Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s.

Optimization Algorithms and Engineering: Recent Advances and Applications

Mahdi Feizbahr,1 Navid Tonekaboni,2Guang-Jun Jiang,3,4 and Hong-Xia Chen3,4Show moreAcademic Editor: Mohammad YazdiReceived08 Apr 2021Revised18 Jun 2021Accepted17 Jul 2021Published11 Aug 2021

Abstract

Vegetation along the river increases the roughness and reduces the average flow velocity, reduces flow energy, and changes the flow velocity profile in the cross section of the river. Many canals and rivers in nature are covered with vegetation during the floods. Canal’s roughness is strongly affected by plants and therefore it has a great effect on flow resistance during flood. Roughness resistance against the flow due to the plants depends on the flow conditions and plant, so the model should simulate the current velocity by considering the effects of velocity, depth of flow, and type of vegetation along the canal. Total of 48 models have been simulated to investigate the effect of roughness in the canal. The results indicated that, by enhancing the velocity, the effect of vegetation in decreasing the bed velocity is negligible, while when the current has lower speed, the effect of vegetation on decreasing the bed velocity is obviously considerable.


강의 식생은 거칠기를 증가시키고 평균 유속을 감소시키며, 유속 에너지를 감소시키고 강의 단면에서 유속 프로파일을 변경합니다. 자연의 많은 운하와 강은 홍수 동안 초목으로 덮여 있습니다. 운하의 조도는 식물의 영향을 많이 받으므로 홍수시 유동저항에 큰 영향을 미칩니다. 식물로 인한 흐름에 대한 거칠기 저항은 흐름 조건 및 식물에 따라 다르므로 모델은 유속, 흐름 깊이 및 운하를 따라 식생 유형의 영향을 고려하여 현재 속도를 시뮬레이션해야 합니다. 근관의 거칠기의 영향을 조사하기 위해 총 48개의 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 결과는 유속을 높임으로써 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 무시할 수 있는 반면, 해류가 더 낮은 유속일 때 유속을 감소시키는 식생의 영향은 분명히 상당함을 나타냈다.

1. Introduction

Considering the impact of each variable is a very popular field within the analytical and statistical methods and intelligent systems [114]. This can help research for better modeling considering the relation of variables or interaction of them toward reaching a better condition for the objective function in control and engineering [1527]. Consequently, it is necessary to study the effects of the passive factors on the active domain [2836]. Because of the effect of vegetation on reducing the discharge capacity of rivers [37], pruning plants was necessary to improve the condition of rivers. One of the important effects of vegetation in river protection is the action of roots, which cause soil consolidation and soil structure improvement and, by enhancing the shear strength of soil, increase the resistance of canal walls against the erosive force of water. The outer limbs of the plant increase the roughness of the canal walls and reduce the flow velocity and deplete the flow energy in vicinity of the walls. Vegetation by reducing the shear stress of the canal bed reduces flood discharge and sedimentation in the intervals between vegetation and increases the stability of the walls [3841].

One of the main factors influencing the speed, depth, and extent of flood in this method is Manning’s roughness coefficient. On the other hand, soil cover [42], especially vegetation, is one of the most determining factors in Manning’s roughness coefficient. Therefore, it is expected that those seasonal changes in the vegetation of the region will play an important role in the calculated value of Manning’s roughness coefficient and ultimately in predicting the flood wave behavior [4345]. The roughness caused by plants’ resistance to flood current depends on the flow and plant conditions. Flow conditions include depth and velocity of the plant, and plant conditions include plant type, hardness or flexibility, dimensions, density, and shape of the plant [46]. In general, the issue discussed in this research is the optimization of flood-induced flow in canals by considering the effect of vegetation-induced roughness. Therefore, the effect of plants on the roughness coefficient and canal transmission coefficient and in consequence the flow depth should be evaluated [4748].

Current resistance is generally known by its roughness coefficient. The equation that is mainly used in this field is Manning equation. The ratio of shear velocity to average current velocity  is another form of current resistance. The reason for using the  ratio is that it is dimensionless and has a strong theoretical basis. The reason for using Manning roughness coefficient is its pervasiveness. According to Freeman et al. [49], the Manning roughness coefficient for plants was calculated according to the Kouwen and Unny [50] method for incremental resistance. This method involves increasing the roughness for various surface and plant irregularities. Manning’s roughness coefficient has all the factors affecting the resistance of the canal. Therefore, the appropriate way to more accurately estimate this coefficient is to know the factors affecting this coefficient [51].

To calculate the flow rate, velocity, and depth of flow in canals as well as flood and sediment estimation, it is important to evaluate the flow resistance. To determine the flow resistance in open ducts, Manning, Chézy, and Darcy–Weisbach relations are used [52]. In these relations, there are parameters such as Manning’s roughness coefficient (n), Chézy roughness coefficient (C), and Darcy–Weisbach coefficient (f). All three of these coefficients are a kind of flow resistance coefficient that is widely used in the equations governing flow in rivers [53].

The three relations that express the relationship between the average flow velocity (V) and the resistance and geometric and hydraulic coefficients of the canal are as follows:where nf, and c are Manning, Darcy–Weisbach, and Chézy coefficients, respectively. V = average flow velocity, R = hydraulic radius, Sf = slope of energy line, which in uniform flow is equal to the slope of the canal bed,  = gravitational acceleration, and Kn is a coefficient whose value is equal to 1 in the SI system and 1.486 in the English system. The coefficients of resistance in equations (1) to (3) are related as follows:

Based on the boundary layer theory, the flow resistance for rough substrates is determined from the following general relation:where f = Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction, y = flow depth, Ks = bed roughness size, and A = constant coefficient.

On the other hand, the relationship between the Darcy–Weisbach coefficient of friction and the shear velocity of the flow is as follows:

By using equation (6), equation (5) is converted as follows:

Investigation on the effect of vegetation arrangement on shear velocity of flow in laboratory conditions showed that, with increasing the shear Reynolds number (), the numerical value of the  ratio also increases; in other words the amount of roughness coefficient increases with a slight difference in the cases without vegetation, checkered arrangement, and cross arrangement, respectively [54].

Roughness in river vegetation is simulated in mathematical models with a variable floor slope flume by different densities and discharges. The vegetation considered submerged in the bed of the flume. Results showed that, with increasing vegetation density, canal roughness and flow shear speed increase and with increasing flow rate and depth, Manning’s roughness coefficient decreases. Factors affecting the roughness caused by vegetation include the effect of plant density and arrangement on flow resistance, the effect of flow velocity on flow resistance, and the effect of depth [4555].

One of the works that has been done on the effect of vegetation on the roughness coefficient is Darby [56] study, which investigates a flood wave model that considers all the effects of vegetation on the roughness coefficient. There are currently two methods for estimating vegetation roughness. One method is to add the thrust force effect to Manning’s equation [475758] and the other method is to increase the canal bed roughness (Manning-Strickler coefficient) [455961]. These two methods provide acceptable results in models designed to simulate floodplain flow. Wang et al. [62] simulate the floodplain with submerged vegetation using these two methods and to increase the accuracy of the results, they suggested using the effective height of the plant under running water instead of using the actual height of the plant. Freeman et al. [49] provided equations for determining the coefficient of vegetation roughness under different conditions. Lee et al. [63] proposed a method for calculating the Manning coefficient using the flow velocity ratio at different depths. Much research has been done on the Manning roughness coefficient in rivers, and researchers [496366] sought to obtain a specific number for n to use in river engineering. However, since the depth and geometric conditions of rivers are completely variable in different places, the values of Manning roughness coefficient have changed subsequently, and it has not been possible to choose a fixed number. In river engineering software, the Manning roughness coefficient is determined only for specific and constant conditions or normal flow. Lee et al. [63] stated that seasonal conditions, density, and type of vegetation should also be considered. Hydraulic roughness and Manning roughness coefficient n of the plant were obtained by estimating the total Manning roughness coefficient from the matching of the measured water surface curve and water surface height. The following equation is used for the flow surface curve:where  is the depth of water change, S0 is the slope of the canal floor, Sf is the slope of the energy line, and Fr is the Froude number which is obtained from the following equation:where D is the characteristic length of the canal. Flood flow velocity is one of the important parameters of flood waves, which is very important in calculating the water level profile and energy consumption. In the cases where there are many limitations for researchers due to the wide range of experimental dimensions and the variety of design parameters, the use of numerical methods that are able to estimate the rest of the unknown results with acceptable accuracy is economically justified.

FLOW-3D software uses Finite Difference Method (FDM) for numerical solution of two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow. This software is dedicated to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and is provided by Flow Science [67]. The flow is divided into networks with tubular cells. For each cell there are values of dependent variables and all variables are calculated in the center of the cell, except for the velocity, which is calculated at the center of the cell. In this software, two numerical techniques have been used for geometric simulation, FAVOR™ (Fractional-Area-Volume-Obstacle-Representation) and the VOF (Volume-of-Fluid) method. The equations used at this model for this research include the principle of mass survival and the magnitude of motion as follows. The fluid motion equations in three dimensions, including the Navier–Stokes equations with some additional terms, are as follows:where  are mass accelerations in the directions xyz and  are viscosity accelerations in the directions xyz and are obtained from the following equations:

Shear stresses  in equation (11) are obtained from the following equations:

The standard model is used for high Reynolds currents, but in this model, RNG theory allows the analytical differential formula to be used for the effective viscosity that occurs at low Reynolds numbers. Therefore, the RNG model can be used for low and high Reynolds currents.

Weather changes are high and this affects many factors continuously. The presence of vegetation in any area reduces the velocity of surface flows and prevents soil erosion, so vegetation will have a significant impact on reducing destructive floods. One of the methods of erosion protection in floodplain watersheds is the use of biological methods. The presence of vegetation in watersheds reduces the flow rate during floods and prevents soil erosion. The external organs of plants increase the roughness and decrease the velocity of water flow and thus reduce its shear stress energy. One of the important factors with which the hydraulic resistance of plants is expressed is the roughness coefficient. Measuring the roughness coefficient of plants and investigating their effect on reducing velocity and shear stress of flow is of special importance.

Roughness coefficients in canals are affected by two main factors, namely, flow conditions and vegetation characteristics [68]. So far, much research has been done on the effect of the roughness factor created by vegetation, but the issue of plant density has received less attention. For this purpose, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of vegetation density on flow velocity changes.

In a study conducted using a software model on three density modes in the submerged state effect on flow velocity changes in 48 different modes was investigated (Table 1).Table 1 The studied models.

The number of cells used in this simulation is equal to 1955888 cells. The boundary conditions were introduced to the model as a constant speed and depth (Figure 1). At the output boundary, due to the presence of supercritical current, no parameter for the current is considered. Absolute roughness for floors and walls was introduced to the model (Figure 1). In this case, the flow was assumed to be nonviscous and air entry into the flow was not considered. After  seconds, this model reached a convergence accuracy of .

Figure 1 The simulated model and its boundary conditions.

Due to the fact that it is not possible to model the vegetation in FLOW-3D software, in this research, the vegetation of small soft plants was studied so that Manning’s coefficients can be entered into the canal bed in the form of roughness coefficients obtained from the studies of Chow [69] in similar conditions. In practice, in such modeling, the effect of plant height is eliminated due to the small height of herbaceous plants, and modeling can provide relatively acceptable results in these conditions.

48 models with input velocities proportional to the height of the regular semihexagonal canal were considered to create supercritical conditions. Manning coefficients were applied based on Chow [69] studies in order to control the canal bed. Speed profiles were drawn and discussed.

Any control and simulation system has some inputs that we should determine to test any technology [7077]. Determination and true implementation of such parameters is one of the key steps of any simulation [237881] and computing procedure [8286]. The input current is created by applying the flow rate through the VFR (Volume Flow Rate) option and the output flow is considered Output and for other borders the Symmetry option is considered.

Simulation of the models and checking their action and responses and observing how a process behaves is one of the accepted methods in engineering and science [8788]. For verification of FLOW-3D software, the results of computer simulations are compared with laboratory measurements and according to the values of computational error, convergence error, and the time required for convergence, the most appropriate option for real-time simulation is selected (Figures 2 and 3 ).

Figure 2 Modeling the plant with cylindrical tubes at the bottom of the canal.

Figure 3 Velocity profiles in positions 2 and 5.

The canal is 7 meters long, 0.5 meters wide, and 0.8 meters deep. This test was used to validate the application of the software to predict the flow rate parameters. In this experiment, instead of using the plant, cylindrical pipes were used in the bottom of the canal.

The conditions of this modeling are similar to the laboratory conditions and the boundary conditions used in the laboratory were used for numerical modeling. The critical flow enters the simulation model from the upstream boundary, so in the upstream boundary conditions, critical velocity and depth are considered. The flow at the downstream boundary is supercritical, so no parameters are applied to the downstream boundary.

The software well predicts the process of changing the speed profile in the open canal along with the considered obstacles. The error in the calculated speed values can be due to the complexity of the flow and the interaction of the turbulence caused by the roughness of the floor with the turbulence caused by the three-dimensional cycles in the hydraulic jump. As a result, the software is able to predict the speed distribution in open canals.

2. Modeling Results

After analyzing the models, the results were shown in graphs (Figures 414 ). The total number of experiments in this study was 48 due to the limitations of modeling.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 4 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 1 m and flow velocities of 3–3.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 1 meter and a flow velocity of (a) 3 meters per second, (b) 3.1 meters per second, (c) 3.2 meters per second, and (d) 3.3 meters per second.

Figure 5 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3 meters per second.

Figure 6 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.1 meters per second.

Figure 7 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.2 meters per second.

Figure 8 Canal diagram with a depth of 1 meter and a flow rate of 3.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 9 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 2 m and flow velocities of 4–4.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

Figure 10 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4 meters per second.

Figure 11 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.1 meters per second.

Figure 12 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.2 meters per second.

Figure 13 Canal diagram with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of 4.3 meters per second.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(d)
(d)Figure 14 Flow velocity profiles for canals with a depth of 3 m and flow velocities of 5–5.3 m/s. Canal with a depth of 2 meters and a flow rate of (a) 4 meters per second, (b) 4.1 meters per second, (c) 4.2 meters per second, and (d) 4.3 meters per second.

To investigate the effects of roughness with flow velocity, the trend of flow velocity changes at different depths and with supercritical flow to a Froude number proportional to the depth of the section has been obtained.

According to the velocity profiles of Figure 5, it can be seen that, with the increasing of Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figures 5 to 8, it can be found that, with increasing the Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the models 1 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and of course increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 10, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

According to Figure 11, we see that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 510, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

With increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases (Figure 12). But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models (Figures 58 and 1011), which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 13, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of Figures 5 to 12, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

According to Figure 15, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases.

Figure 15 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5 meters per second.

According to Figure 16, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher model, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 16 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.1 meters per second.

According to Figure 17, it is clear that, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 17 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.2 meters per second.

According to Figure 18, with increasing Manning’s coefficient, the canal bed speed decreases. But this deceleration is more noticeable than the deceleration of the higher models, which can be justified by increasing the speed and, of course, increasing the Froude number.

Figure 18 Canal diagram with a depth of 3 meters and a flow rate of 5.3 meters per second.

According to Figure 19, it can be seen that the vegetation placed in front of the flow input velocity has negligible effect on the reduction of velocity, which of course can be justified due to the flexibility of the vegetation. The only unusual thing is the unexpected decrease in floor speed of 3 m/s compared to higher speeds.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 19 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 1 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 1 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 1 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 1 m.

According to Figure 20, by increasing the speed of vegetation, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow rate becomes more noticeable. And the role of input current does not have much effect in reducing speed.(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 20 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 2 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 2 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 2 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 2 m.

According to Figure 21, it can be seen that, with increasing speed, the effect of vegetation on reducing the bed flow rate becomes more noticeable and the role of the input current does not have much effect. In general, it can be seen that, by increasing the speed of the input current, the slope of the profiles increases from the bed to the water surface and due to the fact that, in software, the roughness coefficient applies to the channel floor only in the boundary conditions, this can be perfectly justified. Of course, it can be noted that, due to the flexible conditions of the vegetation of the bed, this modeling can show acceptable results for such grasses in the canal floor. In the next directions, we may try application of swarm-based optimization methods for modeling and finding the most effective factors in this research [27815188994]. In future, we can also apply the simulation logic and software of this research for other domains such as power engineering [9599].(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)(a)
(a)(b)
(b)(c)
(c)Figure 21 Comparison of velocity profiles with the same plant densities (depth 3 m). Comparison of velocity profiles with (a) plant densities of 25%, depth 3 m; (b) plant densities of 50%, depth 3 m; and (c) plant densities of 75%, depth 3 m.

3. Conclusion

The effects of vegetation on the flood canal were investigated by numerical modeling with FLOW-3D software. After analyzing the results, the following conclusions were reached:(i)Increasing the density of vegetation reduces the velocity of the canal floor but has no effect on the velocity of the canal surface.(ii)Increasing the Froude number is directly related to increasing the speed of the canal floor.(iii)In the canal with a depth of one meter, a sudden increase in speed can be observed from the lowest speed and higher speed, which is justified by the sudden increase in Froude number.(iv)As the inlet flow rate increases, the slope of the profiles from the bed to the water surface increases.(v)By reducing the Froude number, the effect of vegetation on reducing the flow bed rate becomes more noticeable. And the input velocity in reducing the velocity of the canal floor does not have much effect.(vi)At a flow rate between 3 and 3.3 meters per second due to the shallow depth of the canal and the higher landing number a more critical area is observed in which the flow bed velocity in this area is between 2.86 and 3.1 m/s.(vii)Due to the critical flow velocity and the slight effect of the roughness of the horseshoe vortex floor, it is not visible and is only partially observed in models 1-2-3 and 21.(viii)As the flow rate increases, the effect of vegetation on the rate of bed reduction decreases.(ix)In conditions where less current intensity is passing, vegetation has a greater effect on reducing current intensity and energy consumption increases.(x)In the case of using the flow rate of 0.8 cubic meters per second, the velocity distribution and flow regime show about 20% more energy consumption than in the case of using the flow rate of 1.3 cubic meters per second.

Nomenclature

n:Manning’s roughness coefficient
C:Chézy roughness coefficient
f:Darcy–Weisbach coefficient
V:Flow velocity
R:Hydraulic radius
g:Gravitational acceleration
y:Flow depth
Ks:Bed roughness
A:Constant coefficient
:Reynolds number
y/∂x:Depth of water change
S0:Slope of the canal floor
Sf:Slope of energy line
Fr:Froude number
D:Characteristic length of the canal
G:Mass acceleration
:Shear stresses.

Data Availability

All data are included within the paper.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Contract no. 71761030 and Natural Science Foundation of Inner Mongolia under Contract no. 2019LH07003.

References

  1. H. Yu, L. Jie, W. Gui et al., “Dynamic Gaussian bare-bones fruit fly optimizers with abandonment mechanism: method and analysis,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 20, pp. 1–29, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  2. X. Zhao, D. Li, B. Yang, C. Ma, Y. Zhu, and H. Chen, “Feature selection based on improved ant colony optimization for online detection of foreign fiber in cotton,” Applied Soft Computing, vol. 24, pp. 585–596, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  3. J. Hu, H. Chen, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonal learning covariance matrix for defects of grey wolf optimizer: insights, balance, diversity, and feature selection,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 213, Article ID 106684, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  4. C. Yu, M. Chen, K. Chen et al., “SGOA: annealing-behaved grasshopper optimizer for global tasks,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 4, pp. 1–28, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  5. W. Shan, Z. Qiao, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, H. Turabieh, and Y. Teng, “Double adaptive weights for stabilization of moth flame optimizer: balance analysis, engineering cases, and medical diagnosis,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106728, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  6. J. Tu, H. Chen, J. Liu et al., “Evolutionary biogeography-based whale optimization methods with communication structure: towards measuring the balance,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 212, Article ID 106642, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  7. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang et al., “Towards augmented kernel extreme learning models for bankruptcy prediction: algorithmic behavior and comprehensive analysis,” Neurocomputing, vol. 430, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  8. H.-L. Chen, G. Wang, C. Ma, Z.-N. Cai, W.-B. Liu, and S.-J. Wang, “An efficient hybrid kernel extreme learning machine approach for early diagnosis of Parkinson׳s disease,” Neurocomputing, vol. 184, pp. 131–144, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  9. J. Xia, H. Chen, Q. Li et al., “Ultrasound-based differentiation of malignant and benign thyroid Nodules: an extreme learning machine approach,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 147, pp. 37–49, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  10. C. Li, L. Hou, B. Y. Sharma et al., “Developing a new intelligent system for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion,” Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine, vol. 153, pp. 211–225, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  11. X. Xu and H.-L. Chen, “Adaptive computational chemotaxis based on field in bacterial foraging optimization,” Soft Computing, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 797–807, 2014.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  12. M. Wang, H. Chen, B. Yang et al., “Toward an optimal kernel extreme learning machine using a chaotic moth-flame optimization strategy with applications in medical diagnoses,” Neurocomputing, vol. 267, pp. 69–84, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  13. L. Chao, K. Zhang, Z. Li, Y. Zhu, J. Wang, and Z. Yu, “Geographically weighted regression based methods for merging satellite and gauge precipitation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 558, pp. 275–289, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  14. F. J. Golrokh, G. Azeem, and A. Hasan, “Eco-efficiency evaluation in cement industries: DEA malmquist productivity index using optimization models,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  15. D. Zhao, L. Lei, F. Yu et al., “Chaotic random spare ant colony optimization for multi-threshold image segmentation of 2D Kapur entropy,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 8, Article ID 106510, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  16. Y. Zhang, R. Liu, X. Wang, H. Chen, and C. Li, “Boosted binary Harris hawks optimizer and feature selection,” Engineering with Computers, vol. 517, pp. 1–30, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  17. L. Hu, G. Hong, J. Ma, X. Wang, and H. Chen, “An efficient machine learning approach for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computers in Biology and Medicine, vol. 59, pp. 116–124, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  18. L. Shen, H. Chen, Z. Yu et al., “Evolving support vector machines using fruit fly optimization for medical data classification,” Knowledge-Based Systems, vol. 96, pp. 61–75, 2016.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  19. X. Zhao, X. Zhang, Z. Cai et al., “Chaos enhanced grey wolf optimization wrapped ELM for diagnosis of paraquat-poisoned patients,” Computational Biology and Chemistry, vol. 78, pp. 481–490, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  20. Y. Xu, H. Chen, J. Luo, Q. Zhang, S. Jiao, and X. Zhang, “Enhanced Moth-flame optimizer with mutation strategy for global optimization,” Information Sciences, vol. 492, pp. 181–203, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  21. M. Wang and H. Chen, “Chaotic multi-swarm whale optimizer boosted support vector machine for medical diagnosis,” Applied Soft Computing Journal, vol. 88, Article ID 105946, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  22. Y. Chen, J. Li, H. Lu, and P. Yan, “Coupling system dynamics analysis and risk aversion programming for optimizing the mixed noise-driven shale gas-water supply chains,” Journal of Cleaner Production, vol. 278, Article ID 123209, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  23. H. Tang, Y. Xu, A. Lin et al., “Predicting green consumption behaviors of students using efficient firefly grey wolf-assisted K-nearest neighbor classifiers,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 35546–35562, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  24. H.-J. Ma and G.-H. Yang, “Adaptive fault tolerant control of cooperative heterogeneous systems with actuator faults and unreliable interconnections,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 61, no. 11, pp. 3240–3255, 2015.View at: Google Scholar
  25. H.-J. Ma and L.-X. Xu, “Decentralized adaptive fault-tolerant control for a class of strong interconnected nonlinear systems via graph theory,” IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, vol. 66, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  26. H. J. Ma, L. X. Xu, and G. H. Yang, “Multiple environment integral reinforcement learning-based fault-tolerant control for affine nonlinear systems,” IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, vol. 51, pp. 1–16, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  27. J. Hu, M. Wang, C. Zhao, Q. Pan, and C. Du, “Formation control and collision avoidance for multi-UAV systems based on Voronoi partition,” Science China Technological Sciences, vol. 63, no. 1, pp. 65–72, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  28. C. Zhang, H. Li, Y. Qian, C. Chen, and X. Zhou, “Locality-constrained discriminative matrix regression for robust face identification,” IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, vol. 99, pp. 1–15, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  29. X. Zhang, D. Wang, Z. Zhou, and Y. Ma, “Robust low-rank tensor recovery with rectification and alignment,” IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 238–255, 2019.View at: Google Scholar
  30. X. Zhang, J. Wang, T. Wang, R. Jiang, J. Xu, and L. Zhao, “Robust feature learning for adversarial defense via hierarchical feature alignment,” Information Sciences, vol. 560, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  31. X. Zhang, R. Jiang, T. Wang, and J. Wang, “Recursive neural network for video deblurring,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 03, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  32. X. Zhang, T. Wang, J. Wang, G. Tang, and L. Zhao, “Pyramid channel-based feature attention network for image dehazing,” Computer Vision and Image Understanding, vol. 197-198, Article ID 103003, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  33. X. Zhang, T. Wang, W. Luo, and P. Huang, “Multi-level fusion and attention-guided CNN for image dehazing,” IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology, vol. 3, p. 1, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  34. L. He, J. Shen, and Y. Zhang, “Ecological vulnerability assessment for ecological conservation and environmental management,” Journal of Environmental Management, vol. 206, pp. 1115–1125, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  35. Y. Chen, W. Zheng, W. Li, and Y. Huang, “Large group Activity security risk assessment and risk early warning based on random forest algorithm,” Pattern Recognition Letters, vol. 144, pp. 1–5, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  36. J. Hu, H. Zhang, Z. Li, C. Zhao, Z. Xu, and Q. Pan, “Object traversing by monocular UAV in outdoor environment,” Asian Journal of Control, vol. 25, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  37. P. Tian, H. Lu, W. Feng, Y. Guan, and Y. Xue, “Large decrease in streamflow and sediment load of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau driven by future climate change: a case study in Lhasa River Basin,” Catena, vol. 187, Article ID 104340, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  38. A. Stokes, C. Atger, A. G. Bengough, T. Fourcaud, and R. C. Sidle, “Desirable plant root traits for protecting natural and engineered slopes against landslides,” Plant and Soil, vol. 324, no. 1, pp. 1–30, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  39. T. B. Devi, A. Sharma, and B. Kumar, “Studies on emergent flow over vegetative channel bed with downward seepage,” Hydrological Sciences Journal, vol. 62, no. 3, pp. 408–420, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  40. G. Ireland, M. Volpi, and G. Petropoulos, “Examining the capability of supervised machine learning classifiers in extracting flooded areas from Landsat TM imagery: a case study from a Mediterranean flood,” Remote Sensing, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 3372–3399, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  41. L. Goodarzi and S. Javadi, “Assessment of aquifer vulnerability using the DRASTIC model; a case study of the Dezful-Andimeshk Aquifer,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 17–22, 2016.View at: Google Scholar
  42. K. Zhang, Q. Wang, L. Chao et al., “Ground observation-based analysis of soil moisture spatiotemporal variability across a humid to semi-humid transitional zone in China,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 574, pp. 903–914, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  43. L. De Doncker, P. Troch, R. Verhoeven, K. Bal, P. Meire, and J. Quintelier, “Determination of the Manning roughness coefficient influenced by vegetation in the river Aa and Biebrza river,” Environmental Fluid Mechanics, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 549–567, 2009.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  44. M. Fathi-Moghadam and K. Drikvandi, “Manning roughness coefficient for rivers and flood plains with non-submerged vegetation,” International Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1–4, 2012.View at: Google Scholar
  45. F.-C. Wu, H. W. Shen, and Y.-J. Chou, “Variation of roughness coefficients for unsubmerged and submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 9, pp. 934–942, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  46. M. K. Wood, “Rangeland vegetation-hydrologic interactions,” in Vegetation Science Applications for Rangeland Analysis and Management, vol. 3, pp. 469–491, Springer, 1988.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  47. C. Wilson, O. Yagci, H.-P. Rauch, and N. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of a willow vegetated river/floodplain system,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 327, no. 1-2, pp. 13–21, 2006.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  48. R. Yazarloo, M. Khamehchian, and M. R. Nikoodel, “Observational-computational 3d engineering geological model and geotechnical characteristics of young sediments of golestan province,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  49. G. E. Freeman, W. H. Rahmeyer, and R. R. Copeland, “Determination of resistance due to shrubs and woody vegetation,” International Journal of River Basin Management, vol. 19, 2000.View at: Google Scholar
  50. N. Kouwen and T. E. Unny, “Flexible roughness in open channels,” Journal of the Hydraulics Division, vol. 99, no. 5, pp. 713–728, 1973.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  51. S. Hosseini and J. Abrishami, Open Channel Hydraulics, Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2007.
  52. C. S. James, A. L. Birkhead, A. A. Jordanova, and J. J. O’Sullivan, “Flow resistance of emergent vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 42, no. 4, pp. 390–398, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  53. F. Huthoff and D. Augustijn, “Channel roughness in 1D steady uniform flow: Manning or Chézy?,,” NCR-days, vol. 102, 2004.View at: Google Scholar
  54. M. S. Sabegh, M. Saneie, M. Habibi, A. A. Abbasi, and M. Ghadimkhani, “Experimental investigation on the effect of river bank tree planting array, on shear velocity,” Journal of Watershed Engineering and Management, vol. 2, no. 4, 2011.View at: Google Scholar
  55. A. Errico, V. Pasquino, M. Maxwald, G. B. Chirico, L. Solari, and F. Preti, “The effect of flexible vegetation on flow in drainage channels: estimation of roughness coefficients at the real scale,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 120, pp. 411–421, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  56. S. E. Darby, “Effect of riparian vegetation on flow resistance and flood potential,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 125, no. 5, pp. 443–454, 1999.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  57. V. Kutija and H. Thi Minh Hong, “A numerical model for assessing the additional resistance to flow introduced by flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 99–114, 1996.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  58. T. Fischer-Antze, T. Stoesser, P. Bates, and N. R. B. Olsen, “3D numerical modelling of open-channel flow with submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Research, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 303–310, 2001.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  59. U. Stephan and D. Gutknecht, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged flexible vegetation,” Journal of Hydrology, vol. 269, no. 1-2, pp. 27–43, 2002.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  60. F. G. Carollo, V. Ferro, and D. Termini, “Flow resistance law in channels with flexible submerged vegetation,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 131, no. 7, pp. 554–564, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  61. W. Fu-sheng, “Flow resistance of flexible vegetation in open channel,” Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. S1, 2007.View at: Google Scholar
  62. P.-f. Wang, C. Wang, and D. Z. Zhu, “Hydraulic resistance of submerged vegetation related to effective height,” Journal of Hydrodynamics, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 265–273, 2010.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  63. J. K. Lee, L. C. Roig, H. L. Jenter, and H. M. Visser, “Drag coefficients for modeling flow through emergent vegetation in the Florida Everglades,” Ecological Engineering, vol. 22, no. 4-5, pp. 237–248, 2004.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  64. G. J. Arcement and V. R. Schneider, Guide for Selecting Manning’s Roughness Coefficients for Natural Channels and Flood Plains, US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, USA, 1989.
  65. Y. Ding and S. S. Y. Wang, “Identification of Manning’s roughness coefficients in channel network using adjoint analysis,” International Journal of Computational Fluid Dynamics, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 3–13, 2005.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  66. E. T. Engman, “Roughness coefficients for routing surface runoff,” Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, vol. 112, no. 1, pp. 39–53, 1986.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  67. M. Feizbahr, C. Kok Keong, F. Rostami, and M. Shahrokhi, “Wave energy dissipation using perforated and non perforated piles,” International Journal of Engineering, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 212–219, 2018.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  68. M. Farzadkhoo, A. Keshavarzi, H. Hamidifar, and M. Javan, “Sudden pollutant discharge in vegetated compound meandering rivers,” Catena, vol. 182, Article ID 104155, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  69. V. T. Chow, Open-channel Hydraulics, Mcgraw-Hill Civil Engineering Series, Chennai, TN, India, 1959.
  70. X. Zhang, R. Jing, Z. Li, Z. Li, X. Chen, and C.-Y. Su, “Adaptive pseudo inverse control for a class of nonlinear asymmetric and saturated nonlinear hysteretic systems,” IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 916–928, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  71. C. Zuo, Q. Chen, L. Tian, L. Waller, and A. Asundi, “Transport of intensity phase retrieval and computational imaging for partially coherent fields: the phase space perspective,” Optics and Lasers in Engineering, vol. 71, pp. 20–32, 2015.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  72. C. Zuo, J. Sun, J. Li, J. Zhang, A. Asundi, and Q. Chen, “High-resolution transport-of-intensity quantitative phase microscopy with annular illumination,” Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 7654–7722, 2017.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  73. B.-H. Li, Y. Liu, A.-M. Zhang, W.-H. Wang, and S. Wan, “A survey on blocking technology of entity resolution,” Journal of Computer Science and Technology, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 769–793, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  74. Y. Liu, B. Zhang, Y. Feng et al., “Development of 340-GHz transceiver front end based on GaAs monolithic integration technology for THz active imaging array,” Applied Sciences, vol. 10, no. 21, p. 7924, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  75. J. Hu, H. Zhang, L. Liu, X. Zhu, C. Zhao, and Q. Pan, “Convergent multiagent formation control with collision avoidance,” IEEE Transactions on Robotics, vol. 36, no. 6, pp. 1805–1818, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  76. M. B. Movahhed, J. Ayoubinejad, F. N. Asl, and M. Feizbahr, “The effect of rain on pedestrians crossing speed,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 6, no. 3, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  77. A. Li, D. Spano, J. Krivochiza et al., “A tutorial on interference exploitation via symbol-level precoding: overview, state-of-the-art and future directions,” IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 796–839, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  78. W. Zhu, C. Ma, X. Zhao et al., “Evaluation of sino foreign cooperative education project using orthogonal sine cosine optimized kernel extreme learning machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 61107–61123, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  79. G. Liu, W. Jia, M. Wang et al., “Predicting cervical hyperextension injury: a covariance guided sine cosine support vector machine,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 46895–46908, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  80. Y. Wei, H. Lv, M. Chen et al., “Predicting entrepreneurial intention of students: an extreme learning machine with Gaussian barebone harris hawks optimizer,” IEEE Access, vol. 8, pp. 76841–76855, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  81. A. Lin, Q. Wu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Predicting intentions of students for master programs using a chaos-induced sine cosine-based fuzzy K-Nearest neighbor classifier,” Ieee Access, vol. 7, pp. 67235–67248, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  82. Y. Fan, P. Wang, A. A. Heidari et al., “Rationalized fruit fly optimization with sine cosine algorithm: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 157, Article ID 113486, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  83. E. Rodríguez-Esparza, L. A. Zanella-Calzada, D. Oliva et al., “An efficient Harris hawks-inspired image segmentation method,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 155, Article ID 113428, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  84. S. Jiao, G. Chong, C. Huang et al., “Orthogonally adapted Harris hawks optimization for parameter estimation of photovoltaic models,” Energy, vol. 203, Article ID 117804, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  85. Z. Xu, Z. Hu, A. A. Heidari et al., “Orthogonally-designed adapted grasshopper optimization: a comprehensive analysis,” Expert Systems with Applications, vol. 150, Article ID 113282, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  86. A. Abbassi, R. Abbassi, A. A. Heidari et al., “Parameters identification of photovoltaic cell models using enhanced exploratory salp chains-based approach,” Energy, vol. 198, Article ID 117333, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  87. M. Mahmoodi and K. K. Aminjan, “Numerical simulation of flow through sukhoi 24 air inlet,” Computational Research Progress in Applied Science & Engineering (CRPASE), vol. 03, 2017.View at: Google Scholar
  88. F. J. Golrokh and A. Hasan, “A comparison of machine learning clustering algorithms based on the DEA optimization approach for pharmaceutical companies in developing countries,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
  89. H. Chen, A. A. Heidari, H. Chen, M. Wang, Z. Pan, and A. H. Gandomi, “Multi-population differential evolution-assisted Harris hawks optimization: framework and case studies,” Future Generation Computer Systems, vol. 111, pp. 175–198, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  90. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “Bayesian hierarchical model-based information fusion for degradation analysis considering non-competing relationship,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175222–175227, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  91. J. Guo, H. Zheng, B. Li, and G.-Z. Fu, “A Bayesian approach for degradation analysis with individual differences,” IEEE Access, vol. 7, pp. 175033–175040, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  92. M. M. A. Malakoutian, Y. Malakoutian, P. Mostafapour, and S. Z. D. Abed, “Prediction for monthly rainfall of six meteorological regions and TRNC (case study: north Cyprus),” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 2, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  93. H. Arslan, M. Ranjbar, and Z. Mutlum, “Maximum sound transmission loss in multi-chamber reactive silencers: are two chambers enough?,,” ENG Transactions, vol. 2, no. 1, 2021.View at: Google Scholar
  94. N. Tonekaboni, M. Feizbahr, N. Tonekaboni, G.-J. Jiang, and H.-X. Chen, “Optimization of solar CCHP systems with collector enhanced by porous media and nanofluid,” Mathematical Problems in Engineering, vol. 2021, Article ID 9984840, 12 pages, 2021.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  95. Z. Niu, B. Zhang, J. Wang et al., “The research on 220GHz multicarrier high-speed communication system,” China Communications, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 131–139, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  96. B. Zhang, Z. Niu, J. Wang et al., “Four‐hundred gigahertz broadband multi‐branch waveguide coupler,” IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, vol. 14, no. 11, pp. 1175–1179, 2020.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  97. Z.-Q. Niu, L. Yang, B. Zhang et al., “A mechanical reliability study of 3dB waveguide hybrid couplers in the submillimeter and terahertz band,” Journal of Zhejiang University Science, vol. 1, no. 1, 1998.View at: Google Scholar
  98. B. Zhang, D. Ji, D. Fang, S. Liang, Y. Fan, and X. Chen, “A novel 220-GHz GaN diode on-chip tripler with high driven power,” IEEE Electron Device Letters, vol. 40, no. 5, pp. 780–783, 2019.View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar
  99. M. Taleghani and A. Taleghani, “Identification and ranking of factors affecting the implementation of knowledge management engineering based on TOPSIS technique,” ENG Transactions, vol. 1, no. 1, 2020.View at: Google Scholar
Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing

Conflict resolution in the multi-stakeholder stepped spillway design under uncertainty by machine learning techniques

Md TusherMollah, Raphaël Comminal, Marcin P.Serdeczny, David B.Pedersen, Jon Spangenberg
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

Abstract

This paper presents computational fluid dynamics simulations of the deposition flow during printing of multiple layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing. The developed model predicts the morphology of the deposited layers and captures the layer deformations during the printing of viscoplastic materials. The physics is governed by the continuity and momentum equations with the Bingham constitutive model, formulated as a generalized Newtonian fluid. The cross-sectional shapes of the deposited layers are predicted, and the deformation of layers is studied for different constitutive parameters of the material. It is shown that the deformation of layers is due to the hydrostatic pressure of the printed material, as well as the extrusion pressure during the extrusion. The simulations show that a higher yield stress results in prints with less deformations, while a higher plastic viscosity leads to larger deformations in the deposited layers. Moreover, the influence of the printing speed, extrusion speed, layer height, and nozzle diameter on the deformation of the printed layers is investigated. Finally, the model provides a conservative estimate of the required increase in yield stress that a viscoplastic material demands after deposition in order to support the hydrostatic and extrusion pressure of the subsequently printed layers.

