 가지고 있다. 이에 따라 해양 산업을 중심으로 부산, 인천, 울산 등 대규모의 광역도시가 발달하였을 뿐만 아니라, 창원, 포항, 군산, 목포, 여수 등의 중․소규모 도시들도 발달되어 있다. 또한, 최근에는 연안 지역이 바다를 전망으로 하는 입지 조건을 가지고 있어 개발 선호도가 높고, 이에 따라 부산시 해운대의 마린시티, 엘시티와 같은 주거 및 상업시설의 개발이 지속되고 있다(Kang et al., 2019b).

한편, 최근 기후변화에 따른 지구 온난화 현상으로 평균 해수면이 상승하고, 해수면 온도도 상승하면서 태풍 및 강우의 강도가 커지고 있어 전 세계적으로 자연 재해로 인한 피해가 증가하고 있다(Kim et al., 2016). 실제로 2020년에는 최장기간의 장마가 발생하여 부산, 울산은 물론, 전국에서 50명의 인명 피해와 3,489세대의 이재민이 발생하였다1). 특히, 연안 지역은 강우, 만조 시 해수면 상승, 폭풍 해일(storm surge)에 의한 월파(wave overtopping) 등 복합적인 외력(compound external forces)에 의해 침수될 수 있다(Lee et al., 2020). 일례로, 2016년 태풍 차바 시 부산시 해운대구의 마린시티는 강우와 폭풍 해일에 의한 월파가 발생함에 따라 대규모 침수를 유발하였다(Kang et al., 2019b). 또한, 2020년 7월 23일에 부산에서는 시간당 81.6 mm의 집중호우와 약최고고조위를 상회하는 만조가 동시에 발생하였고, 이로 인해 감조 하천인 동천의 수위가 크게 상승하여 하천이 범람하였다(KSCE, 2021).

연안 지역의 복합 외력을 고려한 침수 분석에 관한 사례로서, 우선 강우와 조위를 고려한 연구 사례는 다음과 같다. Han et al. (2014)은 XP-SWMM을 이용하여 창원시 배수 구역을 대상으로 침수 모의를 수행하였는데, 연안 도시의 침수 모의에는 조위의 영향을 반드시 고려해야 함을 제시하였다. Choi et al. (2018a)은 경남 사천시 선구동 일대에 대하여 초과 강우 및 해수면 상승 시나리오를 조합하여 침수 분석을 수행하였다. Choi et al. (2018b)은 XP-SWMM을 이용하여 여수시 연등천 및 여수시청 지역에 대하여 강우 시나리오와 해수위 상승 시나리오를 고려한 복합 원인에 의한 침수 모의를 수행하여 홍수예경보 기준표를 작성하였다. 한편, 강우, 조위, 월파를 고려한 연구 사례로서, Song et al. (2017)은 부산시 해운대구 수영만 일원에 대하여 XP-SWMM으로 월파량의 적용 유무에 따른 침수 면적을 비교하였다. Suh and Kim (2018)은 부산시 마린시티 지역을 대상으로 태풍 차바 때 EurOtop의 경험식을 ADSWAN에 적용하여 월파량을 반영하였다. Chen et al. (2017)은 TELEMAC-2D 및 SWMM을 기반으로 한 극한 강우, 월파 및 조위를 고려하여 중국 해안 원자력 발전소의 침수를 예측하고 분석하기 위한 결합 모델을 개발한 바 있다. 한편, Lee et al. (2020)은 수리‧수문학 분야와 해양공학 분야에서 사용되는 물리 모형의 기술적 연계를 통해 연안 지역의 침수 모의의 재현성을 높였다.

상기의 연구들은 공통적으로 연안 지역에 대하여 복합 외력을 고려했을 때 발생되는 침수 현상의 재현 또는 예측을 목적으로 수행되었다. 이 연구는 이와 차별하여 복합 외력을 고려하는 경우 나타날 수 있는 연안 지역의 침수 특성 분석을 목적으로 수행되었다. 이를 위해 단일 외력을 독립적으로 고려했을 때 발생되는 침수 양상과 동시에 고려하는 경우의 침수 현상을 비교, 분석하였다. 복합 외력에 의한 지역적 침수 특성 분석은 우리나라 남해안과 서해안에 위치한 4개 지역에 대하여 적용되었다.

1) 장연제, 47일째 이어진 긴 장마, 50명 인명피해… 9년만에 최대, 동아닷컴, 2020년 8월 9일 수정, 2021년 3월 4일 접속, https://www.donga.com/news/article/all/20200809/102369692/2

2. 연구 방법

2.1 연안 지역의 침수 영향 인자

연안 지역의 침수는 크게 세 가지의 메카니즘으로 발생될 수 있다. 우선, 연안 지역은 바다와 인접하고 있기 때문에 그 영향을 직접적으로 받는다. Kim (2018)에 의하면, 연안 지역의 침수는 폭풍 해일에 의해 상승한 조위와 월파로 인해 발생될 수 있다(Table 1). 특히, 경상남도의 창원과 통영, 인천광역시의 소래포구 어시장 등 남해안 및 서해안 지역의 일부는 백중사리, 슈퍼문(super moon) 등 만조 시 조위의 상승으로 인한 침수가 발생하는 지역이 존재한다(Kang et al., 2019a). 두 번째는 강우에 의한 내수 침수 발생이다. ME (2011)에서는 도시 지역의 우수 관거를 10 ~ 30년 빈도로 계획하도록 지정하고 있고, 펌프 시설은 30 ~ 50년 빈도의 홍수를 배수시킬 수 있도록 정하고 있다. 하지만 최근에는 기후변화의 영향으로 도시 지역 배수시설의 설계 빈도를 초과하는 강우가 빈번하게 나타나고 있다. 실제로 2016년의 태풍 차바 시 울산 기상관측소에 관측된 시간 최대 강우량은 106.0 mm로서, 이는 300년 빈도 이상의 강우량에 해당하였다(Kang et al., 2019a). 따라서 배수시설의 설계 빈도 이상의 강우는 연안 도시 지역의 침수를 유발할 수 있다. 세 번째, 하천이 인접한 연안 도시에서는 하천의 범람으로 인해 침수가 발생할 수 있다. 하천의 경우, 기본계획이 수립되기는 하지만, 설계 빈도를 상회하는 강우의 발생, 제방, 수문 등 홍수 방어시설의 기능 저하, 예산 등의 문제로 하천기본계획 이행의 지연 등에 의해 범람할 가능성이 존재한다.

Table 1.

Type of natural hazard damage in coastal areas (Kim, 2018)

ItemRisk factor
Facilities damage∙ Breaking of coastal facilities by wave
– Breakwater, revetment, lighters wharf etc.
∙ Local scouring at the toe of the structures by wave
∙ Road collapse by wave overtopping
Inundation damage∙ Inundation damage by wave overtopping
∙ Inundation of coastal lowlands by storm surge
Erosion damage∙ Backshore erosion due to high swell waves
∙ Shoreline changes caused by construction of coastal erosion control structure
∙ Sediment transport due to the construction of artificial structures

상기의 내용을 종합하면, 연안 지역은 조위 및 월파에 의한 침수, 강우에 의한 내수 침수, 하천 범람에 의한 침수로 구분될 수 있다. 이 연구에서는 폭풍 해일에 의한 조위 상승 및 월파와 강우를 연안 지역의 침수 유발 외력으로 고려하였다. 하천 범람의 경우, 상대적으로 사례가 희소하여 제외하였다.

2.2 복합 외력을 고려한 침수 모의 방법

이 연구에서는 조위 및 월파와 강우를 연안 지역의 침수 발생에 관한 외력 조건으로 고려하였다. 따라서 해당 외력 조건을 고려하여 침수 분석을 수행할 수 있어야 한다. 이와 관련하여 Lee et al. (2020)은 Fig. 1과 같이 수리‧수문 및 해양공학 분야에서 사용되는 물리 기반 모형의 연계를 통해 조위, 월파, 강우를 고려한 침수 분석 방법을 제시하였고, 이 연구에서는 해당 방법을 이용하였다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F1.jpg
Fig. 1.

Connection among the models for inundation analysis in coastal areas (Lee et al., 2020)

우선, 태풍에 의해 발생되는 폭풍 해일의 영향을 분석하기 위해서는 태풍에 의해 발생되는 기압 강하, 해상풍, 진행 속도 등을 고려하여 해수면의 변화 양상 및 조석-해일-파랑을 충분히 재현 가능해야 한다. 이 연구에서는 국내․외에서 검증 및 공인된 폭풍 해일 모형인 ADCIRC 모형과 파랑 모형인 UnSWAN이 결합된 ADCSWAN (coupled model of ADCIRC and UnSWAN)을 이용하였다. 정수압 가정의 ADCSWAN은 월파량 산정에 단순 경험식을 적용하는 단점이 있지만 넓은 영역을 모의할 수 있고, FLOW-3D는 해안선의 경계를 고해상도로 재현이 가능하다. 이에 연구에서는 먼 바다 영역에 대해서는 ADCSWAN을 이용하여 분석하였고, 연안 주변의 바다 영역과 월파량 산정에 대해서는 FLOW-3D 모형을 이용하였다. 한편, 연안 지역의 침수 모의를 위해서는 유역에서 발생하는 강우-유출 현상과 우수 관거 등의 배수 체계에 대한 분석이 가능해야 한다. 또한, 배수 체계로부터 범람한 물이 지표면을 따라 흘러가는 현상을 해석할 수 있어야 하고, 바다의 조위 및 월파량을 경계조건으로 반영할 수 있어야 한다. 이 연구에서는 이러한 현상을 모의할 수 있고, 도시 침수 모의에 활용도가 높은 XP-SWMM을 이용하였다.

2.3 침수 분석 대상지역

연구의 대상지역은 조위 및 월파에 의한 침수와 강우에 의한 내수 침수의 영향이 복합적으로 발생할 수 있는 남해안과 서해안에 위치한 4개 지역이다. Table 2는 침수 분석 대상지역을 정리하여 나타낸 표이고, Fig. 2는 각 지역의 유역 경계를 나타낸 그림이다.

Table 2.

Target region for inundation analysis

ClassificationAdministrative districtTarget regionArea
(km2)
Main cause of inundationPump
facility
Number of
major outfall
The south
coast
Haundae-gu, BusanMarine City area0.53Wave overtopping9
Haundae-gu, BusanCentum City area4.76Poor interior drainage at high tide level12
The west
coast
GunsanJungang-dong area0.79Poor interior drainage at high tide level23
BoryeongOcheon Port area0.41High tide level5
https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F2.jpg
Fig. 2.

Watershed area

남해안의 분석 대상지역 중 부산시 해운대구의 마린시티는 바다 조망을 중심으로 조성된 주거지 및 상업시설 중심의 개발지역이다. 마린시티는 2016년 태풍 차바 및 2018년 태풍 콩레이 등 태풍 내습 시 월파에 의한 해수 월류로 인해 도로 및 상가 일부가 침수를 겪은 지역이다. 부산시 해운대구의 센텀시티는 과거 수영만 매립지였던 곳에 조성된 주거지 및 상업시설 중심의 신도시 지역이다. 센텀시티 유역의 북쪽은 해발고도 El. 634 m의 장산이 위치하는 등 산지 특성도 가지고 있어 상대적으로 유역 면적이 넓고, 배수시설의 규모도 크고 복잡하다. 하지만 수영강 하구의 저지대 지역에 위치함에 따라 강우 시 내수 배제가 불량하고, 특히 만조 시 침수가 잦은 지역이다.

서해안 분석 대상지역 중 전라북도 군산시의 중앙동 일원은 군산시 내항 내측에 조성된 구도시로서, 금강 및 경포천 하구에 위치하는 저지대이다. 이에 따라 군산시 풍수해저감종합계획에서는 해당 지역을 3개의 영역으로 구분하여 내수재해 위험지구(영동지구, 중동지구, 경암지구)로 지정하였고, 이 연구에서는 해당 지역을 모두 고려하였다. 한편, 군산시 중앙동 일원은 특히, 만조 시 내수 배제가 매우 불량하여 2개의 펌프시설이 운영되고 있다. 충청남도 보령시의 오천면에 위치한 오천항은 배후의 산지를 포함한 소규모 유역에 위치한다. 서해안의 특성에 따라 조석 간만의 차가 크고, 특히 태풍 내습 시 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수가 잦은 지역이다. 산지의 강우-유출수는 복개된 2개의 수로를 통해 바다로 배제되고, 상가들이 위치한 연안 주변 지역에는 강우-유출수 배제를 위한 3개의 배수 체계가 구성되어 있다.

3. 연구 결과

3.1 침수 모의 모형 구축

XP-SWMM을 이용하여 분석 대상지역별 침수 모의 모형을 구축하였다. 적절한 침수 분석 수행을 위해 지역별 수치지형도, 도시 공간 정보 시스템(urban information system, UIS), 하수 관망도 등의 수치 자료와 현장 조사를 통해 유역의 배수 체계를 구성하였다. 그리고 2차원 침수 분석을 위해 무인 드론 및 육상 라이다(LiDAR) 측량을 수행하여 평면해상도가 1 m 이하인 고해상도 수치지형모형(digital terrain model, DTM)을 구성하였고, 침수 모의 격자를 생성하였다.

Fig. 3은 XP-SWMM의 상세 구축 사례로서 부산시 마린시티 배수 유역에 대한 소유역 및 관거 분할 등을 통해 구성한 배수 체계와 고해상도 측량 결과를 이용하여 구성한 수치표면모형(digital surface model, DSM)을 나타낸다. Fig. 4는 각 대상지역에 대해 XP-SWMM을 이용하여 구축한 침수 모의 모형을 나타낸다. 침수 분석을 위해서는 침수 모의 영역에 대한 설정이 필요한데, 다수의 사전 모의를 통해 유역 내에서 침수가 발생되는 지역을 검토하여 결정하였다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F3.jpg
Fig. 3.

Analysis of watershed drainage system and high-resolution survey for Marine City

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F4.jpg
Fig. 4.

Simulation model for inundation analysis by target region using XP-SWMM

한편, 이 연구에서는 월파량 및 조위의 산정 과정과 침수 모의 모형의 보정에 관한 내용 등은 다루지 않았다. 관련된 내용은 선행 연구인 Kang et al. (2019b)와 Lee et al. (2020)을 참조할 수 있다.

3.2 침수 모의 설정

3.2.1 분석 방법

복합 외력에 의한 침수 영향을 검토하기 위해서는 외력 조건에 대한 빈도와 지속기간의 설정이 필요하다. 이 연구에서는 재해 현상이 충분히 나타날 수 있도록 강우와 조위 및 월파의 빈도를 모두 100년으로 설정하였다. 이때, 조위와 월파량의 산정에는 만조(약최고고조위) 시, 100년 빈도에 해당하는 태풍 내습에 따른 폭풍 해일의 발생 조건을 고려하였다.

지역별 강우 발생 특성과 유역 특성을 고려하기 위해 MOIS (2017)의 방재성능목표 기준에 따라 임계 지속기간을 결정하여 대상지역별 강우의 지속기간으로 설정하였다. 이때, 강우의 시간 분포는 MLTM (2011)의 Huff 3분위를 이용하였다. 그리고 조위와 월파의 경우, 일반적인 폭풍 해일의 지속기간을 고려하여 5시간으로 결정하였다. 한편, 침수 모의를 위한 계산 시간 간격, 2차원 모의 격자 등의 입력자료는 분석 대상지역의 유역 규모와 침수 분석 대상 영역을 고려하여 결정하였다. 참고로 침수 분석에 사용된 수치지형모형은 1 m 급의 고해상도로 구성되었지만, 2차원 침수 모의 격자의 크기는 지역별로 3 ~ 4 m이다. 이는 연구에서 사용된 XP-SWMM의 격자 수(100,000개) 제약에 따른 설정이나, Sun (2021)은 민감도 분석을 통해 2차원 침수 분석을 위한 적정 격자 크기를 3 ~ 4.5 m로 제시한 바 있다.

Table 3은 이 연구에서 설정한 침수 모의 조건과 분석 방법을 정리하여 나타낸 표이다.

Table 3.

Simulation condition and method

ClassificationTarget regionSimulation conditionSimulation method
RainfallStorm surgeSimulation time interval2D
grid size
Return
period
DurationTemporal
distribution
Return
period
DurationWatershed
routing
Channel
routing
2D
inundation
The south coastMarine City area100 yr1 hr3rd quartile
of Huff’s
method
1005 hr5 min10 sec1 sec3 m
Centum City area1 hr1005 min10 sec1 sec4 m
The west coastJungang-dong area2 hr1005 min10 sec1 sec3.5 m
Ocheon Port area1 hr1001 min10 sec1 sec3 m

3.2.2 복합 재해의 동시 고려

이 연구의 대상지역들은 모두 소규모의 해안가 도시지역이고, 이러한 지역에 대한 강우의 임계지속기간은 1시간 ~ 2시간이나, 이 연구에서 분석한 폭풍 해일의 지속기간은 5시간으로 강우의 지속기간과 폭풍 해일의 지속기간이 상이하다. 이에 이 연구에서는 서로 다른 지속기간을 가진 강우와 폭풍 해일 또는 조위를 고려하기 위해 강우의 중심과 폭풍 해일의 중심이 동일한 시간에 위치하도록 설정하였다(Fig. 5).

XP-SWMM은 폭풍 해일이 지속되는 5시간 전체를 모의하도록 설정하였고, 폭풍 해일이 가장 큰 시점에 강우의 중심이 위치하도록 강우 발생 시기를 결정하였다. 다만, 부산 마린시티의 경우, 폭풍 해일에 의한 피해가 주로 월파에 의해 발생되므로 강우의 중심과 월파의 중심을 일치시켰고(Fig. 5(a)), 상대적으로 조위의 영향이 큰 3개 지역은 강우의 중심과 조위의 중심을 맞추었다. Fig. 5(b)는 군산시 중앙동 지역의 복합 외력에 의한 침수 분석에 사용된 강우와 조위의 조합이다.

한편, 100년 빈도의 확률강우량만을 고려한 침수 분석에서는 유역 유출부의 경계조건으로 우수 관거의 설계 조건을 고려하여 약최고고조위가 일정하게 유지되도록 설정하였다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F5.jpg
Fig. 5.

Consideration of external force conditions with different durations

3.2.3 XP-SWMM의 월파량 고려

XP-SWMM에 ADCSWAN 및 FLOW-3D 모형에 의해 산정된 월파량을 입력하기 위해 해안가 지역에 절점을 생성하여 월파 현상을 구현하였다. XP-SWMM에서 월파량을 입력하기 위한 절점의 위치는 FLOW-3D 모형에서 월파량을 산정한 격자의 중심 위치이다.

Fig. 6(a)는 마린시티 지역에 대한 월파량 입력 지점을 나타낸 것으로서, 유역 경계 주변에 동일 간격으로 원으로 표시한 지점들이 해당된다. Fig. 6(b)는 XP-SWMM에 월파량 입력 지점들을 반영하고, 하나의 절점에 월파량 시계열을 입력한 화면을 나타낸다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F6.jpg
Fig. 6.

Considering wave overtopping on XP-SWMM

3.3 침수 모의 결과

3.3.1 단일 외력에 의한 침수 모의 결과

Fig. 7은 단일 외력을 고려한 지역별 침수 모의 결과이다. 즉, Fig. 7의 왼쪽 그림들은 지역별로 100년 빈도 강우에 의한 침수 모의 결과를 나타내고, Fig. 7의 오른쪽 그림들은 만조 시 100년 빈도 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 모의 결과이다. 대체로 강우에 의한 침수 영역은 유역 중․상류 지역의 유역 전반에 걸쳐 발생하였고, 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 영역은 해안가 전면부에 위치하는 것을 볼 수 있다. 이는 폭풍 해일에 의한 조위 상승과 월파의 영향이 상류로 갈수록 감소하기 때문이다.

한편, 4개 지역 모두에서 공통적으로 강우에 비해 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 영향이 상대적으로 크게 분석되었다. 이러한 결과는 연안 지역의 경우, 폭풍 해일에 대비한 침수 피해 저감 노력이 보다 중요함을 의미한다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F7.jpg
Fig. 7.

Simulation results by single external force (left: rainfall, right: storm surge)

3.3.2 복합 외력에 의한 침수 모의 결과

Fig. 8은 복합 외력을 고려한 지역별 침수 모의 결과이다. 즉, 강우 및 폭풍 해일을 동시에 고려함에 따라 발생된 침수 영역을 나타낸다. 복합 외력을 고려하는 경우, 단일 외력만을 고려한 분석 결과(Fig. 7)보다 침수 영역은 넓어졌고, 침수심은 깊어졌다.

복합 외력에 의한 침수 분석 결과는 대체로 단일 외력에 의한 침수 모의 결과를 중첩시켜 나타낸 결과와 유사하였고, 이는 일반적으로 예상할 수 있는 결과이다. 주목할만한 결과는 군산시 중앙동의 침수 분석에서 나타났다. 즉, 군산시 중앙동의 경우, 단일 외력만을 고려한 침수 모의 결과에서 나타나지 않았던 새로운 침수 영역이 발생하였다(Fig. 8(c)). 이와 관련된 상세 내용은 3.4절의 고찰에서 기술하였다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F8.jpg
Fig. 8.

Simulation results by compound external forces

3.4 결과 고찰

외력 조건별 침수의 영향을 정량적으로 비교하기 위해 침수 면적을 이용하였다. 이 연구에서는 강우만에 의해 유발된 침수 면적을 기준(기준값: 1)으로 하고, 폭풍 해일(조위+월파량)에 의한 침수 면적과 복합 외력에 의한 침수 면적의 상대적 비율로 분석하였다(Table 4).

Table 4.

Impact evaluation for inundation area by external force

ConditionMarine City, BusanCentum City, BusanJungang-dong area,
Gunsan
Ocheon Port area,
Boryeong
Inundation area
(km2)
RateInundation area
(km2)
RateInundation area
(km2)
RateInundation area
(km2)
Rate
Single
external force
Rainfall (①)0.01641.00.07591.00.04571.00.01751.0
Storm surge (②)0.03632.210.06850.900.14633.200.04122.35
Compound
external forces
Combination
(①+②)
0.05243.190.15051.980.26325.760.04732.70

분석 결과, 부산 센텀시티를 제외한 3개 지역은 모두 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 면적이 강우에 의한 침수 면적에 비해 2.2 ~ 3.2배 넓은 것으로 분석되었다. 한편, 복합 외력에 의한 침수 면적은 마린시티와 센텀시티의 경우, 각각의 외력에 의한 침수 면적의 합과 유사하게 나타났다. 이는 각각의 외력에 의한 침수 영역이 상이하여 거의 중복되지 않음을 의미한다. 반면에, 오천항에서는 각각의 외력에 의한 침수 면적의 합이 복합 외력에 의한 면적보다 크게 나타났다. 이는 오천항의 경우, 유역면적이 작고 배수 체계가 비교적 단순하여 강우와 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 영역이 중복되기 때문인 것으로 분석되었다(Fig. 7(d)).