이 논문은 재료 압출 적층 제조에서 여러 레이어를 인쇄하는 동안 증착 흐름의 전산 유체 역학 시뮬레이션을 제공합니다. 개발된 모델은 증착된 레이어의 형태를 예측하고 점소성 재료를 인쇄하는 동안 레이어 변형을 캡처합니다.

물리학은 일반화된 뉴턴 유체로 공식화된 Bingham 구성 모델의 연속성 및 운동량 방정식에 의해 제어됩니다. 증착된 층의 단면 모양이 예측되고 재료의 다양한 구성 매개변수에 대해 층의 변형이 연구됩니다. 층의 변형은 인쇄물의 정수압과 압출시 압출압력으로 인한 것임을 알 수 있다.

시뮬레이션에 따르면 항복 응력이 높을수록 변형이 적은 인쇄물이 생성되는 반면 플라스틱 점도가 높을수록 증착된 레이어에서 변형이 커집니다. 또한 인쇄 속도, 압출 속도, 층 높이 및 노즐 직경이 인쇄된 층의 변형에 미치는 영향을 조사했습니다.

마지막으로, 이 모델은 후속 인쇄된 레이어의 정수압 및 압출 압력을 지원하기 위해 증착 후 점소성 재료가 요구하는 항복 응력의 필요한 증가에 대한 보수적인 추정치를 제공합니다.

Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing
Stability and deformations of deposited layers in material extrusion additive manufacturing

Keywords

Viscoplastic MaterialsMaterial Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (MEX-AM)Multiple-Layers DepositionComputational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)Deformation Control

Figure 17. Longitudinal turbulent kinetic energy distribution on the smooth and triangular macroroughnesses: (A) Y/2; (B) Y/6.

Numerical Simulations of the Flow Field of a Submerged Hydraulic Jump over Triangular Macroroughnesses

Triangular Macroroughnesses 대한 잠긴 수압 점프의 유동장 수치 시뮬레이션

by Amir Ghaderi 1,2,Mehdi Dasineh 3,Francesco Aristodemo 2 andCostanza Aricò 4,*1Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Zanjan, Zanjan 537138791, Iran2Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calabria, Arcavacata, 87036 Rende, Italy3Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Maragheh, Maragheh 8311155181, Iran4Department of Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo, Italy*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.Academic Editor: Anis YounesWater202113(5), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13050674

Abstract

The submerged hydraulic jump is a sudden change from the supercritical to subcritical flow, specified by strong turbulence, air entrainment and energy loss. Despite recent studies, hydraulic jump characteristics in smooth and rough beds, the turbulence, the mean velocity and the flow patterns in the cavity region of a submerged hydraulic jump in the rough beds, especially in the case of triangular macroroughnesses, are not completely understood. The objective of this paper was to numerically investigate via the FLOW-3D model the effects of triangular macroroughnesses on the characteristics of submerged jump, including the longitudinal profile of streamlines, flow patterns in the cavity region, horizontal velocity profiles, streamwise velocity distribution, thickness of the inner layer, bed shear stress coefficient, Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) and energy loss, in different macroroughness arrangements and various inlet Froude numbers (1.7 < Fr1 < 9.3). To verify the accuracy and reliability of the present numerical simulations, literature experimental data were considered.

Keywords: submerged hydraulic jumptriangular macroroughnessesTKEbed shear stress coefficientvelocityFLOW-3D model

수중 유압 점프는 강한 난류, 공기 동반 및 에너지 손실로 지정된 초임계에서 아임계 흐름으로의 급격한 변화입니다. 최근 연구에도 불구하고, 특히 삼각형 거시적 거칠기의 경우, 평활 및 거친 베드에서의 수압 점프 특성, 거친 베드에서 잠긴 수압 점프의 공동 영역에서 난류, 평균 속도 및 유동 패턴이 완전히 이해되지 않았습니다.

이 논문의 목적은 유선의 종방향 프로파일, 캐비티 영역의 유동 패턴, 수평 속도 프로파일, 스트림 방향 속도 분포, 두께를 포함하여 서브머지드 점프의 특성에 대한 삼각형 거시 거칠기의 영향을 FLOW-3D 모델을 통해 수치적으로 조사하는 것이었습니다.

내부 층의 층 전단 응력 계수, 난류 운동 에너지(TKE) 및 에너지 손실, 다양한 거시 거칠기 배열 및 다양한 입구 Froude 수(1.7 < Fr1 < 9.3). 현재 수치 시뮬레이션의 정확성과 신뢰성을 검증하기 위해 문헌 실험 데이터를 고려했습니다.

 Introduction

격렬한 난류 혼합과 기포 동반이 있는 수압 점프는 초임계에서 아임계 흐름으로의 변화 과정으로 간주됩니다[1]. 자유 및 수중 유압 점프는 일반적으로 게이트, 배수로 및 둑과 같은 수력 구조 아래의 에너지 손실에 적합합니다. 매끄러운 베드에서 유압 점프의 특성은 널리 연구되었습니다[2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9].

베드의 거칠기 요소가 매끄러운 베드와 비교하여 수압 점프의 특성에 어떻게 영향을 미치는지 예측하기 위해 거시적 거칠기에 대한 자유 및 수중 수력 점프에 대해 여러 실험 및 수치 연구가 수행되었습니다. Ead와 Rajaratnam[10]은 사인파 거대 거칠기에 대한 수리학적 점프의 특성을 조사하고 무차원 분석을 통해 수면 프로파일과 배출을 정규화했습니다.

Tokyayet al. [11]은 두 사인 곡선 거대 거칠기에 대한 점프 길이 비율과 에너지 손실이 매끄러운 베드보다 각각 35% 더 작고 6% 더 높다는 것을 관찰했습니다. Abbaspur et al. [12]는 6개의 사인파형 거대 거칠기에 대한 수력학적 점프의 특성을 연구했습니다. 그 결과, 꼬리수심과 점프길이는 평상보다 낮았고 Froude 수는 점프길이에 큰 영향을 미쳤습니다.

Shafai-Bejestan과 Neisi[13]는 수압 점프에 대한 마름모꼴 거대 거칠기의 영향을 조사했습니다. 결과는 마름모꼴 거시 거칠기를 사용하면 매끄러운 침대와 비교하여 꼬리 수심과 점프 길이를 감소시키는 것으로 나타났습니다. Izadjoo와 Shafai-Bejestan[14]은 다양한 사다리꼴 거시 거칠기에 대한 수압 점프를 연구했습니다.

그들은 전단응력계수가 평활층보다 10배 이상 크고 점프길이가 50% 감소하는 것을 관찰하였습니다. Nikmehr과 Aminpour[15]는 Flow-3D 모델 버전 11.2[16]를 사용하여 사다리꼴 블록이 있는 거시적 거칠기에 대한 수력학적 점프의 특성을 조사했습니다. 결과는 거시 거칠기의 높이와 거리가 증가할수록 전단 응력 계수뿐만 아니라 베드 근처에서 속도가 감소하는 것으로 나타났습니다.

Ghaderi et al. [17]은 다양한 형태의 거시 거칠기(삼각형, 정사각형 및 반 타원형)에 대한 자유 및 수중 수력 점프 특성을 연구했습니다. 결과는 Froude 수의 증가에 따라 자유 및 수중 점프에서 전단 응력 계수, 에너지 손실, 수중 깊이, 미수 깊이 및 상대 점프 길이가 증가함을 나타냅니다.

자유 및 수중 점프에서 가장 높은 전단 응력과 에너지 손실은 삼각형의 거시 거칠기가 존재할 때 발생했습니다. Elsebaie와 Shabayek[18]은 5가지 형태의 거시적 거칠기(삼각형, 사다리꼴, 2개의 측면 경사 및 직사각형이 있는 정현파)에 대한 수력학적 점프의 특성을 연구했습니다. 결과는 모든 거시적 거칠기에 대한 에너지 손실이 매끄러운 베드에서보다 15배 이상이라는 것을 보여주었습니다.

Samadi-Boroujeni et al. [19]는 다양한 각도의 6개의 삼각형 거시 거칠기에 대한 수력 점프를 조사한 결과 삼각형 거시 거칠기가 평활 베드에 비해 점프 길이를 줄이고 에너지 손실과 베드 전단 응력 계수를 증가시키는 것으로 나타났습니다.

Ahmed et al. [20]은 매끄러운 베드와 삼각형 거시 거칠기에서 수중 수력 점프 특성을 조사했습니다. 결과는 부드러운 침대와 비교할 때 잠긴 깊이와 점프 길이가 감소했다고 밝혔습니다. 표 1은 다른 연구자들이 제시한 과거의 유압 점프에 대한 실험 및 수치 연구의 세부 사항을 나열합니다.

Table 1. Main characteristics of some past experimental and numerical studies on hydraulic jumps.

ReferenceShape Bed-Channel Type-
Jump Type
Channel Dimension (m)Roughness (mm)Fr1Investigated Flow
Properties
Ead and Rajaratnam [10]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-Free jumpCL1 = 7.60
CW2 = 0.44
CH3 = 0.60
-Corrugated sheets (RH4 = 13 and 22)4–10-Upstream and tailwater depths-Jump length-Roller length-Velocity-Water surface profile
Tokyay et al. [11]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-Free jumpCL = 10.50
CW = 0.253
CH = 0.432
-Two sinusoidal corrugated (RH = 10 and 13)5–12-Depth ratio-Jump length-Energy loss
Izadjoo and Shafai-Bejestan [14]-Smooth and rough beds-Two rectangular-channel-Free jumpCL = 1.2, 9
CW = 0.25, 0.50
CH = 0.40
Baffle with trapezoidal cross section
(RH: 13 and 26)
6–12-Upstream and tailwater depths-Jump length-Velocity-Bed shear stress coefficient
Abbaspour et al. [12]-Horizontal bed with slope 0.002-Rectangular channel—smooth and rough beds-Free jumpCL = 10
CW = 0.25
CH = 0.50
-Sinusoidal bed (RH = 15,20, 25 and 35)3.80–8.60-Water surface profile-Depth ratio-Jump length-Energy loss-Velocity profiles-Bed shear stress coefficient
Shafai-Bejestan and Neisi [13]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-Free jumpCL = 7.50
CW = 0.35
CH = 0.50
Lozenge bed4.50–12-Sequent depth-Jump length
Elsebaie and Shabayek [18]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-With side slopes of 45 degrees for two trapezoidal and triangular macroroughnesses and of 60 degrees for other trapezoidal macroroughnesses-Free jumpCL = 9
CW = 0.295
CH = 0.32
-Sinusoidal-Triangular-Trapezoidal with two side-Rectangular-(RH = 18 and corrugation wavelength = 65)50-Water surface profile-Sequent depth-Jump length-Bed shear stress coefficient
Samadi-Boroujeni et al. [19]-Rectangular channel-Smooth and rough beds-Free jumpCL = 12
CW = 0.40
CH = 0.40
-Six triangular corrugated (RH = 2.5)6.10–13.10-Water surface profile-Sequent depth-Jump length-Energy loss-Velocity profiles-Bed shear stress coefficient
Ahmed et al. [20]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-Submerged jumpCL = 24.50
CW = 0.75
CH = 0.70
-Triangular corrugated sheet (RH = 40)1.68–9.29-Conjugated and tailwater depths-Submerged ratio-Deficit depth-Relative jump length-Jump length-Relative roller jump length-Jump efficiency-Bed shear stress coefficient
Nikmehr and Aminpour [15]-Horizontal bed with slope 0.002-Rectangular channel-Rough bed-Free jumpCL = 12
CW = 0.25
CH = 0.50
-Trapezoidal blocks (RH = 2, 3 and 4)5.01–13.70-Water surface profile-Sequent depth-Jump length-Roller length-Velocity
Ghaderi et al. [17]-Smooth and rough beds-Rectangular channel-Free and submerged jumpCL = 4.50
CW = 0.75
CH = 0.70
-Triangular, square and semi-oval macroroughnesses (RH = 40 and distance of roughness of I = 40, 80, 120, 160 and 200)1.70–9.30-Horizontal velocity distributions-Bed shear stress coefficient-Sequent depth ratio and submerged depth ratio-Jump length-Energy loss
Present studyRectangular channel
Smooth and rough beds
Submerged jump
CL = 4.50
CW = 0.75
CH = 0.70
-Triangular macroroughnesses (RH = 40 and distance of roughness of I = 40, 80, 120, 160 and 200)1.70–9.30-Longitudinal profile of streamlines-Flow patterns in the cavity region-Horizontal velocity profiles-Streamwise velocity distribution-Bed shear stress coefficient-TKE-Thickness of the inner layer-Energy loss

CL1: channel length, CW2: channel width, CH3: channel height, RH4: roughness height.

이전에 논의된 조사의 주요 부분은 실험실 접근 방식을 기반으로 하며 사인파, 마름모꼴, 사다리꼴, 정사각형, 직사각형 및 삼각형 매크로 거칠기가 공액 깊이, 잠긴 깊이, 점프 길이, 에너지 손실과 같은 일부 자유 및 수중 유압 점프 특성에 어떻게 영향을 미치는지 조사합니다.

베드 및 전단 응력 계수. 더욱이, 저자[17]에 의해 다양한 형태의 거시적 거칠기에 대한 수력학적 점프에 대한 이전 발표된 논문을 참조하면, 삼각형의 거대조도는 가장 높은 층 전단 응력 계수 및 에너지 손실을 가지며 또한 가장 낮은 잠긴 깊이, tailwater를 갖는 것으로 관찰되었습니다.

다른 거친 모양, 즉 정사각형 및 반 타원형과 부드러운 침대에 비해 깊이와 점프 길이. 따라서 본 논문에서는 삼각형 매크로 거칠기를 사용하여(일정한 거칠기 높이가 T = 4cm이고 삼각형 거칠기의 거리가 I = 4, 8, 12, 16 및 20cm인 다른 T/I 비율에 대해), 특정 캐비티 영역의 유동 패턴, 난류 운동 에너지(TKE) 및 흐름 방향 속도 분포와 같은 연구가 필요합니다.

CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) 방법은 자유 및 수중 유압 점프[21]와 같은 복잡한 흐름의 모델링 프로세스를 수행하는 중요한 도구로 등장하며 수중 유압 점프의 특성은 CFD 시뮬레이션을 사용하여 정확하게 예측할 수 있습니다 [22,23 ].

본 논문은 초기에 수중 유압 점프의 주요 특성, 수치 모델에 대한 입력 매개변수 및 Ahmed et al.의 참조 실험 조사를 제시합니다. [20], 검증 목적으로 보고되었습니다. 또한, 본 연구에서는 유선의 종방향 프로파일, 캐비티 영역의 유동 패턴, 수평 속도 프로파일, 내부 층의 두께, 베드 전단 응력 계수, TKE 및 에너지 손실과 같은 특성을 조사할 것입니다.

Figure 1. Definition sketch of a submerged hydraulic jump at triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 1. Definition sketch of a submerged hydraulic jump at triangular macroroughnesses.

Table 2. Effective parameters in the numerical model.

Bed TypeQ
(l/s)
I
(cm)
T (cm)d (cm)y1
(cm)
y4
(cm)
Fr1= u1/(gy1)0.5SRe1= (u1y1)/υ
Smooth30, 4551.62–3.839.64–32.101.7–9.30.26–0.5039,884–59,825
Triangular macroroughnesses30, 454, 8, 12, 16, 20451.62–3.846.82–30.081.7–9.30.21–0.4439,884–59,825
Figure 2. Longitudinal profile of the experimental flume (Ahmed et al. [20]).
Figure 2. Longitudinal profile of the experimental flume (Ahmed et al. [20]).

Table 3. Main flow variables for the numerical and physical models (Ahmed et al. [20]).

ModelsBed TypeQ (l/s)d (cm)y1 (cm)u1 (m/s)Fr1
Numerical and PhysicalSmooth4551.62–3.831.04–3.701.7–9.3
T/I = 0.54551.61–3.831.05–3.711.7–9.3
T/I = 0.254551.60–3.841.04–3.711.7–9.3
Figure 3. The boundary conditions governing the simulations.
Figure 3. The boundary conditions governing the simulations.
Figure 4. Sketch of mesh setup.
Figure 4. Sketch of mesh setup.

Table 4. Characteristics of the computational grids.

MeshNested Block Cell Size (cm)Containing Block Cell Size (cm)
10.551.10
20.651.30
30.851.70

Table 5. The numerical results of mesh convergence analysis.

ParametersAmounts
fs1 (-)7.15
fs2 (-)6.88
fs3 (-)6.19
K (-)5.61
E32 (%)10.02
E21 (%)3.77
GCI21 (%)3.03
GCI32 (%)3.57
GCI32/rp GCI210.98
Figure 5. Time changes of the flow discharge in the inlet and outlet boundaries conditions (A): Q = 0.03 m3/s (B): Q = 0.045 m3/s.
Figure 5. Time changes of the flow discharge in the inlet and outlet boundaries conditions (A): Q = 0.03 m3/s (B): Q = 0.045 m3/s.
Figure 6. The evolutionary process of a submerged hydraulic jump on the smooth bed—Q = 0.03 m3/s.
Figure 6. The evolutionary process of a submerged hydraulic jump on the smooth bed—Q = 0.03 m3/s.
Figure 7. Numerical versus experimental basic parameters of the submerged hydraulic jump. (A): y3/y1; and (B): y4/y1.
Figure 7. Numerical versus experimental basic parameters of the submerged hydraulic jump. (A): y3/y1; and (B): y4/y1.
Figure 8. Velocity vector field and flow pattern through the gate in a submerged hydraulic jump condition: (A) smooth bed; (B) triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 8. Velocity vector field and flow pattern through the gate in a submerged hydraulic jump condition: (A) smooth bed; (B) triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 9. Velocity vector distributions in the x–z plane (y = 0) within the cavity region.
Figure 9. Velocity vector distributions in the x–z plane (y = 0) within the cavity region.
Figure 10. Typical vertical distribution of the mean horizontal velocity in a submerged hydraulic jump [46].
Figure 10. Typical vertical distribution of the mean horizontal velocity in a submerged hydraulic jump [46].
Figure 11. Typical horizontal velocity profiles in a submerged hydraulic jump on smooth bed and triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 11. Typical horizontal velocity profiles in a submerged hydraulic jump on smooth bed and triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 12. Horizontal velocity distribution at different distances from the sluice gate for the different T/I for Fr1 = 6.1
Figure 12. Horizontal velocity distribution at different distances from the sluice gate for the different T/I for Fr1 = 6.1
Figure 13. Stream-wise velocity distribution for the triangular macroroughnesses with T/I = 0.5 and 0.25.
Figure 13. Stream-wise velocity distribution for the triangular macroroughnesses with T/I = 0.5 and 0.25.
Figure 14. Dimensionless horizontal velocity distribution in the submerged hydraulic jump for different Froude numbers in triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 14. Dimensionless horizontal velocity distribution in the submerged hydraulic jump for different Froude numbers in triangular macroroughnesses.
Figure 15. Spatial variations of (umax/u1) and (δ⁄y1).
Figure 15. Spatial variations of (umax/u1) and (δ⁄y1).
Figure 16. The shear stress coefficient (ε) versus the inlet Froude number (Fr1).
Figure 16. The shear stress coefficient (ε) versus the inlet Froude number (Fr1).
Figure 17. Longitudinal turbulent kinetic energy distribution on the smooth and triangular macroroughnesses: (A) Y/2; (B) Y/6.
Figure 17. Longitudinal turbulent kinetic energy distribution on the smooth and triangular macroroughnesses: (A) Y/2; (B) Y/6.
Figure 18. The energy loss (EL/E3) of the submerged jump versus inlet Froude number (Fr1).
Figure 18. The energy loss (EL/E3) of the submerged jump versus inlet Froude number (Fr1).

Conclusions

  • 본 논문에서는 유선의 종방향 프로파일, 공동 영역의 유동 패턴, 수평 속도 프로파일, 스트림 방향 속도 분포, 내부 층의 두께, 베드 전단 응력 계수, 난류 운동 에너지(TKE)를 포함하는 수중 유압 점프의 특성을 제시하고 논의했습니다. ) 및 삼각형 거시적 거칠기에 대한 에너지 손실. 이러한 특성은 FLOW-3D® 모델을 사용하여 수치적으로 조사되었습니다. 자유 표면을 시뮬레이션하기 위한 VOF(Volume of Fluid) 방법과 난류 RNG k-ε 모델이 구현됩니다. 본 모델을 검증하기 위해 평활층과 삼각형 거시 거칠기에 대해 수치 시뮬레이션과 실험 결과를 비교했습니다. 본 연구의 다음과 같은 결과를 도출할 수 있다.
  • 개발 및 개발 지역의 삼각형 거시 거칠기의 흐름 패턴은 수중 유압 점프 조건의 매끄러운 바닥과 비교하여 더 작은 영역에서 동일합니다. 삼각형의 거대 거칠기는 거대 거칠기 사이의 공동 영역에서 또 다른 시계 방향 와류의 형성으로 이어집니다.
  • T/I = 1, 0.5 및 0.33과 같은 거리에 대해 속도 벡터 분포는 캐비티 영역에서 시계 방향 소용돌이를 표시하며, 여기서 속도의 크기는 평균 유속보다 훨씬 작습니다. 삼각형 거대 거칠기(T/I = 0.25 및 0.2) 사이의 거리를 늘리면 캐비티 영역에 크기가 다른 두 개의 소용돌이가 형성됩니다.
  • 삼각형 거시조도 사이의 거리가 충분히 길면 흐름이 다음 조도에 도달할 때까지 속도 분포가 회복됩니다. 그러나 짧은 거리에서 흐름은 속도 분포의 적절한 회복 없이 다음 거칠기에 도달합니다. 따라서 거시 거칠기 사이의 거리가 감소함에 따라 마찰 계수의 증가율이 감소합니다.
  • 삼각형의 거시적 거칠기에서, 잠수 점프의 지정된 섹션에서 최대 속도는 자유 점프보다 높은 값으로 이어집니다. 또한, 수중 점프에서 두 가지 유형의 베드(부드러움 및 거친 베드)에 대해 깊이 및 와류 증가로 인해 베드로부터의 최대 속도 거리는 감소합니다. 잠수 점프에서 경계층 두께는 자유 점프보다 얇습니다.
  • 매끄러운 베드의 난류 영역은 게이트로부터의 거리에 따라 생성되고 자유 표면 롤러 영역 근처에서 발생하는 반면, 거시적 거칠기에서는 난류가 게이트 근처에서 시작되어 더 큰 강도와 제한된 스위프 영역으로 시작됩니다. 이는 반시계 방향 순환의 결과입니다. 거시 거칠기 사이의 공간에서 자유 표면 롤러 및 시계 방향 와류.
  • 삼각 거시 거칠기에서 침지 점프의 베드 전단 응력 계수와 에너지 손실은 유입구 Froude 수의 증가에 따라 증가하는 매끄러운 베드에서 발견된 것보다 더 큽니다. T/I = 0.50 및 0.20에서 최고 및 최저 베드 전단 응력 계수 및 에너지 손실이 평활 베드에 비해 거칠기 요소의 거리가 증가함에 따라 발생합니다.
  • 거의 거칠기 요소가 있는 삼각형 매크로 거칠기의 존재에 의해 주어지는 점프 길이와 잠긴 수심 및 꼬리 수심의 감소는 결과적으로 크기, 즉 길이 및 높이가 감소하는 정수조 설계에 사용될 수 있습니다.
  • 일반적으로 CFD 모델은 다양한 수력 조건 및 기하학적 배열을 고려하여 잠수 점프의 특성 예측을 시뮬레이션할 수 있습니다. 캐비티 영역의 흐름 패턴, 흐름 방향 및 수평 속도 분포, 베드 전단 응력 계수, TKE 및 유압 점프의 에너지 손실은 수치적 방법으로 시뮬레이션할 수 있습니다. 그러나 거시적 차원과 유동장 및 공동 유동의 변화에 ​​대한 다양한 배열에 대한 연구는 향후 과제로 남아 있다.

References

  1. White, F.M. Viscous Fluid Flow, 2nd ed.; McGraw-Hill University of Rhode Island: Montreal, QC, Canada, 1991. [Google Scholar]
  2. Launder, B.E.; Rodi, W. The turbulent wall jet. Prog. Aerosp. Sci. 197919, 81–128. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  3. McCorquodale, J.A. Hydraulic jumps and internal flows. In Encyclopedia of Fluid Mechanics; Cheremisinoff, N.P., Ed.; Golf Publishing: Houston, TX, USA, 1986; pp. 120–173. [Google Scholar]
  4. Federico, I.; Marrone, S.; Colagrossi, A.; Aristodemo, F.; Antuono, M. Simulating 2D open-channel flows through an SPH model. Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 201234, 35–46. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  5. Khan, S.A. An analytical analysis of hydraulic jump in triangular channel: A proposed model. J. Inst. Eng. India Ser. A 201394, 83–87. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  6. Mortazavi, M.; Le Chenadec, V.; Moin, P.; Mani, A. Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent hydraulic jump: Turbulence statistics and air entrainment. J. Fluid Mech. 2016797, 60–94. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  7. Daneshfaraz, R.; Ghahramanzadeh, A.; Ghaderi, A.; Joudi, A.R.; Abraham, J. Investigation of the effect of edge shape on characteristics of flow under vertical gates. J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 2016108, 425–432. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  8. Azimi, H.; Shabanlou, S.; Kardar, S. Characteristics of hydraulic jump in U-shaped channels. Arab. J. Sci. Eng. 201742, 3751–3760. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  9. De Padova, D.; Mossa, M.; Sibilla, S. SPH numerical investigation of characteristics of hydraulic jumps. Environ. Fluid Mech. 201818, 849–870. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  10. Ead, S.A.; Rajaratnam, N. Hydraulic jumps on corrugated beds. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2002128, 656–663. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  11. Tokyay, N.D. Effect of channel bed corrugations on hydraulic jumps. In Proceedings of the World Water and Environmental Resources Congress 2005, Anchorage, AK, USA, 15–19 May 2005; pp. 1–9. [Google Scholar]
  12. Abbaspour, A.; Dalir, A.H.; Farsadizadeh, D.; Sadraddini, A.A. Effect of sinusoidal corrugated bed on hydraulic jump characteristics. J. Hydro-Environ. Res. 20093, 109–117. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  13. Shafai-Bejestan, M.S.; Neisi, K. A new roughened bed hydraulic jump stilling basin. Asian J. Appl. Sci. 20092, 436–445. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  14. Izadjoo, F.; Shafai-Bejestan, M. Corrugated bed hydraulic jump stilling basin. J. Appl. Sci. 20077, 1164–1169. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  15. Nikmehr, S.; Aminpour, Y. Numerical Simulation of Hydraulic Jump over Rough Beds. Period. Polytech. Civil Eng. 201764, 396–407. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  16. Flow Science Inc. FLOW-3D V 11.2 User’s Manual; Flow Science Inc.: Santa Fe, NM, USA, 2016. [Google Scholar]
  17. Ghaderi, A.; Dasineh, M.; Aristodemo, F.; Ghahramanzadeh, A. Characteristics of free and submerged hydraulic jumps over different macroroughnesses. J. Hydroinform. 202022, 1554–1572. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  18. Elsebaie, I.H.; Shabayek, S. Formation of hydraulic jumps on corrugated beds. Int. J. Civil Environ. Eng. IJCEE–IJENS 201010, 37–47. [Google Scholar]
  19. Samadi-Boroujeni, H.; Ghazali, M.; Gorbani, B.; Nafchi, R.F. Effect of triangular corrugated beds on the hydraulic jump characteristics. Can. J. Civil Eng. 201340, 841–847. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  20. Ahmed, H.M.A.; El Gendy, M.; Mirdan, A.M.H.; Ali, A.A.M.; Haleem, F.S.F.A. Effect of corrugated beds on characteristics of submerged hydraulic jump. Ain Shams Eng. J. 20145, 1033–1042. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  21. Viti, N.; Valero, D.; Gualtieri, C. Numerical simulation of hydraulic jumps. Part 2: Recent results and future outlook. Water 201911, 28. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  22. Gumus, V.; Simsek, O.; Soydan, N.G.; Akoz, M.S.; Kirkgoz, M.S. Numerical modeling of submerged hydraulic jump from a sluice gate. J. Irrig. Drain. Eng. 2016142, 04015037. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  23. Jesudhas, V.; Roussinova, V.; Balachandar, R.; Barron, R. Submerged hydraulic jump study using DES. J. Hydraul. Eng. 2017143, 04016091. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  24. Rajaratnam, N. The hydraulic jump as a wall jet. J. Hydraul. Div. 196591, 107–132. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  25. Hager, W.H. Energy Dissipaters and Hydraulic Jump; Kluwer Academic Publisher: Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1992; pp. 185–224. [Google Scholar]
  26. Long, D.; Steffler, P.M.; Rajaratnam, N. LDA study of flow structure in submerged Hydraulic jumps. J. Hydraul. Res. 199028, 437–460. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  27. Chow, V.T. Open Channel Hydraulics; McGraw-Hill: New York, NY, USA, 1959. [Google Scholar]
  28. Wilcox, D.C. Turbulence Modeling for CFD, 3rd ed.; DCW Industries, Inc.: La Canada, CA, USA, 2006. [Google Scholar]
  29. Hirt, C.W.; Nichols, B.D. Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. J. Comput. Phys. 198139, 201–225. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  30. Pourshahbaz, H.; Abbasi, S.; Pandey, M.; Pu, J.H.; Taghvaei, P.; Tofangdar, N. Morphology and hydrodynamics numerical simulation around groynes. ISH J. Hydraul. Eng. 2020, 1–9. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  31. Choufu, L.; Abbasi, S.; Pourshahbaz, H.; Taghvaei, P.; Tfwala, S. Investigation of flow, erosion, and sedimentation pattern around varied groynes under different hydraulic and geometric conditions: A numerical study. Water 201911, 235. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  32. Zhenwei, Z.; Haixia, L. Experimental investigation on the anisotropic tensorial eddy viscosity model for turbulence flow. Int. J. Heat Technol. 201634, 186–190. [Google Scholar]
  33. Carvalho, R.; Lemos Ramo, C. Numerical computation of the flow in hydraulic jump stilling basins. J. Hydraul. Res. 200846, 739–752. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  34. Bayon, A.; Valero, D.; García-Bartual, R.; López-Jiménez, P.A. Performance assessment of Open FOAM and FLOW-3D in the numerical modeling of a low Reynolds number hydraulic jump. Environ. Model. Softw. 201680, 322–335. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  35. Daneshfaraz, R.; Ghaderi, A.; Akhtari, A.; Di Francesco, S. On the Effect of Block Roughness in Ogee Spillways with Flip Buckets. Fluids 20205, 182. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  36. Ghaderi, A.; Abbasi, S. CFD simulation of local scouring around airfoil-shaped bridge piers with and without collar. Sādhanā 201944, 216. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  37. Ghaderi, A.; Daneshfaraz, R.; Dasineh, M.; Di Francesco, S. Energy Dissipation and Hydraulics of Flow over Trapezoidal–Triangular Labyrinth Weirs. Water 202012, 1992. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  38. Ghaderi, A.; Abbasi, S.; Abraham, J.; Azamathulla, H.M. Efficiency of trapezoidal labyrinth shaped stepped spillways. Flow Meas. Instrum. 202072, 101711. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  39. Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S.A. Renormalization group analysis of turbulence. I. basic theory. J. Sci. Comput. 19861, 3–51. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  40. Biscarini, C.; Di Francesco, S.; Ridolfi, E.; Manciola, P. On the simulation of floods in a narrow bending valley: The malpasset dam break case study. Water 20168, 545. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  41. Ghaderi, A.; Daneshfaraz, R.; Abbasi, S.; Abraham, J. Numerical analysis of the hydraulic characteristics of modified labyrinth weirs. Int. J. Energy Water Resour. 20204, 425–436. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  42. Alfonsi, G. Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations for turbulence modeling. Appl. Mech. Rev. 200962. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  43. Abbasi, S.; Fatemi, S.; Ghaderi, A.; Di Francesco, S. The Effect of Geometric Parameters of the Antivortex on a Triangular Labyrinth Side Weir. Water 202113, 14. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  44. Celik, I.B.; Ghia, U.; Roache, P.J. Procedure for estimation and reporting of uncertainty due to discretization in CFD applications. J. Fluids Eng. 2008130, 0780011–0780013. [Google Scholar]
  45. Khan, M.I.; Simons, R.R.; Grass, A.J. Influence of cavity flow regimes on turbulence diffusion coefficient. J. Vis. 20069, 57–68. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  46. Javanappa, S.K.; Narasimhamurthy, V.D. DNS of plane Couette flow with surface roughness. Int. J. Adv. Eng. Sci. Appl. Math. 2020, 1–13. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  47. Nasrabadi, M.; Omid, M.H.; Farhoudi, J. Submerged hydraulic jump with sediment-laden flow. Int. J. Sediment Res. 201227, 100–111. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  48. Pourabdollah, N.; Heidarpour, M.; Abedi Koupai, J. Characteristics of free and submerged hydraulic jumps in different stilling basins. In Water Management; Thomas Telford Ltd.: London, UK, 2019; pp. 1–11. [Google Scholar]
  49. Rajaratnam, N. Turbulent Jets; Elsevier Science: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1976. [Google Scholar]
  50. Aristodemo, F.; Marrone, S.; Federico, I. SPH modeling of plane jets into water bodies through an inflow/outflow algorithm. Ocean Eng. 2015105, 160–175. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  51. Shekari, Y.; Javan, M.; Eghbalzadeh, A. Three-dimensional numerical study of submerged hydraulic jumps. Arab. J. Sci. Eng. 201439, 6969–6981. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  52. Khan, A.A.; Steffler, P.M. Physically based hydraulic jump model for depth-averaged computations. J. Hydraul. Eng. 1996122, 540–548. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
  53. De Dios, M.; Bombardelli, F.A.; García, C.M.; Liscia, S.O.; Lopardo, R.A.; Parravicini, J.A. Experimental characterization of three-dimensional flow vortical structures in submerged hydraulic jumps. J. Hydro-Environ. Res. 201715, 1–12. [Google Scholar] [CrossRef]
Publisher’s Note: MDPI stays neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.
Fig. 12. Comparison of simulation results with experimental data for a flow rate of water = Ql=15 ml/hr and a flow rate of air = Qg =3 ml/hr.

Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method

Abstract

This paper demonstrates that the Volume of Fluid (TruVOF) method in FLOW-3D (a general purpose CFD software) is an effective tool for studying droplet dynamics and mixing in microfluidic devices. The first example studied is a T-junction where flow patterns for both droplet generation and passive mixing are analyzed. The second example studied is a co-flowing device where the formation and breakup of bubbles is simulated. The effect of viscosity on bubble formation is also analyzed. For a T-junction the bubble size is corroborated with experimental data. Both the bubble size and frequency are studied and corroborated with experimental data for a co-flowing device. The third example studied is the electrowetting phenomenon observed in a small water droplet resting on a dielectric material. The steady-state contact angle is plotted against the voltage applied. The results are compared with both the Young-Lippmann curve and experimental results. 

이 논문은 FLOW-3D (범용 CFD 소프트웨어)의 유체 부피 (TruVOF) 방법이 미세 유체 장치에서 액적 역학 및 혼합을 연구하는데 효과적인 도구임을 보여줍니다.

연구된 첫 번째 예는 액적 생성 및 수동 혼합에 대한 흐름 패턴이 분석되는 T- 접합입니다. 연구된 두 번째 예는 기포의 형성 및 분해가 시뮬레이션 되는 동시 유동 장치입니다.

기포 형성에 대한 점도의 영향도 분석됩니다. T 접합의 경우 기포 크기는 실험 데이터로 확증됩니다. 기포 크기와 빈도 모두 공동 유동 장치에 대한 실험 데이터로 연구되고 확증됩니다.

연구된 세 번째 예는 유전 물질 위에 놓인 작은 물방울에서 관찰 된 전기 습윤 현상입니다. 정상 상태 접촉각은 적용된 전압에 대해 플롯됩니다. 결과는 Young-Lippmann 곡선 및 실험 결과와 비교됩니다.

Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method Fig 1
Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method Fig 1
Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method Fig 2
Simulation of Droplet Dynamics and Mixing in Microfluidic Devices using a VOF-Based Method Fig 2

References

Formation of bubbles in a simple co-flowing micro-channel

SaveAlertResearch FeedFormation of droplets and bubbles in a microfluidic T-junction-scaling and mechanism of break-up.

SaveAlertResearch FeedCreating, transporting, cutting, and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation for digital microfluidic circuits,

SaveAlertResearch FeedFLOW DEVELOPMENT OF CO-FLOWING STREAMS IN RECTANGULAR MICRO-CHANNELS

SaveAlertResearch FeedA microfluidic system for controlling reaction networks in time.

SaveAlertResearch FeedElectrowetting: from basics to applications

SaveAlertResearch FeedVolume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries

Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure

Three-Dimensional Flow Analysis of a Thermosetting Compound during Mold Filling

Junichi Saeki and Tsutomu Kono
Production Engineering Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd.
292, Y shida-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama, 244-0817 Japan

Abstract

Thermosetting molding compounds are widely used for encapsulating semiconductor devices and electronic modules. In recent years, the number of electronic parts encapsulated in an electronic module has increased, in order to meet the requirements for high performance. As a result, the configuration of inserted parts during molding has become very complicated. Meanwhile, package thickness has been reduced in response to consumer demands for miniaturization. These trends have led to complicated flow patterns of molten compounds in a mold cavity, increasing the difficulty of predicting the occurrence of void formation or gold-wire deformation.

A method of three-dimensional (3-D) flow analysis of thermosetting compounds has been developed with the objective of minimizing the trial term before mass production and of enhancing the quality of molded products. A constitutive equation model was developed to describe isothermal viscosity changes as a function of time and temperature. This isothermal model was used for predicting non-isothermal viscosity changes. In addition, an empirical model was developed for calculating the amount of wire deformation as a function of viscosity, wire configuration, and other parameters. These models were integrated with FLOW-3D® software, which is used for multipurpose 3-D flow analysis.

The mold-filling dynamics of an epoxy compound were analyzed using the newly developed modeling software during transfer molding of an actual high performance electronic module. The changes in the 3-D distributions of parameters such as temperature, viscosity, velocity, and pressure were compared with the flow front patterns. The predicted results of cavity filling behavior corresponded well with actual short shot data. As well, the predicted amount of gold-wire deformation at each LSI chip with a substrate connection also corresponded well with observed data obtained by X-ray inspection of the molded product.

Korea Abstract

열경화성 몰딩 컴파운드는 반도체 장치 및 전자 모듈을 캡슐화하는 데 널리 사용됩니다. 최근에는 고성능에 대한 요구 사항을 충족시키기 위해 전자 모듈에 캡슐화되는 전자 부품의 수가 증가하고 있습니다.

그 결과 성형시 삽입 부품의 구성이 매우 복잡해졌습니다. 한편, 소비자의 소형화 요구에 부응하여 패키지 두께를 줄였다. 이러한 경향은 몰드 캐비티에서 용융된 화합물의 복잡한 흐름 패턴을 야기하여 보이드 형성 또는 금선 변형의 발생을 예측하기 어렵게합니다.

열경화성 화합물의 3 차원 (3-D) 유동 분석 방법은 대량 생산 전에 시험 기간을 최소화하고 성형 제품의 품질을 향상시킬 목적으로 개발되었습니다. 시간과 온도의 함수로서 등온 점도 변화를 설명하기 위해 구성 방정식 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 등온 모델은 비등 온 점도 변화를 예측하는 데 사용되었습니다.

또한 점도, 와이어 구성 및 기타 매개 변수의 함수로 와이어 변형량을 계산하기위한 경험적 모델이 개발되었습니다. 이 모델은 다목적 3D 흐름 분석에 사용되는 FLOW-3D® 소프트웨어와 통합되었습니다.

실제 고성능 전자 모듈의 트랜스퍼 몰딩 과정에서 새로 개발 된 모델링 소프트웨어를 사용하여 에폭시 화합물의 몰드 충전 역학을 분석했습니다. 온도, 점도, 속도 및 압력과 같은 매개 변수의 3D 분포 변화를 유동 선단 패턴과 비교했습니다.

캐비티 충전 거동의 예측 결과는 실제 미 성형 데이터와 잘 일치했습니다. 또한, 기판 연결이 있는 각 LSI 칩에서 예상되는 금선 변형량은 성형품의 X-ray 검사에서 얻은 관찰 데이터와도 잘 일치했습니다.

Fig.1 A system of three-dimensional flow analysis for thermosetting compounds
Fig.1 A system of three-dimensional flow analysis for thermosetting compounds
Fig.2 Procedure for determining viscosity changes of thermosetting compounds
Fig.2 Procedure for determining viscosity changes of thermosetting compounds
Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure
Fig.4 Schematic of a package structure
Fig.6 Calculated results of filling behavior and temperature  distribution in the runner
Fig.6 Calculated results of filling behavior and temperature distribution in the runner
Fig.8 Comparison of cavity filling
Fig.8 Comparison of cavity filling

References

1)J.Saeki et al. ,6th annual meeting of PPS, 12KN1(1990)
2)J.Saeki et al. , JSME International Journal Series Ⅱ, 33,486(1990)
3)J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,12,67(2000)
4) J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,12,788(2000)
5) J.Saeki et al.,SEIKEI KAKOU,13,49(2001)

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Numerical investigation of flow characteristics over stepped spillways

Güven, Aytaç
Mahmood, Ahmed Hussein
Water Supply (2021) 21 (3): 1344–1355.
https://doi.org/10.2166/ws.2020.283Article history

Abstract

Spillways are constructed to evacuate flood discharge safely so that a flood wave does not overtop the dam body. There are different types of spillways, with the ogee type being the conventional one. A stepped spillway is an example of a nonconventional spillway. The turbulent flow over a stepped spillway was studied numerically by using the Flow-3D package. Different fluid flow characteristics such as longitudinal flow velocity, temperature distribution, density and chemical concentration can be well simulated by Flow-3D. In this study, the influence of slope changes on flow characteristics such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures distribution over a stepped spillway was modelled by Flow-3D. The results from the numerical model were compared with an experimental study done by others in the literature. Two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model were simulated. The turbulent flow in the experimental model was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) turbulence scheme in the numerical model. A good agreement was achieved between the numerical results and the observed ones, which are exhibited in terms of graphics and statistical tables.

배수로는 홍수가 댐 몸체 위로 넘치지 않도록 안전하게 홍수를 피할 수 있도록 건설되었습니다. 다른 유형의 배수로가 있으며, ogee 유형이 기존 유형입니다. 계단식 배수로는 비 전통적인 배수로의 예입니다. 계단식 배수로 위의 난류는 Flow-3D 패키지를 사용하여 수치적으로 연구되었습니다.

세로 유속, 온도 분포, 밀도 및 화학 농도와 같은 다양한 유체 흐름 특성은 Flow-3D로 잘 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. 이 연구에서는 계단식 배수로에 대한 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포와 같은 유동 특성에 대한 경사 변화의 영향을 Flow-3D로 모델링 했습니다.

수치 모델의 결과는 문헌에서 다른 사람들이 수행한 실험 연구와 비교되었습니다. 각 모델에 대해 서로 다른 배출이 있는 계단식 배수로의 두 모델이 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 실험 모델의 난류 흐름은 수치 모델의 Renormalized Group (RNG) 난류 계획에 의해 시뮬레이션되었습니다. 수치 결과와 관찰 된 결과 사이에 좋은 일치가 이루어졌으며, 이는 그래픽 및 통계 테이블로 표시됩니다.

HIGHLIGHTS

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

  • A numerical model was developed for stepped spillways.
  • The turbulent flow was simulated by the Renormalized Group (RNG) model.
  • Both numerical and experimental results showed that flow characteristics are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps.

Keyword

CFDnumerical modellingslope changestepped spillwayturbulent flow

INTRODUCTION

댐 구조는 물 보호가 생활의 핵심이기 때문에 물을 저장하거나 물을 운반하는 전 세계에서 가장 중요한 프로젝트입니다. 그리고 여수로는 댐의 가장 중요한 부분 중 하나로 분류됩니다. 홍수로 인한 파괴 나 피해로부터 댐을 보호하기 위해 여수로가 건설됩니다.

수력 발전, 항해, 레크리에이션 및 어업의 중요성을 감안할 때 댐 건설 및 홍수 통제는 전 세계적으로 매우 중요한 문제로 간주 될 수 있습니다. 많은 유형의 배수로가 있지만 가장 일반적인 유형은 다음과 같습니다 : ogee 배수로, 자유 낙하 배수로, 사이펀 배수로, 슈트 배수로, 측면 채널 배수로, 터널 배수로, 샤프트 배수로 및 계단식 배수로.

그리고 모든 여수로는 입구 채널, 제어 구조, 배출 캐리어 및 출구 채널의 네 가지 필수 구성 요소로 구성됩니다. 특히 롤러 압축 콘크리트 (RCC) 댐 건설 기술과 더 쉽고 빠르며 저렴한 건설 기술로 분류 된 계단식 배수로 건설과 관련하여 최근 수십 년 동안 많은 계단식 배수로가 건설되었습니다 (Chanson 2002; Felder & Chanson 2011).

계단식 배수로 구조는 캐비테이션 위험을 감소시키는 에너지 소산 속도를 증가시킵니다 (Boes & Hager 2003b). 계단식 배수로는 다양한 조건에서 더 매력적으로 만드는 장점이 있습니다.

계단식 배수로의 흐름 거동은 일반적으로 낮잠, 천이 및 스키밍 흐름 체제의 세 가지 다른 영역으로 분류됩니다 (Chanson 2002). 유속이 낮을 때 nappe 흐름 체제가 발생하고 자유 낙하하는 낮잠의 시퀀스로 특징 지워지는 반면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서는 물이 외부 계단 가장자리 위의 유사 바닥에서 일관된 흐름으로 계단 위로 흐릅니다.

또한 주요 흐름에서 3 차원 재순환 소용돌이가 발생한다는 것도 분명합니다 (예 : Chanson 2002; Gonzalez & Chanson 2008). 계단 가장자리 근처의 의사 바닥에서 흐름의 방향은 가상 바닥과 가상으로 정렬됩니다. Takahashi & Ohtsu (2012)에 따르면, 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 주어진 유속에 대해 흐름은 계단 가장자리 근처의 수평 계단면에 영향을 미치고 슈트 경사가 감소하면 충돌 영역의 면적이 증가합니다. 전이 흐름 체제는 나페 흐름과 스키밍 흐름 체제 사이에서 발생합니다. 계단식 배수로를 설계 할 때 스키밍 흐름 체계를 고려해야합니다 (예 : Chanson 1994, Matos 2000, Chanson 2002, Boes & Hager 2003a).

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics), 즉 수력 공학의 수치 모델은 일반적으로 물리적 모델에 소요되는 총 비용과 시간을 줄여줍니다. 따라서 수치 모델은 실험 모델보다 빠르고 저렴한 것으로 분류되며 동시에 하나 이상의 목적으로 사용될 수도 있습니다. 사용 가능한 많은 CFD 소프트웨어 패키지가 있지만 가장 널리 사용되는 것은 FLOW-3D입니다. 이 연구에서는 Flow 3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 유량이 서로 다른 두 모델에 대해 계단식 배수로에서 공기 농도, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력 분포를 시뮬레이션합니다.

Roshan et al. (2010)은 서로 다른 수의 계단 및 배출을 가진 계단식 배수로의 두 가지 물리적 모델에 대한 흐름 체제 및 에너지 소산 조사를 연구했습니다. 실험 모델의 기울기는 각각 19.2 %, 12 단계와 23 단계의 수입니다. 결과는 23 단계 물리적 모델에서 관찰 된 흐름 영역이 12 단계 모델보다 더 수용 가능한 것으로 간주되었음을 보여줍니다. 그러나 12 단계 모델의 에너지 손실은 23 단계 모델보다 더 많았습니다. 그리고 실험은 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 23 단계 모델의 에너지 소산이 12 단계 모델보다 약 12 ​​% 더 적다는 것을 관찰했습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020a)는 계단 크기와 유속이 다른 정련 매개 변수의 영향을 조사하기 위해 계단식 배수로에 대한 실험 연구를 수행했습니다. 그 결과, 흐름 체계가 냅페 흐름 체계에서 발생하는 최소 scouring 깊이와 같은 scouring 구멍 치수에 영향을 미친다는 것을 보여주었습니다. 또한 테일 워터 깊이와 계단 크기는 최대 scouring깊이에 대한 실제 매개 변수입니다. 테일 워터의 깊이를 6.31cm에서 8.54 및 11.82cm로 늘림으로써 수세 깊이가 각각 18.56 % 및 11.42 % 증가했습니다. 또한 이 증가하는 테일 워터 깊이는 scouring 길이를 각각 31.43 % 및 16.55 % 감소 시킵니다. 또한 유속을 높이면 Froude 수가 증가하고 흐름의 운동량이 증가하면 scouring이 촉진됩니다. 또한 결과는 중간의 scouring이 횡단면의 측벽보다 적다는 것을 나타냅니다. 계단식 배수로 하류의 최대 scouring 깊이를 예측 한 후 실험 결과와 비교하기 위한 실험식이 제안 되었습니다. 그리고 비교 결과 제안 된 공식은 각각 3.86 %와 9.31 %의 상대 오차와 최대 오차 내에서 scouring 깊이를 예측할 수 있음을 보여주었습니다.

Ghaderi et al. (2020b)는 사다리꼴 미로 모양 (TLS) 단계의 수치 조사를 했습니다. 결과는 이러한 유형의 배수로가 확대 비율 LT / Wt (LT는 총 가장자리 길이, Wt는 배수로의 폭)를 증가시키기 때문에 더 나은 성능을 갖는 것으로 관찰되었습니다. 또한 사다리꼴 미로 모양의 계단식 배수로는 더 큰 마찰 계수와 더 낮은 잔류 수두를 가지고 있습니다. 마찰 계수는 다양한 배율에 대해 0.79에서 1.33까지 다르며 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 대략 0.66과 같습니다. 또한 TLS 계단식 배수로에서 잔류 수두의 비율 (Hres / dc)은 약 2.89이고 평평한 계단식 배수로의 경우 약 4.32와 같습니다.

Shahheydari et al. (2015)는 Flow-3D 소프트웨어, RNG k-ε 모델 및 VOF (Volume of Fluid) 방법을 사용하여 배출 계수 및 에너지 소산과 같은 자유 표면 흐름의 프로파일을 연구하여 스키밍 흐름 체제에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 흐름을 조사했습니다. 실험 결과와 비교했습니다. 결과는 에너지 소산 율과 방전 계수율의 관계가 역으로 실험 모델의 결과와 잘 일치 함을 보여 주었다.

Mohammad Rezapour Tabari & Tavakoli (2016)는 계단 높이 (h), 계단 길이 (L), 계단 수 (Ns) 및 단위 폭의 방전 (q)과 같은 다양한 매개 변수가 계단식 에너지 ​​소산에 미치는 영향을 조사했습니다. 방수로. 그들은 해석에 FLOW-3D 소프트웨어를 사용하여 계단식 배수로에서 에너지 손실과 임계 흐름 깊이 사이의 관계를 평가했습니다. 또한 유동 난류에 사용되는 방정식과 표준 k-ɛ 모델을 풀기 위해 유한 체적 방법을 적용했습니다. 결과에 따르면 스텝 수가 증가하고 유량 배출량이 증가하면 에너지 손실이 감소합니다. 얻은 결과를 다른 연구와 비교하고 경험적, 수학적 조사를 수행하여 결국 합격 가능한 결과를 얻었습니다.

METHODOLOGY

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: ListenFor all numerical models the basic principle is very similar: a set of partial differential equations (PDE) present the physical problems. The flow of fluids (gas and liquid) are governed by the conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. For Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), the PDE system is substituted by a set of algebraic equations which can be worked out by using numerical methods (Versteeg & Malalasekera 2007). Flow-3D uses the finite volume approach to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, by applying the technique of Fractional Area/Volume Obstacle Representation (FAVOR) to define an obstacle (Flow Science Inc. 2012). Equations (1) and (2) are RANS and continuity equations with FAVOR variables that are applied for incompressible flows.

formula

(1)

formula

(2)where  is the velocity in xi direction, t is the time,  is the fractional area open to flow in the subscript directions,  is the volume fraction of fluid in each cell, p is the hydrostatic pressure,  is the density, is the gravitational force in subscript directions and  is the Reynolds stresses.

Turbulence modelling is one of three key elements in CFD (Gunal 1996). There are many types of turbulence models, but the most common are Zero-equation models, One-equation models, Two-equation models, Reynolds Stress/Flux models and Algebraic Stress/Flux models. In FLOW-3D software, five turbulence models are available. The formulation used in the FLOW-3D software differs slightly from other formulations that includes the influence of the fractional areas/volumes of the FAVORTM method and generalizes the turbulence production (or decay) associated with buoyancy forces. The latter generalization, for example, includes buoyancy effects associated with non-inertial accelerations.

The available turbulence models in Flow-3D software are the Prandtl Mixing Length Model, the One-Equation Turbulent Energy Model, the Two-Equation Standard  Model, the Two-Equation Renormalization-Group (RNG) Model and large Eddy Simulation Model (Flow Science Inc. 2012).In this research the RNG model was selected because this model is more commonly used than other models in dealing with particles; moreover, it is more accurate to work with air entrainment and other particles. In general, the RNG model is classified as a more widely-used application than the standard k-ɛ model. And in particular, the RNG model is more accurate in flows that have strong shear regions than the standard k-ɛ model and it is defined to describe low intensity turbulent flows. For the turbulent dissipation  it solves an additional transport equation:

formula

(3)where CDIS1, CDIS2, and CDIS3 are dimensionless parameters and the user can modify them. The diffusion of dissipation, Diff ɛ, is

formula

(4)where uv and w are the x, y and z coordinates of the fluid velocity; ⁠, ⁠,  and ⁠, are FLOW-3D’s FAVORTM defined terms;  and  are turbulence due to shearing and buoyancy effects, respectively. R and  are related to the cylindrical coordinate system. The default values of RMTKE, CDIS1 and CNU differ, being 1.39, 1.42 and 0.085 respectively. And CDIS2 is calculated from turbulent production (⁠⁠) and turbulent kinetic energy (⁠⁠).The kinematic turbulent viscosity is the same in all turbulence transport models and is calculated from

formula

(5)where ⁠: is the turbulent kinematic viscosity.  is defined as the numerical challenge between the RNG and the two-equation k-ɛ models, found in the equation below. To avoid an unphysically large result for  in Equation (3), since this equation could produce a value for  very close to zero and also because the physical value of  may approach to zero in such cases, the value of  is calculated from the following equation:

formula

(6)where ⁠: the turbulent length scale.

VOF and FAVOR are classifications of volume-fraction methods. In these two methods, firstly the area should be subdivided into a control volume grid or a small element. Each flow parameter like velocity, temperature and pressure values within the element are computed for each element containing liquids. Generally, these values represent the volumetric average of values in the elements.Numerous methods have been used recently to solve free infinite boundaries in the various numerical simulations. VOF is an easy and powerful method created based on the concept of a fractional intensity of fluid. A significant number of studies have confirmed that this method is more flexible and efficient than others dealing with the configurations of a complex free boundary. By using VOF technology the Flow-3D free surface was modelled and first declared in Hirt & Nichols (1981). In the VOF method there are three ingredients: a planner to define the surface, an algorithm for tracking the surface as a net mediator moving over a computational grid, and application of the boundary conditions to the surface. Configurations of the fluids are defined in terms of VOF function, F (x, y, z, t) (Hirt & Nichols 1981). And this VOF function shows the volume of flow per unit volume

formula

(7)

formula

(8)

formula

(9)where  is the density of the fluid, is a turbulent diffusion term,  is a mass source,  is the fractional volume open to flow. The components of velocity (u, v, w) are in the direction of coordinates (x, y, z) or (r, ⁠).  in the x-direction is the fractional area open to flow,  and  are identical area fractions for flow in the y and z directions. The R coefficient is based on the selection of the coordinate system.

The FAVOR method is a different method and uses another volume fraction technique, which is only used to define the geometry, such as the volume of liquid in each cell used to determine the position of fluid surfaces. Another fractional volume can be used to define the solid surface. Then, this information is used to determine the boundary conditions of the wall that the flow should be adapted for.

Case study

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

In this study, the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016) was simulated. In a channel composed of two 4 m long modules, with a transparent sidewall of height 0.6 m and 0.5 m width. The upstream chute slope (i.e. pseudo-bottom angle) Ɵ1 = 50°, the downstream chute slope Ɵ2 = 30° or 18.6°, the step heights h = 0.06 m, the total number of steps along the 50° chute 41 steps, the total number of steps along the 30° chute 34 steps and the total number of steps along the 18.6° chute 20 steps.

The flume inflow tool contained a jetbox with a maximum opening set to 0.12 meters, designed for passing the maximum unit discharge of 0.48 m2/s. The measurements of the flow properties (i.e. air concentration and velocity) were computed perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom as shown in Figure 1 at the centre of twenty stream-wise cross-sections, along the stepped chute, (i.e. in five steps up on the slope change and fifteen steps down on the slope change, namely from step number −09 to +23 on 50°–30° slope change, or from −09 to +15 on 50°–18.6° slope change, respectively).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).
Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Sketch of the air concentration C and velocity V measured perpendicular to the pseudo-bottom used by Mirza (Ostad Mirza 2016).

Pressure sensors were arranged with the x/l values for different slope change as shown in Table 1, where x is the distance from the step edge, along the horizontal step face, and l is the length of the horizontal step face. The location of pressure sensors is shown in Table 1.Table 1

Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces

Θ(°)L(m)x/l (–)
50.0 0.050 0.35 0.64 – – – 
30.0 0.104 0.17 0.50 0.84 – – 
18.6 0.178 0.10 0.30 0.50 0.7 0.88 
Location of pressure sensors on horizontal step faces
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.
Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Inlet boundary condition for Q = 0.235 m3/s and fluid elevation 4.21834 m.

Numerical model set-up

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

A 3D numerical model of hydraulic phenomena was simulated based on an experimental study by Ostad Mirza (2016). The water surcharge and flow pressure over the stepped spillway was computed for two models of a stepped spillway with different discharge for each model. In this study, the package was used to simulate the flow parameters such as air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressures. The solver uses the finite volume technique to discretize the computational domain. In every test run, one incompressible fluid flow with a free surface flow selected at 20̊ was used for this simulation model. Table 2 shows the variables used in test runs.Table 2

Variables used in test runs

Test no.Θ1 (°)Θ2 (°)h(m)d0q (m3s1)dc/h (–)
50 18.6 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 18.6 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.045 0.1 2.6 
50 30.0 0.06 0.082 0.235 4.6 
Table 2 Variables used in test runs

For stepped spillway simulation, several parameters should be specified to get accurate simulations, which is the scope of this research. Viscosity and turbulent, gravity and non-inertial reference frame, air entrainment, density evaluation and drift-flux should be activated for these simulations. There are five different choices in the ‘viscosity and turbulent’ option, in the viscosity flow and Renormalized Group (RNG) model. Then a dynamical model is selected as the second option, the ‘gravity and non-inertial reference frame’. Only the z-component was inputted as a negative 9.81 m/s2 and this value represents gravitational acceleration but in the same option the x and y components will be zero. Air entrainment is selected. Finally, in the drift-flux model, the density of phase one is input as (water) 1,000 kg/m3 and the density of phase two (air) as 1.225 kg/m3. Minimum volume fraction of phase one is input equal to 0.1 and maximum volume fraction of phase two to 1 to allow air concentration to reach 90%, then the option allowing gas to escape at free surface is selected, to obtain closer simulation.

The flow domain is divided into small regions relatively by the mesh in Flow-3D numerical model. Cells are the smallest part of the mesh, in which flow characteristics such as air concentration, velocity and dynamic pressure are calculated. The accuracy of the results and simulation time depends directly on the mesh block size so the cell size is very important. Orthogonal mesh was used in cartesian coordinate systems. A smaller cell size provides more accuracy for results, so we reduced the number of cells whilst including enough accuracy. In this study, the size of cells in x, y and z directions was selected as 0.015 m after several trials.

Figure 3 shows the 3D computational domain model 50–18.6 slope change, that is 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 4.23 m height. The 3D model of the computational domain model 50–30 slope changes this to 6.0 m length, 0.50 m width and 5.068 m height and the size of meshes in x, y, and z directions are 0.015 m. For the 50–18.6 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,009,952, total number of active cells = 3,352,307, include real cells (used for solving the flow equations) = 3,316,269, open real cells = 3,316,269, fully blocked real cells equal to zero, external boundary cells were 36,038, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report). For 50–30 slope change model: both total number of active and passive cells = 4,760,002, total number of active cells equal to 4,272,109, including real cells (used for solving the flow equations) were 3,990,878, open real cells = 3,990,878 fully blocked real cells = zero, external boundary cells were 281,231, inter-block boundary cells = 0 (Flow-3D report).

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.
Figure3 The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

Figure 3VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

The 3D computational domain model (50–18.6) slope change, and boundary condition for (50–30 slope change) model.

When solving the Navier-Stokes equation and continuous equations, boundary conditions should be applied. The most important work of boundary conditions is to create flow conditions similar to physical status. The Flow-3D software has many types of boundary condition; each type can be used for the specific condition of the models. The boundary conditions in Flow-3D are symmetry, continuative, specific pressure, grid overlay, wave, wall, periodic, specific velocity, outflow, and volume flow rate.

There are two options to input finite flow rate in the Flow-3D software either for inlet discharge of the system or for the outlet discharge of the domain: specified velocity and volume flow rate. In this research, the X-minimum boundary condition, volume flow rate, has been chosen. For X-maximum boundary condition, outflow was selected because there is nothing to be calculated at the end of the flume. The volume flow rate and the elevation of surface water was set for Q = 0.1 and 0.235 m3/s respectively (Figure 2).

The bottom (Z-min) is prepared as a wall boundary condition and the top (Z-max) is computed as a pressure boundary condition, and for both (Y-min) and (Y-max) as symmetry.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

The air concentration distribution profiles in two models of stepped spillway were obtained at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow for both upstream and downstream of a slope change 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° for different discharge as in Table 2, and as shown in Figure 4 for 50°–18.6° slope change and Figure 5 for 50°–30° slope change configuration for dc/h = 4.6. The simulation results of the air concentration are very close to the experimental results in all curves and fairly close to that predicted by the advection-diffusion model for the air bubbles suggested by Chanson (1997) on a constant sloping chute.

Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure 4 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6. VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 4VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.
Figure5 Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 5VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated air concentration distribution for steps number −5, +1, +5, +11, +19 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6.

Figure 6VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 6 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5, +8, +11 and +15 along the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.
Figure 7 Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

Figure 7VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Experimental and simulated dimensionless velocity distribution for steps number −5, −1, +1, +5. +11, +15 and +22 along the 50°–30° slope change for dc/h = 2.6.

But as is shown in all above mentioned figures it is clear that at the pseudo-bottom the CFD results of air concentration are less than experimental ones until the depth of water reaches a quarter of the total depth of water. Also the direction of the curves are parallel to each other when going up towards the surface water and are incorporated approximately near the surface water. For all curves, the cross-section is separate between upstream and downstream steps. Therefore the (-) sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and the (+) sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

The dimensionless velocity distribution (V/V90) profile was acquired at an acquisition time equal to 25 seconds in skimming flow of the upstream and downstream slope change for both 50°–18.6° and 50°–30° slope change. The simulation results are compared with the experimental ones showing that for all curves there is close similarity for each point between the observed and experimental results. The curves increase parallel to each other and they merge near at the surface water as shown in Figure 6 for slope change 50°–18.6° configuration and Figure 7 for slope change 50°–30° configuration. However, at step numbers +1 and +5 in Figure 7 there are few differences between the simulated and observed results, namely the simulation curves ascend regularly meaning the velocity increases regularly from the pseudo-bottom up to the surface water.

Figure 8 (50°–18.6° slope change) and Figure 9 (50°–30° slope change) compare the simulation results and the experimental results for the presented dimensionless dynamic pressure distribution for different points on the stepped spillway. The results show a good agreement with the experimental and numerical simulations in all curves. For some points, few discrepancies can be noted in pressure magnitudes between the simulated and the observed ones, but they are in the acceptable range. Although the experimental data do not completely agree with the simulated results, there is an overall agreement.

Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 8 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 8VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 +3 and +20 on the horizontal step faces of 50°–18.6° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number  −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.
Figure 9 Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

Figure 9VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between simulated and experimental results for the dimensionless pressure for steps number −1, −2, −3 and +1, +2 and +30, +31 on the horizontal step face of 50°–30° slope change configuration, for dc/h = 4.6, x is the distance from the step edge.