군산시 중앙동 일대의 경우, 복합 외력에 의한 침수 면적이 각각의 독립적인 외력 조건에 의한 침수 면적의 합에 비해 37.1% 크게 나타났다. 이러한 현상의 원인을 분석하기 위해 복합 외력 조건에서만 나타난 우수 관거(Fig. 8(c)의 A 구간)에 대하여 종단을 검토하였다(Fig. 9). Fig. 9(a)는 강우만에 의해 분석된 우수 관거 내 흐름 종단을 나타내고, Fig. 9(b)는 폭풍 해일만에 의한 우수 관거의 종단이다. 그림을 통해 각각의 독립적인 외력 조건 하에서는 해당 구간에서 침수가 발생되지 않은 것을 볼 수 있다. 다만, 강우만을 고려하더라도 우수 관거는 만관이 된 상태를 확인할 수 있다(Fig. 9(a)). 반면에, 만관 상태에서 폭풍 해일이 함께 고려됨에 따라 해수 범람과 조위 상승에 의해 우수 배제가 불량하게 되었고, 이로 인해 침수가 유발된 것으로 분석되었다(Fig. 9(c)). 따라서 이러한 지역은 복합 외력에 대한 취약지구로 판단할 수 있고, 단일 외력의 고려만으로는 침수를 예상하기 어려운 지역임을 알 수 있다.

https://static.apub.kr/journalsite/sites/kwra/2021-054-07/N0200540702/images/kwra_54_07_02_F9.jpg
Fig. 9.

A part of drainage profiles by external force in Jungang-dong area, Gunsan

4. 결 론

이 연구에서는 외력 조건에 따른 연안 지역의 침수 특성을 분석하였다. 연구에서 고려된 외력 조건은 두 가지로서 강우와 폭풍 해일(조위와 월파)이다. 분석 대상 연안 지역으로는 남해안에 위치하는 2개 지역(부산시 해운대구의 마린시티와 센텀시티)과 서해안의 2개 지역(군산시 중앙동 일원 및 보령시 오천항)이 선정되었다.

복합 외력을 고려한 연안 지역의 침수 모의를 위해서는 유역의 강우-유출 현상과 바다의 조위 및 월파량을 경계조건으로 반영할 수 있는 침수 모의 모형이 요구되는데, 이 연구에서는 XP-SWMM을 이용하였다. 한편, 조위 및 월파량 산정에는 ADCSWAN (ADCIRC와 UnSWAN) 및 FLOW-3D 모형이 이용되었다.

연안 지역별 침수 모의는 100년 빈도의 강우와 폭풍 해일을 독립적으로 고려한 경우와 복합적으로 고려한 경우를 구분하여 수행되었다. 우선, 외력을 독립적으로 고려한 결과, 대체로 폭풍 해일만 고려한 경우가 강우만 고려한 경우에 비해 침수 영향이 크게 나타났다. 따라서 연안 지역의 경우, 폭풍 해일에 의한 침수 피해 방지 계획이 상대적으로 중요한 것으로 분석되었다. 두 번째, 복합 외력에 의한 침수 분석 결과는 대체로 단일 외력에 의한 침수 모의 결과를 중첩시켜 나타낸 결과와 유사하였다. 다만, 특정 지역에서는 복합 외력을 고려함에 따라 단일 외력만을 고려한 침수 모의에서 나타나지 않았던 새로운 침수 영역이 발생하기도 하였다. 이러한 결과는 독립적인 외력 조건에서는 우수 관거가 만관 또는 그 이하의 상태가 되지만, 두 가지의 외력이 동시에 고려됨에 따라 우수 관거의 통수능 한계를 초과하여 나타났다. 이러한 지역은 복합 외력에 대한 취약지구로 판단되었고, 해당 지역의 적절한 침수 방지 대책 수립을 위해서는 복합적인 외력 조건이 고려되어야 함을 시사하였다.

현행, 자연재해저감종합계획에서는 침수와 관련된 재해 원인 지역을 내수재해, 해안재해, 하천재해 등으로 구분하고 있다. 하지만 이 연구에서 검토된 바와 같이, 연안 지역의 침수 원인은 복합적으로 나타날 뿐만 아니라, 복합 외력을 고려함에 따라 추가적으로 나타날 수 있는 침수 위험 지역도 존재한다. 따라서 기존의 획일적인 재해 원인의 구분보다는 지역의 특성에 맞는 복합적인 재해 원인을 검토할 필요가 있음을 제안한다.

Acknowledgements

본 논문은 행정안전부 극한 재난대응 기반기술 개발사업의 일환인 “해안가 복합재난 위험지역 피해저감 기술개발(연구과제번호: 2018-MOIS31-008)”의 지원으로 수행되었습니다.

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Han, H., Kim, Y., Kang, N., and, Kim, H.S. (2014). “Inundation analysis of a coastal urban area considering tide level.” 2014 Conference of Korean Society of Civil Engineers, KSCE, pp. 1507-1508.

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Kang, T., Lee, S., and Sun, D. (2019a). “A technical review for reducing inundation damage to high-rise and underground-linked complex buildings in Coastal Areas (1): Proposal for analytical method.” Journal of Korean Society of Hazard Mitigation, Vol. 19, No. 5, pp. 35-43. 10.9798/KOSHAM.2019.19.5.35

6

Kang, T., Lee, S., Choi, H., and Yoon, S. (2019b). “A technical review for reducing inundation damage to high-rise and underground-linked complex buildings in coastal areas (2): Case analysis for application.” Journal of Korean Society of Hazard Mitigation, Vol. 19, No. 5, pp. 45-53. 10.9798/KOSHAM.2019.19.5.45

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Kim, J.O., Kim, J.Y., and Lee, W.H. (2016). “Analysis on complex disaster information contents for building disaster map of coastal cities.” Journal of the Korean Association of Geographic Information Studies, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 43-60. 10.11108/kagis.2016.19.3.043

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Kim, P.J. (2018). Improvement measures on the risk area designation of coastal disaster in consideration of natural hazards. Ph.D. dissertation, Chonnam National University.

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Korean Society of Civil Engineers (KSCE) (2021). A report on the cause analysis and countermeasures establishment for Dongcheon flooding and lowland inundation. Busan/Ulsan, Gyungnam branch.

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Lee, S., Kang, T., Sun, D., and Park, J.J. (2020). “Enhancing an analysis method of compound flooding in coastal areas by linking flow simulation models of coasts and watershed.” Sustainability, Vol. 12, No. 16, 6572. 10.3390/su12166572

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Ministry of Environment (ME) (2011). Standard for sewerage facilities. Korea Water and Wastewater Works Association.

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Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs (MLTM) (2011). Improvement and complementary research for probability rainfall.

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Ministry of the Interior and Safety (MOIS) (2017). Criteria for establishment and operation of disaster prevention performance target by region: Considering future climate change impacts.

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Song, Y., Joo, J., Lee, J., and Park, M. (2017). “A study on estimation of inundation area in coastal urban area applying wave overtopping.” Journal of Korean Society of Hazard Mitigation, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 501-510. 10.9798/KOSHAM.2017.17.2.501

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Suh, S.W., and Kim, H.J. (2018). “Simulation of wave overtopping and inundation over a dike caused by Typhoon Chaba at Marine City, Busan, Korea.” Journal of Coastal Research, Vol. 85, pp. 711-715.

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Sun, D. (2021). Sensitivity analysis of XP-SWMM for inundation analysis in coastal area. M.Sc. Thesis, Pukyong National University.

Figure 1. Three-dimensional finite element model of local scouring of semi-exposed submarine cable.

반노출 해저케이블의 국부 정련과정 및 영향인자에 대한 수치적 연구

Numerical Study of the Local Scouring Process and Influencing Factors of Semi-Exposed Submarine Cables

by Qishun Li,Yanpeng Hao *,Peng Zhang,Haotian Tan,Wanxing Tian,Linhao Chen andLin Yang

School of Electric Power Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.J. Mar. Sci. Eng.202311(7), 1349; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11071349

Received: 10 June 2023 / Revised: 19 June 2023 / Accepted: 27 June 2023 / Published: 1 July 2023(This article belongs to the Section Ocean Engineering)

일부 수식이 손상되어 표시될 수 있습니다. 이 경우 원문을 참조하시기 바랍니다.

Abstract

Local scouring might result in the spanning of submarine cables, endangering their mechanical and electrical properties. In this contribution, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation model is developed using FLOW-3D, and the scouring process of semi-exposed submarine cables is investigated. The effects of the sediment critical Shields number, sediment density, and ocean current velocity on local scouring are discussed, and variation rules for the submarine cables’ spanning time are provided. The results indicate that three scouring holes are formed around the submarine cables. The location of the bottom of the holes corresponds to that of the maximum shear velocity. The continuous development of scouring holes at the wake position leads to the spanning of the submarine cables. The increase in the sediment’s critical Shields number and sediment density, as well as the decrease in the ocean current velocity, will extend the time for maintaining the stability of the upstream scouring hole and retard the development velocity of the wake position and downstream scouring holes. The spanning time has a cubic relationship with the sediment’s critical Shields number, a linear relationship with the sediment density, and an exponential relationship with the ocean current velocity. In this paper, the local scouring process of semi-exposed submarine cables is studied, which provides a theoretical basis for the operation and maintenance of submarine cables.

Keywords: 

submarine cablelocal scouringnumerical simulationcomputational fluid dynamics

1. Introduction

As a key piece of equipment in cross-sea power grids, submarine cables are widely used to connect autonomous power grids, supply power to islands or offshore platforms, and transmit electric power generated by marine renewable energy installations to onshore substations [1]. Once submarine cables break down due to natural disasters or human-made damage, the normal operation of other marine electric power equipment connected to them may be affected. These chain reactions will cause great economic losses and serious social impacts [2].

To protect submarine cables, they are usually buried 1 to 3 m below the seabed [3]. However, submarine cables are still confronted with potential threats from the complex subsea environment. Under the influence of fishing, anchor damage, ocean current scouring, and other factors, the sediment above submarine cables will always inevitably migrate. When a submarine cable is partially exposed, the scouring at this position will be exacerbated; eventually, it will cause the submarine cable to span. According to a field investigation of the 500 kV oil-filled submarine cable that is part of the Hainan networking system, the total length of the span is 49 m [4]. Under strong ocean currents, spanning submarine cables may experience vortex-induced vibrations. Fatigue stress caused by vortex-induced vibrations may lead to metal sheath rupture [5], which endangers the mechanical and electrical properties of submarine cables. Therefore, understanding the local scouring processes of partially exposed submarine cables is crucial for predicting scouring patterns. This is the basis for developing effective operation and maintenance strategies for submarine cables.

The mechanism and influencing factors of sediment erosion have been examined by researchers around the world. In 1988, Sumer [6] conducted experiments to show that the shedding vortex in the wake of a pipeline would increase the Shields parameter by 3–4 times, which would result in severe scouring. In 1991, Chiew [7] performed experiments to prove that the maximum scouring depth could be obtained when the pipeline was located on a flat bed and was scoured by a unidirectional water flow. Based on the test results, they provided a prediction formula for the maximum scouring depth. In 2003, Mastbergen [8] proposed a one-dimensional, steady-state numerical model of turbidity currents, which considered the negative pore pressures in the seabed. The calculated results of this model were basically consistent with the actual scouring of a submarine canyon. In 2007, Dey [9] presented a semitheoretical model for the computation of the maximum clear-water scour depth below underwater pipelines in uniform sediments under a steady flow, and the predicted scour depth in clear water satisfactorily agreed with the observed values. In 2008, Dey [10] conducted experiments on clear-water scour below underwater pipelines under a steady flow and obtained a variation pattern of the depth of the scouring hole. In 2008, Liang [11] used a two-dimensional numerical simulation to study the scouring process of a tube bundle under the action of currents and waves. They discovered that, compared with the scouring of a single tube, the scouring depth of the tube bundle was deeper, and the scouring time was longer. In 2012, Yang [12] found that placing rubber sheets under pipes can greatly accelerate their self-burial. The rubber sheets had the best performance when their length was about 1.5 times the size of the pipe. In 2020, Li [13] investigated the two-dimensional local scour beneath two submarine pipelines in tandem under wave-plus-current conditions via numerical simulation. They found that for conditions involving waves plus a low-strength current, the scour pattern beneath the two pipelines behaved like that in the pure-wave condition. Conversely, when the current had equal strength to the wave-induced flow, the scour pattern beneath the two pipelines resembled that in the pure-current condition. In 2020, Guan [14] studied and discussed the interactive coupling effects among a vibrating pipeline, flow field, and scour process through experiments, and the experimental data showed that the evolution of the scour hole had significant influences on the pipeline vibrations. In 2021, Liu [15] developed a two-dimensional finite element numerical model and researched the local scour around a vibrating pipeline. The numerical results showed that the maximum vibration amplitude of the pipeline could reach about 1.2 times diameter, and the maximum scour depth occurred on the wake side of the vibrating pipeline. In 2021, Huang [16] carried out two-dimensional numerical simulations to investigate the scour beneath a single pipeline and piggyback pipelines subjected to an oscillatory flow condition at a KC number of 11 and captured typical steady-streaming structures around the pipelines due to the oscillatory flow condition. In 2021, Cui [17] investigated the characteristics of the riverbed scour profile for a pipeline buried at different depths under the condition of riverbed sediments with different particle sizes. The results indicated that, in general, the equilibrium scour depth changed in a spoon shape with the gradual increase in the embedment ratio. In 2022, Li [18] used numerical simulation to study the influence of the burial depth of partially buried pipelines on the surrounding flow field, but they did not investigate the scour depth. In 2022, Zhu [19] performed experiments to prove that the scour hole propagation rate under a pipeline decreases with an increasing pipeline embedment ratio and rises with the KC number. In 2022, Najafzadeh [20] proposed equations for the prediction of the scouring propagation rate around pipelines due to currents based on a machine learning model, and the prediction results were consistent with the experimental data. In 2023, Ma [21] used the computational fluid dynamics coarse-grained discrete element method to simulate the scour process around a pipeline. The results showed that this method can effectively reduce the considerable need for computing resources and excessive computation time. In 2023, through numerical simulations, Hu [22] discovered that the water velocity and the pipeline diameter had a significant effect on the depth of scouring.

In the preceding works, the researchers investigated the mechanism of sediment scouring and the effect of various factors on the local scouring of submarine pipelines. However, submarine cables are buried beneath the seabed, while submarine pipelines are erected above the seabed. The difference in laying methods leads to a large discrepancy between their local scouring processes. Therefore, the conclusions of the above investigations are not applicable to the local scouring of submarine cables. Currently, there is no report on the research of the local scouring of partially exposed submarine cables.

In this paper, a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) finite element model, based on two-phase flow, is established using FLOW-3D. The local scouring process of semi-exposed submarine cables under steady-state ocean currents is studied, and the variation rules of the depth and the shape of the scouring holes, as well as the shear velocity with time, are obtained. By setting different critical Shields numbers of the sediment, different sediment densities, and different ocean current velocities, the change rule of the scouring holes’ development rate and the time required for the spanning of submarine cables are explored.

2. Sediment Scouring Model

In the sediment scouring model, the sediment is set as the dispersed particle, which is regarded as a kind of quasifluid. In this context, sediment scouring is considered as a two-phase flow process between the liquid phase and solid particle phase. The sediment in this process is further divided into two categories: one is suspended in the fluid, and the other is deposited on the bottom.When the local Shields number of sediment is greater than the critical Shields number, the deposited sediment will be transformed into the suspended sediment under the action of ocean currents. The calculation formulae of the local Shields numbers θ and the critical Shields numbers 

θcr of sediment is given as [23,24

]

𝜃=𝑈2𝑓(𝜌𝑠/𝜌𝑓−1)𝑔𝑑50,�=��2(��/��−1)��50,(1)

𝜃𝑐𝑟=0.31+1.2𝐷∗+0.055(1−𝑒−0.02𝐷∗),���=0.31+1.2�*+0.055(1−�−0.02�*),(2)

𝐷∗=𝑑50𝜌𝑓(𝜌𝑠−𝜌𝑓)𝑔/𝜇2−−−−−−−−−−−−−−√3,�*=�50��(��−��)�/�23,(3)where 

Uf is the shearing velocity of bed surface, 

ρs is the density of the sediment particle, 

ρf is the fluid density, g is the acceleration of gravity, d

50 is the median size of sediment, and μ is the dynamic viscosity of sediment.And each sediment particle suspended in the fluid obeys the equations for mass conservation and energy conservation

∂𝑐𝑠∂𝑡+∇⋅(𝑢𝑐𝑠)=0,∂��∂�+∇⋅(�¯��)=0,(4)

∂𝑢𝑠∂𝑡+𝑢⋅∇𝑢𝑠=−1𝜌𝑠∇𝑃+𝐹−𝐾𝑓𝑠𝜌𝑠𝑢𝑟,∂��∂�+�¯⋅∇��=−1��∇�+�−�������,(5)where 

cs is the concentration of the sediment particle, 

𝑢�¯ is the mean velocity vector of the fluid and the sediment particle, 

us is the velocity of the sediment particle, 

fs is the volume fraction of the sediment particle, P is the pressure, F is the volumetric and viscous force, K is the drag force, and 

ur is the relative velocity.

3. Numerical Setup and Modeling

In this paper, a three-dimensional submarine cable local scouring simulation model is established by FLOW-3D. Based on the numerical simulation, the process of the submarine cable, which gradually changes from semi-exposed to the spanning state under the steady-state ocean current, is studied. The geometric modeling, the mesh division, the physical field setup, and the grid independent test of CFD numerical model are as follows.

3.1. Geometric Modeling and Mesh Division

A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model of the local scouring of a semi-exposed submarine cable is established, which is shown in Figure 1. The dimensions of the model are marked in Figure 1. The inlet direction of the ocean current is defined as the upstream of the submarine cable (referred to as upstream), and the outlet direction of the ocean current is defined as the downstream of the submarine cable (referred to as downstream).

Jmse 11 01349 g001 550

Figure 1. Three-dimensional finite element model of local scouring of semi-exposed submarine cable.

The submarine cable with a diameter of 0.2 m is positioned on sediment that is initially in a semi-exposed state. When the length of the span is short, the submarine cable will not show obvious deformation due to gravity or scouring from the ocean current. Therefore, the submarine cable surface is set as the fixed boundary. The model’s left boundary is set as the inlet, the right boundary is set as the outlet, the front and rear boundaries are set as symmetry, and the bottom boundary is set as the non-slip wall. Since the water depth above the submarine cable is more than 0.6 m in practice, the top boundary of the model is also set as symmetry. The sediment near the inlet and the outlet will be carried by ocean currents, which leads to the abnormal scouring terrain. At each end of the sediment, a baffle (thickness of 3 cm) is installed to ensure that the simulation results can reflect the real situation.

Due to the fact that the flow field around the semi-exposed submarine cable is not a simple two-dimensional symmetrical distribution, it should be solved by three-dimensional numerical simulation. Considering the accuracy and efficiency of the calculation, the size of mesh is set to 0.02 m. The total number of meshes after the dissection is 133,254.

3.2. Physical Field Setup

The CFD finite element model contains four physical field modules: sediment scouring module, gravity and non-inertial reference frame module, density evaluation module, and viscosity and turbulence module. In this paper, the renormalization group (RNG) kε turbulence model is used, which has high computational accuracy for turbulent vortices. Therefore, this turbulence model is suitable for calculating the sediment scouring process around the semi-exposed submarine cable [25]. The key parameters of the numerical simulation are referring to the survey results of submarine sediments in the Korean Peninsula [26], as listed in Table 1.Table 1. Key parameters of numerical simulation.

Table

3.3. Mesh Independent Test

In order to eliminate errors caused by the quantity of grids in the calculation process, two sizes of mesh are set on the validation model, and the scour profiles under different mesh sizes are compared. The validation model is shown in Figure 2, and the scouring terrain under different mesh size is given in Figure 3.

Jmse 11 01349 g002 550

Figure 2. Validation model.

Jmse 11 01349 g003 550

Figure 3. Scouring terrain under different mesh sizes.

It can be seen from Figure 3 that with the increase in the number of meshes, the scouring terrain of the verification model changes slightly, and the scouring depth is basically unchanged. Considering the accuracy of the numerical simulation and the calculation’s time cost, it is reasonable to consider setting the mesh size to 0.02 m.

4. Results and Analysis

4.1. Analysis of Local Scouring Process

Based on the CFD finite element numerical simulation, the local scouring process of the submarine cable under the steady-state ocean current is analyzed. The end time of the simulation is 9 h, the initial time step is 0.01 s, and the fluid velocity is 0.40 m/s. Simulation results are saved every minute. Figure 4 illustrates the scouring terrain around the semi-exposed submarine cable, which has been scoured by the steady-state current for 5 h.

Jmse 11 01349 g004 550

Figure 4. Scouring terrain around semi-exposed submarine cable (scour for 5 h).

As can be seen from Figure 4, three scouring holes were separately formed in the upstream wake position and downstream of the semi-exposed submarine cable. The scouring holes are labeled according to their locations. The variation of the scouring terrain around the semi-exposed submarine cable over time is given in Figure 5. The red circle in the picture corresponds to the position of the submarine cable, and the red box in the legend marks the time when the submarine cable is spanning.

Jmse 11 01349 g005 550

Figure 5. Variation of scouring terrain around semi-exposed submarine cable adapted to time.

From Figure 5, in the first hour of scouring, the upstream (−0.5 m to −0.1 m) and downstream (0.43 m to 1.5 m) scouring holes appeared. The upstream scouring hole was relatively flat with depth of 0.04 m. The depth of the downstream scouring hole increased with the increase in distance, and the maximum depth was 0.13 m. The scouring hole that developed at the wake position was very shallow, and its depth was only 0.007 m.

In the second hour of scouring, the upstream scouring hole’s depth remained nearly constant. The depth of the downstream scouring hole only increased by 0.002 m. The scouring hole at the wake position developed steadily, and its depth increased from 0.007 m to 0.014 m.

The upstream and downstream scouring holes did not continue to develop during the third to the sixth hour. Compared to the first two hours, the development of scouring holes at the wake position accelerated significantly, with an average growth rate of 0.028 m/h. The growth rate in the fifth hour of the scouring hole at the wake position was slightly faster than the other times. After 6 h of scouring, the sediment on the right side of the submarine cable had been hollowed out.

In the seventh and the eighth hour of scouring, the upstream scouring hole’s depth increased slightly, the downstream scouring hole still remained stable, and the depth of the scouring hole at wake position increased by 0.019 m. The sediment under the submarine cable was gradually eroded as well. By the end of the eighth hour, the lower right part of the submarine cable had been exposed to water as well.

At 8 h 21 min of the scouring, the submarine cable was completely spanned, and the scouring holes were connected to each other. Within the next 10 min, the development of the scouring holes sped up significantly, and the maximum depth of scouring holes increased greatly to 0.27 m.

In reference [17], researchers have studied the local scouring process of semi-buried pipelines in sandy riverbeds through experiments. The test results show that the scouring process can be divided into a start-up stage, micropore formation stage, extension stage, and equilibrium stage. In this paper, the first three stages are simulated, and the results are in good agreement with the experiment, which proves the accuracy of the present numerical model.

In this research, the velocity of ocean currents at the sediment surface is defined as the shear velocity, which plays an important role in the process of local scouring. Figure 6 provides visual data on how the shear velocity varies over time.

Jmse 11 01349 g006 550

Figure 6. Shear velocity changes in the scouring process.

The semi-exposed submarine cable protrudes from the seabed, which makes the shear velocity of its surface much higher than other locations. After the submarine cable is spanned, the shear velocity of the scouring hole surface below it is taken. This is the reason for the sudden change of shear velocity at the submarine cable’s location in Figure 6.The shear velocity in the initial state of the upstream scouring hole is obviously greater than in subsequent times. After 1 h of scouring, the shear velocity in the upstream scouring hole rapidly decreased from 1.1 × 10

−2 m/s to 3.98 × 10

−3 m/s and remained stable until the end of the sixth hour. This phenomenon explains why the upstream scouring hole developed rapidly in the first hour but remained stable for the following 5 h.The shear velocity in the downstream scouring hole reduced at first and then increased; its initial value was 1.41 × 10

−2 m/s. It took approximately 5 h for the shear velocity to stabilize, and the stable shear velocity was 2.26 × 10

−3 m/s. Therefore, compared with the upstream scouring hole, the downstream scouring hole was deeper and required more time to reach stability.The initial shear velocity in the scouring hole at the wake position was only 7.1 × 10

−3 m/s, which almost does not change in the first hour. This leads to a very slow development of the scouring hole at the wake position in the early stages. The maximum shear velocity in this scouring hole gradually increased to 1.05 × 10

−2 m/s from the second to the fifth hour, and then decreased to 6.61 × 10

−3 m/s by the end of the eighth hour. This is why the scouring hole at the wake position grows fastest around the fifth hour. Consistent with the pattern of change in the scouring hole’s terrain, the location of the maximal shear velocity also shifted to the right with time.

The shear velocity of all three scouring holes rose dramatically in the last hour. Combined with the terrain in Figure 5, this can be attributed to the complete spanning of the submarine cable.

From Equations (3)–(5), one can see the movement of the sediment is related directly with the sediment’s critical Shields number, sediment density, and ocean current velocity. Based on the parameters in Table 1, the influence of the above parameters on the local scouring process of semi-exposed submarine cables will be discussed.

4.2. Influence Factors

4.2.1. Sediment’s Critical Shields Number

The sediment’s critical Shields number 

θcr is set as 0.02, 0.03, 0.04, 0.05, 0.06, and 0.07, and the variations of scouring terrain over time under each 

θcr are displayed in Figure 7.

Jmse 11 01349 g007 550

Figure 7. Influence of sediment’s critical Shields number 

θcr on local scouring around semi-exposed submarine cable: (a

θcr = 0.02; (b

θcr = 0.03; (c

θcr = 0.04; (d

θcr = 0.05; (e

θcr = 0.06; and (f

θcr = 0.07.From Figure 7, one can see that a change in 

θcr will affect the depth of the upstream scouring hole and the development speed of the scouring hole at the wake position, but it will have no significant impact on the expansion of the downstream scouring hole.Under conditions of different 

θcr, the upstream scouring hole will reach a temporary plateau within 1 h, at which time the stable depth will be about 0.04 m. When 

θcr ≤ 0.05, the upstream scouring hole will continue to expand after a few hours. The stable time is obviously affected by 

θcr, which will gradually increase from 1 h to 11 h with the increase in 

θcr. The terrain of the upstream scouring hole will gradually convert to deep on the left and to shallow on the right. Since the scouring hole at the wake position has not been stable, its state at the time of submarine cable spanning is studied emphatically. In the whole process of scouring, the scouring hole at the wake position continues to develop and does not reach a stable state. With the increase in 

θcr, the development velocity of the scouring hole at the wake position will decrease considerably. Its average evolution velocity decreases from 3.88 cm/h to 1.62 cm/h, and its depth decreases from 21.9 cm to 18.8 cm. Under the condition of each 

θcr, the downstream scouring hole will stabilize within 1 h, and the stable depth will be basically unchanged (all about 13.5 cm).As 

θcr increases, so does the sediment’s ability to withstand shearing forces, which will cause it to become increasingly difficult to be eroded or carried away by ocean currents. This effect has been directly reflected in the depth of scouring holes (upstream and wake position). Due to the blocking effect of semi-exposed submarine cables, the wake is elongated, which is why the downstream scouring hole develops before the scouring hole at the wake position and quickly reaches a stable state. However, due to the high wake intensity, this process is not significantly affected by the change of 

θcr.

4.2.2. Sediment Density

The density of sediment 

ρs is set as 1550 kg/m

3, 1600 kg/m

3, 1650 kg/m

3, 1700 kg/m

3, 1750 kg/m

3, and 1800 kg/m

3, and the variation of scouring terrain over time under each 

ρs are displayed in Figure 8.

Jmse 11 01349 g008 550

Figure 8. Influence of sediment density 

ρs on local scouring around semi-exposed submarine cable: (a

ρs = 1550 kg/m

3; (bρs = 1600 kg/m

3; (cρs = 1650 kg/m

3; (dρs = 1700 kg/m

3; (eρs = 1750 kg/m

3; and (f

ρs = 1800 kg/m

3.From Figure 8, one can see that a change in 

ρs will also affect the depth of the upstream scouring hole and the development speed of the scouring hole at the wake position. In addition, it can even have an impact on the downstream scouring hole depth.Under different 

ρs conditions, the upstream scouring hole will always reach a temporary stable state in 1 h, at which time the stable depth will be 0.04 m. When 

ρs ≤ 1750 kg/m

3, the upstream scouring hole will continue to expand after a few hours. The stabilization time of upstream scouring hole is more clearly affected by 

ρs, which will gradually increase from 3 h to 13 h with the increase in 

ρs. The terrain of the upstream scouring hole will gradually change to deep on the left and to shallow on the right. Since the scouring hole at the wake position has not been stable, its state at the time of the submarine cable spanning is studied emphatically, too. In the whole process of scouring, the scouring hole at the wake position continues to develop and does not reach a stable state. When 

ρs is large, the development rate of scouring hole obviously decreased with time. With the increase in 

ρs, the development velocity of the scouring hole at the wake position reduces from 3.38 cm/h to 1.14 cm/h, and the depth of this scouring hole declines from 20 cm to 15 cm. As 

ρs increases, the stabilization time of the downstream scouring hole increases from less than 1 h to about 2 h, but the stabilization depth of the downstream scouring hole remains essentially the same (all around 13.5 cm).As can be seen from Equation (1), the increase in 

ρs will reduce the Shields number, thus weakening the shear action of the sediment by the ocean current, which explains the extension of the stability time of the upstream scouring hole. At the same time, with the increase in the depth of scouring hole at the wake position, its shear velocity will decreases. Therefore, under a larger 

ρs value, the development speed of scouring hole at the wake position will decrease significantly with time. Possibly for the same reason, 

ρs can affect the development rate of downstream scouring hole.

4.2.3. Ocean Current Velocity

The ocean current velocity v is set as 0.35 m/s, 0.40 m/s, 0.45 m/s, 0.50 m/s, 0.55 m/s, and 0.60 m/s. Figure 9 presents the variation in scouring terrain with time for each v.

Jmse 11 01349 g009 550

Figure 9. Influence of ocean current velocity v on local scouring around semi-exposed submarine cable: (av = 0.35 m/s; (bv = 0.40 m/s; (cv = 0.45 m/s; (dv = 0.50 m/s; (ev = 0.55 m/s; and (fv = 0.60 m/s.

Changes in v affect the depth of the upstream and downstream scouring holes, as well as the development velocity of the wake position and downstream scouring holes.

When v ≤ 0.45 m/s, the upstream scouring hole will reach a temporary stable state within 1 h, at which point the stable depth will be 0.04 m. The stabilization time of the upstream scouring hole is affected by v, which will gradually decrease from 15 h to 3 h with the increase in v. When v > 0.45 m/s, the upstream scouring hole is going to expand continuously. With the increase in v, its average development velocity increases from 6.68 cm/h to 8.66 cm/h, and its terrain changes to deep on the left and to shallow on the right. When the submarine cable is spanning, special attention should be paid to the depth of the scouring hole at the wake position. Throughout whole scouring process, the scouring hole at the wake position continues to develop and does not reach a stable state. With the increase in v, the depth of scouring hole at the wake position will increase from 14 cm to 20 cm, and the average development velocity will increase from 0.91 cm/h to 10.43 cm/h. As v increases, the time required to stabilize the downstream scouring hole is shortened from 1to 2 h to less than 1 h, but the stable depth is remains nearly constant at 13.5 cm.

An increase in v will increase the shear velocity. Therefore, when the depth of the scouring hole increases, the shear velocity in the hole will also increase, which can deepen both the upstream and downstream scouring hole. According to Equation (1), the Shields number is proportional to the square of the shear velocity. The increase in shear velocity significantly intensifies local scouring, which increases the development rate of scouring holes at the wake position and downstream.

4.3. Variation Rule of Spanning Time

In this paper, the spanning time is defined as the time taken for a semi-exposed submarine cable (initial state) to become a spanning submarine cable. Figure 10 illustrates the effect of the above parameters on the spanning time of the semi-exposed submarine cable.

Jmse 11 01349 g010 550

Figure 10. Influence of different parameters on spanning time of the semi-exposed submarine cable: (a) Sediment critical Shields number; (b) Sediment density; and (c) Ocean current velocity.From Figure 10a, the spanning time monotonically increases with the increase in the critical Shields number of sediment. However, the slope of the curve decreases first and then increases, and the inflection point is at 

θcr = 4.59 × 10

−2. The relationship between spanning time t and sediment’s critical Shields number 

θcr can be formulated by a cubic function as shown in Equation (6):

𝑡=−2.98+6.76𝜃𝑐𝑟−1.45𝜃2𝑐𝑟+0.11𝜃3𝑐𝑟.�=−2.98+6.76���−1.45���2+0.11���3.(6)It can be seen from Figure 10b that with the increase in the sediment density, the spanning time increases monotonically and linearly. The relationship between the spanning time t and the sediment’s density 

ρs can be formulated by the first order function as shown in Equation (7):

𝑡=−41.59+30.54𝜌𝑠.�=−41.59+30.54��.(7)Figure 10c shows that with the increase in the ocean current velocity, the spanning time decreases monotonically. The slope of the curve increases with the increase in the ocean current velocity, so it can be considered that there is saturation of the ocean current velocity effect. The relationship between the spanning time t and the ocean current velocity v can be formulated by the exponential function

𝑡=0.15𝑣−4.38.�=0.15�−4.38.(8)

5. Conclusions

In this paper, a three-dimensional CFD finite element numerical simulation model is established, which is used to research the local scouring process of the semi-exposed submarine cable under the steady-state ocean current. The relationship between shear velocity and scouring terrain is discussed, the influence of sediment critical Shields number, sediment density and ocean current velocity on the local scouring process is analyzed, and the variation rules of the spanning time of the semi-exposed submarine cable is given. The conclusions are as follows:

  • Under the steady-state ocean currents, scouring holes will be formed at the upstream, wake position and downstream of the semi-exposed submarine cable. The upstream and downstream scouring holes develop faster, which will reach a temporary stable state at about 1 h after the start of the scouring. The scouring hole at the wake position will continue to expand at a slower rate and eventually lead to the spanning of the submarine cable.
  • There is a close relationship between the distribution of shear velocity and the scouring terrain. As the local scouring process occurs, the location of the maximum shear velocity within the scouring hole shifts and causes the bottom of the hole to move as well.
  • When the sediment’s critical Shields number and density are significantly large and ocean current velocity is sufficiently low, the duration of the stable state of the upstream scouring hole will be prolonged, and the average development velocity of the scouring holes at the wake position and downstream will be reduced.
  • The relationship between the spanning time and the critical Shields number θcr can be formulated as a cubic function, in which the curve’s inflection point is θcr = 4.59 × 10−2. The relationship between spanning time and sediment density can be formulated as a linear function. The relationship between spanning time and ocean current velocity can be formulated by exponential function.

Based on the conclusions of this paper, even when it is too late to take measures or when the exposed position of the submarine cable cannot be located, the degree of burial depth development still can be predicted. This prediction is important for the operation and maintenance of the submarine cable. However, the study still leaves something to be desired. Only the local scouring process under the steady-state ocean current was studied, which is an extreme condition. In practice, exposed submarine cables are more likely to be scoured by reciprocating ocean currents. In the future, we will investigate the local scouring of submarine cables under the reciprocating ocean current.

Author Contributions

Conceptualization, Y.H. and Q.L.; methodology, Q.L., P.Z. and H.T.; software, Q.L.; validation, Q.L., L.C. and W.T.; writing—original draft preparation, Q.L.; writing—review and editing, Y.H. and Q.L.; supervision, Y.H. and L.Y. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

Funding

This research was funded by the [Smart Grid Joint Fund Key Project between National Natural Science Foundation of China and State Grid Corporation] grant number [U1766220].

Institutional Review Board Statement

Not applicable.

Informed Consent Statement

Not applicable.

Data Availability Statement

The data supporting the reported results cannot be shared at this time, as they have been used in producing more publications on this research.

Acknowledgments

This work is supported by the Smart Grid Joint Fund Key Project of the National Natural Science Foundation of China and State Grid Corporation (Grant No. U1766220).

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Intrusion of fine sediments into river bed and its effect on river environment – a research review

미세한 퇴적물이 강바닥에 침투하고 하천 환경에 미치는 영향 – 연구 검토

Intrusion of fine sediments into river bed and its effect on river environment – a research review

Nilav Karna,K.S. Hari Prasad, Sanjay Giri & A.S. Lodhi

Abstract

Fine sediments enter into the river through various sources such as channel bed, bank, and catchment. It has been regarded as a type of pollution in river. Fine sediments present in a river have a significant effect on river health. Benthic micro-organism, plants, and large fishes, all are part of food chain of river biota. Any detrimental effect on any of these components of food chain misbalances the entire riverine ecosystem. Numerous studies have been carried out on the various environmental aspects of rivers considering the presence of fine sediment in river flow. The present paper critically reviews many of these aspects to understand the various environmental impacts of suspended sediment on river health, flora and fauna.

Keywords: 

  1. Introduction
    The existence of fine sediment in a river system is a natural phenomenon. But in many cases it is exacerbated by the manmade activities. The natural cause of fines being in flow generally keeps the whole system in equilibrium except during some calamites whereas anthropogenic activities leading to fines entering into the flow puts several adverse impacts on the entire river system and its ecology. Presence of fines in flow is considered as a type of pollution in water. In United States,
    the fine sediment in water along with other non point source pollution is considered as a major obstacle in providing quality water for fishes and recreation activities (Diplas and Parker 1985).
    Sediments in a river are broadly of two types, organic and inorganic, and they both move in two ways either along the bed of the channel called bed load or in suspension called suspended load and their movements depend upon fluid flow and sediment characteristics. Further many investigators have divided the materials in suspension into two different types.
    One which originates from channel bed and bank is called bed material suspended load and another that migrates from feeding catchment area is called wash load. A general perception is that wash loads are very fine materials like clay, silt but it may not always be true (Woo et al. 1986). In general, suspended materials are of size less than 2 mm. The impact of sand on the various aspects of river is comparatively less than that of silt and clay. The latter are chemically active and good carrier of many contaminants and nutrients such as dioxins, phosphorous, heavy and trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs), radionuclide, etc. (Foster and Charlesworth 1996; Horowitz et al. 1995; Owens et al. 2001; Salomons and Förstner 1984; Stone and Droppo 1994; Thoms 1987). Foy and Bailey-Watt (1998) reported that out of 129 lakes in England and Wales, 69% have phosphorous contamination. Ten percent lakes, rivers, and bays of United States have sediment contaminants with chemicals as reported by USEPA. Several field and experimental studies have been conducted
    considering, sand, silt, and clay as suspended material. Hence, the subject reported herein is based on considering the fine sediment size smaller than 2 mm.
    Fine sediments have the ability to alter the hydraulics of the flow. Presence of fines in flow can change the magnitude of turbulence, it can change the friction resistance to flow. Fines can change the mobility and permeability of the bed material. In some extreme cases, fines in flow may even change the morphology of the river (Doeg and Koehn 1994; Nuttall 1972; Wright and Berrie 1987). Fines in the flow adversely affect the producer by increasing the turbidity, hindering the
    photosynthesis process by limiting the light penetration. This is ultimately reflected in the entire food ecosystem of river (Davis-Colley et al. 1992; Van Niewenhuyre and Laparrieve 1986). In addition, abrasion due to flowing sediment kills the aquatic flora (Edwards 1969; Brookes 1986). Intrusion of fines into the pores of river bed reduces space for several invertebrates, affects the spawning process (Petts 1984; Richards and Bacon 1994; Schalchli 1992). There are several other direct
    or indirect, short-term or long-term impacts of fines in river.
    The present paper reports the physical/environmental significance of fines in river. The hydraulic significance of presence of fines in the river has been reviewed in another paper (Effect of fine sediments on river hydraulics – a research review – http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09715010.2014.982001).

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The distribution of the computed maximum current speed during the entire duration of the NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D simulations. The resolution of computational domain is 10 m

Performance Comparison of NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D® Models in Tsunami Propagation, Inundation and Currents using NTHMP Benchmark Problems

NTHMP 벤치마크 문제를 사용하여 쓰나미 전파, 침수 및 해류에서 NAMI DANCE 및 FLOW-3D® 모델의 성능 비교

Pure and Applied Geophysics volume 176, pages3115–3153 (2019)Cite this article

Abstract

Field observations provide valuable data regarding nearshore tsunami impact, yet only in inundation areas where tsunami waves have already flooded. Therefore, tsunami modeling is essential to understand tsunami behavior and prepare for tsunami inundation. It is necessary that all numerical models used in tsunami emergency planning be subject to benchmark tests for validation and verification. This study focuses on two numerical codes, NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D®, for validation and performance comparison. NAMI DANCE is an in-house tsunami numerical model developed by the Ocean Engineering Research Center of Middle East Technical University, Turkey and Laboratory of Special Research Bureau for Automation of Marine Research, Russia. FLOW-3D® is a general purpose computational fluid dynamics software, which was developed by scientists who pioneered in the design of the Volume-of-Fluid technique. The codes are validated and their performances are compared via analytical, experimental and field benchmark problems, which are documented in the ‘‘Proceedings and Results of the 2011 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Model Benchmarking Workshop’’ and the ‘‘Proceedings and Results of the NTHMP 2015 Tsunami Current Modeling Workshop”. The variations between the numerical solutions of these two models are evaluated through statistical error analysis.

현장 관찰은 연안 쓰나미 영향에 관한 귀중한 데이터를 제공하지만 쓰나미 파도가 이미 범람한 침수 지역에서만 가능합니다. 따라서 쓰나미 모델링은 쓰나미 행동을 이해하고 쓰나미 범람에 대비하는 데 필수적입니다.

쓰나미 비상 계획에 사용되는 모든 수치 모델은 검증 및 검증을 위한 벤치마크 테스트를 받아야 합니다. 이 연구는 검증 및 성능 비교를 위해 NAMI DANCE 및 FLOW-3D®의 두 가지 숫자 코드에 중점을 둡니다.

NAMI DANCE는 터키 중동 기술 대학의 해양 공학 연구 센터와 러시아 해양 연구 자동화를 위한 특별 조사국 연구소에서 개발한 사내 쓰나미 수치 모델입니다. FLOW-3D®는 Volume-of-Fluid 기술의 설계를 개척한 과학자들이 개발한 범용 전산 유체 역학 소프트웨어입니다.

코드의 유효성이 검증되고 분석, 실험 및 현장 벤치마크 문제를 통해 코드의 성능이 비교되며, 이는 ‘2011년 NTHMP(National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) 모델 벤치마킹 워크숍의 절차 및 결과’와 ”절차 및 NTHMP 2015 쓰나미 현재 모델링 워크숍 결과”. 이 두 모델의 수치 해 사이의 변동은 통계적 오류 분석을 통해 평가됩니다.

The distribution of the computed maximum current speed during the entire duration of the NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D simulations. The resolution of computational domain is 10 m
The distribution of the computed maximum current speed during the entire duration of the NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D simulations. The resolution of computational domain is 10 m

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Dr. Andrey Zaytsev due to his undeniable contributions to the development of in-house numerical model, NAMI DANCE. The Turkish branch of Flow Science, Inc. is also acknowledged. Finally, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), who provided most of the benchmark data, is appreciated. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

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  1. Deniz Velioglu SogutPresent address: 1212 Computer Science, Department of Civil Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, 11794, USA

Authors and Affiliations

  1. Middle East Technical University, 06800, Ankara, TurkeyDeniz Velioglu Sogut & Ahmet Cevdet Yalciner

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Correspondence to Deniz Velioglu Sogut.

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Velioglu Sogut, D., Yalciner, A.C. Performance Comparison of NAMI DANCE and FLOW-3D® Models in Tsunami Propagation, Inundation and Currents using NTHMP Benchmark Problems. Pure Appl. Geophys. 176, 3115–3153 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00024-018-1907-9

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  • Received22 December 2017
  • Revised16 May 2018
  • Accepted24 May 2018
  • Published07 June 2018
  • Issue Date01 July 2019
  • DOIhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00024-018-1907-9

Keywords

  • Tsunami
  • depth-averaged shallow water
  • Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes
  • benchmarking
  • NAMI DANCE
  • FLOW-3D®
Fig. 1. Protection matt over the scour pit.

그물형 세굴방지매트를 사용한 수직말뚝의 흐름에 대한 수치적 연구

Numerical study of the flow at a vertical pile with net-like scour protection matt
Minxi Zhanga,b
, Hanyan Zhaoc
, Dongliang Zhao d, Shaolin Yuee
, Huan Zhoue
,
Xudong Zhaoa
, Carlo Gualtierif
, Guoliang Yua,b,∗
a SKLOE, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China b KLMIES, MOE, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean & Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China c Guangdong Research Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower, Guangzhou 510610, China d CCCC Second Harbor Engineering Co., Ltd., Wuhan 430040, China e CCCC Road & Bridge Special Engineering Co., Ltd, Wuhan 430071, China f Department of Structures for Engineering and Architecture, University of Naples Federico II, Italy

Abstract

현재 또는 파도 환경에서 말뚝 또는 부두의 국부 세굴은 전 세계적으로 상부 구조물의 안전을 위협합니다. 말뚝이나 부두에서 세굴 방지 덮개로 그물 모양의 매트를 적용하는 것이 제안되었습니다. 매트는 국부 세굴 구덩이의 흐름을 약화 및 확산시켜 국부 세굴을 줄이고 퇴적물 퇴적을 강화합니다. 매트로 덮힌 말뚝의 흐름을 조사하기 위해 수치 시뮬레이션을 수행했습니다. 시뮬레이션 결과는 매트의 두께 dt(2.6d95 ~ 17.9d95)와 개구부 크기 dn(7.7d95 ~ 28.2d95)을 최적화하는 데 사용되었습니다. 매트가 국부 속도를 상당히 감소시키고 말뚝에서 와류를 소멸시켜 국부 세굴 범위를 실질적으로 감소시키는 것으로 밝혀졌습니다. 매트의 개구부 크기가 작을수록 베드에서의 유동확산이 더 효과적이었으며 말뚝에서 더 작은 베드전단응력이 관찰되었다. 본 연구에서 고려한 유동 조건의 경우 상대 두께 T = 7.7 및 상대 개구 크기 S = 7.7인 매트가 세굴 방지에 효과적일 수 있습니다.