The pressure profiles were acquired at an acquisition time equal to 70 seconds in skimming flow on 50°–18.6°, where p is the measured dynamic pressure, h is step height and ϒ is water specific weight. A negative sign for steps represents a step upstream of the slope change cross-section and a positive sign represents a step downstream of the slope change cross-section.

Figure 10 shows the experimental streamwise development of dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change for dc/h = 4.6, x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute compared with the numerical simulation. It is obvious from Figure 10 that the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure before slope change (steps number −1, −2 and −3) both of the experimental and simulated results are close to each other. However, it is clear that there is a little difference between the results of the streamwise development of dimensionless pressure at step numbers +1, +2 and +3. Moreover, from step number +3 to the end, the curves get close to each other.

Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.
Figure 10 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 10VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–18.6° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.3 on 18.6° sloping chute.

Figure 11 compares the experimental and the numerical results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute. It is apparent that the outcomes of the experimental work are close to the numerical results, however, the results of the simulation are above the experimental ones before the slope change, but the results of the simulation descend below the experimental ones after the slope change till the end.

Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.
Figure 11 Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

Figure 11VIEW LARGEDOWNLOAD SLIDE

Comparison between experimental and simulated results for the streamwise development of the dimensionless pressure on the 50°–30° slope change, for dc/h = 4.6, and x/l = 0.35 on 50° sloping chute and x/l = 0.17 on 30° sloping chute.

CONCLUSION

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

In this research, numerical modelling was attempted to investigate the effect of abrupt slope change on the flow properties (air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure) over a stepped spillway with two different models and various flow rates in a skimming flow regime by using the CFD technique. The numerical model was verified and compared with the experimental results of Ostad Mirza (2016). The same domain of the numerical model was inputted as in experimental models to reduce errors as much as possible.

Flow-3D is a well modelled tool that deals with particles. In this research, the model deals well with air entrainment particles by observing their results with experimental results. And the reason for the small difference between the numerical and the experimental results is that the program deals with particles more accurately than the laboratory. In general, both numerical and experimental results showed that near to the slope change the flow bulking, air entrainment, velocity distribution and dynamic pressure are greatly affected by abrupt slope change on the steps. Although the extent of the slope change was relatively small, the influence of the slope change was major on flow characteristics.

The Renormalized Group (RNG) model was selected as a turbulence solver. For 3D modelling, orthogonal mesh was used as a computational domain and the mesh grid size used for X, Y, and Z direction was equal to 0.015 m. In CFD modelling, air concentration and velocity distribution were recorded for a period of 25 seconds, but dynamic pressure was recorded for a period of 70 seconds. The results showed that there is a good agreement between the numerical and the physical models. So, it can be concluded that the proposed CFD model is very suitable for use in simulating and analysing the design of hydraulic structures.

이 연구에서 수치 모델링은 두 가지 다른 모델과 다양한 유속을 사용하여 스키밍 흐름 영역에서 계단식 배수로에 대한 유동 특성 (공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력)에 대한 급격한 경사 변화의 영향을 조사하기 위해 시도되었습니다. CFD 기술. 수치 모델을 검증하여 Ostad Mirza (2016)의 실험 결과와 비교 하였다. 오차를 최대한 줄이기 위해 실험 모형과 동일한 수치 모형을 입력 하였다.

Flow-3D는 파티클을 다루는 잘 모델링 된 도구입니다. 이 연구에서 모델은 실험 결과를 통해 결과를 관찰하여 공기 혼입 입자를 잘 처리합니다. 그리고 수치와 실험 결과의 차이가 작은 이유는 프로그램이 실험실보다 입자를 더 정확하게 다루기 때문입니다. 일반적으로 수치 및 실험 결과는 경사에 가까워지면 유동 벌킹, 공기 혼입, 속도 분포 및 동적 압력이 계단의 급격한 경사 변화에 크게 영향을받는 것으로 나타났습니다. 사면 변화의 정도는 상대적으로 작았지만 사면 변화의 영향은 유동 특성에 큰 영향을 미쳤다.

Renormalized Group (RNG) 모델이 난류 솔버로 선택되었습니다. 3D 모델링의 경우 계산 영역으로 직교 메쉬가 사용되었으며 X, Y, Z 방향에 사용 된 메쉬 그리드 크기는 0.015m입니다. CFD 모델링에서 공기 농도와 속도 분포는 25 초 동안 기록되었지만 동적 압력은 70 초 동안 기록되었습니다. 결과는 수치 모델과 물리적 모델간에 좋은 일치가 있음을 보여줍니다. 따라서 제안 된 CFD 모델은 수력 구조물의 설계 시뮬레이션 및 해석에 매우 적합하다는 결론을 내릴 수 있습니다.

DATA AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

ListenReadSpeaker webReader: Listen

All relevant data are included in the paper or its Supplementary Information.

REFERENCES

Boes R. M. Hager W. H. 2003a Hydraulic design of stepped spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 129 (9), 671–679.
Google Scholar
Boes R. M. Hager W. H. 2003b Two-Phase flow characteristics of stepped spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 129 (9), 661–670.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 1994 Hydraulics of skimming flows over stepped channels and spillways. Journal of Hydraulic Research 32 (3), 445–460.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 1997 Air Bubble Entrainment in Free Surface Turbulent Shear Flows. Academic Press, London.
Google Scholar
Chanson H. 2002 The Hydraulics of Stepped Chutes and Spillways. Balkema, Lisse, The Netherlands.
Google Scholar
Felder S. Chanson H. 2011 Energy dissipation down a stepped spillway with nonuniform step heights. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 137 (11), 1543–1548.
Google Scholar
Flow Science, Inc. 2012 FLOW-3D v10-1 User Manual. Flow Science, Inc., Santa Fe, CA.
Ghaderi A. Daneshfaraz R. Torabi M. Abraham J. Azamathulla H. M. 2020a Experimental investigation on effective scouring parameters downstream from stepped spillways. Water Supply 20 (5), 1988–1998.
Google Scholar
Ghaderi A. Abbasi S. Abraham J. Azamathulla H. M. 2020b Efficiency of trapezoidal labyrinth shaped stepped spillways. Flow Measurement and Instrumentation 72, 101711.
Google Scholar
Gonzalez C. A. Chanson H. 2008 Turbulence and cavity recirculation in air-water skimming flows on a stepped spillway. Journal of Hydraulic Research 46 (1), 65–72.
Google Scholar
Gunal M. 1996 Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Hydraulic Jumps. PhD Thesis, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology, Manchester, UK.
Hirt C. W. Nichols B. D. 1981 Volume of fluid (VOF) method for the dynamics of free boundaries. Journal of Computational Physics 39 (1), 201–225.
Google Scholar
Matos J. 2000 Hydraulic design of stepped spillways over RCC dams. In: Intl Workshop on Hydraulics of Stepped Spillways (H.-E. Minor & W. Hager, eds). Balkema Publ, Zurich, pp. 187–194.
Google Scholar
Mohammad Rezapour Tabari M. Tavakoli S. 2016 Effects of stepped spillway geometry on flow pattern and energy dissipation. Arabian Journal for Science & Engineering (Springer Science & Business Media BV) 41 (4), 1215–1224.
Google Scholar
Ostad Mirza M. J. 2016 Experimental Study on the Influence of Abrupt Slope Changes on Flow Characteristics Over Stepped Spillways. Communications du Laboratoire de Constructions Hydrauliques, No. 64 (A. J. Schleiss, ed.). Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.
Roshan R. Azamathulla H. M. Marosi M. Sarkardeh H. Pahlavan H. Ab Ghani A. 2010 Hydraulics of stepped spillways with different numbers of steps. Dams and Reservoirs 20 (3), 131–136.
Google Scholar
Shahheydari H. Nodoshan E. J. Barati R. Moghadam M. A. 2015 Discharge coefficient and energy dissipation over stepped spillway under skimming flow regime. KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering 19 (4), 1174–1182.
Google Scholar
Takahashi M. Ohtsu I. 2012 Aerated flow characteristics of skimming flow over stepped chutes. Journal of Hydraulic Research 50 (4), 427–434.
Google Scholar
Versteeg H. K. Malalasekera W. 2007 An Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics: The Finite Volume Method. Pearson Education, Harlow.
Google Scholar
© 2021 The Authors
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Licence (CC BY 4.0), which permits copying, adaptation and redistribution, provided the original work is properly cited (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).

Numerical Modelling of Semi-Solid Flow under Processing Conditions

처리조건에서의 반고체유동의 수치모델링

David H. Kirkwood and Philip J. Ward
Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Sheffield I UK

Keywords: semi-solid alloys, thixotropy, flow modelling.

Abstract

During the industrial process of semi-solid forming (or thixoforming) of alloy slurries, typically the operation of die filling takes around 0.1s.
During this time period the alloy slug is transformed from a solid-like structure capable of maintaining its shape, into a liquid-like slurry able
to fill a complex die cavity: this involves a decrease in viscosity of some 6 orders of magnitUde. Many attempts to measure thixotropic breakdown experimentally in alloy slurries have relied on the use of concentric cylindrical viscometers in which viscosity changes have been followed after shear rate changes over times above 1s to in excess of 1000 s, which have little relevance to actual processing conditions and therefore to modelling of flow in industrial practice. The present paper is an attempt to abstract thixotropic breakdown rates from rapid compression tests between parallel plates moving together at velocities of around 1mis, similar to industrial conditions. From this analysis, a model of slurry flow has been developed in which rapid thixotropic breakdown of the slurry occurs at high shear rates.

합금 슬러리의 반고체 성형 (또는 틱소 성형)의 산업 공정 동안, 일반적으로 다이 충진 작업은 약 0.1 초가 걸립니다.
이 기간 동안 합금 슬러그는 모양을 유지할 수있는 고체와 같은 구조에서 액체와 같은 슬러리로 변형됩니다.
복잡한 다이 캐비티를 채우기 위해 : 이것은 약 6 차의 마그 니트 점도 감소를 포함합니다. 합금 슬러리에서 실험적으로 요 변성 파괴를 측정하려는 많은 시도는 전단 속도가 1 초 이상에서 1000 초 이상으로 변화 한 후 점도 변화가 뒤 따르는 동심원 원통형 점도계의 사용에 의존하여 실제 가공 조건과는 거의 관련이 없습니다. 따라서 산업 현장에서 흐름 모델링에. 본 논문은 산업 조건과 유사하게 약 1mis의 속도로 함께 이동하는 평행 판 사이의 빠른 압축 테스트에서 요 변성 파괴 율을 추상화하려는 시도입니다. 이 분석으로부터 슬러리의 급속한 요 변성 분해가 높은 전단 속도에서 발생하는 슬러리 흐름 모델이 개발되었습니다.

Introduction

기존의 다이캐스팅을 위한 다이 설계는 과거에 예비 테스트 및 조정과 함께 축적 된 실무 경험의 문제였으며, 단기 실행, 랩, 다공성 등과 같은 결함을 제거하기 위해 다이 캐스트 제품을 검사했습니다. 이것은 모두 비용이 많이 드는 절차입니다.

시간과 비용, 그리고 프로세스의 컴퓨터 모델링은 이를 줄이거 나 없애기 위해 많은 운영자에 의해 개발되었습니다. 반고체 가공 (thixoforming)에서는 반고체 합금 슬러리의 전단이 내부 구조를 파괴하여 충전 작업 중 시간이 지남에 따라 점도가 낮아짐으로 발생하는 비 뉴턴 점도로 인해 모델링 문제가 더욱 어려워집니다.

시스템 전체에서 균일하지 않습니다. 충전 중에 발생하는 추가 응고로 인해 문제가 더욱 복잡해집니다. 빠른 충전으로 인해 이 단계에서 매우 작은 것으로 간주되기 때문에 현재 분석에서는 무시되었습니다.

우리 모델의 또 다른 한계는 슬러리가 균질한 물질로 거동 한다는 가정이며, 이는 어느 지점에서나 단일 점도로 설명될 수 있습니다. 이것은 빠른 전단의 고려 사항과 정상적인 요 변형성 조건 내에서 0.6 미만의 고형분을 분별하는 것으로 제한합니다.

<중략>……

Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).
Figure 1. Steady-state shear stress a as a function of shear rate y in Sn-Pb alloy [10).
Figure 2. Equilibrium viscosity as a function of shear rate in Sn-Pb alloy, fraction solid:0.36, fitted to Cross Model.
Figure 2. Equilibrium viscosity as a function of shear rate in Sn-Pb alloy, fraction solid:0.36, fitted to Cross Model.
Figure 3. Cheng Diagram: shear stress vs. shear rate.
Figure 3. Cheng Diagram: shear stress vs. shear rate.
Figure 4. Reciprocal of experimental breakdown time vs. y 1.3 for Sn-Pb alloy
Figure 4. Reciprocal of experimental breakdown time vs. y 1.3 for Sn-Pb alloy
Figure 5. Relaxation time, T, as a function of shear rate; see also figure 4, Fs =0.36.
Figure 5. Relaxation time, T, as a function of shear rate; see also figure 4, Fs =0.36.
Figure 6. Experimental and modelled results for compression test on AI-A356 alloy at two temperatures.
Figure 6. Experimental and modelled results for compression test on AI-A356 alloy at two temperatures.
Table 1. Calculated parameters for the breakdown in compression tests [20].
Table 1. Calculated parameters for the breakdown in compression tests [20].
Figure 7. Drop-forge results from Yurko and Flemings [7].
Figure 7. Drop-forge results from Yurko and Flemings [7].
Figure 8. Prediction of FLOW-3D®.
Figure 8. Prediction of FLOW-3D®.

Conclusions

y에서 전단 된 반고체 슬러리의 틱소 트로픽 분해에 대한 속도 방정식은 다음과 같은 형식으로 제안됩니다. T = l / (a ​​+ uym), 여기서 T는 급속 분해 또는 유사 정상 상태 구조에 대한 특성 시간이며, 밴드 m은 상수입니다. 이 관계는 제한된 범위의 전단 속도에서 Sn-Pb 합금의 전단 속도 점프에 의해 실험적으로 확인되었습니다.

이 파괴율 방정식은 AI-Si 합금의 반고체 슬러그에 대한 빠른 압축 테스트에서 실험적으로 얻은 힘-변위 곡선을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 FLOW-3D® (버전 8.2 : FlowScience Inc.)에 도입되었습니다. 담금 시간과 다른 압축 속도에서. 이 분석의 결과는 모든 경우에 요 변성 거동이 관련되어 있음을 나타내지만, 5 분 동안 담근 후 (산업 관행에서와 같이) 구조가 크게 분해되었으며 초기에는 낮은 전단 속도 영역에서 흐름이 뉴턴에 가깝습니다.

파괴율은 100 S-I 이상의 전단율에서 극적으로 증가하는 것으로 가정 됩니다. 이 예측은 높은 전단 속도에서 더 세심한 작업에 의해 테스트되어야 하지만 평균 전단 속도가 1300 sol까지 생성된 드롭 단조 실험에 의해 뒷받침되는 것으로 보입니다 [7].

References

[I] T.Y Liu, H.Y. Atkinson, PJ. Ward, D.H. Kirkwood: Metall.Mater.TransA, 34A (2003), 409/17.
[2] A. Zavaliangos and A. Lawley: J. Mater. Eng. Perfonn., 4 (1995),40/47.
[3] M.R. Barkhudarov, e.L. Bronisz, e.w. Hirt: ProcAth Int. Conf. onSemi-solid Processing of Alloys and Composites,1996, Sheffield,p.llO.
[4] W.R.Loue, M.Suery, J.L.Querbes: Proc.2ndInt.Conf.on Semi-solidProcessing of Alloys and Composites,1992, Cambridge MA , pp266-75.
[5] P.Kapranos, D.H.Kirkwood, M.R. Barkhudarov: Proc.5th Int. Conf.on Semi-solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, Golden, Colorado,1998. pp.II-19.
[6] T.Y. Liu, H.Y. Atkinson, P. Kapranos, D.H. Kirkwood, S.G. Hogg:Metall. Mater. Trans A, 34A (2003), 1545/54.
[7] J.A. Yurko and M.e. Flemings: Metall. Mater. Trans A, 33A (2002),2737/46.
[8] M. Modigell and J. Koke: Mechanics of Time Dependent Materials, 3(1999), 15/30.
[9] Y. Laxmanan and M.e. Flemings: Metall. Trans. A, IIA( 1980),1927/36.
[IO]A.R.A Mclelland, N.G. Henderson, H.Y. Atkinson, D.H. Kirkwood:Mater. Sci. Eng., A232 (1997), 110/18.
[II] H.A. Barnes: 1. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech., 81 (1999),133n8.
[12]A.N. Alexandrou, E. Due , Y. Entov: 1. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech.,96 (2001), 383/403.
[13]C.L. Martin, P. Kumar and S. Brown: Acta Mat. Mater., 42 (1994),3603/14.
[14]C. Quaak, L. Katgennan and W.H. Kool: Proc. 4th Conf. on Semi-solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, 1996, Sheffield, pp.35/39.
[15]D.C-H. Cheng: Int. Journal Cosmetic Science, 9 (1987), pp.151/91.
[16]An Introduction to Rheology: H.A. Barnes, J.F. Hutton and K Walters,Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1989.
[17]A.M. de Figueredo, A. Kato and M.e. Flemings: Proc.6th Int. Conf.on Semi-solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, 2000, Turin,477/82.
[18]1.y’ Chen and Z. Fan: Mater. Sci. Tech., 18 (2002), 237/42.
[19]Z. Fan: Int. Mater. Rev., 47 (2002), No.2, 49/85.
[20]D.H. Kirkwood and P.J. Ward: Proc. 8th Int. Conf. on Semi-solid Processing of Alloys and Composites, 2004, Cyprus. To be published.

Mixing Tank with FLOW-3D

CFD Stirs Up Mixing 일반

CFD (전산 유체 역학) 전문가가 필요하고 때로는 실행하는데 몇 주가 걸리는 믹싱 시뮬레이션의 시대는 오래 전입니다. 컴퓨팅 및 관련 기술의 엄청난 도약에 힘 입어 Ansys, Comsol 및 Flow Science와 같은 회사는 엔지니어의 데스크톱에 사용하기 쉬운 믹싱 시뮬레이션을 제공하고 있습니다.

“병렬화 및 고성능 컴퓨팅의 발전과 템플릿화는 비전문 화학 엔지니어에게 정확한 CFD 시뮬레이션을 제공했습니다.”라고 펜실베이니아  피츠버그에있는 Ansys Inc.의 수석 제품 마케팅 관리자인 Bill Kulp는 말합니다 .

흐름 개선을위한 실용적인 지침이 필요하십니까? 다운로드 화학 처리의 eHandbook을 지금 흐름 도전 싸우는 방법!

예를 들어, 회사는 휴스턴에있는 Nalco Champion과 함께 프로젝트를 시작했습니다. 이 프로젝트는 시뮬레이션 전문가가 아닌 화학 엔지니어에게 Ansys Fluent 및 ACT (분석 제어 기술) 템플릿 기반 시뮬레이션 앱에 대한 액세스 권한을 부여합니다. 새로운 화학 물질을위한 프로세스를 빠르고 효율적으로 확장합니다.

Giving Mixing Its Due

“화학 산업은 CFD와 같은 계산 도구를 사용하여 많은 것을 얻을 수 있지만 혼합 프로세스는 단순하다고 가정하기 때문에 간과되는 경우가 있습니다. 그러나 최신 수치 기법을 사용하여 우수한 성능을 달성하는 흥미로운 방법이 많이 있습니다.”라고 Flow Science Inc. , Santa Fe, NM의 CFD 엔지니어인 Ioannis Karampelas는 말합니다 .

이러한 많은 기술이 회사의 Flow-3D Multiphysics 모델링 소프트웨어 패키지와 전용 포스트 프로세서 시각화 도구 인 FlowSight에 포함되어 있습니다.

“모든 상업용 CFD 패키지는 어떤 형태의 시각화 도구와 번들로 제공되지만 FlowSight는 매우 강력하고 사용하기 쉽고 이해하기 쉽게 설계되었습니다. 예를 들어, 프로세스를 재 설계하려는 엔지니어는 다양한 설계 변경의 효과를 평가하기 위해 매우 직관적인 시각화 도구가 필요합니다.”라고 그는 설명합니다.

이 접근 방식은 실험 측정을 얻기 어려운 공정 (예 : 쉽게 측정 할 수없는 매개 변수 및 독성 물질의 존재로 인해 본질적으로 위험한 공정)을 더 잘 이해하고 최적화하는데 특히 효과적입니다.

동일한 접근 방식은 또한 믹서 관련 장비 공급 업체가 고객 요구에 맞게 제품을보다 정확하게 개발하고 맞춤화하는 데 도움이되었습니다. “이는 불필요한 프로토 타이핑 비용이나 잠재적 인 과도한 엔지니어링을 방지합니다. 두 가지 모두 일부 공급 업체의 문제였습니다.”라고 Karampelas는 말합니다.

CFD 기술 자체는 계속해서 발전하고 있습니다. 예를 들어, 수치 알고리즘의 관점에서 볼 때 구형 입자의 상호 작용이 열 전달을 적절하게 모델링하는 데 중요한 다양한 문제에 대해 이산 요소 모델링을 쉽게 적용 할 수있는 반면, LES 난류 모델은 난류 흐름 패턴을 정확하게 시뮬레이션하는 데 이상적입니다.

컴퓨팅 리소스에 대한 비용과 수요에도 불구하고 Karampelas는 난류 모델의 전체 제품군을 제공 할 수있는 것이 중요하다고 생각합니다. 특히 LES는 이미 대부분의 학계와 일부 산업 (예 : 전력 공학)에서 선택하는 방법이기 때문입니다. .

그럼에도 불구하고 CFD의 사용이 제한적이거나 비실용적 일 수있는 경우는 확실히 있습니다. 여기에는 나노 입자에서 벌크 유체 증발을 모델링하는 것과 같이 관심의 규모가 다른 규모에 따라 달라질 수있는 문제와 중요한 물리적 현상이 아직 알려지지 않았거나 제대로 이해되지 않았거나 아마도 매우 복잡한 문제 (예 : 모델링)가 포함됩니다. 음 펨바 효과”라고 Karampelas는 경고합니다.

반면에 더욱 강력한 하드웨어와 업데이트 된 수치 알고리즘의 출현은 CFD 소프트웨어를 사용하여 과다한 설계 및 최적화 문제를 해결하기위한 최적의 접근 방식이 될 것이라고 그는 믿습니다.

“복잡한 열교환 시스템 및 새로운 혼합 기술과 같이 점점 더 복잡한 공정을 모델링 할 수있는 능력은 가까운 장래에 가능할 수있는 일을 간단히 보여줍니다. 수치적 방법 사용의 주요 이점은 설계자가 상상력에 의해서만 제한되어 소규모 믹서에서 대규모 반응기 및 증류 컬럼에 이르기까지 다양한 화학 플랜트 공정을 최적화 할 수있는 길을 열어 준다는 것입니다. 실험적 또는 경험적 접근 방식은 항상 관련성이 있지만 CFD가 미래의 엔지니어를위한 선택 도구가 될 것이라고 확신합니다.”라고 그는 결론을 내립니다.


Ottewell2
Seán Ottewell은 Chemical Processing의 편집장입니다. sottewell@putman.net으로 이메일을 보낼 수 있습니다 .

기사 원문 : https://www.chemicalprocessing.com/articles/2017/cfd-stirs-up-mixing/

Fig. 3. Nylon 11 impact sequence onto a preheated substrate

Impact Modeling of Thermally Sprayed Polymer Particles

Ivosevic, M., Cairncross, R. A., Knight, R., Philadelphia / USA

열 스프레이는 전통적으로 금속, 카바이드 및 세라믹 코팅을 증착하는 데 사용되어 왔지만 최근에는 HVOF (High Velocity Oxy-Fuel) 열 스프레이 공정의 높은 운동 에너지로 인해 용융 점도가 높은 폴리머의 무용제 처리도 가능하다는 사실이 밝혀졌습니다. , 유해한 휘발성 유기 용매가 필요하지 않습니다. 이 작업의 주된 목표는 지식 기반을 개발하고 HVOF 연소 스프레이 공정에 의해 분사되는 폴리머 입자의 충격 거동에 대한 질적 이해를 개선하는 것이 었습니다. 고분자 입자의 HVOF 분사 중 입자 가속, 가열 및 충격 변형의 수치 모델이 개발되었습니다. Volume-of-Fluid (VoF) 전산 유체 역학 패키지 인 Flow3D®는 입자가 강철 기판과 충돌하는 동안 유체 역학 및 열 전달을 모델링하는 데 사용되었습니다. 입자 가속 및 열 전달 모델을 사용하여 예측 된 방사형 온도 프로파일은 저온, 고점도 코어 및 고온, 저점도 표면을 가진 폴리머 입자를 시뮬레이션하기 위해 온도 의존 점도 모델과 함께 Flow3D®의 초기 조건으로 사용되었습니다. 이 접근법은 얇은 디스크 내에서 크고 거의 반구형 인 코어를 나타내는 변형 된 입자를 예측했으며 광학 현미경을 사용하여 만든 열 스프레이 스 플랫의 실험 관찰과 일치했습니다.

폴리머 증착에 열 분무 공정을 사용하는 주요 이점은 다음과 같습니다. (i) 휘발성 유기 화합물 (VOCs)을 사용하지 않는 무용제 코팅; (ii) 거의 모든 환경 조건에서 큰 물체를 코팅 할 수있는 능력; (iii) 용융 점도가 높은 폴리머 코팅을 적용하는 능력; 및 (iv) 일반적으로 정전기 분말 코팅 및 용제 기반 페인트에 필요한 오븐 건조 또는 경화와 같은 증착 후 처리없이 “즉시 사용 가능한”코팅을 생산할 수있는 능력. 이러한 공정에 비해 주요 단점은 다음과 같습니다. (i) 낮은 증착 효율, (ii) 낮은 품질의 표면 마감 및 (iii) 높은 공정 복잡성 (종종 폴리머 용융 및 분해 온도에 의해 정의되는 좁은 공정 창). 폴리머 증착에 세 가지 열 스프레이 공정이 사용 된 것으로 알려졌습니다 [1].

  • 기존의 화염 분사.
  • HVOF 연소 스프레이.
  • 플라즈마 스프레이.

HVOF 및 플라즈마 스프레이 공정에 의해 분사되는 폴리머의 수는 제한되어 있으며 HVOF 및 플라즈마 스프레이 폴리머 코팅의 상업적 응용은 아직 개발 단계에 있습니다 [1]. 폴리머의 HVOF 스프레이는 화염 스프레이 [최대 ~ 100m / s]에 비해 상당히 높은 입자 속도 [최대 1,000m / s]로 인해 주로 주목을 받았습니다. 이는 특히 고 분자량 폴리머 및 높은 (> 5 vol. %) 세라믹 강화 함량을 갖는 폴리머 / 세라믹 복합재를 포함하여 용융 점도가 높은 코팅의 증착에있어 중요한 이점입니다.

Fig. 1. Nylon 11 splats deposited onto a room temperature glass slide.
Fig. 1. Nylon 11 splats deposited onto a room temperature glass slide.
Fig. 2. Nylon 11 splats deposited onto a preheated glass slide (200 °C).
Fig. 2. Nylon 11 splats deposited onto a preheated glass slide (200 °C).
Fig. 3. Nylon 11 impact sequence onto a preheated substrate
Fig. 3. Nylon 11 impact sequence onto a preheated substrate, (I) partially melted particle before impact, (II) “fried-egg” shaped splat, (III) post-deposition flow of a fully molten droplet, (IV) droplet shrinkage during cooling.
Fig. 5. Predicted velocities of Nylon 11 particles in an HVOF jet (total O2 + H2 gas flow rate of 1.86 g/s at Φ = 0.83).
Fig. 5. Predicted velocities of Nylon 11 particles in an HVOF jet (total O2 + H2 gas flow rate of 1.86 g/s at Φ = 0.83).
Fig. 7. Simulated deformation of a Nylon 11 droplet with a radial temperature gradient and temperaturedependent viscosity during impact.
Fig. 7. Simulated deformation of a Nylon 11 droplet with a radial temperature gradient and temperaturedependent viscosity during impact.
Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.

Coupled CFD-Response Surface Method (RSM) Methodology for Optimizing Jettability Operating Conditions

분사성 작동 조건을 최적화하기 위한 결합된 CFD-Response Surface Method(RSM)

Nuno Couto 1, Valter Silva 1,2,* , João Cardoso 2, Leo M. González-Gutiérrez 3 and Antonio Souto-Iglesias 41
INEGI-FEUP, Faculty of Engineering, Porto University, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal;
nunodiniscouto@hotmail.com
2 VALORIZA, Polytechnic Institute of Portalegre, 7300-110 Portalegre, Portugal; jps.cardoso@ipportalegre.pt
3 CEHINAV, DMFPA, ETSIN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain; leo.gonzalez@upm.es
4 CEHINAV, DACSON, ETSIN, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain;
antonio.souto@upm.es

  • Correspondence: valter.silva@ipportalegre.pt; Tel.: +351-245-301-592

소개

물방울 생성에 대한 이해는 여러 산업 응용 분야에서 매우 중요합니다 [ 1 ]. 잉크젯 프린팅 프로세스는 일반적으로 10 ~ 100 μm [ 1 ] 범위의 독특하고 작은 액적 크기를 특징으로 하며 연속적 또는 충동적 흐름을 사용하여 얻을 수 있습니다 (마지막 방식은 주문형 드롭 (DoD)이라고도 함). 잉크젯).

여러 장점 덕분에 DoD 방법은 산업 환경에서 상당한 수용을 얻고 있습니다 [ 2 ].DoD는 복잡한 프로세스이며 유체 속성, 노즐 형상 및 구동 파형 [ 1 , 3 ]의 세 가지 주요 범주로 분류되는 여러 매개 변수에 따라 달라집니다 .그러나 길이와 시간 척도가 모두 마이크로 오더 [ 4 ] 이기 때문에 실험을하기가 어렵습니다 .

결과적으로 실험 설정은 항상 비용이 많이 들고 복잡하며 CFD (전산 유체 역학)와 같은 고급 수치 접근 방식이 엄격한 요구 사항입니다 [ 5 , 6 ]. VOF (volume-of-fluid) 접근 방식은 액체 분해 및 액적 생성에 대한 다상 공정을 시뮬레이션하기위한 적절한 대안으로 밝혀졌으며 과거 연구에서 그대로 사용되었습니다 [ 7 , 8], 인쇄 프로세스의 맥락에서 전자는 여전히 현재 연구의 주제입니다. 

또한 VOF 체계를 사용하면 단일 운동량 방정식 세트를 해결하고 도메인 전체에 걸쳐 각 유체의 체적 분율을 추적하여 명확하게 정의된 인터페이스로 둘 이상의 혼합 불가능한 유체를 효과적으로 시뮬레이션 할 수 있습니다. Feng [ 9 ]는 VOF 접근 방식을 사용하여 일시적인 유체 인터페이스 변형 및 중단을 효과적으로 추적하는 패키지 FLOW-3D를 사용하여 낙하 배출 중 복잡한 유체 역학 프로세스를 시뮬레이션하는 선구자 작업 중 하나를 수행했습니다.

주요 목표는 볼륨 및 속도와 같은 민감한 변수를 더 잘 이해하면서 장치 개발에서 일반적인 설계 규칙을 구현하는 것이 었습니다. 이러한 종류의 공정과 관련된 주요 질문 중 하나는 안정적인 액적 형성을 위한 작동 범위의 정의입니다.

Fromm [ 10 ]은 Reynolds 수와 Weber 수의 제곱근 비율이 2보다 작으면 안정적인 방울을 생성 할 수 없다는 것을 확인했습니다. 이 무차원 값은 나중에 Z 번호로 알려졌으며 분사 가능성 범위 [ 11 ]를 정의합니다 . 문헌에서 분사 가능성을 위한 Z 간격은 1 ~ 10 [ 12 ], 4 ~ 14 [ 13 ] 또는 0.67 ~ 50 [ 14]을 찾을 수 있습니다. 

이것은 Z 값 만으로는 분사 가능성 조건을 나타낼 수 없음을 분명히 의미합니다. 실제로, 다른 속성을 가진 유체는 다른 인쇄 품질을 나타내면서 동일한 Z 값을 나타낼 수 있습니다. 액적 생성 공정과 해당 분사 성은 주로 전체 공정 품질에 큰 영향을 미치는 매개 변수 세트에 의해 결정됩니다. 

토대 메커니즘을 더 잘 이해하려면 확장 된 작동 조건 및 매개 변수 세트를 고려하여 여러 실험 또는 수치 실행을 수행해야 합니다. DoE (design-of-experiment) 접근 방식과 같은 체계적인 접근 방식이 없으면 이것은 달성하기 매우 어려운 작업이 될 수 있습니다. 최적화 문제를 해결하기 위해 반응 표면 방법을 사용하여 처음으로 체계화된 접근 방식이 개발된 Box and Wilson [ 15 ] 의 선구자 기사 이후 ,이 입증된 방법론은 많은 화학 및 산업 공정[ 16 ] 및 기타 관련 학계에 성공적으로 적용되었습니다.

예를 들어 Silva와 Rouboa [ 17 ]는 직접 메탄올 연료 전지의 출력 밀도에 영향을 미치는 관련 매개 변수를 식별하기 위해 반응 표면 방법론 (RSM)을 사용했습니다. 많은 실제 산업 응용 분야에서 실험 연구는 작동 매개 변수를 조절하기 어렵 기 때문에 제한적이지만 주로 설정을 개발하거나 실험을 실행하는 데 드는 비용이 높기 때문입니다. 

따라서 솔루션은 주요 시스템 응답을 시뮬레이션하고 예측할 수 있는 효과적인 수학적 모델의 개발에 의존합니다. DoE와 같은 최적화 방법론을 수치 모델과 결합하면 비용이 많이 들고 시간이 많이 걸리는 실험을 피하고 다양한 입력 조합을 사용하여 최적의 조건을 얻을 수 있습니다 [ 16 ]. 

실바와 루 보아 [ 18] CFD 프레임 워크 하에서 개발 된 2D Eulerian-Eulerian 바이오 매스 가스화 모델에서 얻은 결과를 RSM과 결합하여 다양한 응용 분야에서 합성 가스를 생성하기 위한 최적의 작동 조건을 찾습니다. 