Fig. 1. Protection matt over the scour pit.
Fig. 26. Distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy on the y-z plane (X = 0.5) for various S
Fig. 26. Distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy on the y-z plane (X = 0.5) for various S

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Effects of pile-cap elevation on scour and turbulence around a complex bridge pier

복잡한 교각 주변의 세굴 및 난기류에 대한 말뚝 뚜껑 높이의 영향

ABSTRACT

이 연구에서는 세 가지 다른 말뚝 뚜껑 높이에서 직사각형 말뚝 캡이 있는 복잡한 부두 주변의 지역 세굴 및 관련 흐름 유체 역학을 조사합니다. 말뚝 캡 높이가 초기 모래층에 대해 선택되었으며, 말뚝 캡이 흐름에 노출되지 않고(사례 I), 부분적으로 노출되고(사례 II) 완전히 노출(사례 III)되도록 했습니다. 실험은 맑은 물 세굴 조건 하에서 재순환 수로에서 수행되었으며, 입자 이미지 유속계 (PIV) 기술을 사용하여 다른 수직면에서 순간 유속을 얻었습니다. 부분적으로 노출된 파일 캡 케이스는 최대 수세미 깊이(MSD)를 보여주었습니다. 사례 II에서 MSD가 발생한 이유는 난류 유동장 분석을 통해 밝혀졌는데, 이는 말뚝 캡이 흐름에 노출됨에 따라 더 높은 세굴 깊이를 담당하는 말뚝 가장자리에서 와류 생성에 지배적으로 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 유동장에 대한 파일 캡의 영향은 평균 속도, 소용돌이, 레이놀즈 전단 응력 및 난류 운동 에너지 윤곽을 통해 사례 III에서 두드러지게 나타났지만 파일 캡이 베드에서 떨어져 있었기 때문에 파일 캡 모서리는 수세미에 직접적인 영향을 미치지 않았습니다.

In this study, the local scour and the associated flow hydrodynamics around a complex pier with rectangular pile-cap at three different pile-cap elevations are investigated. The pile-cap elevations were selected with respect to the initial sand bed, such that the pile-cap was unexposed (case I), partially exposed (case II), and fully exposed (case III) to the flow. The experiments were performed in a recirculating flume under clear-water scour conditions, and the instantaneous flow velocity was obtained at different vertical planes using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. The partially exposed pile-cap case showed the maximum obtained scour-depth (MSD). The reason behind the MSD occurrence in case II was enunciated through the analysis of turbulent flow field which showed that as the pile-cap got exposed to the flow, it dominantly affected the generation of vortices from the pile-cap corners responsible for the higher scour depth. The effect of the pile-cap on the flow field was prominently seen in case III through the mean velocities, vorticity, Reynolds shear stresses and turbulent kinetic energy contours, but since the pile-cap was away from the bed, the pile-cap corners did not show any direct effect on the scour.

KEYWORDS: 

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Figure 11. Sketch of scour mechanism around USAF under random waves.

Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves

by Ruigeng Hu 1,Hongjun Liu 2,Hao Leng 1,Peng Yu 3 andXiuhai Wang 1,2,*

1College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266000, China

2Key Lab of Marine Environment and Ecology (Ocean University of China), Ministry of Education, Qingdao 266000, China

3Qingdao Geo-Engineering Survering Institute, Qingdao 266100, China

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 20219(8), 886; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9080886

Received: 6 July 2021 / Revised: 8 August 2021 / Accepted: 13 August 2021 / Published: 17 August 2021

(This article belongs to the Section Ocean Engineering)

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Abstract

A series of numerical simulation were conducted to study the local scour around umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF) under random waves. In this study, the validation was carried out firstly to verify the accuracy of the present model. Furthermore, the scour evolution and scour mechanism were analyzed respectively. In addition, two revised models were proposed to predict the equilibrium scour depth Seq around USAF. At last, a parametric study was carried out to study the effects of the Froude number Fr and Euler number Eu for the Seq. The results indicate that the present numerical model is accurate and reasonable for depicting the scour morphology under random waves. The revised Raaijmakers’s model shows good agreement with the simulating results of the present study when KCs,p < 8. The predicting results of the revised stochastic model are the most favorable for n = 10 when KCrms,a < 4. The higher Fr and Eu both lead to the more intensive horseshoe vortex and larger Seq.

Keywords: 

scournumerical investigationrandom wavesequilibrium scour depthKC number

1. Introduction

The rapid expansion of cities tends to cause social and economic problems, such as environmental pollution and traffic jam. As a kind of clean energy, offshore wind power has developed rapidly in recent years. The foundation of offshore wind turbine (OWT) supports the upper tower, and suffers the cyclic loading induced by waves, tides and winds, which exerts a vital influence on the OWT system. The types of OWT foundation include the fixed and floating foundation, and the fixed foundation was used usually for nearshore wind turbine. After the construction of fixed foundation, the hydrodynamic field changes in the vicinity of the foundation, leading to the horseshoe vortex formation and streamline compression at the upside and sides of foundation respectively [1,2,3,4]. As a result, the neighboring soil would be carried away by the shear stress induced by vortex, and the scour hole would emerge in the vicinity of foundation. The scour holes increase the cantilever length, and weaken the lateral bearing capacity of foundation [5,6,7,8,9]. Moreover, the natural frequency of OWT system increases with the increase of cantilever length, causing the resonance occurs when the system natural frequency equals the wave or wind frequency [10,11,12]. Given that, an innovative foundation called umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF) has been designed for nearshore wind power. The previous studies indicated the USAF was characterized by the favorable lateral bearing capacity with the low cost [6,13,14]. The close-up of USAF is shown in Figure 1, and it includes six parts: 1-interal buckets, 2-external skirt, 3-anchor ring, 4-anchor branch, 5-supporting rod, 6-telescopic hook. The detailed description and application method of USAF can be found in reference [13].

Jmse 09 00886 g001 550

Figure 1. The close-up of umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF).

Numerical and experimental investigations of scour around OWT foundation under steady currents and waves have been extensively studied by many researchers [1,2,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24]. The seabed scour can be classified as two types according to Shields parameter θ, i.e., clear bed scour (θ < θcr) or live bed scour (θ > θcr). Due to the set of foundation, the adverse hydraulic pressure gradient exists at upstream foundation edges, resulting in the streamline separation between boundary layer flow and seabed. The separating boundary layer ascended at upstream anchor edges and developed into the horseshoe vortex. Then, the horseshoe vortex moved downstream gradually along the periphery of the anchor, and the vortex shed off continually at the lee-side of the anchor, i.e., wake vortex. The core of wake vortex is a negative pressure center, liking a vacuum cleaner. Hence, the soil particles were swirled into the negative pressure core and carried away by wake vortexes. At the same time, the onset of scour at rear side occurred. Finally, the wake vortex became downflow when the turbulence energy could not support the survival of wake vortex. According to Tavouktsoglou et al. [25], the scale of pile wall boundary layer is proportional to 1/ln(Rd) (Rd is pile Reynolds), which means the turbulence intensity induced by the flow-structure interaction would decrease with Rd increases, but the effects of Rd can be neglected only if the flow around the foundation is fully turbulent [26]. According to previous studies [1,15,27,28,29,30,31,32], the scour development around pile foundation under waves was significantly influenced by Shields parameter θ and KC number simultaneously (calculated by Equation (1)). Sand ripples widely existed around pile under waves in the case of live bed scour, and the scour morphology is related with θ and KC. Compared with θKC has a greater influence on the scour morphology [21,27,28]. The influence mechanism of KC on the scour around the pile is reflected in two aspects: the horseshoe vortex at upstream and wake vortex shedding at downstream.

KC=UwmTD��=�wm��(1)

where, Uwm is the maximum velocity of the undisturbed wave-induced oscillatory flow at the sea bottom above the wave boundary layer, T is wave period, and D is pile diameter.

There are two prerequisites to satisfy the formation of horseshoe vortex at upstream pile edges: (1) the incoming flow boundary layer with sufficient thickness and (2) the magnitude of upstream adverse pressure gradient making the boundary layer separating [1,15,16,18,20]. The smaller KC results the lower adverse pressure gradient, and the boundary layer cannot separate, herein, there is almost no horseshoe vortex emerging at upside of pile. Sumer et al. [1,15] carried out several sets of wave flume experiments under regular and irregular waves respectively, and the experiment results show that there is no horseshoe vortex when KC is less than 6. While the scale and lifespan of horseshoe vortex increase evidently with the increase of KC when KC is larger than 6. Moreover, the wake vortex contributes to the scour at lee-side of pile. Similar with the case of horseshoe vortex, there is no wake vortex when KC is less than 6. The wake vortex is mainly responsible for scour around pile when KC is greater than 6 and less than O(100), while horseshoe vortex controls scour nearly when KC is greater than O(100).

Sumer et al. [1] found that the equilibrium scour depth was nil around pile when KC was less than 6 under regular waves for live bed scour, while the equilibrium scour depth increased with the increase of KC. Based on that, Sumer proposed an equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (2)). Carreiras et al. [33] revised Sumer’s equation with m = 0.06 for nonlinear waves. Different with the findings of Sumer et al. [1] and Carreiras et al. [33], Corvaro et al. [21] found the scour still occurred for KC ≈ 4, and proposed the revised equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (3)) for KC > 4.

Rudolph and Bos [2] conducted a series of wave flume experiments to investigate the scour depth around monopile under waves only, waves and currents combined respectively, indicting KC was one of key parameters in influencing equilibrium scour depth, and proposed the equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (4)) for low KC (1 < KC < 10). Through analyzing the extensive data from published literatures, Raaijmakers and Rudolph [34] developed the equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (5)) for low KC, which was suitable for waves only, waves and currents combined. Khalfin [35] carried out several sets of wave flume experiments to study scour development around monopile, and proposed the equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (6)) for low KC (0.1 < KC < 3.5). Different with above equations, the Khalfin’s equation considers the Shields parameter θ and KC number simultaneously in predicting equilibrium scour depth. The flow reversal occurred under through in one wave period, so sand particles would be carried away from lee-side of pile to upside, resulting in sand particles backfilled into the upstream scour hole [20,29]. Considering the backfilling effects, Zanke et al. [36] proposed the equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (7)) around pile by theoretical analysis, and the equation is suitable for the whole range of KC number under regular waves and currents combined.

S/D=1.3(1−exp([−m(KC−6)])�/�=1.3(1−exp(−�(��−6))(2)

where, m = 0.03 for linear waves.

S/D=1.3(1−exp([−0.02(KC−4)])�/�=1.3(1−exp(−0.02(��−4))(3)

S/D=1.3γKwaveKhw�/�=1.3��wave�ℎw(4)

where, γ is safety factor, depending on design process, typically γ = 1.5, Kwave is correction factor considering wave action, Khw is correction factor considering water depth.

S/D=1.5[tanh(hwD)]KwaveKhw�/�=1.5tanh(ℎw�)�wave�ℎw(5)

where, hw is water depth.

S/D=0.0753(θθcr−−−√−0.5)0.69KC0.68�/�=0.0753(��cr−0.5)0.69��0.68(6)

where, θ is shields parameter, θcr is critical shields parameter.

S/D=2.5(1−0.5u/uc)xrelxrel=xeff/(1+xeff)xeff=0.03(1−0.35ucr/u)(KC−6)⎫⎭⎬⎪⎪�/�=2.5(1−0.5�/��)��������=����/(1+����)����=0.03(1−0.35�cr/�)(��−6)(7)

where, u is near-bed orbital velocity amplitude, uc is critical velocity corresponding the onset of sediment motion.

S/D=1.3{1−exp[−0.03(KC2lnn+36)1/2−6]}�/�=1.31−exp−0.03(��2ln�+36)1/2−6(8)

where, n is the 1/n’th highest wave for random waves

For predicting equilibrium scour depth under irregular waves, i.e., random waves, Sumer and Fredsøe [16] found it’s suitable to take Equation (2) to predict equilibrium scour depth around pile under random waves with the root-mean-square (RMS) value of near-bed orbital velocity amplitude Um and peak wave period TP to calculate KC. Khalfin [35] recommended the RMS wave height Hrms and peak wave period TP were used to calculate KC for Equation (6). References [37,38,39,40] developed a series of stochastic theoretical models to predict equilibrium scour depth around pile under random waves, nonlinear random waves plus currents respectively. The stochastic approach thought the 1/n’th highest wave were responsible for scour in vicinity of pile under random waves, and the KC was calculated in Equation (8) with Um and mean zero-crossing wave period Tz. The results calculated by Equation (8) agree well with experimental values of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] if the 1/10′th highest wave was used. To author’s knowledge, the stochastic approach proposed by Myrhaug and Rue [37] is the only theoretical model to predict equilibrium scour depth around pile under random waves for the whole range of KC number in published documents. Other methods of predicting scour depth under random waves are mainly originated from the equation for regular waves-only, waves and currents combined, which are limited to the large KC number, such as KC > 6 for Equation (2) and KC > 4 for Equation (3) respectively. However, situations with relatively low KC number (KC < 4) often occur in reality, for example, monopile or suction anchor for OWT foundations in ocean environment. Moreover, local scour around OWT foundations under random waves has not yet been investigated fully. Therefore, further study are still needed in the aspect of scour around OWT foundations with low KC number under random waves. Given that, this study presents the scour sediment model around umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF) under random waves. In this study, a comparison of equilibrium scour depth around USAF between this present numerical models and the previous theoretical models and experimental results was presented firstly. Then, this study gave a comprehensive analysis for the scour mechanisms around USAF. After that, two revised models were proposed according to the model of Raaijmakers and Rudolph [34] and the stochastic model developed by Myrhaug and Rue [37] respectively to predict the equilibrium scour depth. Finally, a parametric study was conducted to study the effects of the Froude number (Fr) and Euler number (Eu) to equilibrium scour depth respectively.

2. Numerical Method

2.1. Governing Equations of Flow

The following equations adopted in present model are already available in Flow 3D software. The authors used these theoretical equations to simulate scour in random waves without modification. The incompressible viscous fluid motion satisfies the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, so the present numerical model solves RANS equations:

∂u∂t+1VF(uAx∂u∂x+vAy∂u∂y+wAz∂u∂z)=−1ρf∂p∂x+Gx+fx∂�∂�+1��(���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�)=−1�f∂�∂�+��+��(9)

∂v∂t+1VF(uAx∂v∂x+vAy∂v∂y+wAz∂v∂z)=−1ρf∂p∂y+Gy+fy∂�∂�+1��(���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�)=−1�f∂�∂�+��+��(10)

∂w∂t+1VF(uAx∂w∂x+vAy∂w∂y+wAz∂w∂z)=−1ρf∂p∂z+Gz+fz∂�∂�+1��(���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�+���∂�∂�)=−1�f∂�∂�+��+��(11)

where, VF is the volume fraction; uv, and w are the velocity components in xyz direction respectively with Cartesian coordinates; Ai is the area fraction; ρf is the fluid density, fi is the viscous fluid acceleration, Gi is the fluid body acceleration (i = xyz).

2.2. Turbulent Model

The turbulence closure is available by the turbulent model, such as one-equation, the one-equation k-ε model, the standard k-ε model, RNG k-ε turbulent model and large eddy simulation (LES) model. The LES model requires very fine mesh grid, so the computational time is large, which hinders the LES model application in engineering. The RNG k-ε model can reduce computational time greatly with high accuracy in the near-wall region. Furthermore, the RNG k-ε model computes the maximum turbulent mixing length dynamically in simulating sediment scour model. Therefore, the RNG k-ε model was adopted to study the scour around anchor under random waves [41,42].

∂kT∂T+1VF(uAx∂kT∂x+vAy∂kT∂y+wAz∂kT∂z)=PT+GT+DiffkT−εkT∂��∂�+1��(���∂��∂�+���∂��∂�+���∂��∂�)=��+��+������−���(12)

∂εT∂T+1VF(uAx∂εT∂x+vAy∂εT∂y+wAz∂εT∂z)=CDIS1εTkT(PT+CDIS3GT)+Diffε−CDIS2ε2TkT∂��∂�+1��(���∂��∂�+���∂��∂�+���∂��∂�)=����1����(��+����3��)+�����−����2��2��(13)

where, kT is specific kinetic energy involved with turbulent velocity, GT is the turbulent energy generated by buoyancy; εT is the turbulent energy dissipating rate, PT is the turbulent energy, Diffε and DiffkT are diffusion terms associated with VFAiCDIS1CDIS2 and CDIS3 are dimensionless parameters, and CDIS1CDIS3 have default values of 1.42, 0.2 respectively. CDIS2 can be obtained from PT and kT.

2.3. Sediment Scour Model

The sand particles may suffer four processes under waves, i.e., entrainment, bed load transport, suspended load transport, and deposition, so the sediment scour model should depict the above processes efficiently. In present numerical simulation, the sediment scour model includes the following aspects:

2.3.1. Entrainment and Deposition

The combination of entrainment and deposition determines the net scour rate of seabed in present sediment scour model. The entrainment lift velocity of sand particles was calculated as [43]:

ulift,i=αinsd0.3∗(θ−θcr)1.5∥g∥di(ρi−ρf)ρf−−−−−−−−−−−−√�lift,i=�����*0.3(�−�cr)1.5���(��−�f)�f(14)

where, αi is the entrainment parameter, ns is the outward point perpendicular to the seabed, d* is the dimensionless diameter of sand particles, which was calculated by Equation (15), θcr is the critical Shields parameter, g is the gravity acceleration, di is the diameter of sand particles, ρi is the density of seabed species.

d∗=di(∥g∥ρf(ρi−ρf)μ2f)1/3�*=��(��f(��−�f)�f2)1/3(15)

where μf is the fluid dynamic viscosity.

In Equation (14), the entrainment parameter αi confirms the rate at which sediment erodes when the given shear stress is larger than the critical shear stress, and the recommended value 0.018 was adopted according to the experimental data of Mastbergen and Von den Berg [43]. ns is the outward pointing normal to the seabed interface, and ns = (0,0,1) according to the Cartesian coordinates used in present numerical model.

The shields parameter was obtained from the following equation:

θ=U2f,m(ρi/ρf−1)gd50�=�f,m2(��/�f−1)��50(16)

where, Uf,m is the maximum value of the near-bed friction velocity; d50 is the median diameter of sand particles. The detailed calculation procedure of θ was available in Soulsby [44].

The critical shields parameter θcr was obtained from the Equation (17) [44]

θcr=0.31+1.2d∗+0.055[1−exp(−0.02d∗)]�cr=0.31+1.2�*+0.0551−exp(−0.02�*)(17)

The sand particles begin to deposit on seabed when the turbulence energy weaken and cann’t support the particles suspending. The setting velocity of the particles was calculated from the following equation [44]:

usettling,i=νfdi[(10.362+1.049d3∗)0.5−10.36]�settling,�=�f��(10.362+1.049�*3)0.5−10.36(18)

where νf is the fluid kinematic viscosity.

2.3.2. Bed Load Transport

This is called bed load transport when the sand particles roll or bounce over the seabed and always have contact with seabed. The bed load transport velocity was computed by [45]:

ubedload,i=qb,iδicb,ifb�bedload,�=�b,����b,��b(19)

where, qb,i is the bed load transport rate, which was obtained from Equation (20), δi is the bed load thickness, which was calculated by Equation (21), cb,i is the volume fraction of sand i in the multiple species, fb is the critical packing fraction of the seabed.

qb,i=8[∥g∥(ρi−ρfρf)d3i]1/2�b,�=8�(��−�f�f)��31/2(20)

δi=0.3d0.7∗(θθcr−1)0.5di��=0.3�*0.7(��cr−1)0.5��(21)

2.3.3. Suspended Load Transport

Through the following transport equation, the suspended sediment concentration could be acquired.

∂Cs,i∂t+∇(us,iCs,i)=∇∇(DfCs,i)∂�s,�∂�+∇(�s,��s,�)=∇∇(�f�s,�)(22)

where, Cs,i is the suspended sand particles mass concentration of sand i in the multiple species, us,i is the sand particles velocity of sand iDf is the diffusivity.

The velocity of sand i in the multiple species could be obtained from the following equation:

us,i=u¯¯+usettling,ics,i�s,�=�¯+�settling,��s,�(23)

where, u¯�¯ is the velocity of mixed fluid-particles, which can be calculated by the RANS equation with turbulence model, cs,i is the suspended sand particles volume concentration, which was computed from Equation (24).

cs,i=Cs,iρi�s,�=�s,���(24)

3. Model Setup

The seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional scour numerical model was built using Flow-3D software. As shown in Figure 2, the model includes sandy seabed, USAF model, sea water, two baffles and porous media. The dimensions of USAF are shown in Table 1. The sandy bed (210 m in length, 30 m in width and 11 m in height) is made up of uniform fine sand with median diameter d50 = 0.041 cm. The USAF model includes upper steel tube with the length of 20 m, which was installed in the middle of seabed. The location of USAF is positioned at 140 m from the upstream inflow boundary and 70 m from the downstream outflow boundary. Two baffles were installed at two ends of seabed. In order to eliminate the wave reflection basically, the porous media was set at the outflow side on the seabed.

Jmse 09 00886 g002 550

Figure 2. (a) The sketch of seabed-USAF-wave three-dimensional model; (b) boundary condation:Wv-wave boundary, S-symmetric boundary, O-outflow boundary; (c) USAF model.

Table 1. Numerical simulating cases.

Table

3.1. Mesh Geometric Dimensions

In the simulation of the scour under the random waves, the model includes the umbrella suction anchor foundation, seabed and fluid. As shown in Figure 3, the model mesh includes global mesh grid and nested mesh grid, and the total number of grids is 1,812,000. The basic procedure for building mesh grid consists of two steps. Step 1: Divide the global mesh using regular hexahedron with size of 0.6 × 0.6. The global mesh area is cubic box, embracing the seabed and whole fluid volume, and the dimensions are 210 m in length, 30 m in width and 32 m in height. The details of determining the grid size can see the following mesh sensitivity section. Step 2: Set nested fine mesh grid in vicinity of the USAF with size of 0.3 × 0.3 so as to shorten the computation cost and improve the calculation accuracy. The encryption range is −15 m to 15 m in x direction, −15 m to 15 m in y direction and 0 m to 32 m in z direction, respectively. In order to accurately capture the free-surface dynamics, such as the fluid-air interface, the volume of fluid (VOF) method was adopted for tracking the free water surface. One specific algorithm called FAVORTM (Fractional Area/Volume Obstacle Representation) was used to define the fractional face areas and fractional volumes of the cells which are open to fluid flow.

Jmse 09 00886 g003 550

Figure 3. The sketch of mesh grid.

3.2. Boundary Conditions

As shown in Figure 2, the initial fluid length is 210 m as long as seabed. A wave boundary was specified at the upstream offshore end. The details of determining the random wave spectrum can see the following wave parameters section. The outflow boundary was set at the downstream onshore end. The symmetry boundary was used at the top and two sides of the model. The symmetric boundaries were the better strategy to improve the computation efficiency and save the calculation cost [46]. At the seabed bottom, the wall boundary was adopted, which means the u = v = w= 0. Besides, the upper steel tube of USAF was set as no-slip condition.

3.3. Wave Parameters

The random waves with JONSWAP wave spectrum were used for all simulations as realistic representation of offshore conditions. The unidirectional JONSWAP frequency spectrum was described as [47]:

S(ω)=αg2ω5exp[−54(ωpω)4]γexp[−(ω−ωp)22σ2ω2p]�(�)=��2�5exp−54(�p�)4�exp−(�−�p)22�2�p2(25)

where, α is wave energy scale parameter, which is calculated by Equation (26), ω is frequency, ωp is wave spectrum peak frequency, which can be obtained from Equation (27). γ is wave spectrum peak enhancement factor, in this study γ = 3.3. σ is spectral width factor, σ equals 0.07 for ω ≤ ωp and 0.09 for ω > ωp respectively.

α=0.0076(gXU2)−0.22�=0.0076(���2)−0.22(26)

ωp=22(gU)(gXU2)−0.33�p=22(��)(���2)−0.33(27)

where, X is fetch length, U is average wind velocity at 10 m height from mean sea level.

In present numerical model, the input key parameters include X and U for wave boundary with JONSWAP wave spectrum. The objective wave height and period are available by different combinations of X and U. In this study, we designed 9 cases with different wave heights, periods and water depths for simulating scour around USAF under random waves (see Table 2). For random waves, the wave steepness ε and Ursell number Ur were acquired form Equations (28) and (29) respectively

ε=2πgHsT2a�=2���s�a2(28)

Ur=Hsk2h3w�r=�s�2ℎw3(29)

where, Hs is significant wave height, Ta is average wave period, k is wave number, hw is water depth. The Shield parameter θ satisfies θ > θcr for all simulations in current study, indicating the live bed scour prevails.

Table 2. Numerical simulating cases.

Table

3.4. Mesh Sensitivity

In this section, a mesh sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of mesh grid size to results and make sure the calculation is mesh size independent and converged. Three mesh grid size were chosen: Mesh 1—global mesh grid size of 0.75 × 0.75, nested fine mesh grid size of 0.4 × 0.4, and total number of grids 1,724,000, Mesh 2—global mesh grid size of 0.6 × 0.6, nested fine mesh grid size of 0.3 × 0.3, and total number of grids 1,812,000, Mesh 3—global mesh grid size of 0.4 × 0.4, nested fine mesh grid size of 0.2 × 0.2, and total number of grids 1,932,000. The near-bed shear velocity U* is an important factor for influencing scour process [1,15], so U* at the position of (4,0,11.12) was evaluated under three mesh sizes. As the Figure 4 shown, the maximum error of shear velocity ∆U*1,2 is about 39.8% between the mesh 1 and mesh 2, and 4.8% between the mesh 2 and mesh 3. According to the mesh sensitivity criterion adopted by Pang et al. [48], it’s reasonable to think the results are mesh size independent and converged with mesh 2. Additionally, the present model was built according to prototype size, and the mesh size used in present model is larger than the mesh size adopted by Higueira et al. [49] and Corvaro et al. [50]. If we choose the smallest cell size, it will take too much time. For example, the simulation with Mesh3 required about 260 h by using a computer with Intel Xeon Scalable Gold 4214 CPU @24 Cores, 2.2 GHz and 64.00 GB RAM. Therefore, in this case, considering calculation accuracy and computation efficiency, the mesh 2 was chosen for all the simulation in this study.

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Figure 4. Comparison of near-bed shear velocity U* with different mesh grid size.

The nested mesh block was adopted for seabed in vicinity of the USAF, which was overlapped with the global mesh block. When two mesh blocks overlap each other, the governing equations are by default solved on the mesh block with smaller average cell size (i.e., higher grid resolution). It is should be noted that the Flow 3D software used the moving mesh captures the scour evolution and automatically adjusts the time step size to be as large as possible without exceeding any of the stability limits, affecting accuracy, or unduly increasing the effort required to enforce the continuity condition [51].

3.5. Model Validation

In order to verify the reliability of the present model, the results of present study were compared with the experimental data of Khosronejad et al. [52]. The experiment was conducted in an open channel with a slender vertical pile under unidirectional currents. The comparison of scour development between the present results and the experimental results is shown in Figure 5. The Figure 5 reveals that the present results agree well with the experimental data of Khosronejad et al. [52]. In the first stage, the scour depth increases rapidly. After that, the scour depth achieves a maximum value gradually. The equilibrium scour depth calculated by the present model is basically corresponding with the experimental results of Khosronejad et al. [52], although scour depth in the present model is slightly larger than the experimental results at initial stage.

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Figure 5. Comparison of time evolution of scour between the present study and Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17].

Secondly, another comparison was further conducted between the results of present study and the experimental data of Petersen et al. [17]. The experiment was carried out in a flume with a circular vertical pile in combined waves and current. Figure 4 shows a comparison of time evolution of scour depth between the simulating and the experimental results. As Figure 5 indicates, the scour depth in this study has good overall agreement with the experimental results proposed in Petersen et al. [17]. The equilibrium scour depth calculated by the present model is 0.399 m, which equals to the experimental value basically. Overall, the above verifications prove the present model is accurate and capable in dealing with sediment scour under waves.

In addition, in order to calibrate and validate the present model for hydrodynamic parameters, the comparison of water surface elevation was carried out with laboratory experiments conducted by Stahlmann [53] for wave gauge No. 3. The Figure 6 depicts the surface wave profiles between experiments and numerical model results. The comparison indicates that there is a good agreement between the model results and experimental values, especially the locations of wave crest and trough. Comparison of the surface elevation instructs the present model has an acceptable relative error, and the model is a calibrated in terms of the hydrodynamic parameters.

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Figure 6. Comparison of surface elevation between the present study and Stahlmann [53].

Finally, another comparison was conducted for equilibrium scour depth or maximum scour depth under random waves with the experimental data of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Schendel et al. [22]. The Figure 7 shows the comparison between the numerical results and experimental data of Run01, Run05, Run21 and Run22 in Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and test A05 and A09 in Schendel et al. [22]. As shown in Figure 7, the equilibrium scour depth or maximum scour depth distributed within the ±30 error lines basically, meaning the reliability and accuracy of present model for predicting equilibrium scour depth around foundation in random waves. However, compared with the experimental values, the present model overestimated the equilibrium scour depth generally. Given that, a calibration for scour depth was carried out by multiplying the mean reduced coefficient 0.85 in following section.

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Figure 7. Comparison of equilibrium (or maximum) scour depth between the present study and Sumer and Fredsøe [16], Schendel et al. [22].

Through the various examination for hydrodynamic and morphology parameters, it can be concluded that the present model is a validated and calibrated model for scour under random waves. Thus, the present numerical model would be utilized for scour simulation around foundation under random waves.

4. Numerical Results and Discussions

4.1. Scour Evolution

Figure 8 displays the scour evolution for case 1–9. As shown in Figure 8a, the scour depth increased rapidly at the initial stage, and then slowed down at the transition stage, which attributes to the backfilling occurred in scour holes under live bed scour condition, resulting in the net scour decreasing. Finally, the scour reached the equilibrium state when the amount of sediment backfilling equaled to that of scouring in the scour holes, i.e., the net scour transport rate was nil. Sumer and Fredsøe [16] proposed the following formula for the scour development under waves

St=Seq(1−exp(−t/Tc))�t=�eq(1−exp(−�/�c))(30)

where Tc is time scale of scour process.

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Figure 8. Time evolution of scour for case 1–9: (a) Case 1–5; (b) Case 6–9.

The computing time is 3600 s and the scour development curves in Figure 8 kept fluctuating, meaning it’s still not in equilibrium scour stage in these cases. According to Sumer and Fredsøe [16], the equilibrium scour depth can be acquired by fitting the data with Equation (30). From Figure 8, it can be seen that the scour evolution obtained from Equation (30) is consistent with the present study basically at initial stage, but the scour depth predicted by Equation (30) developed slightly faster than the simulating results and the Equation (30) overestimated the scour depth to some extent. Overall, the whole tendency of the results calculated by Equation (30) agrees well with the simulating results of the present study, which means the Equation (30) is applicable to depict the scour evolution around USAF under random waves.

4.2. Scour Mechanism under Random Waves

The scour morphology and scour evolution around USAF are similar under random waves in case 1~9. Taking case 7 as an example, the scour morphology is shown in Figure 9.

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Figure 9. Scour morphology under different times for case 7.

From Figure 9, at the initial stage (t < 1200 s), the scour occurred at upstream foundation edges between neighboring anchor branches. The maximum scour depth appeared at the lee-side of the USAF. Correspondingly, the sediments deposited at the periphery of the USAF, and the location of the maximum accretion depth was positioned at an angle of about 45° symmetrically with respect to the wave propagating direction in the lee-side of the USAF. After that, when t > 2400 s, the location of the maximum scour depth shifted to the upside of the USAF at an angle of about 45° with respect to the wave propagating direction.

According to previous studies [1,15,16,19,30,31], the horseshoe vortex, streamline compression and wake vortex shedding were responsible for scour around foundation. The Figure 10 displays the distribution of flow velocity in vicinity of foundation, which reflects the evolving processes of horseshoe vertex.

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Figure 10. Velocity profile around USAF: (a) Flow runup and down stream at upstream anchor edges; (b) Horseshoe vortex at upstream anchor edges; (c) Flow reversal during wave through stage at lee side.

As shown in Figure 10, the inflow tripped to the upstream edges of the USAF and it was blocked by the upper tube of USAF. Then, the downflow formed the horizontal axis clockwise vortex and rolled on the seabed bypassing the tube, that is, the horseshoe vortex (Figure 11). The Figure 12 displays the turbulence intensity around the tube on the seabed. From Figure 12, it can be seen that the turbulence intensity was high-intensity with respect to the region of horseshoe vortex. This phenomenon occurred because of drastic water flow momentum exchanging in the horseshoe vortex. As a result, it created the prominent shear stress on the seabed, causing the local scour at the upstream edges of USAF. Besides, the horseshoe vortex moved downstream gradually along the periphery of the tube and the wake vortex shed off continually at the lee-side of the USAF, i.e., wake vortex.

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Figure 11. Sketch of scour mechanism around USAF under random waves.

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Figure 12. Turbulence intensity: (a) Turbulence intensity of horseshoe vortex; (b) Turbulence intensity of wake vortex; (c) Turbulence intensity of accretion area.

The core of wake vortex is a negative pressure center, liking a vacuum cleaner [11,42]. Hence, the soil particles were swirled into the negative pressure core and carried away by wake vortex. At the same time, the onset of scour at rear side occurred. Finally, the wake vortex became downflow at the downside of USAF. As is shown in Figure 12, the turbulence intensity was low where the downflow occurred at lee-side, which means the turbulence energy may not be able to support the survival of wake vortex, leading to accretion happening. As mentioned in previous section, the formation of horseshoe vortex was dependent with adverse pressure gradient at upside of foundation. As shown in Figure 13, the evaluated range of pressure distribution is −15 m to 15 m in x direction. The t = 450 s and t = 1800 s indicate that the wave crest and trough arrived at the upside and lee-side of the foundation respectively, and the t = 350 s was neither the wave crest nor trough. The adverse gradient pressure reached the maximum value at t = 450 s corresponding to the wave crest phase. In this case, it’s helpful for the wave boundary separating fully from seabed, which leads to the formation of horseshoe vortex with high turbulence intensity. Therefore, the horseshoe vortex is responsible for the local scour between neighboring anchor branches at upside of USAF. What’s more, due to the combination of the horseshoe vortex and streamline compression, the maximum scour depth occurred at the upside of the USAF with an angle of about 45° corresponding to the wave propagating direction. This is consistent with the findings of Pang et al. [48] and Sumer et al. [1,15] in case of regular waves. At the wave trough phase (t = 1800 s), the pressure gradient became positive at upstream USAF edges, which hindered the separating of wave boundary from seabed. In the meantime, the flow reversal occurred (Figure 10) and the adverse gradient pressure appeared at downstream USAF edges, but the magnitude of adverse gradient pressure at lee-side was lower than the upstream gradient pressure under wave crest. In this way, the intensity of horseshoe vortex behind the USAF under wave trough was low, which explains the difference of scour depth at upstream and downstream, i.e., the scour asymmetry. In other words, the scour asymmetry at upside and downside of USAF was attributed to wave asymmetry for random waves, and the phenomenon became more evident for nonlinear waves [21]. Briefly speaking, the vortex system at wave crest phase was mainly related to the scour process around USAF under random waves.

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Figure 13. Pressure distribution around USAF.

4.3. Equilibrium Scour Depth

The KC number is a key parameter for horseshoe vortex emerging and evolving under waves. According to Equation (1), when pile diameter D is fixed, the KC depends on the maximum near-bed velocity Uwm and wave period T. For random waves, the Uwm can be denoted by the root-mean-square (RMS) value of near-bed velocity amplitude Uwm,rms or the significant value of near-bed velocity amplitude Uwm,s. The Uwm,rms and Uwm,s for all simulating cases of the present study are listed in Table 3 and Table 4. The T can be denoted by the mean up zero-crossing wave period Ta, peak wave period Tp, significant wave period Ts, the maximum wave period Tm, 1/10′th highest wave period Tn = 1/10 and 1/5′th highest wave period Tn = 1/5 for random waves, so the different combinations of Uwm and T will acquire different KC. The Table 3 and Table 4 list 12 types of KC, for example, the KCrms,s was calculated by Uwm,rms and Ts. Sumer and Fredsøe [16] conducted a series of wave flume experiments to investigate the scour depth around monopile under random waves, and found the equilibrium scour depth predicting equation (Equation (2)) for regular waves was applicable for random waves with KCrms,p. It should be noted that the Equation (2) is only suitable for KC > 6 under regular waves or KCrms,p > 6 under random waves.

Table 3. Uwm,rms and KC for case 1~9.

Table

Table 4. Uwm,s and KC for case 1~9.

Table

Raaijmakers and Rudolph [34] proposed the equilibrium scour depth predicting model (Equation (5)) around pile under waves, which is suitable for low KC. The format of Equation (5) is similar with the formula proposed by Breusers [54], which can predict the equilibrium scour depth around pile at different scour stages. In order to verify the applicability of Raaijmakers’s model for predicting the equilibrium scour depth around USAF under random waves, a validation of the equilibrium scour depth Seq between the present study and Raaijmakers’s equation was conducted. The position where the scour depth Seq was evaluated is the location of the maximum scour depth, and it was depicted in Figure 14. The Figure 15 displays the comparison of Seq with different KC between the present study and Raaijmakers’s model.

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Figure 14. Sketch of the position where the Seq was evaluated.

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Figure 15. Comparison of the equilibrium scour depth between the present model and the model of Raaijmakers and Rudolph [34]: (aKCrms,sKCrms,a; (bKCrms,pKCrms,m; (cKCrms,n = 1/10KCrms,n = 1/5; (dKCs,sKCs,a; (eKCs,pKCs,m; (fKCs,n = 1/10KCs,n = 1/5.

As shown in Figure 15, there is an error in predicting Seq between the present study and Raaijmakers’s model, and Raaijmakers’s model underestimates the results generally. Although the error exists, the varying trend of Seq with KC obtained from Raaijmakers’s model is consistent with the present study basically. What’s more, the error is minimum and the Raaijmakers’s model is of relatively high accuracy for predicting scour around USAF under random waves by using KCs,p. Based on this, a further revision was made to eliminate the error as much as possible, i.e., add the deviation value ∆S/D in the Raaijmakers’s model. The revised equilibrium scour depth predicting equation based on Raaijmakers’s model can be written as

S′eq/D=1.95[tanh(hD)](1−exp(−0.012KCs,p))+ΔS/D�eq′/�=1.95tanh(ℎ�)(1−exp(−0.012��s,p))+∆�/�(31)

As the Figure 16 shown, through trial-calculation, when ∆S/D = 0.05, the results calculated by Equation (31) show good agreement with the simulating results of the present study. The maximum error is about 18.2% and the engineering requirements have been met basically. In order to further verify the accuracy of the revised model for large KC (KCs,p > 4) under random waves, a validation between the revised model and the previous experimental results [21]. The experiment was conducted in a flume (50 m in length, 1.0 m in width and 1.3 m in height) with a slender vertical pile (D = 0.1 m) under random waves. The seabed is composed of 0.13 m deep layer of sand with d50 = 0.6 mm and the water depth is 0.5 m for all tests. The significant wave height is 0.12~0.21 m and the KCs,p is 5.52~11.38. The comparison between the predicting results by Equation (31) and the experimental results of Corvaro et al. [21] is shown in Figure 17. From Figure 17, the experimental data evenly distributes around the predicted results and the prediction accuracy is favorable when KCs,p < 8. However, the gap between the predicting results and experimental data becomes large and the Equation (31) overestimates the equilibrium scour depth to some extent when KCs,p > 8.

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Figure 16. Comparison of Seq between the simulating results and the predicting values by Equation (31).

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Figure 17. Comparison of Seq/D between the Experimental results of Corvaro et al. [21] and the predicting values by Equation (31).

In ocean environment, the waves are composed of a train of sinusoidal waves with different frequencies and amplitudes. The energy of constituent waves with very large and very small frequencies is relatively low, and the energy of waves is mainly concentrated in a certain range of moderate frequencies. Myrhaug and Rue [37] thought the 1/n’th highest wave was responsible for scour and proposed the stochastic model to predict the equilibrium scour depth around pile under random waves for full range of KC. Noteworthy is that the KC was denoted by KCrms,a in the stochastic model. To verify the application of the stochastic model for predicting scour depth around USAF, a validation between the simulating results of present study and predicting results by the stochastic model with n = 2,3,5,10,20,500 was carried out respectively.

As shown in Figure 18, compared with the simulating results, the stochastic model underestimates the equilibrium scour depth around USAF generally. Although the error exists, the varying trend of Seq with KCrms,a obtained from the stochastic model is consistent with the present study basically. What’s more, the gap between the predicting values by stochastic model and the simulating results decreases with the increase of n, but for large n, for example n = 500, the varying trend diverges between the predicting values and simulating results, meaning it’s not feasible only by increasing n in stochastic model to predict the equilibrium scour depth around USAF.

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Figure 18. Comparison of Seq between the simulating results and the predicting values by Equation (8).

The Figure 19 lists the deviation value ∆Seq/D′ between the predicting values and simulating results with different KCrms,a and n. Then, fitted the relationship between the ∆S′and n under different KCrms,a, and the fitting curve can be written by Equation (32). The revised stochastic model (Equation (33)) can be acquired by adding ∆Seq/D′ to Equation (8).

ΔSeq/D=0.052*exp(−n/6.566)+0.068∆�eq/�=0.052*exp(−�/6.566)+0.068(32)

S′eq¯/D=S′eq/D+0.052*exp(−n/6.566)+0.068�eq′¯/�=�eq′/�+0.052*exp(−�/6.566)+0.068(33)

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Figure 19. The fitting line between ∆S′and n.

The comparison between the predicting results by Equation (33) and the simulating results of present study is shown in Figure 20. According to the Figure 20, the varying trend of Seq with KCrms,a obtained from the stochastic model is consistent with the present study basically. Compared with predicting results by the stochastic model, the results calculated by Equation (33) is favorable. Moreover, comparison with simulating results indicates that the predicting results are the most favorable for n = 10, which is consistent with the findings of Myrhaug and Rue [37] for equilibrium scour depth predicting around slender pile in case of random waves.

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Figure 20. Comparison of Seq between the simulating results and the predicting values by Equation (33).

In order to further verify the accuracy of the Equation (33) for large KC (KCrms,a > 4) under random waves, a validation was conducted between the Equation (33) and the previous experimental results of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21]. The details of experiments conducted by Corvaro et al. [21] were described in above section. Sumer and Fredsøe [16] investigated the local scour around pile under random waves. The experiments were conducted in a wave basin with a slender vertical pile (D = 0.032, 0.055 m). The seabed is composed of 0.14 m deep layer of sand with d50 = 0.2 mm and the water depth was maintained at 0.5 m. The JONSWAP wave spectrum was used and the KCrms,a was 5.29~16.95. The comparison between the predicting results by Equation (33) and the experimental results of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21] are shown in Figure 21. From Figure 21, contrary to the case of low KCrms,a (KCrms,a < 4), the error between the predicting values and experimental results increases with decreasing of n for KCrms,a > 4. Therefore, the predicting results are the most favorable for n = 2 when KCrms,a > 4.

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Figure 21. Comparison of Seq between the experimental results of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21] and the predicting values by Equation (33).

Noteworthy is that the present model was built according to prototype size, so the errors between the numerical results and experimental data of References [16,21] may be attribute to the scale effects. In laboratory experiments on scouring process, it is typically impossible to ensure a rigorous similarity of all physical parameters between the model and prototype structure, leading to the scale effects in the laboratory experiments. To avoid a cohesive behaviour, the bed material was not scaled geometrically according to model scale. As a consequence, the relatively large-scaled sediments sizes may result in the overestimation of bed load transport and underestimation of suspended load transport compared with field conditions. What’s more, the disproportional scaled sediment presumably lead to the difference of bed roughness between the model and prototype, and thus large influences for wave boundary layer on the seabed and scour process. Besides, according to Corvaro et al. [21] and Schendel et al. [55], the pile Reynolds numbers and Froude numbers both affect the scour depth for the condition of non fully developed turbulent flow in laboratory experiments.

4.4. Parametric Study

4.4.1. Influence of Froude Number

As described above, the set of foundation leads to the adverse pressure gradient appearing at upstream, leading to the wave boundary layer separating from seabed, then horseshoe vortex formatting and the horseshoe vortex are mainly responsible for scour around foundation (see Figure 22). The Froude number Fr is the key parameter to influence the scale and intensity of horseshoe vortex. The Fr under waves can be calculated by the following formula [42]

Fr=UwgD−−−√�r=�w��(34)

where Uw is the mean water particle velocity during 1/4 cycle of wave oscillation, obtained from the following formula. Noteworthy is that the root-mean-square (RMS) value of near-bed velocity amplitude Uwm,rms is used for calculating Uwm.

Uw=1T/4∫0T/4Uwmsin(t/T)dt=2πUwm�w=1�/4∫0�/4�wmsin(�/�)��=2��wm(35)

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Figure 22. Sketch of flow field at upstream USAF edges.

Tavouktsoglou et al. [25] proposed the following formula between Fr and the vertical location of the stagnation y

yh∝Fer�ℎ∝�r�(36)

where e is constant.