저자는 입력 요인으로 인한 최상의 응답과 최소한의 변동을 모두 보장하는 작동 조건을 찾을 수 있었습니다. Frawley et al. [ 19 ] CFD 및 DoE 기술 (특히 RSM)을 결합하여 파이프의 팔꿈치에서 고체 입자 침식에 대한 다양한 주요 요인의 영향을 조사하여 침식 예측 모델을 개발할 수 있습니다.우리가 아는 한, DoD 잉크젯 프로세스의 개선 및 더 나은 이해에 적용되는 DoE 접근법 (실험적으로 또는 모든 종류의 수치 모델과 결합)을 구현하는 연구는 없습니다. 선도 기업이 이러한 접근 방식을 적용 할 가능성이 있지만 관련 결과는 민감할 수 있으므로 더 넓은 커뮤니티에서 사용할 수 없습니다. 이 사실은 DoD 잉크젯 공정에서 액적 생성에 대한 여러 매개 변수의 영향을 평가하기 위한 이러한 종류의 연구로서 현재 논문의 영향을 증가 시킬 수 있습니다.

CFD 프레임 워크 내에서 VOF 접근 방식을 사용하여 여러 컴퓨터 실험의 설계를 개발하고 RSM을 분석 도구로 사용했습니다. 충분한 수치 정확도와 수용 가능한 시간 계산 시뮬레이션의 균형을 맞추기 위해 메쉬 수렴 연구가 수행되었습니다. 설계 목적을 위해 점도, 표면 장력, 입구 속도 및 노즐 직경이 입력 요인으로 선택되었습니다. 응답은 break-up 시간과 break-up 길이였습니다.

Figure 1. Schematic of the computational domain
Figure 1. Schematic of the computational domain
Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.
Figure 2. Ink fraction contours for mesh 1 through 4 (left to right) at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs.
Figure 3. Comparison between surface tensions at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 3. Comparison between surface tensions at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 4. Comparison between viscosity values at the following four time steps: (a) 6 μs, (b) 12 μs, (c) 18 μs, and (d) 24 μs.
Figure 4. Comparison between viscosity values at the following four time steps: (a) 6 μs, (b) 12 μs, (c) 18 μs, and (d) 24 μs.
Figure 5. Comparison between different nozzle diameters at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 5. Comparison between different nozzle diameters at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 6. Comparison between different inlet velocities at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 6. Comparison between different inlet velocities at the following four time steps: (a) 6 µs, (b) 12 µs, (c) 18 µs, and (d) 24 µs
Figure 8. Contour response plots for break-up time as a function of (a) surface tension and viscosity, (b) nozzle diameter and viscosity, (c) inlet velocity and viscosity, (d) nozzle diameter and surface tension, (e) inlet velocity and surface tension, and (f) inlet velocity and nozzle diameter.
Figure 8. Contour response plots for break-up time as a function of (a) surface tension and viscosity, (b) nozzle diameter and viscosity, (c) inlet velocity and viscosity, (d) nozzle diameter and surface tension, (e) inlet velocity and surface tension, and (f) inlet velocity and nozzle diameter.
Figure 12. Break-up length as a function of the We–Ca space (obtained from the 25 runs).
Figure 12. Break-up length as a function of the We–Ca space (obtained from the 25 runs).

References

  1. Hutchings, I.M.; Martin, G.D. Inkjet Technology for Digital Fabrication; John Wiley & Sons Ltd.: Hoboken, NJ,
    USA, 2013.
  2. Waasdorp, R.; Heuvel, O.; Versluis, F.; Hajee, B.; GhatKesar, M. Acessing individual 75-micron diameter
    nozzles of a desktop inkjet printer to dispense picoliter droplets on demand. RSC Adv. 2018, 8, 14765.
  3. Zhang, H.; Wang, J.; Lu, G. Numerical investigation of the influence of companion drops on drop-ondemand ink jetting. Appl. Phys. Eng. 2012, 13, 584–595.
  4. Dong, H.; Carr, W. An experimental study of drop-on-demand drop formation. Phys. Fluids 2006, 18,
    072102.
  5. Patel, M.; Pericleous, K.; Cross, M. Numerical Modelling of Circulating Fluidized beds. Int. J. Comput.
  6. Fluid Dyn. 1993, 1, 161–176. [CrossRef]
  7. Zhao, X.; Glenn, C.; Xiao, Z.; Zhang, S. CFD development for macro particle simulations. Int. J. Comput.
  8. Fluid Dyn. 2014, 28, 232–249. [CrossRef]
  9. Hasan, M.N.; Chandy, A.; Choi, J.W. Numerical analysis of post-impact droplet deformation for direct-print.
  10. Eng. Appl. Comput. Fluid Mech. 2015, 9, 543–555. [CrossRef]
  11. Ghafouri-Azar, R.; Mostaghimi, J.; Chandra, S. Numerical study of impact and solidification of a droplet
  12. over a deposited frozen splat. Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2004, 18, 133–138. [CrossRef]
  13. Feng, J. A General Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Drop Ejection in Drop-on-Demand Ink Jet Devices. J. Imaging
  14. Sci. Technol. 2002, 46, 398–408.
  15. Fromm, J. Numerical Calculation of the Fluid Dynamics of Drop-on-Demand Jets. IBM J. Res. Dev. 1984, 28,
  16. 322–333. [CrossRef]
  17. Nallan, H.; Sadie, J.; Kitsomboonloha, R.; Volkman, S.; Subramanian, V. Systematic Design of Jettable
  18. Nanoparticle-Based Inkjet Inks: Rheology, Acoustics and Jettability. Langmuir 2014, 30, 13470–13477.
  19. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  20. Reis, N.; Derby, B. Ink Jet Deposition of Ceramic Suspensions: Modelling and Experiments of Droplet Formation;
  21. Chapter in MRS Online Proceeding Library Archive; Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK, 2000;
  22. Volume 624, pp. 117–122.
  23. Jang, D.; Kim, D.; Moon, J. Influence of Fluid Physical Properties on Ink-Jet Printability. Langmuir 2009, 25,
  24. 2629–2635. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  25. Tai, J.; Gan, H.Y.; Liang, Y.N.; Lok, B.K. Control of Droplet Formation in Inkjet Printing Using Ohnesorge
  26. Number Category: Materials and Processes. In Proceedings of the 10th Electronics Packaging Technology
  27. Conference, EPTC, Singapore, 9–12 December 2008; pp. 761–766.
  28. Box, G.; Wilson, K. On the Experimental Attainment of Optimum Conditions. J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B 1951, 13,
  29. 1–45.
  30. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Optimizing the gasification operating conditions of forest residues by coupling a
  31. two-stage equilibrium model with a response surface methodology. Fuel Process. Technol. 2014, 122, 163–169.
  32. [CrossRef]
  33. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Optimizing the DMFC Operating Conditions using a Response Surface Method.
  34. Appl. Math. Comput. 2012, 218, 6733–6743. [CrossRef]
  35. Silva, V.; Rouboa, A. Combining a 2-D multiphase CFD model with a Response Surface Methodology to
  36. optimize the gasification of Portuguese biomasses. Energy Convers. Manag. 2015, 99, 28–40. [CrossRef]
  37. Frawley, P.; Corish, J.; Niven, A.; Geron, M. Combination of CFD and DOE to analyse solid particle erosion
  38. in elbows. Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 2009, 23, 411–426. [CrossRef]
  39. Morrison, N.F.; Harlen, O.G. Viscoelasticity in inkjet printing. Rheol. Acta 2010, 49, 619–632. [CrossRef]
  40. ANSYS Inc. ANSYS Fluent Tutorial Guide; Release 15.0; ANSYS Inc.: Canonsburg, PA, USA, November 2013.
  41. ANSYS Inc. ANSYS Fluent Theory Guide; Release 17.0; ANSYS Inc.: Canonsburg, PA, USA, January 2016.
  42. Dinsenmeyer, R.; Fourmigué, J.F.; Caney, N.; Marty, P. Volume of fluid approach of boiling flows in
  43. concentrated solar plants. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 2017, 65, 177–191. [CrossRef]
  44. Das, S.; Weerasiri, L.D.; Yang, W. Influence of surface tension on bubble nucleation, formation and onset of
  45. sliding. Colloids Surf. A Physicochem. Eng. Asp. 2017, 516, 23–31. [CrossRef]
  46. Du, W.; Zhang, J.; Lu, P.; Xu, J.; Wei, W.; He, G.; Zhang, L. Advanced understanding of local wetting
  47. behaviour in gas-liquid-solid packed beds using CFD with a volume of fluid (VOF) method. Chem. Eng. Sci.
  48. 2017, 170, 378–392. [CrossRef]
  49. Shrestha, S.; Chou, K. A build surface study of Powder-Bed electron beam additive manufacturing by
  50. 3D thermo-fluid simulation and white-light interferometry. Int. J. Mach. Tools Manuf. 2017, 121, 37–49.
  51. [CrossRef]
  52. Zhong, Y.; Fang, H.; Ma, Q.; Dong, X. Analysis of droplet stability after ejection from an inkjet nozzle. J. Fluid
  53. Mech. 2018, 845, 378–391. [CrossRef]
  54. Zhang, X. Dynamics of drop formation in viscous flows. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1999, 54, 1759–1774. [CrossRef]
  55. Calvert, P. Inkjet printing for materials and devices. Chem. Mater. 2001, 13, 3299–3305. [CrossRef]
  56. Kim, C.S.; Park, S.; Sim, W.; Kim, Y.; Yoo, Y. Modelling and characterization of an industrial inkjet head for
  57. micro-patterning on printed circuit boards. Comput. Fluids 2009, 38, 602–612. [CrossRef]
  58. ChemEngineering 2018, 2, 51 19 of 19
  59. Wang, P. Numerical Analysis of Droplet Formation and Transport of a Highly Viscous Liquid. Master’s Thesis,
  60. University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA, 2014.
  61. Zhang, Z.; Xiong, R.; Corr, D.; Huang, Y. Study of Impingement Types and Printing Quality during Laser
  62. Printing of Viscoelastic Alginate Solutions. Langmuir 2016, 32, 3004–3014. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
  63. Derby, B. Inkjet Printing Ceramics: From Drops to Solid. J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 2011, 31, 2543–2550. [CrossRef]
  64. Kim, E.; Baek, J. Numerical Study on the Effects of Non Dimensional Parameters on Drop-on-Demand
  65. Droplet Formation Dynamics and Printability Range in the up-Scaled Model. Phys. Fluids 2012, 24, 082103.
  66. [CrossRef]
FIG. 2. Sequence of images showing capillary-driven neck evolution and droplet formation for low-viscosity fluids

Computational analysis of self-similar capillary-driven thinning and pinch-off dynamics during dripping using the volume-of-fluid method

낙하 형성 및 분리는 표면 장력 구동 흐름으로 인해 가늘어지는 유체 목의 형성을 포함하여 큰 위상 변화를 수반하며, 목의 pinch-off에서 Laplace pressure와 같은 속성은 유한한 시간 특이성을 나타냅니다. 드롭 형성 중에 발생하는 큰 위상 변형과 비선형성을 정확하게 시뮬레이션하는 것은 일반적으로 pinch-off 순간에 가까운 작은 특징을 해결하기 위해서는 고해상도 및 정확도가 필요하기 때문에 수치 시뮬레이션이 계산적으로 요구됩니다.

필요한 질량 및 계산 시간을 보존하고 인터페이스를 추적하는 데 내재된 이점에도 불구하고, 초기 실무자들이 물 점도가 10배 이상인 유체에 대한 수렴 문제를 보고했기 때문에 낙하 형성 연구에 VOF(Volume-of-fluid) 방법을 활용하는 연구는 거의 없습니다.

이 기여에서, 우리는 FLOW-3D에 구현된 VOF 방법을 사용하여 물 점도보다 4배 더 높은 점도 값을 포함하여 뉴턴 유체에 대한 드리프트의 원형 자유 표면 흐름을 시뮬레이션합니다. 우리는 이 연구의 일부로 수행된 실험에 대해 시뮬레이션된 목 모양, 목 진화 속도 및 헤어짐 길이를 벤치마킹합니다.

핀치오프 역학은 관성, 점성 및 모세관 응력의 복잡한 상호 작용에 의해 결정되며, 여기서 실험과 시뮬레이션 모두에서 대조되는 자기 유사 스케일링 법칙은 종종 역학에 대해 설명합니다. 우리는 시뮬레이션된 반지름 진화 프로파일이 축 대칭 흐름에 대한 뉴턴 유체에 대해 실험적으로 관찰되고 이론적으로 예측되는 핀치오프 역학과 일치함을 보여준다. 또한, 우리는 가는 목 안에서 법칙, 속도 및 변형 필드의 스케일링에 대한 사전 요인을 결정하고, 우리는 실험과 비교할 수 있는 중단 시간과 길이뿐만 아니라 사전 요인을 VOF 방법을 사용하여 시뮬레이션할 수 있음을 보여줍니다.

experimental setup, as shown schematically in Fig. 1(a), includes a dispensing system
experimental setup, as shown schematically in Fig. 1(a), includes a dispensing system
 A numerical simulation of drop formation from a cylindrical nozzle at a constant flow rate is performed. (c) Graphical representation of the VOF approach
A numerical simulation of drop formation from a cylindrical nozzle at a constant flow rate is performed. (c) Graphical representation of the VOF approach
FIG. 2. Sequence of images showing capillary-driven neck evolution and droplet formation for low-viscosity fluids
FIG. 2. Sequence of images showing capillary-driven neck evolution and droplet formation for low-viscosity fluids. (a) A sequence of simulated images of water (0 wt. % glycerol) shows neck formation and subsequent thinning and pinch-off dynamics including the formation of the satellite drop. (b) A sequence of images shows neck radius evolution and drop detachment for the low viscosity fluid composed of 50 wt. % glycerol in water. The time step between images is 500 µs, and the scale bar represents a length of 1 mm for the two cases shown. The color bar shows the velocity field in units of cm/s. The addition of glycerol seems to exercise a relatively minor influence on pinch-off dynamics despite a five-fold increase in viscosity.
FIG. 3. Computed evolution of the minimum radius of the water neck during the drop formation and detachment process
FIG. 3. Computed evolution of the minimum radius of the water neck during the drop formation and detachment process. The instantaneous neck radius of water and the inertio-capillary fit are shown. The inset shows a self-similar nature of neck thinning dynamics close to a pinch-off moment. The characteristic cone angle of 18.1◦ as predicted by Day et al.50 and visualized in experiments52 is captured well using the VOF method.
FIG. 5. Glycerol thinning image sequence and break-up length visualization for three cases
FIG. 5. Glycerol thinning image sequence and break-up length visualization for three cases. (a) Glycerol thinning is shown through a sequence of snapshots with a time step ∆t = 5 ms and reveals quite different dynamics compared to previously seen for low viscosity fluids. The length of a filament changes significantly when the glycerol content increases above 70 wt. %. (b) Final lengths of the simulated liquid filaments before pinch-off for three cases of glycerol + water mixtures (0 wt. %, 70 wt. %, and 100 wt. %).
FIG. 8. Comparison of experiments and simulations for the case of a drop formation for 80 wt. % glycerol and water mixture
FIG. 8. Comparison of experiments and simulations for the case of a drop formation for 80 wt. % glycerol and water mixture. (a) A set of images obtained from experiments (upper row) and simulations (bottom row) with a time step of 1 ms show good agreement. The simulated drop profiles shown in the bottom row are colored by the velocity magnitude [ranging from 0 (dark blue) to 100 cm/s (red) and colored online], and velocity vectors are shown in the images. (b) Radius evolution with time of liquid filament formed during the drop formation process is shown on a log-log plot for the two cases.

레이놀즈 수

본 자료는 국내 사용자들의 편의를 위해 원문 번역을 해서 제공하기 때문에 일부 오역이 있을 수 있어서 원문과 함께 수록합니다. 자료를 이용하실 때 참고하시기 바랍니다.

Reynolds Number

레이놀즈 수

주어진 수치 방법에 의해 정확하게 계산 될 수 있는 유동에 대해서 가장 높고, 가장 낮은 레이놀즈 수 무엇입니까? 이 질문은 다양한 답과 그리고 가장 기술적인 문제들로서 주어진 답을 포함하는 가정들로부터 다양한 답을 가지고 있습니다.

본 목적을 위해, 레이놀즈 수는 R = R LU / ν로 정의되며, 여기서 L과 U는 유동 특성 길이 및 스케일이고, ν는 유체의 동점도(kinematic viscosity )입니다. 즉 물체의 관성이 점성에 비해서 얼마나 큰가를 나타내는 척도로 이 레이놀즈 수가 작을수록 층류(유체의 유선이 유지되면서 흐르는 유동)가, 클수록 난류가 형성된다. 무 차원 레이놀즈 수가 점성의 관성 효과의 측정을 중요성을 상기시킵니다. 높은 레이놀즈 수에서의 흐름은 정성적으로 다른 행동을 나타내고, 난류 될 수 있습니다.

일반적으로 고려해야 할 가장 중요한 한계는 높은 레이놀즈 수입니다. 이것은 층류가 난류로의 분해 또는 경계층이 표면에서 분리되는 위치에 따라 달라지는 몸체의 양력 및 항력을 예측하는 데 계산이 사용될 수 있는 한계입니다. 유동에 대한 점성 응력의 상대적 효과를 정확하게 시뮬레이션 하는 것이 중요한 이러한 또는 다른 유형의 유동 프로세스에서는 계산에서 어떤 수준의 정확도를 기대할 수 있는지에 대한 아이디어를 갖는 것이 유용합니다.

일반적으로 고려해야 할 가장 중요한 한계는 높은 레이놀즈 수입니다. 이것은 층류에서 난류로 붕괴되는 것을 예측하곤 하는 계산의 한계치이며, 유동의 경계층이 그 표면에서부터 박리되는 곳에서의 물체의 양력과 항력을 예측하는 한계치이기도 합니다. 유동의 다양한 유형에서 유동의 점성 응력의 상대적 효과를 정확하게 시뮬레이션하는 것은 중요하며, 계산상 예측되는 정확도의 수준에 대한 어떤 아이디어를 확보하는 것 또한 매우 유용할 것입니다.

높은 레이놀즈 수 제한 – 물리적 인수

흐름을 정확하게 표현하는데 필요한 계산 요구 사항 (즉, 해상도)을 추정하기 위해 간단한 물리적 인수를 사용할 수 있습니다. 이 주장은 흐름 영역이 작은 요소로 세분화 될 때 요소 내의 모든 흐름량이 천천히 변한다는 가정을 기반으로 합니다. 이 가정은 각 요소의 평균 수량 값이 요소 내의 실제 값에 대한 좋은 근사치라는 의미를 전달합니다.

요소 내에서 느리게 변하는 속도를 가지려면 요소 크기의 척도에서 흐름의 레이놀즈 수가 작아야 합니다 (예 : 1 차 Rd = dx · du / ν ≤ 1.0). 이 표현에서 dx와 du는 요소의 길이와 속도 스케일입니다. 이 물리적 요구 사항, 요소의 흐름의 부드러움 (즉, 낮은 레이놀즈 수, 이 척도의 층류 흐름)은 정확한 수치 분해능에 필요한 요소의 크기를 정의하는데 사용될 수 있습니다.

위의 부등식은 L = Ndx 및 U = Ndu 관계에 의해 거시적 레이놀즈 수로 변환 될 수 있으며, 이는 R ≤ N 2로 이어집니다 . 즉, 개별 요소의 규모에 대한 부드러운 흐름의 물리적 정확도 요구 사항은 정확도로 계산할 수 있는 최대 레이놀즈 넘버원이 NN 2 정도라는 것을 의미합니다. 여기서 N은 특성을 해결하는 데 사용되는 요소의 수입니다. 길이 L.

대표적인 응용에서 N은 종종10 내지 20의 범위에 있는 수로서 매우 큰 수 아닙니다. 그리고 이는 단지 약400 의 정확한 계산을 위해 최대 레이놀즈 수로 변환합니다. 이 결과에 대해 해석을 달기 전에 정확한 레이놀즈 수 계산을 위한 추정을 위해서 다른 접근 방법을 시도하는 유익합니다.

High Reynolds Number Limit – A Numerical Argument

수치 근사에 의해서 계산 도입된 viscous-like smoothing의 양은 truncation error로부터 평가 될 수 있습니다. 알다시피 아이디어는 요소 크기 (그리고 적정한 시간 간격 크기) 멱함수을 미분 근사하는 테일러 급수 전개를 하는 것입니다. 물론, 일관성 있는 근사는 원래 근사환 된 편미분 방정식의 가장 낮은 차수를 이용하는 것입니다.

다음으로 높은 차수는 보통 확산 (즉, 2차 차수 공간 미분형태) 항입니다. 점성 계수와 더불어 이러한 항의 계수 비교는 점성 효과를 더 정확하게 계산 할 수 없을 때의 추정치를 제공합니다.

1차 수치 근사 (예를 들어 대류에 대한donor cell 또는upwind technique )에 대해서 정확도를 위해서 1보다 적어야만 하는 항들의 비는 다음의 판별식을 유도하게 됩니다( R ≤ 2N.) 그리고 2차 수치 근사의 결과, R ≤ N얻어지고 물리적인 인자(Physical Argument)로부터 같은 결과가 얻어 집니다.

이러한 관계의 우변을 곱하는 작은 숫자 요소가 사용되며, 이는 사용 된 특정 수치 근사에 따라 달라 지지만 N에 대한 기본 종속성은 변경되지 않습니다. 모든 2 차 방법이 1 차 방법보다 분명히 훨씬 낫지 만 결과는 고무적이지 않습니다. 정확하게 계산할 수 있는 최대 레이놀즈 수는 N을 늘리지 않는 한 매우 제한적인 것으로 보입니다. 이는 매우 큰 그리드를 처리한다는 의미입니다.

하이 레이놀즈 수에 대한 일반적인 의견

이러한 평가들은 첫 발생 시에는 실망스런 부분도 있으나 종종 완화되는 상황으로 전개됩니다. 무엇보다도 중용한 것은 대부분의 문제들은 점성 응력에 대한 정확한 처리를 요구하지 않습니다. 이러한 문제에 대해서 높은 레이놀즈 수의 상한은 점성 효과가 중요하지 않다는 것을 의도한 의미를 갖습니다.

어떤 유동이 난류에 의해 운동량 혼합이 이루워진 fully turbulent 되기 위해 충분히 높은 레이놀즈 수를 가질 때, 종종 잘 분류될 수 있는 scale을 가진 영역 내에서 100 미만의 유효한 레이놀즈 수의 평균 유동으로 진행되곤 합니다. 물론, 이것은 난류를 기술할 수 있는 적당한 난류 모델이 사용되고 있다는 것을 가정합니다.

마지막으로 점성 효과의 정확한 정보에 따라 일부 유동 특성을 가질 필요가 있을 때 인위적인 의미의 효과를 유도하는 것이 가능 할 수 있습니다. 예를 들어, 풍동 trip wire는 종종 레이놀즈 수 상사성( similarity )의 부족을 고려하여 trigger 유동의 박리에 사용되곤 합니다. 비슷한 처리가 풍동의 수치 시뮬레이션에 추가 될 수 있습니다.

결론은 CFD 방법을 사용하여 높은 레이놀즈 수 흐름을 계산하는 데 사용할 수 있지만 수치해석상의 전산 오차가 물리적인 효과를 압도 할 수 있는 상황에 대한 경고는 해당 난류 모델에 달려있다고 말할 수 있습니다.

낮은 레이놀즈 수 제한

낮은 레이놀즈 수에서 한계는 정밀도의 한계가 아니라 계산을 완료하는데 필요한 계산 시간을 기준으로 한계입니다.  점성 응력 항에 explicit 수치 근사를 사용하면 숫자의 안정성을 유지하기 위해 시간 단계의 크기에 한계가 있습니다.  이 한계는 본질적으로 점성으로 인한 운동량의 변화는 하나의 시간 단계에서 대략 1 개의 요소를 넘어 전파하는 것은 아니라는 것을 보여줍니다.  단순한 2 차원의 경우에는 이 한계는 νdt ≤ dx2/4입니다.

이것은 T = Mdt 및 TU = L이라는 대응을 작성하여 레이놀즈 수를 포함하는 식으로 변형 할 수 있습니다.  즉, 흐름의 특성 시간은 속도 U의 유체가 거리 L을 이동하는 시간이며, 시간 T를 분해 시간 단계의 수는 M입니다.  이러한 관계식에 의해 안정된 조건은 M = 4N2/R 입니다.

이 결과에서 중요한 것은 M이 R에 반비례하여 증가하는 것입니다.  레이놀즈 수가 매우 작은 흐름의 경우 explicit 수치 법에는 매우 많은 시간 단계가 필요할 수 있으며,이 숫자는 해상도의 상승에 따라 급속히 증가하고 있습니다.  낮은 레이놀즈 수의 한계를 가장 효과적으로 제거하는 방법은 implicit 수치 법을 사용하여 점성 응력을 평가하는 것입니다.


Reynolds Number

What are the highest and lowest Reynolds number flows that can be accurately computed by a given numerical method? This question has a variety of answers, and, as with most technical issues, the variety of answers arises from the assumptions involved in giving the answer.

For present purposes, the Reynolds number R is defined as R=LU/ν, where L and U are characteristic length and velocity scales for a flow, and ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. It will be recalled that the non dimensional Reynolds number is a measure of the importance of inertia to viscosity effects. At high Reynolds numbers a flow may become turbulent, exhibiting qualitatively different behavior.

Generally, the most important limit to consider is that of high Reynolds numbers. This is the limit where computations might be used to predict the breakdown of a laminar flow into turbulence, or the lift and drag of a body that is dependent on where boundary layers separate from its surface. In these or other types of flow processes in which it is critical to correctly simulate the relative effect of viscous stresses on the flow, it is useful to have some idea of what level of accuracy can be expected in a computation.

The reason that a Reynolds number limitation exists in computational fluid dynamics CFD) is that the computational stability of most CFD methods relies on some type of numerical smoothing or homogenizing within the computational elements. Since viscosity is a physical mechanism for smoothing flow variations, there can be a problem differentiating between numerical and physical smoothing. This is especially important when critical Reynolds number situations are encountered, because they require an especially accurate estimate of viscous stresses.

High Reynolds Number Limit – A Physical Argument

A simple physical argument can be used to estimate the computational requirements (i.e., resolution) needed to achieve an accurate representation of a flow. The argument is based on the assumption that when a flow region is subdivided into small elements all flow quantities within an element are slowly varying. This assumption carries the implication that the average values of quantities in each element are good approximations for the actual values within the element.

To have a slowly varying velocity within an element, the Reynolds number of the flow on scales of the element size must be small, say of order one, Rd=dx·du/ν ≤ 1.0. In this expression dx and du are length and velocity scales characteristic of the element. This physical requirement, the smoothness of the flow in elements (i.e., a low Reynolds number, laminar flow on this scale), may be used to define the size of elements needed for an accurate numerical resolution.

The above inequality can be converted to a macroscopic Reynolds number by the relations, L=Ndx and U=Ndu, which leads to R ≤ N2. In other words, the physical accuracy requirement of a smooth flow on the scale of individual elements implies that the maximum Reynolds number one can expect to compute with accuracy is on the order of NN2 where N is the number of elements used to resolve a characteristic length L.

In typical applications, N is often in the range of 10 to 20, which translates to a maximum Reynolds number for accurate computations of only about 400, not a very large number! Before commenting on this result it is instructive to try a different approach for estimating the limit for accurate Reynolds number computations.

High Reynolds Number Limit – A Numerical Argument

The amount of viscous-like smoothing introduced into a computation by numerical approximations can be estimated from truncation errors. The idea is to do a Taylor Series expansion on the difference approximations in powers of the element size (and time-step size if that is appropriate). Of course, a consistent approximation should have as its lowest order terms the partial differential equation that was originally being approximated.

At the next higher order there are usually terms that have the character of a diffusion (i.e., second-order space derivatives). A comparison of the coefficients of these terms with the coefficient of viscosity gives an estimate of when viscous effects would no longer be computed accurately.

For a first-order numerical approximation (e.g., a donor cell or upwind technique for advection) the ratio of terms, which must be less than one for accuracy, leads to the criteria R ≤ 2N. With a second-order approximation the result is R ≤ N2, the same result obtained from the “Physical Argument.”

There are small numerical factors multiplying the right-hand sides of these relations, which depend on the specific numerical approximations used, but the basic dependencies on N remain unchanged. Any second-order method is clearly much better than a first-order method, but the results are not encouraging. The maximum Reynolds number that can be computed accurately appears to be quite limited, unless one is willing to increase N, which means dealing with extremely large grids.

General Comments on High Reynolds Numbers

These estimates are discouraging when first encountered, but there are frequently mitigating circumstances. Foremost is the realization that most problems do not require an accurate treatment of viscous stresses. For these problems the high Reynolds number limit has the intended meaning that viscous effects are not important.

When flows have a high enough Reynolds number to be fully turbulent the momentum mixing induced by the turbulence often leads to a mean flow with an effective Reynolds number that is less than 100, well within the range of resolvable scales. Of course, this assumes that a suitable turbulence model is available to describe the turbulence.

Finally, when it is necessary to have some flow property that depends on an accurate knowledge of viscous effects, it may be possible to induce that effect by artificial means. For example, in wind tunnels trip wires are sometimes used to trigger flow separations to account for a lack of Reynolds number similarity. A similar treatment can be added to a numerical simulation of a wind tunnel.

The bottom line is, CFD methods can be used to compute high Reynolds number flows, but it is up to the modeler to be alert for situations where numerical errors could overshadow physical effects.

Low Reynolds Number Limit

At low Reynolds numbers the limit is not one of accuracy but a limit based on the computational time necessary to complete a computation. When explicit numerical approximations are used for viscous stress terms there is a limit on the size of the time step to maintain numerical stability. That limit is essentially a statement that momentum changes caused by viscosity do not propagate more than about one element in one time step. In a simple two-dimensional case this limit is νdt ≤ dx2/4.

This can be transformed into an expression involving the Reynolds number by making the correspondences: T=Mdt and TU=L. That is, the characteristic time for a flow is the time for fluid at velocity U to move a distance L, and the number of time steps resolving time T is M. With these relations the stability condition is then, M = 4N2/R.

The importance of this result is that M increases inversely with R. For very low Reynolds number flows, explicit numerical methods may require a very large number of time steps, and this number increases rapidly with an increase in resolution. The low Reynolds number limit is best eliminated by employing an implicit numerical method for evaluating viscous stresses.

FLOW-3D 튜토리얼 V12

FLOW-3D 튜토리얼 V12

빠른 시작

이 튜토리얼 매뉴얼은 FLOW-3D 처음 사용하는 사용자에게 그래픽 사용자 인터페이스(GUI)의 주요 구성 요소를 쉽게 익히도록 하고, 다양한 시뮬레이션의 설정 및 실행 방법을 안내하기 위한 것입니다.

이 매뉴얼에 있는 실습과정은 FLOW-3D의 기본 사항을 다루기 위한 것입니다. 이 매뉴얼에서 제시하는 문제는 다양한 주제를 설명하고, 발생할 수 있는 많은 질문을 해결하기 위해 선정되었습니다. 이 매뉴얼의 실습과정은 FLOW-3D실행하는 컴퓨터에 앉아 사용하는 것이 가장 좋습니다.

CFD 사용 철학에 대한 간단한 섹션 다음에는 중요 파일과 시뮬레이션 파일을 실행하는 방법이 소개되어 있습니다. 이 소개 섹션 다음에는 모델 설정, 시뮬레이션 실행 및 포스트 프로세스, Simulation Manager 탐색 방법에 대한 설명이 있습니다. 이러한 각 단계에 대한 자세한 내용은 모델 설정, 컴퓨팅 결과 및 후처리 장에서 확인할 수 있습니다.

1.CFD 사용에 대한 철학

CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics)는 유체 흐름(질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존)에 대한 지배 방정식의 컴퓨터 솔루션입니다. 지정된 지배방정식은 이론 장에 설명된 Numerical방법을 사용하여 이산화되고 계산됩니다.

CFD 소프트웨어를 사용하는 것은 여러 면에서 실험을 설정하는 것과 유사합니다. 실제 상황을 시뮬레이션하기 위해 실험을 올바르게 설정하지 않으면, 그 결과는 실제 상황을 반영하지 않습니다. 같은 방법으로 수치 모델이 실제 상황을 정확하게 나타내지 않으면, 그 결과는 실제 상황을 반영하지 않습니다. 사용자는 어떤 것이 중요한지, 어떻게 표현해야 하는지를 결정해야 합니다. 시작하기 전에 다음과 같은 질문을 하는 것이 중요합니다.

  • CFD 계산에서 무엇을 알고 싶습니까?
  • 중요한 현상을 포착하기 위해 규모와 Mesh는 어떻게 설계되어야 하는가?
  • 실제 물리적 상황을 가장 잘 나타내는 경계 조건은 무엇입니까?
  • 어떤 종류의 유체를 사용해야합니까?
  • 이 문제에 어떤 유체 특성이 중요합니까?
  • 다른 어떤 물리적 현상이 중요합니까?
  • 초기 유체 상태는 어떻게 됩니까?
  • 어떤 단위 시스템을 사용해야합니까?

모델링 되는 문제가 실제 상황을 가능한 한 유사하게 나타내는지 확인하는 것이 중요합니다. 사용자는 복잡한 시뮬레이션 작업을 해결 가능한 부분으로 나누는 것이 좋습니다.

복잡한 물리 효과를 추가하기 전에, 간단하고 쉽게 이해할 수 있는 근사값으로 점차적으로 시작하여 프로세스 진행하십시오. 간단한 손 계산(베르누이 방정식, 에너지 균형, 파동
전파, 경계층 성장 등)은 물리 및 매개 변수를 선택하는데 도움이 되고, 결과와 비교할 수 있는 점검항목을 제공합니다.

CFD의 장단점을 이해하면 분석을 진행하는데 도움이 될 수 있습니다. CFD는 다음과 같은 경우 탁월한 분석 옵션입니다.

  • 기하 구조, 물리학 또는 필요한 상세 수준으로 인해 표준 엔지니어링 계산이 유용하지 않은 경우가 많습니다.
  • 실제 실험은 비용이 많이 소요됩니다.
  • 실험에서 수집할 수 있는 것보다 유체흐름에 대한 자세한 정보가 필요한 경우 유용합니다.
  • 위험하거나 적대적인 조건, 확장이 잘되지 않는 프로세스 등으로 인해 정확한 실험 측정을 하기가 어려운 경우
  • 복잡한 흐름 정보에 대한 커뮤니케이션

CFD는 다음과 같은 경우에 덜 효과적입니다.

  • 솔루션이 계산 리소스가 매우 많이 소요되거나, 도메인 크기를 줄이기 위한 가정 또는 해결되지 않은 물리적 현상을 설명하기 위한 반 임계 모델이 필요한 경우
  • CFD 시뮬레이션에 대한 입력이 되는 중요한 물리적 현상이 알려지지 않은 경우
  • 물리적 현상이 잘 이해되지 않거나 매우 복잡한 경우

CFD를 사용할 때 명심해야 할 몇 가지 중요한 참고 사항이 있습니다.

  • CFD는 규정된 초기 및 경계 조건에 따라 지정된 지배 방정식의 수치해석 솔루션입니다. 따라서 모델 설정, 즉 어떤 방정식을 풀어야 하는지, 재료 특성, 초기 조건 및 경계 조건이, 가능한 한 물리적 상황과 최대한 일치해야 합니다.
  • 방정식의 수치 해는 일반적으로 어떤 종류의 근사치를 필요로 합니다. 물리적 모델에 대한 가정과 해결방법을 검토한 후 사용하는 것이 좋습니다.
  • 디지털 컴퓨터는 숫자가 유한 정밀도로 이진수로 표시되는 방식으로 인해 반올림 오류가 발생합니다. 이는 문제를 악화시키기 때문에 매우 근소한 숫자의 차이를 계산해야 하는 상황을 피하십시오. 이러한 상황의 예는 시뮬레이션 도메인이 원점에서 멀리 떨어져 있을 때입니다.

 

2.중요한 파일

FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션과 관련된 많은 파일이 있습니다. 가장 중요한 것들이 아래에 설명되어 있습니다. 모든 prepin.* 파일의 명칭에서 prepin는 파일 형식을 의미하며, 별표시* 위치는 시뮬레이션 이름을 의미합니다. ( : prepin.example_simulation.)

  • ·prepin.*: 시뮬레이션용 입력 파일입니다. 시뮬레이션 설정을 설명하는 모든 입력 변수가 포함되어 있습니다.
  • ·prpgrf.*: 이것은 전 처리기 출력 파일입니다. 여기에는 계산된 초기 조건이 포함되며 시뮬레이션을 실행하기 전에 설정을 확인하는 데 사용될 수 있습니다.
  • ·flsgrf.*: 솔버 출력 파일입니다. 시뮬레이션의 최종 결과가 포함됩니다.
  • ·prperr.*, report.*, prpout.*: 이 파일들은 Preprocessor Diagnostic Files.
  • ·hd3err.*, hd3msg.*, hd3out.*: 이 파일들은 Solver Diagnostic Files.

모든 시뮬레이션 파일은 단일 폴더에 함께 유지하므로, 설명이 될 수 있는 시뮬레이션 이름을 사용하는 것이 좋습니다. 그러나 매우 긴 파일 이름은 운영 체제에 따라 문제가 될 수 있습니다.

노트

  • 시뮬레이션 이름이 inp(즉, 입력 파일이 있다면 prepin.inp) 출력 및 진단 파일은 모두 .dat이름을 갖습니다. 예: flsgrf.dat.
  • 모든 입력 파일은 네트워크 위치의 컴퓨터 대신 로컬 디렉토리에 저장하는 것이 좋습니다. 이것은 솔버가 더 빠르게 실행되고 GUI의 응답 속도가 빨라지며 실행중인 시뮬레이션을 방해하는 네트워크 문제 가능성을 제거합니다.

3.시뮬레이션 관리자

FLOW-3D 시뮬레이션 관리자의 탭은 주로 시뮬레이션을 실행할 수 있도록 시뮬레이션 환경을 구성하고 실행 시뮬레이션에 대한 상태 정보를 표시하는데 사용됩니다.

작업 공간 (Workspaces)

작업 공간(Workspaces)Simulation Manager의 필수 부분이며 파일을 FLOW-3D에서 처리하는 방식입니다. 기본적으로 시뮬레이션을 포함하고 구성하는 폴더입니다. 몇 가지 예를 들면 시뮬레이션과 또 다른 작업 공간인 검증 사례를 포함하도록 할 수 있습니다:

포트폴리오의 작업 공간

새로운 작업 공간 만들기

튜토리얼에서는 작성하려는 시뮬레이션을 포함할 작업 공간(Workspaces)을 작성하십시오.

1.File -> New workspace 이동

2.작업 공간 이름으로 Tutorial를 입력하십시오.

3.기본 위치는 현재 사용자의 홈 디렉토리에 있습니다. 다른 곳에서 찾을 수 있지만 기본 위치가 우리의 목적에 적합합니다.

4.하위 디렉토리를 사용하여 작업 공간 이름 만들기 확인란을 선택합니다. 이렇게 하면 파일 시스템에서 작업 공간에 대한 새로운 하위 디렉토리가 만들어져 시뮬레이션 파일을 훨씬 쉽게 구성할 수 있습니다.

새로운 작업 공간 만들기

5.확인을 눌러 새 작업 공간을 작성하십시오. 이제 포트폴리오에 표시됩니다.

새로운 작업 공간 만들기

작업 공간 닫기

포트폴리오를 정리하고 탐색하기 쉽도록 필요 없는 작업공간을 닫는 것이 편리합니다. 작업 공간을 닫으면 포트폴리오에서 해당 작업 공간만 제거됩니다. 그러나, 컴퓨터에서 작업 공간을 삭제하지는 않습니다.

작업 공간을 닫으려면

1.기존 작업 공간을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 작업 Close Workspace 선택하십시오. 또는 포트폴리오에서 작업 공간을 선택 (왼쪽 클릭) 하고 Delete 키를 누를 수 있습니다.

2.작업 공간을 닫을 것인지 묻는 메세지가 표시됩니다. 예를 선택하십시오.

3.포트폴리오는 더 이상 닫힌 작업 공간을 포함하지 않습니다.

기존 작업 공간 열기

오래된 작업 공간을 열어야 할 때가 있을 것입니다. 예를 들어, 새 프로젝트에 유사한 시뮬레이션을 작성하기 전에 기존 시뮬레이션의 설정을 검토할 수 있습니다. 기존 작업 공간을 열려면

1.File -> Open Workspace를 선택하십시오

2.작업 공간 파일이 있는 디렉토리를 찾으십시오. Tutorial.FLOW-3D_Workspace.

작업 공간 열기

3.작업 공간을 로드 하려면 OK누르십시오.

작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션 작업

작업 공간을 사용하는 방법을 알았으니, 여기에 시뮬레이션을 추가해 봅시다.

Example를 추가하십시오

작업 공간에 작업 시뮬레이션을 추가하는 가장 간단한 방법은 포함된 예제 시뮬레이션 중 하나를 추가하는 것입니다. FLOW-3D의 다양한 기능을 사용하는
방법을 보여주기 위해 설계된 간단하고 빠른 시뮬레이션입니다. 기존 작업 공간에 예제를 추가하려면 다음을 수행하십시오.

1.포트폴리오에서 원하는 작업 공간을 강조 표시하십시오

2.File -> Add example 선택하십시오. 또는 작업공간을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 예제 추가선택할 수 있습니다.

3.예제 대화 상자에서 예제를 선택하고 열기를 누르십시오. 자연 대류(Natural Convection) 예제를 선택했습니다.

시뮬레이션 예제 추가

4.새 시뮬레이션 대화 상자가 열립니다.

5.디렉토리가 작업 공간 위치에 있는지 확인하는 것이 좋으므로 기본 시뮬레이션 이름과 위치를 잘 확인하는 것이 좋습니다. FLOW-3D는 모든 시뮬레이션 파일을 이 작업 공간 디렉토리의 별도 하위 디렉토리에 배치하여 파일 구성을 쉽게 만들어 줍니다.

6.시뮬레이션을 위한 단위 시스템을 선택하십시오. 표준 단위 시스템이 권장되지만 각 단위를 독립적으로 선택하기 위해 사용자 지정 단위 시스템을 선택할 수 있습니다.

7.확인을 눌러 새 시뮬레이션을 작업 공간에 추가하십시오.

작업 공간에서의 시뮬레이션

작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션 제거

작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 제거해야 하는 경우가 있습니다 (이는 작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 제거만 하며, 컴퓨터에서 시뮬레이션을 삭제하지는 않습니다). 작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 제거하려면 다음을 수행하십시오.

1.작업 공간에서 기존 시뮬레이션을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 (이 경우 이전 섹션에서 추가 한 예제 사용) 시뮬레이션 제거를 선택하십시오. 또는 작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 선택 (왼쪽 클릭)하고 Delete 키를 누를 수 있습니다.

2.작업 공간에는 더 이상 시뮬레이션이 포함되지 않습니다.

모든 작업 공간 및 디스크에서 시뮬레이션 삭제

작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 제거하는 것 외에도 디스크에서 모든 시뮬레이션 파일을 삭제해야 할 수도 있습니다. 작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 제거하고 디스크에서 시뮬레이션
파일을 삭제하려면 다음을 수행하십시오.

1.작업 공간에서 기존 시뮬레이션을 마우스 오른쪽 단추로 클릭하고 (이 경우 이전 섹션에서 추가 한 예제 사용) 모든 작업 공간 및 디스크에서 시뮬레이션
삭제를
선택하십시오.

2.시뮬레이션 디렉토리에서 삭제할 파일을 선택할 수 있는 창이 나타납니다. 삭제할 파일을 선택한 다음 확인을 눌러 해당 파일을 삭제하거나 취소를 눌러 작업을 중단하십시오.

3.OK를 선택한 경우 선택한 작업 공간은 더 이상 시뮬레이션을 포함하지 않습니다. 선택한 작업 공간의 모든 시뮬레이션 파일은 디렉토리에서 삭제됩니다.

경고

이 작업은 취소할 수 없으므로 계속하기 확인 후 파일을 삭제해야 합니다.

작업 공간에 기존 시뮬레이션 추가

기존 시뮬레이션을 작업 공간에 추가하려면 다음을 수행하십시오.

1.열린 작업 공간을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 기존 시뮬레이션 추가 선택합니다. 작업 공간을 선택한 다음 File->Add Existing Simulation 을 선택할 수도 있습니다.

2.prepin.*파일 위치로 이동하여 열기를 선택하십시오.

작업 공간에 기존 시뮬레이션 추가

3.시뮬레이션이 이제 작업 공간에 나타납니다.

작업 공간에 새로운 시뮬레이션 추가

대부분의 경우 기존 시뮬레이션을 사용하는 대신 새 시뮬레이션을 작성하게 됩니다. 작업 공간에 새로운 시뮬레이션을 추가하려면:

1.기존 작업 공간을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 새 시뮬레이션 추가 선택하십시오.

2.시뮬레이션 이름을 입력하라는 message가 표시됩니다. 이 예제에서는 heat transfer example 불러오십시오.

3.그런 다음 드롭다운 목록을 사용하여 시뮬레이션을 위한 단위 시스템을 결정합니다. 사용 가능한 옵션은 질량, 길이, 시간, 전기요금
각각 g, cm, s, coul기준의 Kg, m, s, CGS입니다. 또한 엔지니어링 단위도 사용할 수 있으며, slug, ft, s의 기초 단위가 있지만, 전기
충전을 위한 단위는 없습니다. 이러한 옵션 중 어느 것도 해당되지 않는 경우, 질량, 길이, 시간 및 전기요금에 대한 기준 등을 사용자 정의하여 사용자 지정 단위 시스템을 사용할 수 있습니다.

4.온도 단위는 드롭다운 목록을 사용하여 지정해야 합니다. 사용 가능한 옵션은 SI CGS 단위의 경우 Celsius
Kelvin, 엔지니어링 단위의 경우 Fahrenheit Rankine입니다. Custom units(사용자 정의 단위) 옵션을 선택한 경우, 사용 가능한 온도 단위는 질량
및 길이에 대해 선택한 기본 단위에 따라 변경됩니다.

노트

새 시뮬레이션의 시뮬레이션 단위는 신중하게 선택하십시오. 일단 설정하면 단위를 변경할 수 없습니다.

5.이 시뮬레이션에 사용된 템플릿이 기본 템플릿이 됩니다. 템플릿은 포함된 설정을 새 시뮬레이션에 적용하는 저장된 값 세트입니다. 다른 템플릿을 사용해야하는 경우
찾아보기 아이콘 (
browse_icon_v12)을 클릭하여 사용 가능한 템플릿 목록에서 선택하십시오.

6.기본 시뮬레이션 이름과 위치는 디렉토리가 작업 공간 위치에 있는지 확인하는 것이 좋습니다. FLOW-3D는 모든 시뮬레이션 파일을 이 작업 공간 디렉토리의 별도 하위 디렉토리에 배치하여 파일 구성을 훨씬 쉽게 만듭니다. 시뮬레이션을 다른 위치에 저장하려면 찾아보기 아이콘 ( browse_icon_v12)을 사용하여 원하는 위치로 이동하십시오.

7.확인을 클릭하여 작업 공간에 새 시뮬레이션을 추가하십시오.

heat transfer example

새로운 시뮬레이션 추가

다른 옵션

우리는 지금 이러한 옵션을 사용하지 않는 동안, 이 시뮬레이션을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하여 추가 옵션에 대한 액세스를 제공합니다.

일반적으로 사용되는 Add Simulation Copy… 그리고 Add Restart Simulation…을 추가합니다. 첫 번째 옵션은 기존 시뮬레이션의 사본을
작성하고, 두 번째 옵션은 기존 시뮬레이션을 복사하고 원래 시뮬레이션의 결과를 다시 시작 시뮬레이션의 초기 조건으로 사용하도록 다시 시작 옵션을 구성합니다.

추가 정보

재시작 시뮬레이션에 대한 자세한 내용은 도움말에서 모델 설정 장의 재시작 섹션을 참조하십시오.

전처리 및 시뮬레이션 실행

시뮬레이션 전처리

시뮬레이션 전처리는 초기 조건을 계산하고 입력 파일에서 일부 진단 테스트를 실행합니다. 문제가 올바르게 구성되었는지 확인하거나 전 처리기의 진단 정보가 필요한 경우에
유용합니다. 시뮬레이션을 실행하기 전에 전처리할 필요가 없습니다. 시뮬레이션을 전처리 하려면

1.작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 Preprocess Simulation->Local 선택합니다. 이 경우 입력 파일 heat transfer example이 아직 완전히 정의되지 않았으므로 작업 공간에서 예제 문제를 선택하십시오.

2.전처리 프로세스가 시작되고 Simulation Manager 하단의 텍스트 창에 일부 정보가 인쇄된 후 성공적으로 완료됩니다. 포트폴리오에서 시뮬레이션 이름 옆의 아이콘도 시뮬레이션이 성공적으로 처리되었음을 나타내도록 변경됩니다.

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 도움말의 컴퓨팅 결과 장의 전처리 섹션을 참조하십시오.

시뮬레이션 실행

시뮬레이션을 실행하면 입력 파일에 정의된 문제에 대한 지배 방정식(물리적 모델, 형상, 초기 조건, 경계 조건 등)이 해석됩니다. 시뮬레이션을 실행하려면

1.작업 공간에서 시뮬레이션을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 Run Simulation->Local을 선택하십시오. 이 경우 입력 파일 heat transfer example이 아직 완전히
정의되지 않았으므로 작업 공간에서 예제 문제를 선택하십시오.

2.솔버가 시작되고 시뮬레이션 관리자 하단의 텍스트 창에 일부 정보가 인쇄되고 플롯이 업데이트 된 후 성공적으로 완료됩니다. 포트폴리오에서 시뮬레이션 이름 옆의
아이콘도 시뮬레이션이 성공적으로 실행되었음을 나타내도록 변경됩니다. 또한 솔버가 실행되는 동안 큐에 시뮬레이션이 나타나는 것을 볼 수 있으며, 완료되면 사라집니다
.

추가 정보

시뮬레이션 실행 및 진단 읽기에 대한 자세한 내용은 도움말의 컴퓨팅 결과 장에서 솔버 실행 섹션을 참조하십시오.

작업 공간에서 모든 시뮬레이션 실행

작업 공간을 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고 Simulate Workspace->Local을 선택하여 작업 공간에서 모든 시뮬레이션을 실행할 수도 있습니다.

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 컴퓨팅 결과 장에서 솔버 실행 섹션을 참조하십시오.

대기열

사전 처리 또는 실행에 작업이 제출되면 큐의 맨 아래에 시뮬레이션이 자동으로 추가됩니다. 그런 다음 솔버에 사용 가능한 라이센스 및 계산 리소스가 있으면 시뮬레이션이 사전 처리되거나 실행됩니다. 대기열에 있지만 아직 전처리 또는 실행되지 않은 시뮬레이션은 대기열 맨 아래의 컨트롤을 사용하여 대기열에서 다시 정렬하거나 대기열에서 제거할 수 있습니다.

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 컴퓨팅 결과 장을 참조하십시오.

파일 시스템에서 파일 찾기

어떤 이유로 구조물 파일에 액세스해야 하는 경우 (아마 *.STL 폴더에 파일을 배치해야 함) 표시된 파일 경로를 시뮬레이션 입력 파일로 클릭하여 파일 시스템의 해당 위치로 이동할 수 있습니다.

파일 링크

4.모델 설정

Model Setup(모델 설정) 탭은 시뮬레이션 관리자에서 현재 선택한 시뮬레이션에 대한 입력 매개 변수를 정의하는 곳입니다. 여기에는 전역설정, 물리학 모델, 유체,
기하학, 메싱, 구성요소 특성, 초기 조건, 경계 조건, 출력 옵션 및 숫자가 포함된다.

이 섹션은 물에 잠긴 모래(; 파랑)의 바닥에서 가열된 구리 블록(; 빨간색)에 의해 발생하는 열 기둥(아래)을 보여주는 간단한 시뮬레이션 설정 방법을 안내합니다.

예제 문제

이 튜토리얼은 방법이나 모델이 어떻게 작동하는지, 옵션을 선택한 이유 등에 대한 포괄적인 논의를 의도한 것이 아니며, 이 특정 시뮬레이션을 설정하기 위해 수행해야 할 사항에
대한 간략한 개요일 뿐입니다. 여기서 행해지는 것에 대한 방법/모델과 추론의 세부사항은 사용 설명서의 다른 장에서 확인할 수 있습니다.

시작하려면 새 작업 공간을 작성하고 새 시뮬레이션을 추가하십시오. 이를 수행하는 방법에 대한 지침은 새 작업 공간 작성 및 작업 공간에 새 시뮬레이션 추가를 참조하십시오.

탐색

모델 설정은 주로 빨간색으로 표시된 처음 9 개의 아이콘의 탐색을 통해 수행됩니다. 각 아이콘은 시뮬레이션의 특정 측면을 구성하기 위한 위젯을 엽니다. Global에서 시작하여 Numerics로 끝나는 다음 섹션은 각 위젯의 목적을 보여줍니다.

시뮬레이션의 다양한 측면을 정의하기위한 탐색 아이콘

통제 수단

다음은 FLOW-3D 사용자 인터페이스의 그래픽 디스플레이 영역에서 사용되는 마우스 컨트롤입니다.

행동

버튼/

동작

기술

회전

왼쪽

길게 클릭

마우스 왼쪽 버튼을 클릭 한 채로 Meshing & Geometry 창에서
마우스를 움직입니다. 그에 따라 모델이 회전합니다.

중간 버튼/스크롤

스크롤/클릭 한
상태

마우스를 앞뒤로 움직여 확대/축소하려면 가운데 휠을 굴리거나 마우스 가운데 버튼을 클릭
한 상태로 유지하십시오.

우측

길게 클릭

마우스 오른쪽 버튼을 클릭 한 채로 창에서 마우스를 움직입니다. 모델이 마우스와 함께 움직입니다.

객체에 초점 설정

해당 없음

객체 위에 커서를 놓기

커서를 개체 위로 가져 가면 마우스 오른쪽 버튼 클릭 메뉴를
통해 추가 조작을 위해 개체가 활성화됩니다. 개체가 활성화되면 강조 표시됩니다. Meshing & Geometry 탭에서 Tools->
Mouse Hover
Selection
환경 설정 이 활성화된 경우에만
수행됩니다.

선택

왼쪽

더블 클릭

객체를 두 번 클릭하면 마우스 오른쪽 버튼 메뉴를 통해 추가
조작을 위해 객체를 선택하고 활성화합니다. Meshing
& Geometry
탭에서 Tools
->Mouse Hover Selection 환경 설정 이
비활성화 된 경우에만 활성화됩니다.

액세스 객체 속성

우측

딸깍 하는 소리

강조 표시된 객체를 마우스 오른쪽 버튼으로 클릭하면 객체
식별, 표시/숨기기, 활성화/비활성화, 투명도 조정 등의 옵션 목록이 표시됩니다.

커서 좌표 반환 (프로브)

왼쪽

Shift + 클릭

Shift 키를 누르면 커서가 대상으로 바뀝니다. Shift 키를 누른 상태에서 클릭하면 화면의 왼쪽 하단에 표시된 표면의 좌표가 표시됩니다.

피벗 점 배치

왼쪽

cntrl + 클릭

Ctrl 키를 누르고 있으면 커서가 피벗 아이콘으로 바뀝니다. Ctrl 키를 누른 상태에서 클릭하여 피벗 점을 설정하십시오. 뷰가
피벗 점을 중심으로 회전합니다. 토글 사용자 정의 피벗 피벗 점을 끕니다.
보기 창 위의 버튼을 누릅니다.

도움이
되는 툴바 옵션도 있습니다. 옵션의 목적을 찾으려면 아이콘 위로 마우스를 가져갑니다.

메시 및 지오메트리 탭의 컨트롤

글로벌

이 매뉴얼에 대한 시뮬레이션을 만들려면 원하는 작업 공간을 마우스 오른쪽 단추로 클릭하고 새 시뮬레이션 추가를 선택하십시오. 매뉴얼 섹션의 새 시뮬레이션 추가 작업 공간에 설명된 대로 이름을 ‘heat transfer example’로 지정하고 작업 공간에 추가하십시오. SI Kelvin을 각각 단위 시스템과 온도로 선택합니다. 일단 설정되면
시뮬레이션을 위한 단위는 변경할 수 없다는 점을 기억하십시오.

글로벌 아이콘 f3d_global_icon을 클릭하여 글로벌 위젯을 여십시오. 여기에서 정의된 단위가 표시되고 시뮬레이션 완료 시간이 설정됩니다. 이 시뮬레이션의 경우 완료 시간을 200 초로 설정하십시오. 시뮬레이션에 대한 중요한 세부 정보는 여기 노트 필드에도 추가할 수 있습니다.

글로벌 탭 예를 들어 문제

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 전역 섹션을 참조하십시오.

물리

물리 f3d_models_icon아이콘을 클릭하여 물리 위젯을 엽니다.

모델 선택을위한 물리 위젯

이 문제의 경우, 하나의 유체, 자유 표면, 경계 및 비압축/제한 압축의 기본 설정이 모두 정확합니다.

관련 물리 메커니즘(, 추가 지배 방정식 또는 지배 방정식 용어)은 물리 위젯에서 정의됩니다. 모델을 활성화하려면 해당 모델의 아이콘을 마우스 왼쪽 버튼으로 클릭하고활성화 선택하십시오. 이 시뮬레이션을 위해서는 다음 모델을 활성화해야 합니다.

·Density evaluation(밀도 평가): 이 모델은 열 기둥을 생성하는 밀도 변화를 설명합니다. 다른 양(: 온도 또는 스칼라)의 함수로 평가된 밀도를 선택하고 Include volumetric thermal expansion 상자를 선택하십시오.

문제 평가를위한 밀도 평가 모델

·Gravity and non-inertial reference frame(중력 및 비 관성 기준 프레임): 중력을 나타내는 힘이 추가되므로 Z 중력 성분에 -9.81을 입력하십시오.

예를 들어 중력 모델

·
Heat transfer(열 전달): 이 모델은 유체와 고체 물체 사이의 열 전달을 설명합니다. 이 시뮬레이션의 경우 First order for the Fluid internal Energy advection를 선택하고 Fluid to solid heat transfer를 활성화하려면 확인란을 선택하십시오. 나머지 옵션은 기본값으로 두어야합니다.

열전달 모델 예 : 문제

·
Viscosity and turbulence(점성 및 난류): 이 모델은 유체의 점성 응력을 설명합니다. Viscous flow 옵션을 선택하고 나머지 옵션은 기본값으로 두십시오.

예를 들어 문제의 점도 모델

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 물리 섹션을 참조하십시오.

유체

유체의 속성은 모델 설정 탭의 유체 위젯에 정의되어 있습니다. 유체 위젯은 수직 도구 모음에서 Fluids f3d_fluids_icon f3d_fluids_icon아이콘을 클릭하여 액세스할 수 있습니다. 먼저 유체 옵션 1 이 속성 옵션으로 선택되어 있는지 확인하십시오. 유체 1의 속성은 수동으로 입력할 수 있지만 일반적인 유체의 속성을 설정하는 빠른 방법은 재료 속성로드 버튼Matdatbas을 클릭하여 재료 데이터베이스에서 유체를 로드하는 것입니다. 다음으로, 원하는 재료를 탐색하십시오. 이 경우 Fluids->Liquids->Water_at_20_C를 선택하고 Load를 클릭하십시오.

이 시뮬레이션에는 데이터베이스에 없는 특성인 체적 열 팽창 계수가 필요합니다. 밀도 하위 탭에서 207e-6을 입력하십시오. 최종 속성 세트는 다음과 같아야 합니다.

유체 특성 (예 : 문제)

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 유체 섹션을 참조하십시오.

Geometry(기하)

기하형상 f3d_geometry_icon아이콘을 클릭하여 물리 위젯을 엽니다.

이 시뮬레이션을 위해 생성해야 하는 두 가지 형상은 구리 블록과 모래층이 있습니다. 둘 다 프리미티브를 사용하여 작성합니다. 보다 현실적인 시뮬레이션은 Primitives, Stereolithography(STL) Geometry File (s)/또는 Raster File (s)을 사용하여 지오메트리를 정의할 수 있습니다.

구리 블록을 만들려면 먼저 지정된 상자 형상 아이콘을 클릭하여 작성합니다. 구리 블록을 x y 방향 원점에서 +/- 2cm 연장하고 z 방향으로 0-4cm 연장합니다. 나머지 옵션은 그대로 두고 블럭을 솔리드로 만들고 새 구성 요소에 추가합니다.

예제 문제에 대한 구리 블록 정의

하위 구성 요소 정의를 마치고 구성 요소 정의로 이동하려면 확인을 선택하십시오. 자동으로 열린 구성요소 추가 대화상자에서 Type as General(솔리드)을 그대로 두고 Name(이름) 필드에 Copper block을 입력한 다음 OK(확인)를 선택하여 구성요소 정의를 완료하십시오.

상자아이콘을 다시 클릭하여 베드 하위 구성 요소를 작성하십시오. 아래 표시된 범위를 사용하고 컴포넌트에 추가 선택 사항을 새 컴포넌트(2)로 설정하십시오.

예를 들어 침대 문제 정의

하위 구성 요소 정의를 마치고 구성 요소 정의로 이동하려면 확인을 선택하십시오. 대화 형으로 이름 필드에서Bed를 입력한 후 구성요소 정의를 마칩니다. 최종 형상은 다음과 같이 표시됩니다.

예제 문제에 대한 형상 정의

새 구성 요소를 추가하면 가로 및 세로 방향으로 그래픽 표시 창에 길이 스케일이 자동으로 생성됩니다. 눈금자 도구를 사용하여 생성된 기하학적 객체의 범위를 빠르게 측정할 수 있습니다.

노트

표시 영역에는 지오메트리 모양 정의만 표시되므로 객체가 솔리드인지 구멍인지에 대한 정보는 표시되지 않습니다. 즐겨 찾기옵션을 사용하여 Mesh 후에 나중에 수행할 수 있습니다.

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 도움말 모델 설정 장의 형상 섹션을 참조하십시오.

구성 요소 속성

열전달 모델은 고체 구성 요소의 전도 방정식을 해결하기 위해 재료 특성이 필요합니다. 이러한 속성은 이 아이콘f3d_geometry_icon을 클릭하여 구성 요소 속성 위젯에서 설정합니다.

구성 요소 특성 위젯

각 구성 요소에는 솔리드 특성 및 표면 특성이 정의 되어 있어야합니다. 구리 블록에 대해 이를 설정하려면 먼저 형상 위젯에서 구성 요소 1: copper block 요소를 선택하십시오. 그런 다음 컴포넌트 특성 위젯에서 솔리드 특성을 선택하고 다음과 같이 특성을 정의하십시오.

구리 블록 고체 특성

여기에서 두 번째 구성 요소(베드)에 대해 설명된 구성 요소 특성 정의를 위한 대체 방법을 사용할 수 있습니다. 이 방법에서는 구성 요소 2: 베드 구성 요소를 클릭하고 재료 필드 옆에 있는 재료 특성로드 Matdatbas 아이콘을 선택하여 시작합니다. 다음으로 재료를 탐색합니다. 이 경우 Solids->Sands->Sand_Quartz 선택하고 Load를 선택하십시오.

베드 솔리드 속성

추가 정보

l 자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 유체 섹션을 참조하십시오.

l 주어진 물리적 모델에 필요한 속성에 대한 자세한 내용은 모델 참조 장을 참조하십시오.

Meshing(메싱)

Mesh Mesh 위젯에서 생성 및 정의되며, 위젯을 통해 액세스 할 수 있습니다. f3d_mesh_icon아이콘을 눌러 add_iconMesh를 추가합니다. Mesh의 범위를 형상에 빠르게 적용하려면 형상에 맞추기 라디오 버튼을 선택하고 오프셋 라디오 버튼을 백분율로 유지합니다. 블록 속성에서 셀 크기를 0.004로 설정하십시오.

메시 블록을 형상에 맞추기

Mesh 상단은 z 방향으로 위쪽으로 확장해야 합니다. Z-Direciton 탭을 선택하고 Mesh Plane 2 0.2를 입력합니다.

z 높이 조정

이 시뮬레이션은 2D가 될 것입니다. 동일한 프로세스에 따라 Y 방향 범위를 -0.005 0.005 로 설정하십시오. 그리고 합계 셀을 1로 설정하십시오.

y 메쉬 평면 조정

최종 Mesh는 그래픽 디스플레이 창 바로 위의 Mesh->Flow Mesh->View 모드 드롭 다운 메뉴에서 옵션을 변경하여 다른 방식으로 볼 수 있습니다. 그리드 라인 마다 그리드 선을 표시합니다 옵션은 Mesh Plane의 옵션만 표시됩니다 Plane Mesh 및 개요 옵션은 Mesh의 범위를 보여줍니다.

또한 솔버가 Mesh의 최종 지오메트리를 인식하는 방법은 FAVOR TM 알고리즘을 사용하여 형상 정의를 면적 분수 및 부피 분수로 변환합니다. 이렇게 하려면 즐겨 찾기아이콘을 클릭한 다음 생성을 선택하십시오.

호의

잠시 후 회색 영역이 고체 물질을 나타내는 아래와 같은 형상을 표시해야 합니다.

선호하는 결과

추가 정보

l Mesh에 대한 자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 Mesh 섹션을 참조하십시오.

l FAVORTM FAVORize
옵션에 대한 자세한 내용은 모델 설정 즐겨 찾기장의 Reviewing the FAVORized Geometry and Mesh 섹션을 참조하십시오.

경계 조건

FLOW-3D는 구성 요소 유형 및 활성 물리적 모델에 기초한 구성 요소에 적절한 경계 조건을 자동으로 적용합니다. 그러나 경계 조건 위젯에서 Mesh 블록면의 경계 조건은 각 Mesh 블록에 대해 수동으로 설정해야 합니다(f3d_bc_icon ).

이 매뉴얼의 경우 경계 조건 중 3 가지가 경계조건( X Min , X Max, Z Max 경계)을 기본 대칭 조건조건부터 변경해야 합니다.

·X Min :

o경계 조건 위젯의 경계 섹션 아래에 있는 X Min 목록을 클릭하십시오. Type에서 경계 유형을 Velocity로 설정하고 X 속도에 대해 0.001을 입력하십시오.

XMIN 경계 조건

·다음으로, 유체 분율 사용에서 유체 표고 사용으로 드롭다운 상자를 변경하고 유체 높이를 0.15로 설정하십시오.

·마지막으로 온도를 298K로 설정하십시오.

XMIN 경계 조건

·
X Max :

o경계 조건 위젯의 경계 섹션 아래에 있는 X 최대 목록을 클릭하십시오. 경계 유형을 압력으로 설정하고 압력에 대해 0을 입력하십시오.

o다음으로, 유체 분율 사용에서 유체 높이 사용으로 드롭다운 상자를 변경하고 유체 높이를 0.15로 설정하십시오.

o마지막으로 온도를 298K로 맞춥니다.

oXMAX 경계 조건

·
Z 최대 :

o경계 조건 위젯의 경계 섹션 아래에 있는 Z 최대 목록을 클릭하십시오. 경계 유형을 압력으로 설정하고 압력에 대해 0을 입력하십시오.

o다음으로 유체 분율을 0.0으로 설정하십시오.

o마지막으로 온도를 298K로 맞춘다.

ZMAX 경계 조건

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 Mesh 경계 조건 섹션을 참조하십시오.

초기 조건

도메인 내부의 솔리드 객체(구성 요소)와 유체 모두에 대해 초기 조건을 설정해야 합니다.

·
구성 요소 :이 시뮬레이션에서 솔리드 객체에 필요한 유일한 초기 조건은 초기 온도입니다. 이것은 각 구성 요소에 대한 위젯에 설정되어 있는 구성 요소 속성에 대해 수행한 것과 유사한 방식으로 구성 요소를 등록합니다. 구성 요소 속성을 설정할 때 이전과 동일한 방법으로 구성 요소 1의 초기 온도를 350K로 설정하고 구성 요소 2의 초기 온도를 298K로 설정하십시오.

유체 초기 조건

유체: 유체의 초기 조건을 설정하기 위해 조금 더 설정해야 합니다. 이 경우 유체 구성, 온도, 속도 및 압력 분포를 모두 설정해야 합니다. 유체 초기 조건은 초기 위젯을 설정하고 초기 f3d_initial_icon를 클릭하면 열립니다.

f3d_initial_icon 아이콘을 선택한 후 유체 목록에서 압력을 선택하고 온도를 298K로 설정합니다. x, y, z 속도를 0.0으로 설정하십시오.

유체 초기 조건

다음으로, 높이/볼륨 목록과 유체 높이 사용 드롭다운 버튼을 선택합니다. 유체 높이를 0.15로 설정하십시오.

유체 초기 조건 계속

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 초기 조건 섹션을 참조하십시오.

출력

FLOW-3D 옵션에는 결과 파일에 기록될 데이터와 출력 위젯에서 발견된 빈도를 제어하는 7가지 데이터 유형이 있습니다. 출력 f3d_output_icon 아이콘을 클릭합니다.

다른 데이터 유형은 다음과 같습니다.

·Restart: 모든 흐름 변수. 기본 출력 주기는 시뮬레이션 시간의 1/10입니다.

·Selected: 사용자가 선택한 흐름 변수 만. 기본 출력 주기는 시뮬레이션 시간의 1/100입니다.