The Figure 23 displays the relationship between Seq/D and Fr of the present study. In order to compare with the simulating results, the experimental data of Corvaro et al. [21] was also depicted in Figure 23. As shown in Figure 23, the equilibrium scour depth appears a logarithmic increase as Fr increases and approaches the mathematical asymptotic value, which is also consistent with the experimental results of Corvaro et al. [21]. According to Figure 24, the adverse pressure gradient pressure at upstream USAF edges increases with the increase of Fr, which is benefit for the wave boundary layer separating from seabed, resulting in the high-intensity horseshoe vortex, hence, causing intensive scour around USAF. Based on the previous study of Tavouktsoglou et al. [25] for scour around pile under currents, the high Fr leads to the stagnation point is closer to the mean sea level for shallow water, causing the stronger downflow kinetic energy. As mentioned in previous section, the energy of downflow at upstream makes up the energy of the subsequent horseshoe vortex, so the stronger downflow kinetic energy results in the more intensive horseshoe vortex. Therefore, the higher Fr leads to the more intensive horseshoe vortex by influencing the position of stagnation point y presumably. Qi and Gao [19] carried out a series of flume tests to investigate the scour around pile under regular waves, and proposed the fitting formula between Seq/D and Fr as following

lg(Seq/D)=Aexp(B/Fr)+Clg(�eq/�)=�exp(�/�r)+�(37)

where AB and C are constant.

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Figure 23. The fitting curve between Seq/D and Fr.

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Figure 24. Sketch of adverse pressure gradient at upstream USAF edges.

Took the Equation (37) to fit the simulating results with A = −0.002, B = 0.686 and C = −0.808, and the results are shown in Figure 23. From Figure 23, the simulating results evenly distribute around the Equation (37) and the varying trend of Seq/D and Fr in present study is consistent with Equation (37) basically, meaning the Equation (37) is applicable to express the relationship of Seq/D with Fr around USAF under random waves.

4.4.2. Influence of Euler Number

The Euler number Eu is the influencing factor for the hydrodynamic field around foundation. The Eu under waves can be calculated by the following formula. The Eu can be represented by the Equation (38) for uniform cylinders [25]. The root-mean-square (RMS) value of near-bed velocity amplitude Um,rms is used for calculating Um.

Eu=U2mgD�u=�m2��(38)

where Um is depth-averaged flow velocity.

The Figure 25 displays the relationship between Seq/D and Eu of the present study. In order to compare with the simulating results, the experimental data of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21] were also plotted in Figure 25. As shown in Figure 25, similar with the varying trend of Seq/D and Fr, the equilibrium scour depth appears a logarithmic increase as Eu increases and approaches the mathematical asymptotic value, which is also consistent with the experimental results of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21]. According to Figure 24, the adverse pressure gradient pressure at upstream USAF edges increases with the increasing of Eu, which is benefit for the wave boundary layer separating from seabed, inducing the high-intensity horseshoe vortex, hence, causing intensive scour around USAF.

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Figure 25. The fitting curve between Seq/D and Eu.

Therefore, the variation of Fr and Eu reflect the magnitude of adverse pressure gradient pressure at upstream. Given that, the Equation (37) also was used to fit the simulating results with A = 8.875, B = 0.078 and C = −9.601, and the results are shown in Figure 25. From Figure 25, the simulating results evenly distribute around the Equation (37) and the varying trend of Seq/D and Eu in present study is consistent with Equation (37) basically, meaning the Equation (37) is also applicable to express the relationship of Seq/D with Eu around USAF under random waves. Additionally, according to the above description of Fr, it can be inferred that the higher Fr and Eu both lead to the more intensive horseshoe vortex by influencing the position of stagnation point y presumably.

5. Conclusions

A series of numerical models were established to investigate the local scour around umbrella suction anchor foundation (USAF) under random waves. The numerical model was validated for hydrodynamic and morphology parameters by comparing with the experimental data of Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17], Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Schendel et al. [22]. Based on the simulating results, the scour evolution and scour mechanisms around USAF under random waves were analyzed respectively. Two revised models were proposed according to the model of Raaijmakers and Rudolph [34] and the stochastic model developed by Myrhaug and Rue [37] to predict the equilibrium scour depth around USAF under random waves. Finally, a parametric study was carried out with the present model to study the effects of the Froude number Fr and Euler number Eu to the equilibrium scour depth around USAF under random waves. The main conclusions can be described as follows.(1)

The packed sediment scour model and the RNG k−ε turbulence model were used to simulate the sand particles transport processes and the flow field around UASF respectively. The scour evolution obtained by the present model agrees well with the experimental results of Khosronejad et al. [52], Petersen et al. [17], Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Schendel et al. [22], which indicates that the present model is accurate and reasonable for depicting the scour morphology around UASF under random waves.(2)

The vortex system at wave crest phase is mainly related to the scour process around USAF under random waves. The maximum scour depth appeared at the lee-side of the USAF at the initial stage (t < 1200 s). Subsequently, when t > 2400 s, the location of the maximum scour depth shifted to the upside of the USAF at an angle of about 45° with respect to the wave propagating direction.(3)

The error is negligible and the Raaijmakers’s model is of relatively high accuracy for predicting scour around USAF under random waves when KC is calculated by KCs,p. Given that, a further revision model (Equation (31)) was proposed according to Raaijmakers’s model to predict the equilibrium scour depth around USAF under random waves and it shows good agreement with the simulating results of the present study when KCs,p < 8.(4)

Another further revision model (Equation (33)) was proposed according to the stochastic model established by Myrhaug and Rue [37] to predict the equilibrium scour depth around USAF under random waves, and the predicting results are the most favorable for n = 10 when KCrms,a < 4. However, contrary to the case of low KCrms,a, the predicting results are the most favorable for n = 2 when KCrms,a > 4 by the comparison with experimental results of Sumer and Fredsøe [16] and Corvaro et al. [21].(5)

The same formula (Equation (37)) is applicable to express the relationship of Seq/D with Eu or Fr, and it can be inferred that the higher Fr and Eu both lead to the more intensive horseshoe vortex and larger Seq.

Author Contributions

Conceptualization, H.L. (Hongjun Liu); Data curation, R.H. and P.Y.; Formal analysis, X.W. and H.L. (Hao Leng); Funding acquisition, X.W.; Writing—original draft, R.H. and P.Y.; Writing—review & editing, X.W. and H.L. (Hao Leng); The final manuscript has been approved by all the authors. All authors have read and agreed to the published version of the manuscript.

Funding

This research was funded by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (grant number 202061027) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant number 41572247).

Institutional Review Board Statement

Not applicable.

Informed Consent Statement

Not applicable.

Data Availability Statement

The data presented in this study are available on request from the corresponding author.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Hu, R.; Liu, H.; Leng, H.; Yu, P.; Wang, X. Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 20219, 886. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9080886

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Hu R, Liu H, Leng H, Yu P, Wang X. Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering. 2021; 9(8):886. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9080886Chicago/Turabian Style

Hu, Ruigeng, Hongjun Liu, Hao Leng, Peng Yu, and Xiuhai Wang. 2021. “Scour Characteristics and Equilibrium Scour Depth Prediction around Umbrella Suction Anchor Foundation under Random Waves” Journal of Marine Science and Engineering 9, no. 8: 886. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9080886

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Design optimization of perforation on deflector for improved performance of vortex settling basin

와류 침전 수조의 성능 향상을 위한 디플렉터의 천공 설계 최적화*

Abstract

Zhuoyun MuYiyi MaLin Li

First published: 18 August 2021

https://doi.org/10.1002/ird.2640

*Optimisation de la conception de la perforation sur le déflecteur pour une meilleure performance du bassin de décantation par vortex.

Funding information: Graduate Research and Innovation Project of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, Grant/Award Number: XJ2020G171; Xinjiang Agricultural University, Grant/Award Number: SLXK-YJS-2019-04; National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant/Award Number: 52069028; Tianshan Youth Project, Grant/Award Number: 2018Q017; Department of Education, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, Grant/Award Number: XJEDU2018I010

ENTHIS LINK GOES TO A ENGLISH SECTIONFRTHIS LINK GOES TO A FRENCH SECTION

For vortex settling basins (VSBs) installed with a deflector, perforation is an effective retrofit to reduce the self-weight of the deflector and sediment deposition on it. The current study investigated experimentally the performance of VSBs the deflector of which was perforated at different locations with various opening ratios. The results showed that perforating the outside overflow area of the deflector was the optimum for reducing sediment deposition. With an opening ratio of 8.67–13% in the outside overflow area of the deflector, the VSB exhibited similar sediment removal efficiency to the original design without any openings on the deflector. The current study provided the design optimization for deflector perforation in VSBs.

디플렉터와 함께 설치된 와류 침전 분지(VSB)의 경우 천공은 디플렉터의 자체 중량과 침전물 증착을 줄이기 위한 효과적인 개조입니다. 현재 연구는 다양한 개방 비율로 다른 위치에서 디플렉터가 천공된 VSB의 성능을 실험적으로 조사했습니다. 결과는 디플렉터의 외부 오버플로 영역을 천공하는 것이 침전물 퇴적을 줄이는 데 최적임을 보여주었습니다. 디플렉터의 외부 오버플로 영역에서 8.67-13%의 개구부로 VSB는 디플렉터에 개구부가 없는 원래 설계와 유사한 침전물 제거 효율을 나타냈습니다. 현재 연구는 VSB의 디플렉터 천공에 대한 설계 최적화를 제공했습니다.

Figure 2 Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Optimized Vegetation Density to Dissipate Energy of Flood Flow in Open Canals

열린 운하에서 홍수 흐름의 에너지를 분산시키기 위해 최적화된 식생 밀도

Mahdi Feizbahr,1Navid Tonekaboni,2Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4and Hong-Xia Chen3,4
Academic Editor: Mohammad Yazdi

Abstract

강을 따라 식생은 조도를 증가시키고 평균 유속을 감소시키며, 유동 에너지를 감소시키고 강 횡단면의 유속 프로파일을 변경합니다. 자연의 많은 운하와 강은 홍수 동안 초목으로 덮여 있습니다. 운하의 조도는 식물의 영향을 많이 받기 때문에 홍수시 유동저항에 큰 영향을 미친다. 식물로 인한 흐름에 대한 거칠기 저항은 흐름 조건과 식물에 따라 달라지므로 모델은 유속, 유속 깊이 및 수로를 따라 식생 유형의 영향을 고려하여 유속을 시뮬레이션해야 합니다. 총 48개의 모델을 시뮬레이션하여 근관의 거칠기 효과를 조사했습니다. 결과는 속도를 높임으로써 베드 속도를 감소시키는 식생의 영향이 무시할만하다는 것을 나타냅니다.

Abstract

Vegetation along the river increases the roughness and reduces the average flow velocity, reduces flow energy, and changes the flow velocity profile in the cross section of the river. Many canals and rivers in nature are covered with vegetation during the floods. Canal’s roughness is strongly affected by plants and therefore it has a great effect on flow resistance during flood. Roughness resistance against the flow due to the plants depends on the flow conditions and plant, so the model should simulate the current velocity by considering the effects of velocity, depth of flow, and type of vegetation along the canal. Total of 48 models have been simulated to investigate the effect of roughness in the canal. The results indicated that, by enhancing the velocity, the effect of vegetation in decreasing the bed velocity is negligible, while when the current has lower speed, the effect of vegetation on decreasing the bed velocity is obviously considerable.

1. Introduction

Considering the impact of each variable is a very popular field within the analytical and statistical methods and intelligent systems [114]. This can help research for better modeling considering the relation of variables or interaction of them toward reaching a better condition for the objective function in control and engineering [1527]. Consequently, it is necessary to study the effects of the passive factors on the active domain [2836]. Because of the effect of vegetation on reducing the discharge capacity of rivers [37], pruning plants was necessary to improve the condition of rivers. One of the important effects of vegetation in river protection is the action of roots, which cause soil consolidation and soil structure improvement and, by enhancing the shear strength of soil, increase the resistance of canal walls against the erosive force of water. The outer limbs of the plant increase the roughness of the canal walls and reduce the flow velocity and deplete the flow energy in vicinity of the walls. Vegetation by reducing the shear stress of the canal bed reduces flood discharge and sedimentation in the intervals between vegetation and increases the stability of the walls [3841].

One of the main factors influencing the speed, depth, and extent of flood in this method is Manning’s roughness coefficient. On the other hand, soil cover [42], especially vegetation, is one of the most determining factors in Manning’s roughness coefficient. Therefore, it is expected that those seasonal changes in the vegetation of the region will play an important role in the calculated value of Manning’s roughness coefficient and ultimately in predicting the flood wave behavior [4345]. The roughness caused by plants’ resistance to flood current depends on the flow and plant conditions. Flow conditions include depth and velocity of the plant, and plant conditions include plant type, hardness or flexibility, dimensions, density, and shape of the plant [46]. In general, the issue discussed in this research is the optimization of flood-induced flow in canals by considering the effect of vegetation-induced roughness. Therefore, the effect of plants on the roughness coefficient and canal transmission coefficient and in consequence the flow depth should be evaluated [4748].

Current resistance is generally known by its roughness coefficient. The equation that is mainly used in this field is Manning equation. The ratio of shear velocity to average current velocity  is another form of current resistance. The reason for using the  ratio is that it is dimensionless and has a strong theoretical basis. The reason for using Manning roughness coefficient is its pervasiveness. According to Freeman et al. [49], the Manning roughness coefficient for plants was calculated according to the Kouwen and Unny [50] method for incremental resistance. This method involves increasing the roughness for various surface and plant irregularities. Manning’s roughness coefficient has all the factors affecting the resistance of the canal. Therefore, the appropriate way to more accurately estimate this coefficient is to know the factors affecting this coefficient [51].

To calculate the flow rate, velocity, and depth of flow in canals as well as flood and sediment estimation, it is important to evaluate the flow resistance. To determine the flow resistance in open ducts, Manning, Chézy, and Darcy–Weisbach relations are used [52]. In these relations, there are parameters such as Manning’s roughness coefficient (n), Chézy roughness coefficient (C), and Darcy–Weisbach coefficient (f). All three of these coefficients are a kind of flow resistance coefficient that is widely used in the equations governing flow in rivers [53].

The three relations that express the relationship between the average flow velocity (V) and the resistance and geometric and hydraulic coefficients of the canal are as follows:where nf, and c are Manning, Darcy–Weisbach, and Chézy coefficients, respectively. V = average flow velocity, R = hydraulic radius, Sf = slope of energy line, which in uniform flow is equal to the slope of the canal bed,  = gravitational acceleration, and Kn is a coefficient whose value is equal to 1 in the SI system and 1.486 in the English system. The coefficients of resistance in equations (1) to (3) are related as follows:

Based on the boundary layer theory, the flow resistance for rough substrates is determined from the following general relation:where f = Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction, y = flow depth, Ks = bed roughness size, and A = constant coefficient.

On the other hand, the relationship between the Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction and the shear velocity of the flow is as follows:

By using equation (6), equation (5) is converted as follows:

Investigation on the effect of vegetation arrangement on shear velocity of flow in laboratory conditions showed that, with increasing the shear Reynolds number (), the numerical value of the  ratio also increases; in other words the amount of roughness coefficient increases with a slight difference in the cases without vegetation, checkered arrangement, and cross arrangement, respectively [54].

Roughness in river vegetation is simulated in mathematical models with a variable floor slope flume by different densities and discharges. The vegetation considered submerged in the bed of the flume. Results showed that, with increasing vegetation density, canal roughness and flow shear speed increase and with increasing flow rate and depth, Manning’s roughness coefficient decreases. Factors affecting the roughness caused by vegetation include the effect of plant density and arrangement on flow resistance, the effect of flow velocity on flow resistance, and the effect of depth [4555].

One of the works that has been done on the effect of vegetation on the roughness coefficient is Darby [56] study, which investigates a flood wave model that considers all the effects of vegetation on the roughness coefficient. There are currently two methods for estimating vegetation roughness. One method is to add the thrust force effect to Manning’s equation [475758] and the other method is to increase the canal bed roughness (Manning-Strickler coefficient) [455961]. These two methods provide acceptable results in models designed to simulate floodplain flow. Wang et al. [62] simulate the floodplain with submerged vegetation using these two methods and to increase the accuracy of the results, they suggested using the effective height of the plant under running water instead of using the actual height of the plant. Freeman et al. [49] provided equations for determining the coefficient of vegetation roughness under different conditions. Lee et al. [63] proposed a method for calculating the Manning coefficient using the flow velocity ratio at different depths. Much research has been done on the Manning roughness coefficient in rivers, and researchers [496366] sought to obtain a specific number for n to use in river engineering. However, since the depth and geometric conditions of rivers are completely variable in different places, the values of Manning roughness coefficient have changed subsequently, and it has not been possible to choose a fixed number. In river engineering software, the Manning roughness coefficient is determined only for specific and constant conditions or normal flow. Lee et al. [63] stated that seasonal conditions, density, and type of vegetation should also be considered. Hydraulic roughness and Manning roughness coefficient n of the plant were obtained by estimating the total Manning roughness coefficient from the matching of the measured water surface curve and water surface height. The following equation is used for the flow surface curve:where  is the depth of water change, S0 is the slope of the canal floor, Sf is the slope of the energy line, and Fr is the Froude number which is obtained from the following equation:where D is the characteristic length of the canal. Flood flow velocity is one of the important parameters of flood waves, which is very important in calculating the water level profile and energy consumption. In the cases where there are many limitations for researchers due to the wide range of experimental dimensions and the variety of design parameters, the use of numerical methods that are able to estimate the rest of the unknown results with acceptable accuracy is economically justified.

FLOW-3D software uses Finite Difference Method (FDM) for numerical solution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow. This software is dedicated to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is provided by Flow Science [67]. The flow is divided into networks with tubular cells. For each cell there are values of dependent variables and all variables are calculated in the center of the cell, except for the velocity, which is calculated at the center of the cell. In this software, two numerical techniques have been used for geometric simulation, FAVOR™ (Fractional-Area-Volume-Obstacle-Representation) and the VOF (Volume-of-Fluid) method. The equations used at this model for this research include the principle of mass survival and the magnitude of motion as follows. The fluid motion equations in three dimensions, including the Navier–Stokes equations with some additional terms, are as follows:where  are mass accelerations in the directions xyz and  are viscosity accelerations in the directions xyz and are obtained from the following equations:

Shear stresses  in equation (11) are obtained from the following equations:

The standard model is used for high Reynolds currents, but in this model, RNG theory allows the analytical differential formula to be used for the effective viscosity that occurs at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the RNG model can be used for low and high Reynolds currents.

Weather changes are high and this affects many factors continuously. The presence of vegetation in any area reduces the velocity of surface flows and prevents soil erosion, so vegetation will have a significant impact on reducing destructive floods. One of the methods of erosion protection in floodplain watersheds is the use of biological methods. The presence of vegetation in watersheds reduces the flow rate during floods and prevents soil erosion. The external organs of plants increase the roughness and decrease the velocity of water flow and thus reduce its shear stress energy. One of the important factors with which the hydraulic resistance of plants is expressed is the roughness coefficient. Measuring the roughness coefficient of plants and investigating their effect on reducing velocity and shear stress of flow is of special importance.

Roughness coefficients in canals are affected by two main factors, namely, flow conditions and vegetation characteristics [68]. So far, much research has been done on the effect of the roughness factor created by vegetation, but the issue of plant density has received less attention. For this purpose, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of vegetation density on flow velocity changes.

In a study conducted using a software model on three density modes in the submerged state effect on flow velocity changes in 48 different modes was investigated (Table 1).

Table 1 

The studied models.

The number of cells used in this simulation is equal to 1955888 cells. The boundary conditions were introduced to the model as a constant speed and depth (Figure 1). At the output boundary, due to the presence of supercritical current, no parameter for the current is considered. Absolute roughness for floors and walls was introduced to the model (Figure 1). In this case, the flow was assumed to be nonviscous and air entry into the flow was not considered. After  seconds, this model reached a convergence accuracy of .

Figure 1 

The simulated model and its boundary conditions.

Due to the fact that it is not possible to model the vegetation in FLOW-3D software, in this research, the vegetation of small soft plants was studied so that Manning’s coefficients can be entered into the canal bed in the form of roughness coefficients obtained from the studies of Chow [69] in similar conditions. In practice, in such modeling, the effect of plant height is eliminated due to the small height of herbaceous plants, and modeling can provide relatively acceptable results in these conditions.

48 models with input velocities proportional to the height of the regular semihexagonal canal were considered to create supercritical conditions. Manning coefficients were applied based on Chow [69] studies in order to control the canal bed. Speed profiles were drawn and discussed.

Any control and simulation system has some inputs that we should determine to test any technology [7077]. Determination and true implementation of such parameters is one of the key steps of any simulation [237881] and computing procedure [8286]. The input current is created by applying the flow rate through the VFR (Volume Flow Rate) option and the output flow is considered Output and for other borders the Symmetry option is considered.

Simulation of the models and checking their action and responses and observing how a process behaves is one of the accepted methods in engineering and science [8788]. For verification of FLOW-3D software, the results of computer simulations are compared with laboratory measurements and according to the values of computational error, convergence error, and the time required for convergence, the most appropriate option for real-time simulation is selected (Figures 2 and 3 ).

Figure 2 

Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Figure 3 

Velocity profiles in positions 2 and 5.

The canal is 7 meters long, 0.5 meters wide, and 0.8 meters deep. This test was used to validate the application of the software to predict the flow rate parameters. In this experiment, instead of using the plant, cylindrical pipes were used in the bottom of the canal.

The conditions of this modeling are similar to the laboratory conditions and the boundary conditions used in the laboratory were used for numerical modeling. The critical flow enters the simulation model from the upstream boundary, so in the upstream boundary conditions, critical velocity and depth are considered. The flow at the downstream boundary is supercritical, so no parameters are applied to the downstream boundary.

The software well predicts the process of changing the speed profile in the open canal along with the considered obstacles. The error in the calculated speed values can be due to the complexity of the flow and the interaction of the turbulence caused by the roughness of the floor with the turbulence caused by the three-dimensional cycles in the hydraulic jump. As a result, the software is able to predict the speed distribution in open canals.

2. Modeling Results

After analyzing the models, the results were shown in graphs (Figures 414 ). The total number of experiments in this study was 48 due to the limitations of modeling.


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Figure 4 

Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 1 m and flow velocities of 3–3.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 1 meter and a flow velocity of (a) 3 meters per second, (b) 3.1 meters per second, (c) 3.2 meters per second, and (d) 3.3 meters per second.

Figure 5 

Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3 meters per second.

Figure 6 

Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.1 meters per second.

Figure 7 

Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.2 meters per second.

Figure 8 

Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.3 meters per second.


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Figure 9 

Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 2 m and flow velocities of 4–4.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

Figure 10 

Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4 meters per second.

Figure 11 

Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.1 meters per second.

Figure 12 

Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.2 meters per second.

Figure 13 

Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.3 meters per second.


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Figure 14 

Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

To investigate the effects of roughness with flow velocity, the trend of flow velocity changes at different depths and with supercritical flow to a Froude number proportional to the depth of the section has been obtained.