·History: 하나의 변수와 시간의 변화를 보여주는 데이터. 예는 시간 단계 크기, 평균 운동 에너지, 배플에서의 유속 등을 포함합니다. 기본 출력 주기 = 시뮬레이션 시간의 1/100.

·Short print: hd3msg.*파일에 텍스트 진단 데이터가 기록 됩니다. 기본 출력 주기는 시뮬레이션 시간의 1/100입니다.

·Long print : hd3out.*파일에 텍스트 진단 데이터가 기록 됩니다. 기본 출력 주기는 시뮬레이션 시간의 1/10입니다.

·Solidification: 응고 모델이 활성화 된 경우에만 사용 가능합니다.

·FSI TSE: 변형 가능한 솔리드에 대한 추가 출력 옵션.

일반적으로 이 시뮬레이션에는 기본 출력 속도가 적합합니다. 그러나 Selected Data의 일부 추가 구성은 유용합니다. Selected data interval 0.5로 설정한 다음 Fluid 온도, Fluid velocity, Macroscopic density Wall 온도 옆에 있는 상자를 선택합니다. 그러면 이러한 값이 0.5초마다 출력됩니다.

출력 탭 설정

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 출력 섹션을 참조하십시오.

Numerics

기본 Numerics 옵션은 대부분의 시뮬레이션에서 잘 작동하므로 기본 옵션에서 벗어나야 하는 충분한 이유가 없는 경우에는 현재 그대로 두는 것이 가장 좋습니다.

이것으로 모델 설정 섹션에서 시작된 예제 문제의 설정을 마칩니다. 이제 실행할 준비가 되었으므로 전처리 및 시뮬레이션 실행의 단계에 따라 시뮬레이션을 실행하십시오.

추가 정보

자세한 내용은 모델 설정 장의 Numerics 옵션 섹션을 참조하십시오.

일반 시뮬레이션 설정 점검 목록

시뮬레이션을 설정하는 데 필요한 단계에 대한 개략적인 개요가 아래에 나와 있습니다. 이 목록은 포괄적인 목록이 아닙니다. 일반적인 단계, 고려해야 할 몇 가지 중요한 사항 및 권장되는 설정 순서를 간단히 설명하는 안내서일 뿐입니다.

시작하기 전에

1.물리적 문제의 다이어그램을 그리기 및 주석 달기 : 이 다이어그램에는 기하학적 치수, 유체의 위치, 관련 힘, 움직이는 물체의 속도, 관련 열 전달 메커니즘 등이 포함되어야 합니다. 완성된 다이어그램은 문제에 대한 모든 관련 엔지니어링 정보로 인한 물리적 문제에 대한 이미지여야 합니다.

2.모델링 접근법 결정: 주석이 달린 다이어그램을 가이드로 사용하여 문제점에 접근하는 방법을 결정 : 문제가 되는 유체의 수, 혼화 가능한 경우, 하나 이상의 유체에서 방정식을 풀어야하는 경우 및 압축성이 중요한지 파악하여 시작하십시오. 그런 다음 어떤 물리적 메커니즘이 중요한지 결정하십시오. 이러한 각 옵션 (: 유체 유형, 열 전달 메커니즘 등)에 대한 관련 엔지니어링 정보를 다이어그램에 추가하십시오. 물리적 메커니즘이 포함되거나 무시된 이유를 정당화하려고 합니다. 이를 통해 시뮬레이션 프로세스 초기에 오류를 수정하는 데 시간이 거의 걸리지 않는 초기에 실수를 잡을 수 있습니다.

3.다이어그램에 계산 영역을 그리고, 계산 영역의 가장자리에 있는 물리적 상황 설명 : 경계의 물리적 상황을 가장 잘 나타내는 경계 조건 유형을 기록합니다. 사용 가능한 경계 조건 유형이 경계의 물리적 상황에 대한 합리적인 근사치가 아닌 경우 이 경계를 다른 곳으로 이동해야 합니다.

모델 설정 : 일반

1.문제, 시뮬레이션의 목적, 사례 번호 등을 설명하는 메모를 추가하십시오. 메모는 향후 사용자 또는 나중에 참조할 수 있도록 설정을 설명하고 정당화하는 데 도움이 됩니다. 시뮬레이션의 목적, 분석 방법 등을 논의해야합니다.

2.사용할 솔버와 프로세서 수를 선택하십시오.

3.단위 시스템 선택: 소규모 문제를 모델링 할 때는 작은 단위 ( : mm-gm-msec)사용하고 규모가 큰 문제는 큰 단위 ( : SI)를 사용하십시오. 이를 통해 기계 정밀도로 인한 반올림 오류를 방지할 수 있습니다.

4.유체 수, 인터페이스 추적 옵션 및 유량 모드를 선택하십시오. 주석이 달린 다이어그램을 이 단계의 지침으로 사용하십시오. 유체의 수는 질량, 운동량 및 에너지 보존을 관장하는 방정식이 유체 분율 f> 0(유체 1을 나타내는) 또는 유체 분획 f \ geq 0(유체 1 및 유체 2)이 있는 영역에서 해결되는지 여부를 나타냅니다. 인터페이스
추적 옵션은 유체 분율의 변화가 급격한지 또는 확산되어야 하는지 여부를 정의하는 반면, 흐름 모드는 f = 0두 유체 문제에서 처리되는 영역을 정의합니다.

5.마감 조건 정의: 시뮬레이션 종료 시점을 선택합니다. 시간, 채우기 비율 또는 기타 정상 상태 측정을 기반으로 할 수 있습니다.

6.기존 결과에서 시뮬레이션을 다시 시작하는 방법 정의 (선택 사항): 기존 결과 파일에서 시뮬레이션을 다시 시작할 때 다시 시작 옵션이 적용됩니다. 재시작 옵션은 재시작 소스 파일에서 가져온 정보와 시뮬레이션의 초기 조건을 사용하여 재설정되는 정보를 정의합니다.

모델 설정 : 물리

1.주석이 달린 다이어그램을 기반으로 관련 실제 모델 활성화

모델 설정 : 유체

1.유체의 속성 정의 1: 주석이 달린 다이어그램을 가이드로 사용하여 활성 물리적 모델에 대한 적절한 물리적 속성을 정의하십시오.

2.유체 2의 속성 정의 (사용하는 경우): 주석이 달린 다이어그램을 가이드로 사용하여 활성 물리적 모델에 적절한 물리적 속성을 정의하십시오.

3.인터페이스의 속성 정의: f = 1 f = 0의 영역 사이의 인터페이스 속성을 정의하십시오. 여기에는 표면 장력, 상 변화 및 확산에 대한 특성이 포함됩니다.

모델 설정 : Mesh 및 형상

1.모든 STL 파일의 오류 점검: ADmesh, netfabb Studio 또는 유사한 프로그램을 사용하여 모든 STL 파일의 오류를 점검하십시오. 이는 모델 설정에 시간을 소비하기 전에 형상
정의와 관련된 문제를 파악하는 데 도움이 됩니다.

2.모든 하위 구성 요소 및 구성 요소 가져 오기 및 정의 : 주석이 달린 다이어그램에 설명 된 대로 실제 사례와 일치하도록 3D 솔리드 형상을 정의합니다. 최종 결과는 물리적 형상의 정확한 복제본이어야 합니다. 각 부분에 설명적인 이름을 사용하고 대량 소스가 될 구성 요소를 포함하십시오.

3.모든 구성 요소의 속성 정의: 주석이 달린 다이어그램에 그려진 내용을 기반으로 각 구성 요소의 모든 재료 속성, 표면 속성, 모션 속성 등을 정의합니다. 경계 조건이 정의될 때까지 질량 소스 특성을 정의하기를 기다리십시오.

4.스프링과 로프 및 각각에 대한 관련 속성을 정의합니다.

5.주석이 달린 다이어그램에 설명된 시뮬레이션 도메인과 일치하도록 Mesh를 정의하십시오. 도메인의 모서리가 다이어그램에서 식별된 위치에 있는지 확인하십시오. 또한 인터페이스 (셀이 0 <f <1있는 셀과 셀이 f = 1다른 셀 이 있는 셀)를 식별하려면 세 개의 셀이 필요합니다.f = 0 ). 최소 5 개의 셀이 예상되는 가장 얇은 연속 영역에 맞도록 충분히 작은 셀을 사용하십시오. f = 1 f = 0 .

6.지오메트리를 정의하는 모든 배플 정의

7.경계 조건, 질량 소스, 질량 모멘텀 소스, 밸브 및 벤트 정의: 경계 조건 (질량 소스, 질량 모멘텀 소스, 밸브 및 벤트 포함)은 모든 방정식을 풀기 위해 주어진 위치에서 솔루션을 규정합니다. 주석이 달린 다이어그램을 사용하여 각 경계 (또는 소스 등)에 지정된 내용이 유동 솔루션, 열 전달 솔루션, 전위 등에 대한 현실과 일치하는지 확인하십시오.

8.유체 및 구성 요소의 초기 조건을 정의합니다. 초기 조건은 모든 방정식 (유량 솔루션, 열 전달 솔루션, 전위 등)에 대해 모든 영역에서 솔루션을 규정합니다.t = 0 .주석이
달린 다이어그램을 사용하여 초기 조건에 지정된 내용이 현재 현실에 대한 근사치인지 확인하십시오. 유체 영역뿐만 아니라 구성 요소의 초기 조건을 설정해야 합니다.

9.모든 측정 장치 정의 (샘플링 볼륨, 플럭스 표면 및 히스토리 프로브)

모델 설정 : 출력

1.출력 기준 (시간, 채우기 비율 또는 응고된 비율)을 선택하십시오.

2.재시작 데이터에 추가할 출력을 선택하십시오.

3.선택한 데이터에 기록할 정보를 선택하십시오.

4.재시작, 선택, 히스토리, 짧은 인쇄 및 긴 인쇄 데이터의 출력 속도 정의 : 기본 속도는 재시작 및 긴 인쇄 데이터의 경우 (10개 출력)/(시뮬레이션 종료 시간) 및 선택한 기록, 짧은 인쇄 데이터의 경우 (100개 출력)/(시뮬레이션 종료 시간)입니다.

모델 설정 : 숫자

1.기본값이 아닌 필수 숫자 옵션을 선택 FLOW-3D의 숫자 옵션은 고급 사용자를 대상으로 하며, 지배 방정식을 해결하는 데 사용되는 숫자 근사치 및 방법을 상당히 제어할 수 있습니다. 이러한 옵션 중 일부를 잘못 사용하면 솔루션에 문제가 발생할 수 있으므로 일반적으로 이 옵션의 기능을 먼저 이해하고 조정의 정당성을 갖추지 않고는 이러한 설정을 조정하지 않습니다.

5.FLOW-3D에서 후 처리

이 섹션에서는 FLOW-3D에 통합된 포스트 프로세서를 사용하는 방법에 대해 설명합니다. 보다 강력한 외부 포스트프로세서 FlowSight에 대한 튜토리얼은 FlowSight 설명서를 참조하십시오. 또한 이 섹션에서는 Flow Over A Weir 예제 문제를 실행하여 생성된 결과 파일을 사용합니다. 이 예제 문제를 실행하는 방법에 대한 지침은 예제 추가 및 시뮬레이션 사전 처리 및 실행을 참조합니다.

FlowSight 사용에 대한 기본 참조는 FlowSight Help->helpLocal Help 메뉴에서 액세스하는 FlowSight 사용자 설명서입니다.

추가 정보

기존 플롯

기존 플롯은 솔버가 자동으로 생성하는 사전 정의된 플롯입니다. 사용자 정의 플롯은 아래의 사용자 정의 플롯 섹션에 설명되어 있습니다.

1.분석 탭을 클릭하십시오. FLOW-3D 결과 대화 상자가 표시됩니다; 메세지가 나타나지 않으면 (분석 탭이 열림) 결과 파일 열기를 선택하여 동일한 대화 상자를 엽니다.

2.기존 라디오 버튼을 선택하십시오. 데이터 파일 경로 상자에 두 가지 유형의 파일이 표시됩니다 (있는 경우). 이름이 prpplt.*있는 파일 에는 전처리 flsplt.*기에 의해 자동으로 작성된 플롯이 포함되고 이름이 있는 파일에는 입력 파일에 사전 지정된 플롯 뿐만 아니라 후 처리기에 의해 자동으로 작성된 플롯이 포함됩니다.

3. 확인을 선택 flsplt.Flow_Over_A_Weir하고 클릭하십시오. 그러면 디스플레이 탭이 자동으로 열립니다.

기존 결과 대화 상자

4.사용 가능한 플롯 목록이 오른쪽에 나타납니다. 목록에서 해당 플롯의 이름을 클릭하면 특정 플롯을 볼 수 있습니다. 플롯 26 이 아래에 나와 있습니다.

기존 플롯보기

커스텀 플롯

1.분석 탭으로 돌아갑니다. 대화 상자를 열려면 결과 파일 열기를 선택하십시오.

2.전체 출력 파일을 보려면 사용자 정의 단일 선택 단추를 선택하십시오. 전체 출력 파일에는 prpgrf.*파일과 파일이 포함됩니다 flsgrf.*. 시뮬레이션이 실행되었으므로 전 처리기 출력 파일이 삭제되어 flsgrf파일에 통합되었습니다.

3.flsgrf.Flow_Over_A_Weir대화 상자 에서 파일을 선택하고 확인을 클릭하십시오.

FLOW-3D 결과 대화 상자

이제 분석 탭이 표시됩니다. 시뮬레이션 결과를 시각화 하는 방법에는 여러 가지가 있습니다. 사용 가능한 플롯 유형은 다음과 같습니다.

·Custom : 이 매뉴얼 의 FLSINP 파일을 사용하여 플롯합니다. 사용자 정의 섹션의 출력 코드를 사용하여 출력 플롯을 수동으로 수정하는 데 사용할 수 있습니다. 이것은 고급 옵션입니다.

·프로브 : 개별 셀, 경계, 구성 요소 및 도메인 전체(전역) 변수 대 시간에 대한 그래픽 및 텍스트 출력을 표시합니다. 자세한 내용은 프로브 플롯 프로브 : 특정 시점의 데이터와 시간 을 참조하십시오.

·1-D : 셀 데이터는 X, Y 또는 Z 방향의 셀 라인을 따라 볼 수 있습니다. 플롯 제한은 공간 및 시간에 모두 적용할 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 1-D 플롯 1-D : 라인을 따른 데이터 시간 을 참조하십시오.

·2-D : 셀 데이터는 XY, YZ 또는 XZ 평면에서 볼 수 있습니다. 플롯 제한은 공간 및 시간에 모두 적용할 수 있습니다. 속도 벡터 및 입자를 추가할 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 2 차원 플롯 2 차원 : 평면의 데이터와 시간의 데이터 를 참조하십시오.

·3-D : 유체와 고체의 표면 플롯을 생성하고 셀 데이터로 채색 할 수 있습니다. 속도 벡터, 입자 (있는 경우) 및 유선과 같은 추가 정보를 추가할 수 있습니다. 플롯 제한은 공간 및 시간에 모두 적용할 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 3D 플롯 3D : 표면의 데이터 시간 을 참조하십시오.

·텍스트 출력 : cell-by-cell 재시작, 선택 및 응고 데이터를 텍스트 파일에 쓸 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 텍스트 출력 텍스트 : ASCII 형식의 공간 데이터 출력 시간 을 참조하십시오.

·중립 파일 : 재시작 및 선택된 데이터는 별도의 텍스트 파일에 정의 된 지정된 지점(보간 또는 셀 중심)에서 출력 될 수 있습니다. 자세한 내용은 중립 파일 : 사용자 정의 좌표에서의 공간 데이터 출력 시간 을 참조하십시오.

·FSI TSE : 유한 요소 유체 / 고체 상호 작용 및 열 응력 진화 물리학 패키지에서 출력됩니다. 자세한 내용은 FSI / TSE : 표면의 구조 데이터와 시간 을 참조하십시오.

3 차원 도표

1.Analyze -> 3-D 탭을 선택하십시오.

2.Iso-surface = Fraction of fluid 선택하십시오. 이것은 표면을 그리는 데 사용되는 변수입니다. 선택한 등면 변수에 대한 등고선 값 기준을 충족하는 모든 셀을 통해 표면이 그려집니다. 유체의 분율이 기본값이며 유체 표면이 표시됩니다.

등 면형

3.색상 변수 = 압력을 선택하십시오. 이 선택은 등위면의 색을 지정하는 데 사용되는 변수를 결정합니다 (이 경우 유체 표면은 압력에 의해 색이 그려집니다).

색상 변수 유형

4.Component iso-surface overlay = Solid volume 선택하십시오. 솔리드 볼륨 은 유체와 함께 솔리드 구성 요소를 표시합니다. 이전 단계에서는 체적 분수의 보완을 등위면으로 선택하여 이 작업을 수행했지만 이 옵션을 사용하면 유체와 고체 표면을 동시에 플롯 할 수 있습니다.

등표면 옵션

5.이동 시간 프레임의 최소 및 최대 위치들 (0 내지 1.25 )에 슬라이더 위치.

시간대 옵션

6.렌더 버튼을 클릭하여 디스플레이 탭으로 전환하고 t = 0.0에서 1.25 초 사이에 일련의 11 플롯을 생성하여 압력에 의해 채색된 유체 표면과 위어 구조를 보여줍니다. 데이터 다시 시작 이 선택되었으므로 11 개의 플롯이 있습니다.

7.사용 가능한 플롯이 사용 가능한 시간 프레임 목록에 나열됩니다. 다음을 클릭하여 시간 프레임 사이를 이동하거나 시간 프레임을 두 번 클릭하여 표시하십시오. 첫 번째 및 마지막 시간 프레임은 다음과 같아야 합니다.

위어 구조 렌더링

8.Analyze -> 3-D 탭으로 돌아가서 Data Source 그룹에서 Selected data 라디오 버튼을 선택하십시오.

데이터 소스

9.시간 프레임 선택기의 두 슬라이더가 모두 오른쪽에 있으므로 마지막 시간 프레임 만 생성됩니다. 사용 가능한 시간 프레임이 많고 렌더링하는데 시간이 오래 걸리므로 선택한 데이터를 선택하면 인터페이스에서 자동으로 수행됩니다. 사용 가능한 모든 시간 프레임을 렌더링 하려면 왼쪽 슬라이더를 Time Frame Min = 0 으로 이동하십시오.

10. 렌더링 버튼을 클릭하십시오. 몇 초 안에 뷰가 디스플레이 창으로 전환되고 101 개의 플롯이 사용 가능한 시간 프레임 목록에 나열됩니다. 시간 프레임 사이를 이동하려면 다음을 반복해서 클릭하십시오.

대칭 흐름 표시

위어 중심 아래로 대칭 평면을 사용하여 시뮬레이션을 설정했으므로 위어 구조의 절반만 시뮬레이션되고 표시됩니다. 프리젠테이션 목적으로 대칭 모델의 두 반쪽을 모두 표시할
수 있습니다.

1.아래와 같이 Analyze -> 3-D 탭으로 돌아가서 Open Symmetry Boundaries 확인란을 선택하십시오.

열린 대칭 경계

2.렌더링을 클릭하십시오. 유체 표면이 디스플레이 탭의 대칭 경계에서 열린 상태로 나타납니다.

3.화면 위의 도구 모음 메뉴에서 도구 -> 대칭을 선택하십시오.

4.대화 상자에서 Y 방향 확인란을 선택하여 Y = 0 평면에서 결과를 미러링합니다.

대조

5.적용 닫기를 선택하십시오.

6.마지막 시간 프레임을 두 번 클릭하십시오. 디스플레이는 아래와 같이 전체 위어 구조를 보여줍니다.

전체 위어 구조

3 차원 애니메이션 만들기

다음 단계는 3 차원 유체 표면의 애니메이션을 만드는 것입니다. 애니메이션은 사용 가능한 시간 프레임 목록의 프레임에서 만든 동영상입니다. 애니메이션의 시각적 효과를 향상시키려면 모든 프레임에 공통 색상 스케일을 적용하는 것이 좋습니다.

1.분석 -> 3-D 탭으로 돌아갑니다.

2.윤곽 제한 그룹 상자에서 전역 라디오 버튼을 모두 선택하십시오.

윤곽 제한

3.렌더 클릭 하여 다시 그리고 디스플레이 탭으로 돌아갑니다.

4.도구 -> 대칭 -> Y 방향 -> 적용 선택을 반복하여 Y = 0 평면에서 결과를 반영합니다.

5.선택 도구 -> 애니메이션 -> 러버 밴드 캡처를 다음과 같이 선택 확인 Mesh지가 나타납니다 그것을 읽은 후.

러버 밴드 캡처

6.마우스 왼쪽 버튼을 클릭 한 상태에서 드래그하여 애니메이션을 적용할 화면 부분을 선택하십시오. 선택한 영역 주위에 선택 상자가 나타납니다.

X, Y, 너비 및 높이 상자

7.디스플레이 창 위에서 빨간색 캡처 버튼을 선택하십시오. 애니메이션을 시작하는 대화 상자가 나타납니다.

8.애니메이션의 기본 이름은 out.avi입니다. 아래에 표시된 것처럼 보다 구체적인 이름이 권장됩니다.

9.기본 프레임 속도는 초당 10 프레임입니다. 이 시뮬레이션의 마감 시간은 1.25 초이고, 일정한 시간 간격으로 100 개의 플롯이 있으므로실제속도는 초당 80 프레임입니다. 너무 빠를 수 있으므로 대신 5 입력 하고 확인을 누르십시오.

AVI 캡처

10. 각 시간 프레임이 표시 창에 렌더링 되고 비트 맵 파일이 시뮬레이션 디렉토리에 작성됩니다. 이 프로세스가 완료되면 다음 대화 상자가 나타납니다.

생성 된 이미지 소스 파일

  1. 프로세스의 다음 단계를 시작하려면 확인 버튼을 클릭하십시오. 새로운 프로세스 (BMP2VAI.exe)가 시작되고 압축 방법을 선택할 수 있는 새로운 비디오 압축 창이 나타납니다. 다른 창 뒤에 숨겨져 있으면 앞으로 가져옵니다.
  2. 애니메이션의 기본 압축은 압축되지 않습니다. 파일 크기가 너무 커서 뷰어에 로드 할 수 없으므로 대부분의 애니메이션에는 권장되지 않습니다. Windows를 사용하는 경우 Microsoft Video 1, Linux를 사용하는 경우 Cinepak 선택하십시오. 여기에서 선택하는 것은 컴퓨터에서 사용할 수 있는 비디오 코덱과 비디오를 표시하는 데 사용하는 기계에서 사용할 수 있는 것입니다.
  3. 애니메이션 속도가 데이터 속도에 의해 제한되지 않도록 데이터 속도 확인란을 선택 취소하십시오.
비디오 압축

  1. 압축 프로세스를 시작하려면 확인을 클릭하십시오. 압축이 완료되면 다음 대화 상자가 나타납니다.
AVI 파일 생성

  1. 확인을 클릭하십시오. 애니메이션 프로세스가 완료되었습니다.
  2. Windows 탐색기에서 .avi 파일을 찾는 가장 빠른 방법 은 시뮬레이션 관리자 탭으로 이동하여 시뮬레이션 입력 파일 링크를 클릭하는 것 입니다.
  3. .avi파일 을 두 번 클릭하여 애니메이션을 재생 하십시오. 이전에 선택한 압축 형식을 읽을 수 있는 올바른 코덱이 설치되어 있지 않으면 오픈 소스 다중 코덱 비디오 플레이어 설치를 고려하십시오.

2 차원 도표

1.Analyze -> 2-D 탭을 선택하십시오. 이 시뮬레이션의 결과를 보는 데 가장 유용한 평면은 평면 Y = 0.0에있는 위어 중심선의 XZ 평면입니다.

2.XZ 평면 라디오 버튼을 선택하십시오.

3.Y 제한 슬라이더를 모두 Y = 0.25 (Y = 0.0에 가장 가까운 셀 중심 y 좌표)로 드래그 합니다. 또한 동일한 위치가 J = 2 로 식별되어 해당 셀이 도메인에서 두 번째임을 나타냅니다. 첫 번째 셀 (J = 1) Mesh 외부에 있으며 경계
조건 속성을 계산하는 데 사용됩니다. 기본
윤곽 변수는 압력이며 기본 속도 벡터는 기본적으로 선택됩니다. 솔리드 형상은 모든 2D 플롯과 함께 자동으로 표시되므로 3D 플롯과 같이 활성화 할 필요가 없습니다.

4.벡터 옵션을 클릭하고 X = 2 Z = 2 입력하십시오. 벡터는 이제 다른 모든 셀에 플롯 됩니다. 벡터 옵션을 적용하려면 확인을 선택하십시오.

벡터 옵션

5.Y = 0 평면에서 2 차원 압력 플롯의 시간 시퀀스를 생성하려면 렌더링을 클릭하십시오. T = 0.0 (왼쪽) 인 다음과 유사한 그래픽이 나타납니다. T = 0.125 (중간); 그리고 T = 1.25 (오른쪽).

2D 결과

6.디스플레이 화면의 오른쪽 상단에 있는 형식 버튼을 선택하십시오.

형식 옵션

7.선 색상, 벡터 길이 및 화살촉 크기 변경과 같은 다양한 옵션을 시험해보십시오. 변경 사항을 보려면 적용을 선택하십시오. 완료되면 재설정 확인을 선택하여
기본 설정으로 돌아가서 대화 상자를 닫습니다. 모든 플롯에 대해 선호하는 옵션 세트가 있는 경우
저장 버튼을 선택하여 저장할 수 있습니다.

1 차원 도표

  1. 분석 -> 1-D 탭을 선택하십시오. 이 탭에서는 하나 이상의 플롯 시간에서 셀 행을 따라 압력, 유체 깊이, 유체 상승 및 속도와 같은 셀별 출력 변수의 꺾은 선형
    차트 플롯을 사용할 수 있습니다.
  2. 데이터 소스 로 선택을 선택합니다. 사용 가능한 변수는 이제 더 빈번한 플로팅을 위해 선택된 변수 만 표시합니다.
  3. 자유 변수 표고데이터 변수 로 선택하십시오. 유압 데이터출력 탭에서 선택되었으므로 사용할 수 있습니다.
ID 그래픽을 위해 선택된 데이터

  1. 이 시뮬레이션의 흐름 방향은 주로 x 축과 평행하므로 X 방향을 선택하십시오.
  2. Y 방향 슬라이더를 0.25(J = 2)로 이동하여 Y 방향에서 흐름 중심선에 가장 가까운 셀이 표시됩니다.
  3. 기본적으로 전체 X 범위가 표시됩니다. 플롯의 범위를 제한하려는 경우 X 방향 슬라이더를 이동할 수 있습니다. Z 방향 슬라이더의 위치는 주어진 x, y 위치에서 z 셀의 각 열에 대해 하나의 자유 표면 높이만 기록되므로 중요하지 않습니다. 시간 프레임 슬라이더는 0초와 1.25초여야 합니다.
흘러가는 방향

  1. 렌더링을 클릭하십시오. t = 0.0에서 t = 1.25s까지의 시리즈 플롯이 디스플레이 탭의 플롯 목록에 나열됩니다. 이러한 플롯을 볼 수 있는 여러 가지 모드가
    있습니다. 기본 모드는
    단일 모드이며 형식 버튼 아래의 드롭 다운 상자에 표시됩니다.
기본 단일 모드

  1. 다양한 시간에 유체 표면 높이의 플롯을 비교하려면 드롭 다운 상자에서 오버레이 모드를 선택하십시오.
  2. 오른쪽 창에서 플롯 1, 13 101 선택하려면 클릭하십시오. 플롯 이름에는 또한 기록된 시간이 표시됩니다 (t = 0.0, 0.15s 1.25 ). 출력은 아래와 같이 나타납니다.
자유 표면 고도

  1. 이 플롯을 비트 맵 또는 포스트 스크립트 파일에 저장하려면 출력 버튼을 선택하십시오.
  2. 확인 화면에 플롯 오버레이 플롯을 캡처하는 확인란을 (그리고 단 하나의 출력 파일을).
  3. 쓰기 버튼을 선택하여 이미지 파일을 만듭니다.
  4. 결과 이미지 파일은 시뮬레이션 디렉토리에 있으며 (시뮬레이션 관리자 탭 에서이 파일을 찾는 방법을 기억하십시오) 이름이 지정한 plots_on_screen.bmp됩니다.
출력 사진

프로브 플롯

1.
분석 -> 프로브 탭을 선택하십시오. 시간 기록 플롯은이 탭에서 변수 대 시간의 라인 그래프 또는 텍스트 출력으로 생성됩니다. FLOW-3D 에는 데이터 소스 그룹에서 선택되는 세 가지 유형의 시간 종속 데이터가 있습니다.

·공간 데이터 : 재시작 선택된 데이터 소스. 단일 x, y, z 셀 중심 좌표의 시간 종속 값이 표시됩니다. 값은 시간과 관련하여 통합되거나 시간과 관련하여 차별화되거나 이동 평균 (시간)으로 통합될 수 있습니다.

·일반 history 데이터 :. 글로벌 수량은 시간에 따라 다릅니다. 일반적인 양은 평균 운동 에너지, 시간 단계 및 대류 볼륨 오류입니다. 또한 이 데이터 유형에는 모델 설정 -> 메싱 및 지오메트리 탭에서 이러한 옵션을 선택한 경우 지정된 측정 위치(배플, 샘플링 볼륨, 히스토리 프로브)의 모든 데이터와 이동 또는 정지 상태의 솔리드 및 스프링/로프를
위한 통합 출력이 포함됩니다.

·Mesh-dependent data : 메쉬 경계에서 시간에 따른 수량(계산 또는 사용자 지정)입니다. 일반적인 수량은 경계에서의 유량 및 경계에서의 지정된 유체 높이입니다.

2.데이터 원본에서 일반 기록 라디오 버튼을 선택합니다. X, Y Z 데이터 점 슬라이더가 회색으로 바뀝니다. 이는 일반 기록 데이터가 특정 셀과 연결되어 있지 않기 때문입니다.

3.목록에서 질량  평균 유체 평균 운동 에너지를 선택하십시오.

그래픽 데이터 출력

4. 단위를 선택하여 플로팅 단위 대화 상자를 엽니다.

5. 플롯에 단위 표시를 선택하십시오.

6. SI, CGS, slugs/feet/seconds 또는 pounds/inches/seconds를 선택하여 원하는 단위 시스템으로 결과를 변환하고 출력합니다. 장치를 표시하고 변환하려면 모델 설정 -> 일반 탭에서 장치 시스템을 선택해야 합니다. 이전 단계에서 이 항목을 확인했으며, 지오메트리 및 유체 특성은 centimeters/grams/seconds 시스템에서 지정되었습니다.

플로팅 단위

7.Plotting Units 대화 상자를 닫으려면 OK를 선택하십시오.

8.데이터의 그래픽 출력을 생성하려면 렌더를 선택하십시오. 출력은 시간에 따른 영역의 모든 유체에 대한 질량 평균 평균 운동 에너지를 보여줍니다. 이전 단계에서 선택한 사항에 따라 단위 레이블과 함께 그림이 나타납니다. 플롯은 총 운동 에너지가 일부 평균값 주위에서 진동하고 있음을 나타냅니다. 진동이 작아짐에 따라 시뮬레이션은 정상 상태 흐름에 접근합니다.

프로브 MKE 출력

9.분석 -> 프로브 탭으로 돌아갑니다.

10. 출력 양식 그룹에서 텍스트를 선택하여 그래프를 텍스트 데이터로 출력한 다음 렌더링을 다시 선택하십시오.

출력 형태

11. 나타나는 텍스트 대화 상자에서 다른 이름으로 저장 버튼을 선택하여 출력을 텍스트 파일로 저장할 수 있습니다.

12. 출력 창을 닫으려면 계속을 선택하십시오.

텍스트 출력

1.Analyze -> Text Output 탭을 선택하십시오.

2.텍스트 출력 은 셀별 데이터 ( 다시 시작 또는 선택됨 ) 만 출력 할 수 있고 (구성 요소, 측정 스테이션 또는 글로벌 데이터 없음) 둘 이상의 셀을 선택할 수 있다는 점을 제외하고 프로브 탭 과 동일한 방식으로 작동합니다. 각 플롯 시간에 대한 출력 데이터. 셀은 슬라이더를 사용하여 3D 블록에서 선택됩니다. 기본 공간 범위는 전체 도메인으로 설정됩니다.

3.직접 텍스트 데이터를 출력해보십시오.

 

FLOW-3D TruVOF는 미국 및 기타 국가에서 등록 상표입니다.

FLOW-3D CAST Bibliography

FLOW-3D CAST bibliography

아래는 FSI의 금속 주조 참고 문헌에 수록된 기술 논문 모음입니다. 이 모든 논문에는 FLOW-3D CAST 해석 결과가 수록되어 있습니다. FLOW-3D CAST를 사용하여 금속 주조 산업의 응용 프로그램을 성공적으로 시뮬레이션하는 방법에 대해 자세히 알아보십시오.

Below is a collection of technical papers in our Metal Casting Bibliography. All of these papers feature FLOW-3D CAST results. Learn more about how FLOW-3D CAST can be used to successfully simulate applications for the Metal Casting Industry.

33-20     Eric Riedel, Martin Liepe Stefan Scharf, Simulation of ultrasonic induced cavitation and acoustic streaming in liquid and solidifying aluminum, Metals, 10.4; 476, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10040476

20-20   Wu Yue, Li Zhuo and Lu Rong, Simulation and visual tester verification of solid propellant slurry vacuum plate casting, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 2020. doi.org/10.1002/prep.201900411

17-20   C.A. Jones, M.R. Jolly, A.E.W. Jarfors and M. Irwin, An experimental characterization of thermophysical properties of a porous ceramic shell used in the investment casting process, Supplimental Proceedings, pp. 1095-1105, TMS 2020 149th Annual Meeting and Exhibition, San Diego, CA, February 23-27, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36296-6_102

12-20   Franz Josef Feikus, Paul Bernsteiner, Ricardo Fernández Gutiérrez and Michal Luszczak , Further development of electric motor housings, MTZ Worldwide, 81, pp. 38-43, 2020. doi.org/10.1007/s38313-019-0176-z

09-20   Mingfan Qi, Yonglin Kang, Yuzhao Xu, Zhumabieke Wulabieke and Jingyuan Li, A novel rheological high pressure die-casting process for preparing large thin-walled Al–Si–Fe–Mg–Sr alloy with high heat conductivity, high plasticity and medium strength, Materials Science and Engineering: A, 776, art. no. 139040, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2020.139040

07-20   Stefan Heugenhauser, Erhard Kaschnitz and Peter Schumacher, Development of an aluminum compound casting process – Experiments and numerical simulations, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 279, art. no. 116578, 2020. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2019.116578

05-20   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Mark Jolly and Konstantinos Salonitis, Numerical simulation and evaluation of Campbell running and gating systems, Metals, 10.1, art. no. 68, 2020. doi.org/10.3390/met10010068

102-19   Ferencz Peti and Gabriela Strnad, The effect of squeeze pin dimension and operational parameters on material homogeneity of aluminium high pressure die cast parts, Acta Marisiensis. Seria Technologica, 16.2, 2019. doi.org/0.2478/amset-2019-0010

94-19   E. Riedel, I. Horn, N. Stein, H. Stein, R. Bahr, and S. Scharf, Ultrasonic treatment: a clean technology that supports sustainability incasting processes, Procedia, 26th CIRP Life Cycle Engineering (LCE) Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, May 7-9, 2019. 