According to the velocity profiles of Figure 5, it can be seen that, with the increasing of Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figures 5 to 8, it can be found that, with increasing the Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the models 1 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and of course increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 10, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figure 11, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 510, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

With increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases (Figure 12). But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models (Figures 58 and 1011), which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 13, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 5 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 15, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

Figure 15 

Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5 meters per second.

According to Figure 16, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher model, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 16 

Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.1 meters per second.

According to Figure 17, it is clear that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 17 

Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.2 meters per second.

According to Figure 18, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 18 

Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.3 meters per second.

According to Figure 19, it can be seen that the vegetation placed in front of the flow input velocity has negligible effect on the reduction of velocity, which of course can be justified due to the flexibility of the vegetation. The only unusual thing is the unexpected decrease in floor speed of 3 m/s compared to higher speeds.


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Figure 19 

Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 1 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 1 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 1 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 1 m.

According to Figure 20, by increasing the speed of vegetation, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow rate becomes more noticeable. And the role of input current does not have much effect in reducing speed.


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Figure 20 

Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 2 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 2 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 2 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 2 m.

According to Figure 21, it can be seen that, with increasing speed, the effect of vegetation on reducing the bed flow rate becomes more noticeable and the role of the input current does not have much effect. In general, it can be seen that, by increasing the speed of the input current, the slope of the profiles increases from the bed to the water surface and due to the fact that, in software, the roughness coefficient applies to the channel floor only in the boundary conditions, this can be perfectly justified. Of course, it can be noted that, due to the flexible conditions of the vegetation of the bed, this modeling can show acceptable results for such grasses in the canal floor. In the next directions, we may try application of swarm-based optimization methods for modeling and finding the most effective factors in this research [27815188994]. In future, we can also apply the simulation logic and software of this research for other domains such as power engineering [9599].


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Figure 21 

Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 3 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 3 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 3 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 3 m.

3. Conclusion

The effects of vegetation on the flood canal were investigated by numerical modeling with FLOW-3D software. After analyzing the results, the following conclusions were reached:(i)Increasing the density of vegetation reduces the velocity of the canal floor but has no effect on the velocity of the canal surface.(ii)Increasing the Froude number is directly related to increasing the speed of the canal floor.(iii)In the canal with a depth of one meter, a sudden increase in speed can be observed from the lowest speed and higher speed, which is justified by the sudden increase in Froude number.(iv)As the inlet flow rate increases, the slope of the profiles from the bed to the water surface increases.(v)By reducing the Froude number, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow bed rate becomes more noticeable. And the input velocity in reducing the velocity of the canal floor does not have much effect.(vi)At a flow rate between 3 and 3.3 meters per second due to the shallow depth of the canal and the higher landing number a more critical area is observed in which the flow bed velocity in this area is between 2.86 and 3.1 m/s.(vii)Due to the critical flow velocity and the slight effect of the roughness of the horseshoe vortex floor, it is not visible and is only partially observed in models 1-2-3 and 21.(viii)As the flow rate increases, the effect of vegetation on the rate of bed reduction decreases.(ix)In conditions where less current intensity is passing, vegetation has a greater effect on reducing current intensity and energy consumption increases.(x)In the case of using the flow rate of 0.8 cubic meters per second, the velocity distribution and flow regime show about 20% more energy consumption than in the case of using the flow rate of 1.3 cubic meters per second.

Nomenclature

n:Manning’s roughness coefficient
C:Chézy roughness coefficient
f:Darcy–Weisbach coefficient
V:Flow velocity
R:Hydraulic radius
g:Gravitational acceleration
y:Flow depth
Ks:Bed roughness
A:Constant coefficient
:Reynolds number
y/∂x:Depth of water change
S0:Slope of the canal floor
Sf:Slope of energy line
Fr:Froude number
D:Characteristic length of the canal
G:Mass acceleration
:Shear stresses.

Data Availability

All data are included within the paper.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

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Strain rate magnitude at the free surface, illustrating Kelvin-Helmoltz (KH) shear instabilities.

On the reef scale hydrodynamics at Sodwana Bay, South Africa

Environmental Fluid Mechanics (2022)Cite this article

Abstract

The hydrodynamics of coral reefs strongly influences their biological functioning, impacting processes such as nutrient availability and uptake, recruitment success and bleaching. For example, coral reefs located in oligotrophic regions depend on upwelling for nutrient supply. Coral reefs at Sodwana Bay, located on the east coast of South Africa, are an example of high latitude marginal reefs. These reefs are subjected to complex hydrodynamic forcings due to the interaction between the strong Agulhas current and the highly variable topography of the region. In this study, we explore the reef scale hydrodynamics resulting from the bathymetry for two steady current scenarios at Two-Mile Reef (TMR) using a combination of field data and numerical simulations. The influence of tides or waves was not considered for this study as well as reef-scale roughness. Tilt current meters with onboard temperature sensors were deployed at selected locations within TMR. We used field observations to identify the dominant flow conditions on the reef for numerical simulations that focused on the hydrodynamics driven by mean currents. During the field campaign, southerly currents were the predominant flow feature with occasional flow reversals to the north. Northerly currents were associated with greater variability towards the southern end of TMR. Numerical simulations showed that Jesser Point was central to the development of flow features for both the northerly and southerly current scenarios. High current variability in the south of TMR during reverse currents is related to the formation of Kelvin-Helmholtz type shear instabilities along the outer edge of an eddy formed north of Jesser Point. Furthermore, downward vertical velocities were computed along the offshore shelf at TMR during southerly currents. Current reversals caused a change in vertical velocities to an upward direction due to the orientation of the bathymetry relative to flow directions.

Highlights

  • A predominant southerly current was measured at Two-Mile Reef with occasional reversals towards the north.
  • Field observations indicated that northerly currents are spatially varied along Two-Mile Reef.
  • Simulation of reverse currents show the formation of a separated flow due to interaction with Jesser Point with Kelvin–Helmholtz type shear instabilities along the seaward edge.

지금까지 Sodwana Bay에서 자세한 암초 규모 유체 역학을 모델링하려는 시도는 없었습니다. 이러한 모델의 결과는 규모가 있는 산호초 사이의 흐름이 산호초 건강에 어떤 영향을 미치는지 탐색하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 이 연구에서는 Sodwana Bay의 유체역학을 탐색하는 데 사용할 수 있는 LES 모델을 개발하기 위한 단계별 접근 방식을 구현합니다. 여기서 우리는 이 초기 단계에서 파도와 조수의 영향을 배제하면서 Agulhas 해류의 유체역학에 초점을 맞춥니다. 이 접근법은 흐름의 첫 번째 LES를 제시하고 Sodwana Bay의 산호초에서 혼합함으로써 향후 연구의 기초를 제공합니다.

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Figure 1 | Laboratory channel dimensions.

강화된 조도 계수 및 인버트 레벨 변화가 있는 90도 측면 턴아웃에서의 유동에 대한 실험적 및 수치적 연구

Experimental and numerical study of flow at a 90 degree lateral turnout with enhanced roughness coefficient and invert level changes

Maryam Bagheria, Seyed M. Ali Zomorodianb, Masih Zolghadrc, H. Md. Azamathulla d,*
and C. Venkata Siva Rama Prasade
a Hydraulic Structures, Department of Water Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
b Department of Water Engineering, College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran
c Department of Water Sciences Engineering, College of Agriculture, Jahrom University, Jahrom, Iran
d Civil & Environmental Engineering, The University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus, Port of Spain, Trinidad
e Department of Civil Engineering, St. Peters Engineering College, Hyderabad, India
*Corresponding author. E-mail: azmatheditor@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

측면 분기기(흡입구)의 상류측에서 유동 분리는 분기기 입구에서 맴돌이 전류를 일으키는 중요한 문제입니다. 이는 흐름의 유효 폭, 분기 용량 및 효율성을 감소시킵니다. 따라서 분리구역의 크기를 파악하고 그 크기를 줄이기 위한 방안을 제시하는 것이 필수적이다.

본 연구에서는 분리 구역의 크기를 줄이기 위한 방법으로 분출구 입구에 7가지 유형의 조면화 요소와 4가지 다른 방류가 있는 3가지 다른 베드 인버트 레벨의 설치(총 84회 실험)를 조사했습니다. 또한 3D 전산 유체 역학(CFD) 모델을 사용하여 분리 구역의 흐름 패턴과 치수를 평가했습니다.

결과는 조도 계수를 향상시키면 분리 영역 치수를 최대 38%까지 줄일 수 있는 반면 드롭 구현 효과는 사용된 조도 계수에 따라 이 영역을 다르게 축소할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다. 두 방법을 결합하면 분리 구역 치수를 최대 63%까지 줄일 수 있습니다.

Flow separation at the upstream side of lateral turnouts (intakes) is a critical issue causing eddy currents at the turnout entrance. It reduces the effective width of flow, turnout capacity and efficiency. Therefore, it is essential to identify the dimensions of the separation zone and propose remedies to reduce its dimensions.

Installation of 7 types of roughening elements at the turnout entrance and 3 different bed invert levels, with 4 different discharges (making a total of 84 experiments) were examined in this study as a method to reduce the dimensions of the separation zone. Additionally, a 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model was utilized to evaluate the flow pattern and dimensions of the separation zone.

Results showed that enhancing the roughness coefficient can reduce the separation zone dimensions up to 38% while the drop implementation effect can scale down this area differently based on the roughness coefficient used. Combining both methods can reduce the separation zone dimensions up to 63%.

Key words

discharge ratio, flow separation zone, intake, three dimensional simulation

Experimental and numerical study of flow at a 90 degree lateral turnout with enhanced
roughness coefficient and invert level changes
Experimental and numerical study of flow at a 90 degree lateral turnout with enhanced roughness coefficient and invert level changes
Figure 1 | Laboratory channel dimensions.
Figure 1 | Laboratory channel dimensions.
Figure 2 | Roughness plates.
Figure 2 | Roughness plates.
Figure 4 | Effect of roughness on separation zone dimensions.
Figure 4 | Effect of roughness on separation zone dimensions.
Figure 10 | Comparision of the vortex area (software output) for three roughnesses (0.009, 0.023 and 0.032).
Figure 10 | Comparision of the vortex area (software output) for three roughnesses (0.009, 0.023 and 0.032).
Figure 11 | Comparison of vortex area in 3D mode (tecplot output) with two roughnesses (a) 0.009 and (b) 0.032.
Figure 11 | Comparison of vortex area in 3D mode (tecplot output) with two roughnesses (a) 0.009 and (b) 0.032.
Figure 12 | Velocity vector for flow condition Q¼22 l/s, near surface.
Figure 12 | Velocity vector for flow condition Q¼22 l/s, near surface.

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Figure 15. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on a wall under different Reynolds numbers.

Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment

by Hongbo Mi 1,2, Chuan Wang 1,3, Xuanwen Jia 3,*, Bo Hu 2, Hongliang Wang 4, Hui Wang 3 and Yong Zhu 5

1College of Mechatronics Engineering, Hainan Vocational University of Science and Technology, Haikou 571126, China

2Department of Energy and Power Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China

3College of Hydraulic Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China

4School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering/Flight College, Changzhou Institute of Technology, Changzhou 213032, China

5National Research Center of Pumps, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013, China

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.Sustainability202315(6), 5159; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

Received: 30 January 2023 / Revised: 4 March 2023 / Accepted: 10 March 2023 / Published: 14 March 2023(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies of Renewable Energy and Water Management for Sustainable Environment

Abstract

Due to their high efficiency, low heat loss and associated sustainability advantages, impinging jets have been used extensively in marine engineering, geotechnical engineering and other engineering practices. In this paper, the flow structure and impact characteristics of impinging jets with different Reynolds numbers and impact distances are systematically studied by Flow-3D based on PIV experiments. In the study, the relevant state parameters of the jets are dimensionlessly treated, obtaining not only the linear relationship between the length of the potential nucleation zone and the impinging distance, but also the linear relationship between the axial velocity and the axial distance in the impinging zone. In addition, after the jet impinges on the flat plate, the vortex action range caused by the wall-attached flow of the jet gradually decreases inward with the increase of the impinging distance. By examining the effect of Reynolds number Re on the hydraulic characteristics of the submerged impact jet, it can be found that the structure of the continuous submerged impact jet is relatively independent of the Reynolds number. At the same time, the final simulation results demonstrate the applicability of the linear relationship between the length of the potential core region and the impact distance. This study provides methodological guidance and theoretical support for relevant engineering practice and subsequent research on impinging jets, which has strong theoretical and practical significance.

Keywords: 

PIVFlow-3Dimpinging jethydraulic characteristicsimpinging distance

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Figure 1. Geometric model.

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Figure 2. Model grid schematic.

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Figure 3. (a) Schematic diagram of the experimental setup; (b) PIV images of vertical impinging jets with velocity fields.

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Figure 4. (a) Velocity distribution verification at the outlet of the jet pipe; (b) Distribution of flow angle in the mid-axis of the jet [39].

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Figure 5. Along-range distribution of the dimensionless axial velocity of the jet at different impact distances.Figure 6 shows the variation of H

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Figure 6. Relationship between the distribution of potential core region and the impact height H/D.

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Figure 7. The relationship between the potential core length 

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Figure 8. Along-range distribution of the flow angle φ of the jet at different impact distances.

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Figure 9. Velocity distribution along the axis of the jet at different impinging regions.

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Figure 10. The absolute value distribution of slope under different impact distances.

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Figure 11. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on wall under different impinging distances.

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Figure 12. Along-range distribution of the dimensionless axial velocity of the jet at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 13. Along-range distribution of the flow angle φ of the jet at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 14. Velocity distribution along the jet axis at different Reynolds numbers.

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Figure 15. Velocity distribution of impinging jet on a wall under different Reynolds numbers.

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Mi, H.; Wang, C.; Jia, X.; Hu, B.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Zhu, Y. Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment. Sustainability 202315, 5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

AMA Style

Mi H, Wang C, Jia X, Hu B, Wang H, Wang H, Zhu Y. Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment. Sustainability. 2023; 15(6):5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159Chicago/Turabian Style

Mi, Hongbo, Chuan Wang, Xuanwen Jia, Bo Hu, Hongliang Wang, Hui Wang, and Yong Zhu. 2023. “Hydraulic Characteristics of Continuous Submerged Jet Impinging on a Wall by Using Numerical Simulation and PIV Experiment” Sustainability 15, no. 6: 5159. https://doi.org/10.3390/su15065159

Flow Hydrodynamics Influences Due to Flood Plain Sand Mining in a Meandering Channel

Flow Hydrodynamics Influences Due to Flood Plain Sand Mining in a Meandering Channel

Abstract

Flow hydrodynamics in the main channel due to floodplain sand mining is important for a better understanding of maintaining the natural habitat or the reliance between the flood plain and the main channel for the river’s long-term survival and also facilitates more effective river restoration engineering. Day by day anthropogenic stresses are increasing in the river corridor system, indiscriminate sand mining is one of them. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based software Flow-3D hydro (renormalized group K-ε turbulence model used) is used to study the flow hydrodynamics of sinuous (sinuosity index = 1.25) channel 18 m long, 1 m width, and 0.3 m height with floodplain sand mining pit. Sand mining additionally increases the secondary current near the outer bank of the channel, therefore leading to scouring or erosion at the outer bank, as a result, rivers migrate laterally. The turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is concentrated in the mining pit and near the inner bank. This study result can be used to understand the flow hydrodynamic of the river system due to the series of sand mining.

Keywords

  • Flow hydrodynamics
  • Turbulence modeling
  • Flow-3D
  • Sinuosity
  • Sand mining

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  24. Kim, S.-C., et al.: Estimating bottom stress in tidal boundary layer from acoustic Doppler velocimeter data. J. Hydraul. Eng. 126(6), 399–406 (2000)CrossRef Google Scholar 

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Flow Hydrodynamics Influences Due to Flood Plain Sand Mining in a Meandering Channel

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Abstract

Flow hydrodynamics in the main channel due to floodplain sand mining is important for a better understanding of maintaining the natural habitat or the reliance between the flood plain and the main channel for the river’s long-term survival and also facilitates more effective river restoration engineering. Day by day anthropogenic stresses are increasing in the river corridor system, indiscriminate sand mining is one of them. In this study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based software Flow-3D hydro (renormalized group K-ε turbulence model used) is used to study the flow hydrodynamics of sinuous (sinuosity index = 1.25) channel 18 m long, 1 m width, and 0.3 m height with floodplain sand mining pit. Sand mining additionally increases the secondary current near the outer bank of the channel, therefore leading to scouring or erosion at the outer bank, as a result, rivers migrate laterally. The turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is concentrated in the mining pit and near the inner bank. This study result can be used to understand the flow hydrodynamic of the river system due to the series of sand mining.

Keywords

  • Flow hydrodynamics
  • Turbulence modeling
  • Flow-3D
  • Sinuosity
  • Sand mining

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References

  1. Best, J.: Anthropogenic stresses on the world’s big rivers. Nat. Geosci. 12(1), 7–21 (2019)CrossRef CAS Google Scholar 
  2. Bagnold, R.A.: Some Aspects of the Shape of River Meanders. US Government Printing Office (1960)Google Scholar 
  3. Kondolf, G.M.: Freshwater Gravel Mining and Dredging Issues: White Paper. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (2002)Google Scholar 
  4. Molnár, P., Ramírez, J.A.: Energy dissipation theories and optimal channel characteristics of river networks. Water Resour. Res. 34(7), 1809–1818 (1998)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  5. Padmalal, D., Maya, K.: Sand Mining: Environmental Impacts and Selected Case Studies. Springer (2014)Google Scholar 
  6. Hübler, M., Pothen, F.: Can smart policies solve the sand mining problem? PLoS ONE 16(4), e0248882 (2021)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  7. Khan, S., Sugie, A.: Sand mining and its social impacts on local society in rural Bangladesh: a case study of a village in Tangail district. J. Urban Reg. Stud. Contemp. India 2(1), 1–11 (2015)Google Scholar 
  8. Daneshfaraz, R. et al.: The experimental study of the effects of river mining holes on the bridge piers. Iranian J. Soil Water Res. 50(7), 1619–1633 (2019)Google Scholar 
  9. Hackney, C. R., Darby, S. E., Parsons, D. R., Leyland, J., Best, J. L., Aalto, R., … & Houseago, R. C.: River bank instability from unsustainable sand mining in the lower Mekong River. Nat. Sustain. 3(3), 217–225 (2020)Google Scholar 
  10. Callander, R.A.: River meandering. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 10(1), 129–158 (1978)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  11. Koehnken, L., Rintoul, M.: Impacts of sand mining on ecosystem structure, process and biodiversity in rivers. World Wildlife Fund International (2018)Google Scholar 
  12. Gavriletea, M.D.: Environmental impacts of sand exploitation. Analysis of sand market. Sustainability 9(7), 1118 (2017)Google Scholar 
  13. Koehnken, L., et al.: Impacts of riverine sand mining on freshwater ecosystems: a review of the scientific evidence and guidance for future research. River Res. Appl. 36(3), 362–370 (2020)Google Scholar 
  14. Myers, W.R.C.: Momentum transfer in a compound channel. J. Hydraul. Res. 16(2), 139–150 (1978)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  15. Rajaratnam, N., Ahmadi, R.M.: Interaction between main channel and flood-plain flows. J. Hydraul. Div. 105(5), 573–588 (1979)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  16. Sellin, R.H.J.: A laboratory investigation into the interaction between the flow in the channel of a river and that over its flood plain. La Houille Blanche 7, 793–802 (1964)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  17. Karami, H., et al.: Verification of numerical study of scour around spur dikes using experimental data. Water Environ. J. 28(1), 124–134 (2014)Google Scholar 
  18. Bathurst, J.C., et al.: Overbank sediment deposition patterns for straight and meandering flume channels. Earth Surf. Proc. Land. 27(6), 659–665 (2002)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  19. Xu, D., Bai, Y.: Experimental study on the bed topography evolution in alluvial meandering rivers with various sinuousnesses. J. Hydro-Environ. Res. 7(2), 92–102 (2013)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  20. Priego-Hernández, G.A., Rivera-Trejo, F.: Secondary currents: measurement and analysis. Atmósfera 29(1), 23–34 (2016)Google Scholar 
  21. Alshamani, K.M.M.: Correlations among turbulent shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and axial turbulence intensity. AIAA J. 16(8), 859–861 (1978)CrossRef Google Scholar 
  22. Biron, P.M., et al.: Comparing different methods of bed shear stress estimates in simple and complex flow fields. Earth Surface Process. Landforms: J. British Geomorphol. Res. Group 29(11), 1403–1415 (2004)Google Scholar 
  23. Clark, L.A., Theresa, M.W.: Boundary Shear Stress Along Vegetated Streambanks (2007)Google Scholar 
  24. Kim, S.-C., et al.: Estimating bottom stress in tidal boundary layer from acoustic Doppler velocimeter data. J. Hydraul. Eng. 126(6), 399–406 (2000)CrossRef Google Scholar 

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Author information

Authors and Affiliations

  1. Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, Assam, IndiaO. P. Maurya, K. K. Nandi, S. Modalavalasa & S. Dutta

Corresponding author

Correspondence to O. P. Maurya .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

  1. Centre for the Environment, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, IndiaDeepmoni Deka
  2. Department of Chemical engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, IndiaSubrata Kumar Majumder
  3. Department of Chemical engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati, IndiaMihir Kumar Purkait
CFD Modelling of Local Scour and Flow Field around Isolated and In-Line Bridge Piers using FLOW-3D

CFD Modelling of Local Scour and Flow Field around Isolated and In-Line Bridge Piers using FLOW-3D

Abstract

CFD Modelling of Local Scour and Flow Field around Isolated and In-Line Bridge Piers using FLOW-3D
CFD Modelling of Local Scour and Flow Field around Isolated and In-Line Bridge Piers using FLOW-3D

Harshvardhan Harshvardhan1and Deo Raj Kaushal2

  • 1Research Scholar, Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India (cez198227@iitd.ac.in)
  • 2Professor, Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi, India (Deo.Raj.Kaushal@civil.iitd.ac.in)

Scouring at bridge piers is troublesome and inevitable at the same time. Numerous empirical studies have been conducted in the last century to predict scour depth, but they completely ignore the physics of the problem. The physics behind scouring at bridge piers can be best understood in terms of the effect of the flow field around the pier at different stages of scour. This study comprises experimental and numerical parts. Experiments are conducted in the laboratory in which the flow field data at equilibrium is collected using Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and the equilibrium scoured bed is measured around isolated and In-Line Piers. Additionally, the commercial CFD code “FLOW-3D HYDRO 2022 R1” is utilized to simulate the flow field and scour around bridge piers. The FLOW-3D model solves the three–dimensional momentum and continuity equations coupled with the sediment transport equations to calculate and predict the flow field and the equilibrium scoured bed. While the maximum scour depth at equilibrium has been used to validate various CFD codes in the past, point-wise comparison of scour depth is scanty in previous research works. Moreover, the flow field at the equilibrium scour stage obtained using FLOW-3D has also been compared with experimental data available in the literature and experiment conducted in the laboratory. The performance of the CFD model is evaluated, the flow field and scoured bed geometry at equilibrium are analyzed and results are presented.

How to cite: Harshvardhan, H. and Kaushal, D. R.: CFD Modelling of Local Scour and Flow Field around Isolated and In-Line Bridge Piers using FLOW-3D , EGU General Assembly 2023, Vienna, Austria, 24–28 Apr 2023, EGU23-3820,

https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu23-3820, 2023.

Figure 1.| Physical models of the vertical drop, backdrop and stepped drop developed in the Technical University of Lisbon.

Numerical modelling of air-water flows in sewer drops

하수구 방울의 공기-물 흐름 수치 모델링

Paula Beceiro (corresponding author)
Maria do Céu Almeida
Hydraulic and Environment Department (DHA), National Laboratory for Civil Engineering, Avenida do Brasil 101, 1700-066 Lisbon, Portugal
E-mail: pbeceiro@lnec.pt
Jorge Matos
Department of Civil Engineering, Arquitecture and Geosources,
Technical University of Lisbon (IST), Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal

ABSTRACT

물 흐름에 용존 산소(DO)의 존재는 해로운 영향의 발생을 방지하는 데 유익한 것으로 인식되는 호기성 조건을 보장하는 중요한 요소입니다.

하수도 시스템에서 흐르는 폐수에 DO를 통합하는 것은 공기-액체 경계면 또는 방울이나 접합부와 같은 특이점의 존재로 인해 혼입된 공기를 통한 연속 재방출의 영향을 정량화하기 위해 광범위하게 조사된 프로세스입니다. 공기 혼입 및 후속 환기를 향상시키기 위한 하수구 드롭의 위치는 하수구의 호기성 조건을 촉진하는 효과적인 방법입니다.

본 논문에서는 수직 낙하, 배경 및 계단식 낙하를 CFD(전산유체역학) 코드 FLOW-3D®를 사용하여 모델링하여 이러한 유형의 구조물의 존재로 인해 발생하는 난류로 인한 공기-물 흐름을 평가했습니다. 이용 가능한 실험적 연구에 기초한 수력학적 변수의 평가와 공기 혼입의 분석이 수행되었습니다.

이러한 구조물에 대한 CFD 모델의 결과는 Soares(2003), Afonso(2004) 및 Azevedo(2006)가 개발한 해당 물리적 모델에서 얻은 방류, 압력 헤드 및 수심의 측정을 사용하여 검증되었습니다.

유압 거동에 대해 매우 잘 맞았습니다. 수치 모델을 검증한 후 공기 연행 분석을 수행했습니다.

The presence of dissolved oxygen (DO) in water flows is an important factor to ensure the aerobic conditions recognised as beneficial to prevent the occurrence of detrimental effects. The incorporation of DO in wastewater flowing in sewer systems is a process widely investigated in order to quantify the effect of continuous reaeration through the air-liquid interface or air entrained due the presence of singularities such as drops or junctions. The location of sewer drops to enhance air entrainment and subsequently reaeration is an effective practice to promote aerobic conditions in sewers. In the present paper, vertical drops, backdrops and stepped drop was modelled using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLOW-3D® to evaluate the air-water flows due to the turbulence induced by the presence of this type of structures. The assessment of the hydraulic variables and an analysis of the air entrainment based in the available experimental studies were carried out. The results of the CFD models for these structures were validated using measurements of discharge, pressure head and water depth obtained in the corresponding physical models developed by Soares (2003), Afonso (2004) and Azevedo (2006). A very good fit was obtained for the hydraulic behaviour. After validation of numerical models, analysis of the air entrainment was carried out.

Key words | air entrainment, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), sewer drops

Figure 1.| Physical models of the vertical drop, backdrop and stepped drop developed in the Technical University of Lisbon.
Figure 1.| Physical models of the vertical drop, backdrop and stepped drop developed in the Technical University of Lisbon.
Figure 3. Comparison between the experimental and numerical pressure head along of the invert of the outlet pipe.
Figure 3. Comparison between the experimental and numerical pressure head along of the invert of the outlet pipe.
Figure 4. Average void fraction along the longitudinal axis of the outlet pipe for the lower discharges in the vertical drop and backdrop.
Figure 4. Average void fraction along the longitudinal axis of the outlet pipe for the lower discharges in the vertical drop and backdrop.

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Almeida, M. C., Butler, D. & Matos, J. S. Reaeration by sewer drops. In: 8th Int. Conf. on Urban Storm Drainage, Sydney, Australia.
Azevedo, R. I. Transferência de oxigénio em quedas guiadas em colectores. M.Sc. Thesis, IST, Lisboa, Portugal.
Beceiro, P., Almeida, M. C. & Matos, J. Numerical Modelling of air-water flows in a vertical drop and a backdrop. In: 3rd IAHR Europe Congress, Porto, Portugal.
Bombardelli, F. A., Meireles, I. & Matos, J. S. Laboratory measurements and multi-block numerical simulations of the mean flow and turbulence in the non-aerated skimming flow region of step stepped spillways. Environ. Fluid Mech. 11 (3), 263–288.
Brethour, J. M. & Hirt, C. W. Drift Model for TwoComponent Flows. Flow Science, Inc., Los Alamos, NM, USA.
Chamani, M. R. Jet Flow on Stepped Spillways and Drops. M.Sc. Thesis, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada.
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Dufresne, M., Vazques, J., Terfous, A., Ghenaim, A. & Poulet, J. Experimental investigation and CFD modelling of flow, sedimentation, and solids separation in a combined sewer detention tank. Computer and Fluids 38, 1042–1049.
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Figure 2. Different PKW Types.

A review of Piano Key Weir as a superior alternative for dam rehabilitation

댐 복구를 위한 우수한 대안으로서의 Piano Key Weir에 대한 검토

Amiya Abhash &

K. K. Pandey

Pages 541-551 | Received 03 Mar 2020, Accepted 07 May 2020, Published online: 21 May 2020

ABSTRACT

Dams fall in ‘installations containing dangerous forces’ because of their massive impact on the environment and civilian life and property as per International humanitarian law. As such, it becomes vital for hydraulic engineers to refurbish various solutions for dam rehabilitation. This paper presents a review of a new type of weir installation called Piano Key Weir (PKW), which is becoming popular around the world for its higher spillway capacity both for existing and new dam spillway installations. This paper reviews the geometry along with structural integrity, discharging capacity, economic aspects, aeration requirements, sediment transport and erosion aspects of Piano Key Weir (PKW) as compared with other traditional spillway structures and alternatives from literature. The comparison with other alternatives shows PKW to be an excellent alternative for dam risk mitigation owing to its high spillway capabilities and economy, along with its use in both existing and new hydraulic structures.

댐은 국제 인도법에 따라 환경과 민간인 생활 및 재산에 막대한 영향을 미치기 때문에 ‘위험한 힘을 포함하는 시설물’에 속합니다. 따라서 유압 엔지니어는 댐 복구를 위한 다양한 솔루션을 재정비해야 합니다.

이 백서에서는 PKW(Piano Key Weir)라는 새로운 유형의 둑 설치에 대한 검토를 제공합니다. PKW는 기존 및 신규 댐 방수로 설치 모두에서 더 높은 방수로 용량으로 전 세계적으로 인기를 얻고 있습니다.

이 백서에서는 구조적 무결성, 배출 용량, 경제적 측면, 폭기 요구 사항, 퇴적물 운반 및 PKW(Piano Key Weir)의 침식 측면과 함께 다른 전통적인 여수로 구조 및 문헌의 대안과 비교하여 기하학을 검토합니다.

다른 대안과의 비교는 PKW가 높은 여수로 기능과 경제성으로 인해 댐 위험 완화를 위한 탁월한 대안이며 기존 및 새로운 수력 구조물 모두에 사용됨을 보여줍니다.

KEYWORDS: 

Figure 2. Different PKW Types.
Figure 2. Different PKW Types.

References

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Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.

FLOW-3D Model Development for the Analysis of the Flow Characteristics of Downstream Hydraulic Structures

하류 유압 구조물의 유동 특성 분석을 위한 FLOW-3D 모델 개발

Beom-Jin Kim 1, Jae-Hong Hwang 2 and Byunghyun Kim 3,*
1 Advanced Structures and Seismic Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute,
Daejeon 34057, Korea
2 Korea Water Resources Corporation (K-Water), Daejeon 34350, Korea
3 Department of Civil Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea

  • Correspondence: bhkimc@knu.ac.kr; Tel.: +82-53-950-7819

Abstract

Hydraulic structures installed in rivers inevitably create a water level difference between upstream and downstream regions. The potential energy due to this difference in water level is converted into kinetic energy, causing high-velocity flow and hydraulic jumps in the river. As a result, problems such as scouring and sloping downstream may occur around the hydraulic structures. In this study, a FLOW-3D model was constructed to perform a numerical analysis of the ChangnyeongHaman weir in the Republic of Korea. The constructed model was verified based on surface velocity measurements from a field gate operation experiment. In the simulation results, the flow discharge differed from the measured value by 9–15 m3/s, from which the accuracy was evaluated to be 82–87%. The flow velocity was evaluated with an accuracy of 92% from a difference of 0.01 to 0.16 m/s. Following this verification, a flow analysis of the hydraulic structures was performed according to boundary conditions and operation conditions for numerous scenarios. Since 2018, the ChangnyeongHaman weir gate has been fully opened due to the implementation of Korea’s eco-environmental policy; therefore, in this study, the actual gate operation history data prior to 2018 was applied and evaluated. The evaluation conditions were a 50% open gate condition and the flow discharge of two cases with a large difference in water level. As a result of the analysis, the actual operating conditions showed that the velocity and the Froude number were lower than the optimal conditions, confirming that the selected design was appropriate. It was also found that in the bed protection section, the average flow velocity was high when the water level difference was large, whereas the bottom velocity was high when the gate opening was large. Ultimately, through the reviewed status survey data in this study, the downstream flow characteristics of hydraulic structures along with adequacy verification techniques, optimal design techniques such as procedures for design, and important considerations were derived. Based on the current results, the constructed FLOW-3D-based model can be applied to creating or updating flow analysis guidelines for future repair and reinforcement measures as well as hydraulic structure design.

하천에 설치되는 수력구조물은 필연적으로 상류와 하류의 수위차를 발생시킨다. 이러한 수위차로 인한 위치에너지는 운동에너지로 변환되어 하천의 고속유동과 수압점프를 일으킨다. 그 결과 수력구조물 주변에서 하류의 세굴, 경사 등의 문제가 발생할 수 있다.

본 연구에서는 대한민국 창녕함안보의 수치해석을 위해 FLOW-3D 모델을 구축하였다. 구축된 모델은 현장 게이트 작동 실험에서 표면 속도 측정을 기반으로 검증되었습니다.

시뮬레이션 결과에서 유량은 측정값과 9~15 m3/s 차이가 나고 정확도는 82~87%로 평가되었다. 유속은 0.01~0.16m/s의 차이에서 92%의 정확도로 평가되었습니다.

검증 후 다양한 시나리오에 대한 경계조건 및 운전조건에 따른 수리구조물의 유동해석을 수행하였다. 2018년부터 창녕함안보 문은 한국의 친환경 정책 시행으로 전면 개방되었습니다.

따라서 본 연구에서는 2018년 이전의 실제 게이트 운영 이력 데이터를 적용하여 평가하였다. 평가조건은 50% open gate 조건과 수위차가 큰 2가지 경우의 유수방류로 하였다. 해석 결과 실제 운전조건은 속도와 Froude수가 최적조건보다 낮아 선정된 설계가 적합함을 확인하였다.

또한 베드보호구간에서는 수위차가 크면 평균유속이 높고, 수문개구가 크면 저저유속이 높은 것으로 나타났다. 최종적으로 본 연구에서 검토한 실태조사 자료를 통해 적정성 검증기법과 함께 수력구조물의 하류 유동특성, 설계절차 등 최적 설계기법 및 중요 고려사항을 도출하였다.

현재의 결과를 바탕으로 구축된 FLOW-3D 기반 모델은 수력구조 설계뿐만 아니라 향후 보수 및 보강 조치를 위한 유동해석 가이드라인 생성 또는 업데이트에 적용할 수 있습니다.

Figure 1. Effect of downstream riverbed erosion according to the type of weir foundation.
Figure 1. Effect of downstream riverbed erosion according to the type of weir foundation.
Figure 2. Changnyeong-Haman weir depth survey results (June 2015)
Figure 2. Changnyeong-Haman weir depth survey results (June 2015)
Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.
Figure 4. Field gate discharge experiment.
Figure 16. Analysis results for Case 7 and Case 8
Figure 16. Analysis results for Case 7 and Case 8

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Fig. 8. Comparison of the wave pattern for : (a) Ship wave only; (b) Ship wave in the presence of a following current.

균일한 해류가 존재하는 선박 파도의 수치 시뮬레이션

Numerical simulation of ship waves in the presence of a uniform current

CongfangAiYuxiangMaLeiSunGuohaiDongState Key Laboratory of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024, China

Highlights

• Ship waves in the presence of a uniform current are studied by a non-hydrostatic model.

• Effects of a following current on characteristic wave parameters are investigated.

• Effects of an opposing current on characteristic wave parameters are investigated.

• The response of the maximum water level elevation to the ship draft is discussed.

Abstract

이 논문은 균일한 해류가 존재할 때 선박파의 생성 및 전파를 시뮬레이션하기 위한 비정역학적 모델을 제시합니다. 선박 선체의 움직임을 표현하기 위해 움직이는 압력장 방법이 모델에 통합되었습니다.

뒤따르거나 반대 방향의 균일한 흐름이 있는 경우의 선박 파도의 수치 결과를 흐름이 없는 선박 파도의 수치 결과와 비교합니다. 추종 또는 반대 균일 전류가 존재할 때 계산된 첨단선 각도는 분석 솔루션과 잘 일치합니다. 추종 균일 전류와 반대 균일 전류가 특성파 매개변수에 미치는 영향을 제시하고 논의합니다.

선박 흘수에 대한 최대 수위 상승의 응답은 추종 또는 반대의 균일한 흐름이 있는 경우에도 표시되며 흐름이 없는 선박 파도의 응답과 비교됩니다. 선박 선체 측면의 최대 수위 상승은 Froude 수 Fr’=Us/gh의 특정 범위에 대해 다음과 같은 균일한 흐름의 존재에 의해 증가될 수 있음이 밝혀졌습니다.

여기서 Us는 선박 속도이고 h는 물입니다. 깊이. 균일한 해류를 무시하면 추종류나 반대류가 존재할 때 선박 흘수에 대한 최대 수위 상승의 응답이 과소평가될 수 있습니다.

본 연구는 선박파의 해석에 있어 균일한 해류의 영향을 고려해야 함을 시사합니다.

This paper presents a non-hydrostatic model to simulate the generation and propagation of ship waves in the presence of a uniform current. A moving pressure field method is incorporated into the model to represent the movement of a ship hull. Numerical results of ship waves in the presence of a following or an opposing uniform current are compared with those of ship waves without current. The calculated cusp-line angles in the presence of a following or opposing uniform current agree well with analytical solutions. The effects of a following uniform current and an opposing uniform current on the characteristic wave parameters are presented and discussed. The response of the maximum water level elevation to the ship draft is also presented in the presence of a following or an opposing uniform current and is compared with that for ship waves without current. It is found that the maximum water level elevation lateral to the ship hull can be increased by the presence of a following uniform current for a certain range of Froude numbers Fr′=Us/gh, where Us is the ship speed and h is the water depth. If the uniform current is neglected, the response of the maximum water level elevation to the ship draft in the presence of a following or an opposing current can be underestimated. The present study indicates that the effect of a uniform current should be considered in the analysis of ship waves.

Keywords

Ship waves, Non-hydrostatic model, Following current, Opposing current, Wave parameters

1. Introduction

Similar to wind waves, ships sailing across the sea can also create free-surface undulations ranging from ripples to waves of large size (Grue, 20172020). Ship waves can cause sediment suspension and engineering structures damage and even pose a threat to flora and fauna living near the embankments of waterways (Dempwolff et al., 2022). It is quite important to understand ship waves in various environments. The study of ship waves has been conducted over a century. A large amount of research (Almström et al., 2021Bayraktar and Beji, 2013David et al., 2017Ertekin et al., 1986Gourlay, 2001Havelock, 1908Lee and Lee, 2019Samaras and Karambas, 2021Shi et al., 2018) focused on the generation and propagation of ship waves without current. When a ship navigates in the sea or in a river where tidal flows or river flows always exist, the effect of currents should be taken into account. However, the effect of currents on the characteristic parameters of ship waves is still unclear, because very few publications have been presented on this topic.

Over the past two decades, many two-dimensional (2D) Boussinesq-type models (Bayraktar and Beji, 2013Dam et al., 2008David et al., 2017Samaras and Karambas, 2021Shi et al., 2018) were developed to examine ship waves. For example, Bayraktar and Beji (2013) solved Boussinesq equations with improved dispersion characteristics to simulate ship waves due to a moving pressure field. David et al. (2017) employed a Boussinesq-type model to investigate the effects of the pressure field and its propagation speed on characteristic wave parameters. All of these Boussinesq-type models aimed to simulate ship waves without current except for that of Dam et al. (2008), who investigated the effect of currents on the maximum wave height of ship waves in a narrow channel.

In addition to Boussinesq-type models, numerical models based on the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) or Euler equations are also capable of resolving ship waves. Lee and Lee (20192021) employed the FLOW-3D model to simulate ship waves without current and ship waves in the presence of a uniform current to confirm their equations for ship wave crests. FLOW-3D is a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software based on the NSE, and the volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to capture the moving free surface. However, VOF-based NSE models are computationally expensive due to the treatment of the free surface. To efficiently track the free surface, non-hydrostatic models employ the so-called free surface equation and can be solved efficiently. One pioneering application for the simulation of ship waves by the non-hydrostatic model was initiated by Ma (2012) and named XBeach. Recently, Almström et al. (2021) validated XBeach with improved dispersive behavior by comparison with field measurements. XBeach employed in Almström et al. (2021) is a 2-layer non-hydrostatic model and is accurate up to Kh=4 for the linear dispersion relation (de Ridder et al., 2020), where K=2π/L is the wavenumber. L is the wavelength, and h is the still water depth. However, no applications of non-hydrostatic models on the simulation of ship waves in the presence of a uniform current have been published. For more advances in the numerical modelling of ship waves, the reader is referred to Dempwolff et al. (2022).

This paper investigates ship waves in the presence of a uniform current by using a non-hydrostatic model (Ai et al., 2019), in which a moving pressure field method is incorporated to represent the movement of a ship hull. The model solves the incompressible Euler equations by using a semi-implicit algorithm and is associated with iterating to solve the Poisson equation. The model with two, three and five layers is accurate up to Kh= 7, 15 and 40, respectively (Ai et al., 2019) in resolving the linear dispersion relation. To the best of our knowledge, ship waves in the presence of currents have been studied theoretically (Benjamin et al., 2017Ellingsen, 2014Li and Ellingsen, 2016Li et al., 2019.) and numerically (Dam et al., 2008Lee and Lee, 20192021). However, no publications have presented the effects of a uniform current on characteristic wave parameters except for Dam et al. (2008), who investigated only the effect of currents on the maximum wave height in a narrow channel for the narrow relative Froude number Fr=(Us−Uc)/gh ranging from 0.47 to 0.76, where Us is the ship speed and Uc is the current velocity. To reveal the effect of currents on the characteristic parameters of ship waves, the main objectives of this paper are (1) to validate the capability of the proposed model to resolve ship waves in the presence of a uniform current, (2) to investigate the effects of a following or an opposing current on characteristic wave parameters including the maximum water level elevation and the leading wave period in the ship wave train, (3) to show the differences in characteristic wave parameters between ship waves in the presence of a uniform current and those without current when the same relative Froude number Fr is specified, and (4) to examine the response of the maximum water level elevation to the ship draft in the presence of a uniform current.

The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. The non-hydrostatic model for ship waves is described in Section 2. Section 3 presents numerical validations for ship waves. Numerical results and discussions about the effects of a uniform current on characteristic wave parameters are provided in Section 4, and a conclusion is presented in Section 5.

2. Non-hydrostatic model for ship waves

2.1. Governing equations

The 3D incompressible Euler equations are expressed in the following form:(1)∂u∂x+∂v∂y+∂w∂z=0(2)∂u∂t+∂u2∂x+∂uv∂y+∂uw∂z=−∂p∂x(3)∂v∂t+∂uv∂x+∂v2∂y+∂vw∂z=−∂p∂y(4)∂w∂t+∂uw∂x+∂vw∂y+∂w2∂z=−∂p∂z−gwhere t is the time; u(x,y,z,t), v(x,y,z,t) and w(x,y,z,t) are the velocity components in the horizontal x, y and vertical z directions, respectively; p(x,y,z,t) is the pressure divided by a constant reference density; and g is the gravitational acceleration.

The pressure p(x,y,z,t) can be expressed as(5)p=ps+g(η−z)+qwhere ps(x,y,t) is the pressure at the free surface, η(x,y,t) is the free surface elevation, and q(x,y,z,t) is the non-hydrostatic pressure.

η(x,y,t) is calculated by the following free-surface equation:(6)∂η∂t+∂∂x∫−hηudz+∂∂y∫−hηvdz=0where z=−h(x,y) is the bottom surface.

To generate ship waves, ps(x,y,t) is determined by the following slender-body type pressure field (Bayraktar and Beji, 2013David et al., 2017Samaras and Karambas, 2021):

For −L/2≤x’≤L/2,−B/2≤y’≤B/2(7)ps(x,y,t)|t=0=pm[1−cL(x′/L)4][1−cB(y′/B)2]exp⁡[−a(y′/B)2]where x′=x−x0 and y′=y−y0. (x0,y0) is the center of the pressure field, pm is the peak pressure defined at (x0,y0), and L and B are the lengthwise and breadthwise parameters, respectively. cL, cB and a are set to 16, 2 and 16, respectively.

2.2. Numerical algorithms

In this study, the generation of ship waves is incorporated into the semi-implicit non-hydrostatic model developed by Ai et al. (2019). The 3D grid system used in the model is built from horizontal rectangular grids by adding horizontal layers. The horizontal layers are distributed uniformly along the water depth, which means the layer thickness is defined by Δz=(η+h)/Nz, where Nz is the number of horizontal layers.

In the solution procedure, the first step is to generate ship waves by implementing Eq. (7) together with the prescribed ship track. In the second step, Eqs. (1)(2)(3)(4) are solved by the pressure correction method, which can be subdivided into three stages. The first stage is to compute intermediate velocities un+1/2, vn+1/2, and wn+1/2 by solving Eqs. (2)(3)(4), which contain the non-hydrostatic pressure at the preceding time level. In the second stage, the Poisson equation for the non-hydrostatic pressure correction term is solved on the graphics processing unit (GPU) in conjunction with the conjugate gradient method. The third stage is to compute the new velocities un+1, vn+1, and wn+1 by correcting the intermediate values after including the non-hydrostatic pressure correction term. In the discretization of Eqs.