93-19   Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, Charles A. Monroe, Robin D. Foley, and John A. Griffin, Modeling and Simulation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AlSi- and AlCu-based Alloys, Transactions, 123rd Metalcasting Congress, Atlanta, GA, USA, April 27-30, 2019. 

84-19   Arun Prabhakar, Michail Papanikolaou, Konstantinos Salonitis, and Mark Jolly, Sand casting of sheet lead: numerical simulation of metal flow and solidification, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s00170-019-04522-3

72-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Eric Macdonald, Robert Voigt, and Guha Manogharan, Measurement of metal velocity in sand casting during mold filling, Metals, 9:1079, 2019. doi.org/10.3390/met9101079

71-19   Sebastian Findeisen, Robin Van Der Auwera, Michael Heuser, and Franz-Josef Wöstmann, Gießtechnische Fertigung von E-Motorengehäusen mit interner Kühling (Casting production of electric motor housings with internal cooling), Geisserei, 106, pp. 72-78, 2019 (in German).

58-19     Von Malte Leonhard, Matthias Todte, and Jörg Schäffer, Realistic simulation of the combustion of exothermic feeders, Casting, No. 2, pp. 28-32, 2019. In English and German.

52-19     S. Lakkum and P. Kowitwarangkul, Numerical investigations on the effect of gas flow rate in the gas stirred ladle with dual plugs, International Conference on Materials Research and Innovation (ICMARI), Bangkok, Thailand, December 17-21, 2018. IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, Vol. 526, 2019. doi.org/10.1088/1757-899X/526/1/012028

47-19     Bing Zhou, Shuai Lu, Kaile Xu, Chun Xu, and Zhanyong Wang, Microstructure and simulation of semisolid aluminum alloy castings in the process of stirring integrated transfer-heat (SIT) with water cooling, International Journal of Metalcasting, Online edition, pp. 1-13, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-019-00357-6

31-19     Zihao Yuan, Zhipeng Guo, and S.M. Xiong, Skin layer of A380 aluminium alloy die castings and its blistering during solution treatment, Journal of Materials Science & Technology, Vol. 35, No. 9, pp. 1906-1916, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmst.2019.05.011

25-19     Stefano Mascetti, Raul Pirovano, and Giulio Timelli, Interazione metallo liquido/stampo: Il fenomeno della metallizzazione, La Metallurgia Italiana, No. 4, pp. 44-50, 2019. In Italian.

20-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu, Campbellology for runner system design, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 187-199, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_19

19-19     Chengcheng Lyu, Michail Papanikolaou, and Mark Jolly, Numerical process modelling and simulation of Campbell running systems designs, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 53-64, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_5

18-19     Adrian V. Catalina, Liping Xue, and Charles Monroe, A solidification model with application to AlSi-based alloys, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 201-213, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_20

17-19     Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yu-Hung Chen, The validation of feeder modeling for ductile iron castings, Shape Casting: The Minerals, Metals & Materials Series, pp. 227-238, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-06034-3_22

04-19   Santosh Reddy Sama, Tony Badamo, Paul Lynch and Guha Manogharan, Novel sprue designs in metal casting via 3D sand-printing, Additive Manufacturing, Vol. 25, pp. 563-578, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.addma.2018.12.009

02-19   Jingying Sun, Qichi Le, Li Fu, Jing Bai, Johannes Tretter, Klaus Herbold and Hongwei Huo, Gas entrainment behavior of aluminum alloy engine crankcases during the low-pressure-die-casting-process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Vol. 266, pp. 274-282, 2019. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.11.016

92-18   Fast, Flexible… More Versatile, Foundry Management Technology, March, 2018. 

82-18   Xu Zhao, Ping Wang, Tao Li, Bo-yu Zhang, Peng Wang, Guan-zhou Wang and Shi-qi Lu, Gating system optimization of high pressure die casting thin-wall AlSi10MnMg longitudinal loadbearing beam based on numerical simulation, China Foundry, Vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 436-442, 2018. doi: 10.1007/s41230-018-8052-z

80-18   Michail Papanikolaou, Emanuele Pagone, Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly and Charalampos Makatsoris, A computational framework towards energy efficient casting processes, Sustainable Design and Manufacturing 2018: Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Sustainable Design and Manufacturing (KES-SDM-18), Gold Coast, Australia, June 24-26 2018, SIST 130, pp. 263-276, 2019. doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-04290-5_27

64-18   Vasilios Fourlakidis, Ilia Belov and Attila Diószegi, Strength prediction for pearlitic lamellar graphite iron: Model validation, Metals, Vol. 8, No. 9, 2018. doi.org/10.3390/met8090684

51-18   Xue-feng Zhu, Bao-yi Yu, Li Zheng, Bo-ning Yu, Qiang Li, Shu-ning Lü and Hao Zhang, Influence of pouring methods on filling process, microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ91 Mg alloy pipe by horizontal centrifugal casting, China Foundry, vol. 15, no. 3, pp.196-202, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s41230-018-7256-6

47-18   Santosh Reddy Sama, Jiayi Wang and Guha Manogharan, Non-conventional mold design for metal casting using 3D sand-printing, Journal of Manufacturing Processes, vol. 34-B, pp. 765-775, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmapro.2018.03.049

42-18   M. Koru and O. Serçe, The Effects of Thermal and Dynamical Parameters and Vacuum Application on Porosity in High-Pressure Die Casting of A383 Al-Alloy, International Journal of Metalcasting, pp. 1-17, 2018. doi.org/10.1007/s40962-018-0214-7

41-18   Abhilash Viswanath, S. Savithri, U.T.S. Pillai, Similitude analysis on flow characteristics of water, A356 and AM50 alloys during LPC process, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, vol. 257, pp. 270-277, 2018. doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2018.02.031

29-18   Seyboldt, Christoph and Liewald, Mathias, Investigation on thixojoining to produce hybrid components with intermetallic phase, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034992

28-18   Laura Schomer, Mathias Liewald and Kim Rouven Riedmüller, Simulation of the infiltration process of a ceramic open-pore body with a metal alloy in semi-solid state to design the manufacturing of interpenetrating phase composites, AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1960, no. 1, 2018. doi.org/10.1063/1.5034991

41-17   Y. N. Wu et al., Numerical Simulation on Filling Optimization of Copper Rotor for High Efficient Electric Motors in Die Casting Process, Materials Science Forum, Vol. 898, pp. 1163-1170, 2017.

12-17   A.M.  Zarubin and O.A. Zarubina, Controlling the flow rate of melt in gravity die casting of aluminum alloys, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 16-20, 6, 2017. In Russian.

10-17   A.Y. Korotchenko, Y.V. Golenkov, M.V. Tverskoy and D.E. Khilkov, Simulation of the Flow of Metal Mixtures in the Mold, Liteynoe Proizvodstvo (Casting Manufacturing), pp 18-22, 5, 2017. In Russian.

08-17   Morteza Morakabian Esfahani, Esmaeil Hajjari, Ali Farzadi and Seyed Reza Alavi Zaree, Prediction of the contact time through modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in compound casting process of Al/Mg light metals, Journal of Materials Research, © Materials Research Society 2017

04-17   Huihui Liu, Xiongwei He and Peng Guo, Numerical simulation on semi-solid die-casting of magnesium matrix composite based on orthogonal experiment, AIP Conference Proceedings 1829, 020037 (2017); doi.org/10.1063/1.4979769.

100-16  Robert Watson, New numerical techniques to quantify and predict the effect of entrainment defects, applied to high pressure die casting, PhD Thesis: University of Birmingham, 2016.

88-16   M.C. Carter, T. Kauffung, L. Weyenberg and C. Peters, Low Pressure Die Casting Simulation Discovery through Short Shot, Cast Expo & Metal Casting Congress, April 16-19, 2016, Minneapolis, MN, Copyright 2016 American Foundry Society.

61-16   M. Koru and O. Serçe, Experimental and numerical determination of casting mold interfacial heat transfer coefficient in the high pressure die casting of a 360 aluminum alloy, ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA A, Vol. 129 (2016)

59-16   R. Pirovano and S. Mascetti, Tracking of collapsed bubbles during a filling simulation, La Metallurgia Italiana – n. 6 2016

43-16   Kevin Lee, Understanding shell cracking during de-wax process in investment casting, Ph.D Thesis: University of Birmingham, School of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 2016.

35-16   Konstantinos Salonitis, Mark Jolly, Binxu Zeng, and Hamid Mehrabi, Improvements in energy consumption and environmental impact by novel single shot melting process for casting, Journal of Cleaner Production, doi.org/10.1016/j.jclepro.2016.06.165, Open Access funded by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, June 29, 2016

20-16   Fu-Yuan Hsu, Bifilm Defect Formation in Hydraulic Jump of Liquid Aluminum, Metallurgical and Materials Transactions B, 2016, Band: 47, Heft 3, 1634-1648.

15-16   Mingfan Qia, Yonglin Kanga, Bing Zhoua, Wanneng Liaoa, Guoming Zhua, Yangde Lib,and Weirong Li, A forced convection stirring process for Rheo-HPDC aluminum and magnesium alloys, Journal of Materials Processing Technology 234 (2016) 353–367

112-15   José Miguel Gonçalves Ledo Belo da Costa, Optimization of filling systems for low pressure by FLOW-3D, Dissertação de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Mecânica, 2015.

89-15   B.W. Zhu, L.X. Li, X. Liu, L.Q. Zhang and R. Xu, Effect of Viscosity Measurement Method to Simulate High Pressure Die Casting of Thin-Wall AlSi10MnMg Alloy Castings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Published online, November 2015, doi.org/10.1007/s11665-015-1783-8, © ASM International.

88-15   Peng Zhang, Zhenming Li, Baoliang Liu, Wenjiang Ding and Liming Peng, Improved tensile properties of a new aluminum alloy for high pressure die casting, Materials Science & Engineering A651(2016)376–390, Available online, November 2015.

83-15   Zu-Qi Hu, Xin-Jian Zhang and Shu-Sen Wu, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Die-Filling Behavior of High-Performance Die-Cast Al–Mg–Si–Mn Alloy, Acta Metall. Sin. (Engl. Lett.), doi.org/10.1007/s40195-015-0332-7, © The Chinese Society for Metals and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015.

82-15   J. Müller, L. Xue, M.C. Carter, C. Thoma, M. Fehlbier and M. Todte, A Die Spray Cooling Model for Thermal Die Cycling Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

81-15   M. T. Murray, L.F. Hansen, L. Chilcott, E. Li and A.M. Murray, Case Studies in the Use of Simulation- Improved Yield and Reduced Time to Market, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

80-15   R. Bhola, S. Chandra and D. Souders, Predicting Castability of Thin-Walled Parts for the HPDC Process Using Simulations, 2015 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, Indianapolis, IN, October 2015

76-15   Prosenjit Das, Sudip K. Samanta, Shashank Tiwari and Pradip Dutta, Die Filling Behaviour of Semi Solid A356 Al Alloy Slurry During Rheo Pressure Die Casting, Transactions of the Indian Institute of Metals, pp 1-6, October 2015

74-15   Murat KORU and Orhan SERÇE, Yüksek Basınçlı Döküm Prosesinde Enjeksiyon Parametrelerine Bağlı Olarak Döküm Simülasyon, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Science, Science Journal (CSJ), Vol. 36, No: 5 (2015) ISSN: 1300-1949, May 2015

69-15   A. Viswanath, S. Sivaraman, U. T. S. Pillai, Computer Simulation of Low Pressure Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 45-48, September 2015

68-15   J. Aneesh Kumar, K. Krishnakumar and S. Savithri, Computer Simulation of Centrifugal Casting Process Using FLOW-3D, Materials Science Forum, Vols. 830-831, pp. 53-56, September 2015

59-15   F. Hosseini Yekta and S. A. Sadough Vanini, Simulation of the flow of semi-solid steel alloy using an enhanced model, Metals and Materials International, August 2015.

44-15   Ulrich E. Klotz, Tiziana Heiss and Dario Tiberto, Platinum investment casting material properties, casting simulation and optimum process parameters, Jewelry Technology Forum 2015

41-15   M. Barkhudarov and R. Pirovano, Minimizing Air Entrainment in High Pressure Die Casting Shot Sleeves, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

40-15   M. Todte, A. Fent, and H. Lang, Simulation in support of the development of innovative processes in the casting industry, GIFA 2015, Düsseldorf, Germany

19-15   Bruce Morey, Virtual casting improves powertrain design, Automotive Engineering, SAE International, March 2015.

15-15   K.S. Oh, J.D. Lee, S.J. Kim and J.Y. Choi, Development of a large ingot continuous caster, Metall. Res. Technol. 112, 203 (2015) © EDP Sciences, 2015, doi.org/10.1051/metal/2015006, www.metallurgical-research.org

14-15   Tiziana Heiss, Ulrich E. Klotz and Dario Tiberto, Platinum Investment Casting, Part I: Simulation and Experimental Study of the Casting Process, Johnson Matthey Technol. Rev., 2015, 59, (2), 95, doi.org/10.1595/205651315×687399

138-14 Christopher Thoma, Wolfram Volk, Ruben Heid, Klaus Dilger, Gregor Banner and Harald Eibisch, Simulation-based prediction of the fracture elongation as a failure criterion for thin-walled high-pressure die casting components, International Journal of Metalcasting, Vol. 8, No. 4, pp. 47-54, 2014. doi.org/10.1007/BF03355594

107-14  Mehran Seyed Ahmadi, Dissolution of Si in Molten Al with Gas Injection, ProQuest Dissertations And Theses; Thesis (Ph.D.), University of Toronto (Canada), 2014; Publication Number: AAT 3637106; ISBN: 9781321195231; Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 76-02(E), Section: B.; 191 p.

99-14   R. Bhola and S. Chandra, Predicting Castability for Thin-Walled HPDC Parts, Foundry Management Technology, December 2014

92-14   Warren Bishenden and Changhua Huang, Venting design and process optimization of die casting process for structural components; Part II: Venting design and process optimization, Die Casting Engineer, November 2014

90-14   Ken’ichi Kanazawa, Ken’ichi Yano, Jun’ichi Ogura, and Yasunori Nemoto, Optimum Runner Design for Die-Casting using CFD Simulations and Verification with Water-Model Experiments, Proceedings of the ASME 2014 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE2014, November 14-20, 2014, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, IMECE2014-37419

89-14   P. Kapranos, C. Carney, A. Pola, and M. Jolly, Advanced Casting Methodologies: Investment Casting, Centrifugal Casting, Squeeze Casting, Metal Spinning, and Batch Casting, In Comprehensive Materials Processing; McGeough, J., Ed.; 2014, Elsevier Ltd., 2014; Vol. 5, pp 39–67.

77-14   Andrei Y. Korotchenko, Development of Scientific and Technological Approaches to Casting Net-Shaped Castings in Sand Molds Free of Shrinkage Defects and Hot Tears, Post-doctoral thesis: Russian State Technological University, 2014. In Russian.

69-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Predicting, Preventing Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Modern Casting, September 2014

68-14   L. Xue, M.C. Carter, A.V. Catalina, Z. Lin, C. Li, and C. Qiu, Numerical Simulation of Core Gas Defects in Steel Castings, Copyright 2014 American Foundry Society, 118th Metalcasting Congress, April 8 – 11, 2014, Schaumburg, IL

51-14   Jesus M. Blanco, Primitivo Carranza, Rafael Pintos, Pedro Arriaga, and Lakhdar Remaki, Identification of Defects Originated during the Filling of Cast Pieces through Particles Modelling, 11th World Congress on Computational Mechanics (WCCM XI), 5th European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM V), 6th European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics (ECFD VI), E. Oñate, J. Oliver and A. Huerta (Eds)

47-14   B. Vijaya Ramnatha, C.Elanchezhiana, Vishal Chandrasekhar, A. Arun Kumarb, S. Mohamed Asif, G. Riyaz Mohamed, D. Vinodh Raj , C .Suresh Kumar, Analysis and Optimization of Gating System for Commutator End Bracket, Procedia Materials Science 6 ( 2014 ) 1312 – 1328, 3rd International Conference on Materials Processing and Characterisation (ICMPC 2014)

42-14  Bing Zhou, Yong-lin Kang, Guo-ming Zhu, Jun-zhen Gao, Ming-fan Qi, and Huan-huan Zhang, Forced convection rheoforming process for preparation of 7075 aluminum alloy semisolid slurry and its numerical simulation, Trans. Nonferrous Met. Soc. China 24(2014) 1109−1116

37-14    A. Karwinski, W. Lesniewski, P. Wieliczko, and M. Malysza, Casting of Titanium Alloys in Centrifugal Induction Furnaces, Archives of Metallurgy and Materials, Volume 59, Issue 1, doi.org/10.2478/amm-2014-0068, 2014.

26-14    Bing Zhou, Yonglin Kang, Mingfan Qi, Huanhuan Zhang and Guoming ZhuR-HPDC Process with Forced Convection Mixing Device for Automotive Part of A380 Aluminum Alloy, Materials 2014, 7, 3084-3105; doi.org/10.3390/ma7043084

20-14  Johannes Hartmann, Tobias Fiegl, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foams with tailored density profile by adapted blowing agents, Applied Physics A, doi.org/10.1007/s00339-014-8377-4, March 2014.

19-14    A.Y. Korotchenko, N.A. Nikiforova, E.D. Demjanov, N.C. Larichev, The Influence of the Filling Conditions on the Service Properties of the Part Side Frame, Russian Foundryman, 1 (January), pp 40-43, 2014. In Russian.

11-14 B. Fuchs and C. Körner, Mesh resolution consideration for the viability prediction of lost salt cores in the high pressure die casting process, Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2014, Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

08-14 FY Hsu, SW Wang, and HJ Lin, The External and Internal Shrinkages in Aluminum Gravity Castings, Shape Casting: 5th International Symposium 2014. Available online at Google Books

103-13  B. Fuchs, H. Eibisch and C. Körner, Core Viability Simulation for Salt Core Technology in High-Pressure Die Casting, International Journal of Metalcasting, July 2013, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 39–45

94-13    Randall S. Fielding, J. Crapps, C. Unal, and J.R.Kennedy, Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations, International Conference on Fast reators and Related Fuel Cycles (FR13), 4-7 March 2013, Paris France

90-13  A. Karwińskia, M. Małyszaa, A. Tchórza, A. Gila, B. Lipowska, Integration of Computer Tomography and Simulation Analysis in Evaluation of Quality of Ceramic-Carbon Bonded Foam Filter, Archives of Foundry Engineering, doi.org/10.2478/afe-2013-0084, Published quarterly as the organ of the Foundry Commission of the Polish Academy of Sciences, ISSN, (2299-2944), Volume 13, Issue 4/2013

88-13  Litie and Metallurgia (Casting and Metallurgy), 3 (72), 2013, N.V.Sletova, I.N.Volnov, S.P.Zadrutsky, V.A.Chaikin, Modeling of the Process of Removing Non-metallic Inclusions in Aluminum Alloys Using the FLOW-3D program, pp 138-140. In Russian.

85-13    Michał Szucki,Tomasz Goraj, Janusz Lelito, Józef S. Suchy, Numerical Analysis of Solid Particles Flow in Liquid Metal, XXXVII International Scientific Conference Foundryman’ Day 2013, Krakow, 28-29 November 2013

84-13  Körner, C., Schwankl, M., Himmler, D., Aluminum-Aluminum compound castings by electroless deposited zinc layers, Journal of Materials Processing Technology (2014), doi.org/10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2013.12.01483-13.

77-13  Antonio Armillotta & Raffaello Baraggi & Simone Fasoli, SLM tooling for die casting with conformal cooling channels, The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology, doi.org/10.1007/s00170-013-5523-7, December 2013.

64-13   Johannes Hartmann, Christina Blümel, Stefan Ernst, Tobias Fiegl, Karl-Ernst Wirth, Carolin Körner, Aluminum integral foam castings with microcellular cores by nano-functionalization, J Mater Sci, doi.org/10.1007/s10853-013-7668-z, September 2013.

46-13  Nicholas P. Orenstein, 3D Flow and Temperature Analysis of Filling a Plutonium Mold, LA-UR-13-25537, Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Los Alamos Annual Student Symposium 2013, 2013-07-24 (Rev.1)

42-13   Yang Yue, William D. Griffiths, and Nick R. Green, Modelling of the Effects of Entrainment Defects on Mechanical Properties in a Cast Al-Si-Mg Alloy, Materials Science Forum, 765, 225, 2013.

39-13  J. Crapps, D.S. DeCroix, J.D Galloway, D.A. Korzekwa, R. Aikin, R. Fielding, R. Kennedy, C. Unal, Separate effects identification via casting process modeling for experimental measurement of U-Pu-Zr alloys, Journal of Nuclear Materials, 15 July 2013.

35-13   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

34-13  Martin Lagler, Use of Simulation to Predict the Viability of Salt Cores in the HPDC Process – Shot Curve as a Decisive Criterion, © Die Casting Engineer, July 2013.

24-13    I.N.Volnov, Optimizatsia Liteynoi Tekhnologii, (Casting Technology Optimization), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 27-29. In Russian

23-13  M.R. Barkhudarov, I.N. Volnov, Minimizatsia Zakhvata Vozdukha v Kamere Pressovania pri Litie pod Davleniem, (Minimization of Air Entrainment in the Shot Sleeve During High Pressure Die Casting), Liteyshik Rossii (Russian Foundryman), 3, 2013, 30-34. In Russian

09-13  M.C. Carter and L. Xue, Simulating the Parameters that Affect Core Gas Defects in Metal Castings, Copyright 2012 American Foundry Society, Presented at the 2013 CastExpo, St. Louis, Missouri, April 2013

08-13  C. Reilly, N.R. Green, M.R. Jolly, J.-C. Gebelin, The Modelling Of Oxide Film Entrainment In Casting Systems Using Computational Modelling, Applied Mathematical Modelling, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apm.2013.03.061, April 2013.

03-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part II. Model validation and parametric study, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.061.

02-13  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A fast simulation of transient metal flow and solidification in a narrow channel. Part I: Model development using lubrication approximation, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.12.060.

116-12  Jufu Jianga, Ying Wang, Gang Chena, Jun Liua, Yuanfa Li and Shoujing Luo, “Comparison of mechanical properties and microstructure of AZ91D alloy motorcycle wheels formed by die casting and double control forming, Materials & Design, Volume 40, September 2012, Pages 541-549.

107-12  F.K. Arslan, A.H. Hatman, S.Ö. Ertürk, E. Güner, B. Güner, An Evaluation for Fundamentals of Die Casting Materials Selection and Design, IMMC’16 International Metallurgy & Materials Congress, Istanbul, Turkey, 2012.

103-12 WU Shu-sen, ZHONG Gu, AN Ping, WAN Li, H. NAKAE, Microstructural characteristics of Al−20Si−2Cu−0.4Mg−1Ni alloy formed by rheo-squeeze casting after ultrasonic vibration treatment, Transactions of Nonferrous Metals Society of China, 22 (2012) 2863-2870, November 2012. Full paper available online.

109-12 Alexandre Reikher, Numerical Analysis of Die-Casting Process in Thin Cavities Using Lubrication Approximation, Ph.D. Thesis: The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Engineering Department (2012) Theses and Dissertations. Paper 65.

97-12 Hong Zhou and Li Heng Luo, Filling Pattern of Step Gating System in Lost Foam Casting Process and its Application, Advanced Materials Research, Volumes 602-604, Progress in Materials and Processes, 1916-1921, December 2012.

93-12  Liangchi Zhang, Chunliang Zhang, Jeng-Haur Horng and Zichen Chen, Functions of Step Gating System in the Lost Foam Casting Process, Advanced Materials Research, 591-593, 940, DOI: 10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.591-593.940, November 2012.

91-12  Hong Yan, Jian Bin Zhu, Ping Shan, Numerical Simulation on Rheo-Diecasting of Magnesium Matrix Composites, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/SSP.192-193.287, Solid State Phenomena, 192-193, 287.

89-12  Alexandre Reikher and Krishna M. Pillai, A Fast Numerical Simulation for Modeling Simultaneous Metal Flow and Solidification in Thin Cavities Using the Lubrication Approximation, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A: Applications: An International Journal of Computation and Methodology, 63:2, 75-100, November 2012.

82-12  Jufu Jiang, Gang Chen, Ying Wang, Zhiming Du, Weiwei Shan, and Yuanfa Li, Microstructure and mechanical properties of thin-wall and high-rib parts of AM60B Mg alloy formed by double control forming and die casting under the optimal conditions, Journal of Alloys and Compounds, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jallcom.2012.10.086, October 2012.

78-12   A. Pari, Real Life Problem Solving through Simulations in the Die Casting Industry – Case Studies, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

77-12  Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian and R.A. Miller, Rheological behavior models of metal matrix alloys in semi-solid casting process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

76-12  A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Analysis of Solidification Parameters During the Die Cast Process, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012, Indianapolis, IN.

75-12 R.A. Miller, Y. Wang and K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, Estimating Cavity Fill Time, 2012 Die Casting Congress & Exposition, © NADCA, October 8-10, 2012Indianapolis, IN.

65-12  X.H. Yang, T.J. Lu, T. Kim, Influence of non-conducting pore inclusions on phase change behavior of porous media with constant heat flux boundaryInternational Journal of Thermal Sciences, Available online 10 October 2012. Available online at SciVerse.

55-12  Hejun Li, Pengyun Wang, Lehua Qi, Hansong Zuo, Songyi Zhong, Xianghui Hou, 3D numerical simulation of successive deposition of uniform molten Al droplets on a moving substrate and experimental validation, Computational Materials Science, Volume 65, December 2012, Pages 291–301.

52-12 Hongbing Ji, Yixin Chen and Shengzhou Chen, Numerical Simulation of Inner-Outer Couple Cooling Slab Continuous Casting in the Filling Process, Advanced Materials Research (Volumes 557-559), Advanced Materials and Processes II, pp. 2257-2260, July 2012.

47-12    Petri Väyrynen, Lauri Holappa, and Seppo Louhenkilpi, Simulation of Melting of Alloying Materials in Steel Ladle, SCANMET IV – 4th International Conference on Process Development in Iron and Steelmaking, Lulea, Sweden, June 10-13, 2012.

46-12  Bin Zhang and Dave Salee, Metal Flow and Heat Transfer in Billet DC Casting Using Wagstaff® Optifill™ Metal Distribution Systems, 5th International Metal Quality Workshop, United Arab Emirates Dubai, March 18-22, 2012.

45-12 D.R. Gunasegaram, M. Givord, R.G. O’Donnell and B.R. Finnin, Improvements engineered in UTS and elongation of aluminum alloy high pressure die castings through the alteration of runner geometry and plunger velocity, Materials Science & Engineering.

44-12    Antoni Drys and Stefano Mascetti, Aluminum Casting Simulations, Desktop Engineering, September 2012

42-12   Huizhen Duan, Jiangnan Shen and Yanping Li, Comparative analysis of HPDC process of an auto part with ProCAST and FLOW-3D, Applied Mechanics and Materials Vols. 184-185 (2012) pp 90-94, Online available since 2012/Jun/14 at www.scientific.net, © (2012) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland, doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMM.184-185.90.

41-12    Deniece R. Korzekwa, Cameron M. Knapp, David A. Korzekwa, and John W. Gibbs, Co-Design – Fabrication of Unalloyed Plutonium, LA-UR-12-23441, MDI Summer Research Group Workshop Advanced Manufacturing, 2012-07-25/2012-07-26 (Los Alamos, New Mexico, United States)

29-12  Dario Tiberto and Ulrich E. Klotz, Computer simulation applied to jewellery casting: challenges, results and future possibilities, IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng.33 012008. Full paper available at IOP.

28-12  Y Yue and N R Green, Modelling of different entrainment mechanisms and their influences on the mechanical reliability of Al-Si castings, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33,012072.Full paper available at IOP.

27-12  E Kaschnitz, Numerical simulation of centrifugal casting of pipes, 2012 IOP Conf. Ser.: Mater. Sci. Eng. 33 012031, Issue 1. Full paper available at IOP.

15-12  C. Reilly, N.R Green, M.R. Jolly, The Present State Of Modeling Entrainment Defects In The Shape Casting Process, Applied Mathematical Modelling, Available online 27 April 2012, ISSN 0307-904X, 10.1016/j.apm.2012.04.032.

12-12   Andrei Starobin, Tony Hirt, Hubert Lang, and Matthias Todte, Core drying simulation and validation, International Foundry Research, GIESSEREIFORSCHUNG 64 (2012) No. 1, ISSN 0046-5933, pp 2-5

10-12  H. Vladimir Martínez and Marco F. Valencia (2012). Semisolid Processing of Al/β-SiC Composites by Mechanical Stirring Casting and High Pressure Die Casting, Recent Researches in Metallurgical Engineering – From Extraction to Forming, Dr Mohammad Nusheh (Ed.), ISBN: 978-953-51-0356-1, InTech

07-12     Amir H. G. Isfahani and James M. Brethour, Simulating Thermal Stresses and Cooling Deformations, Die Casting Engineer, March 2012

06-12   Shuisheng Xie, Youfeng He and Xujun Mi, Study on Semi-solid Magnesium Alloys Slurry Preparation and Continuous Roll-casting Process, Magnesium Alloys – Design, Processing and Properties, ISBN: 978-953-307-520-4, InTech.

04-12 J. Spangenberg, N. Roussel, J.H. Hattel, H. Stang, J. Skocek, M.R. Geiker, Flow induced particle migration in fresh concrete: Theoretical frame, numerical simulations and experimental results on model fluids, Cement and Concrete Research, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.01.007, February 2012.

01-12   Lee, B., Baek, U., and Han, J., Optimization of Gating System Design for Die Casting of Thin Magnesium Alloy-Based Multi-Cavity LCD Housings, Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, Springer New York, Issn: 1059-9495, 10.1007/s11665-011-0111-1, Volume 1 / 1992 – Volume 21 / 2012. Available online at Springer Link.

104-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Huey Jiuan Lin, Foam Filters Used in Gravity Casting, Metall and Materi Trans B (2011) 42: 1110. doi:10.1007/s11663-011-9548-8.

99-11    Eduardo Trejo, Centrifugal Casting of an Aluminium Alloy, thesis: Doctor of Philosophy, Metallurgy and Materials School of Engineering University of Birmingham, October 2011. Full paper available upon request.

93-11  Olga Kononova, Andrejs Krasnikovs ,Videvuds Lapsa,Jurijs Kalinka and Angelina Galushchak, Internal Structure Formation in High Strength Fiber Concrete during Casting, World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology 59 2011

76-11  J. Hartmann, A. Trepper, and C. Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials 2011, Volume 13 (2011) No. 11, © Wiley-VCH

71-11  Fu-Yuan Hsu and Yao-Ming Yang Confluence Weld in an Aluminum Gravity Casting, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, Available online 23 November 2011, ISSN 0924-0136, 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2011.11.006.

65-11     V.A. Chaikin, A.V. Chaikin, I.N.Volnov, A Study of the Process of Late Modification Using Simulation, in Zagotovitelnye Proizvodstva v Mashinostroenii, 10, 2011, 8-12. In Russian.

54-11  Ngadia Taha Niane and Jean-Pierre Michalet, Validation of Foundry Process for Aluminum Parts with FLOW-3D Software, Proceedings of the 2011 International Symposium on Liquid Metal Processing and Casting, 2011.

51-11    A. Reikher and H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Cast Part, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

50-11   Y. Wang, K. Kabiri-Bamoradian, and R.A. Miller, Runner design optimization based on CFD simulation for a die with multiple cavities, 2011 Die Casting Congress & Tabletop, Columbus, OH, September 19-21, 2011

48-11 A. Karwiński, W. Leśniewski, S. Pysz, P. Wieliczko, The technology of precision casting of titanium alloys by centrifugal process, Archives of Foundry Engineering, ISSN: 1897-3310), Volume 11, Issue 3/2011, 73-80, 2011.

46-11  Daniel Einsiedler, Entwicklung einer Simulationsmethodik zur Simulation von Strömungs- und Trocknungsvorgängen bei Kernfertigungsprozessen mittels CFD (Development of a simulation methodology for simulating flow and drying operations in core production processes using CFD), MSc thesis at Technical University of Aalen in Germany (Hochschule Aalen), 2011.

44-11  Bin Zhang and Craig Shaber, Aluminum Ingot Thermal Stress Development Modeling of the Wagstaff® EpsilonTM Rolling Ingot DC Casting System during the Start-up Phase, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 196-207, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

43-11 Vu Nguyen, Patrick Rohan, John Grandfield, Alex Levin, Kevin Naidoo, Kurt Oswald, Guillaume Girard, Ben Harker, and Joe Rea, Implementation of CASTfill low-dross pouring system for ingot casting, Materials Science Forum Vol. 693 (2011) pp 227-234, © 2011 Trans Tech Publications, July, 2011.

40-11  A. Starobin, D. Goettsch, M. Walker, D. Burch, Gas Pressure in Aluminum Block Water Jacket Cores, © 2011 American Foundry Society, International Journal of Metalcasting/Summer 2011

37-11 Ferencz Peti, Lucian Grama, Analyze of the Possible Causes of Porosity Type Defects in Aluminum High Pressure Diecast Parts, Scientific Bulletin of the Petru Maior University of Targu Mures, Vol. 8 (XXV) no. 1, 2011, ISSN 1841-9267

31-11  Johannes Hartmann, André Trepper, Carolin Körner, Aluminum Integral Foams with Near-Microcellular Structure, Advanced Engineering Materials, 13: n/a. doi: 10.1002/adem.201100035, June 2011.

27-11  A. Pari, Optimization of HPDC Process using Flow Simulation Case Studies, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

26-11    A. Reikher, H. Gerber, Calculation of the Die Cast Parameters of the Thin Wall Aluminum Die Casting Part, Die Casting Engineer, July 2011

21-11 Thang Nguyen, Vu Nguyen, Morris Murray, Gary Savage, John Carrig, Modelling Die Filling in Ultra-Thin Aluminium Castings, Materials Science Forum (Volume 690), Light Metals Technology V, pp 107-111, 10.4028/www.scientific.net/MSF.690.107, June 2011.

19-11 Jon Spangenberg, Cem Celal Tutum, Jesper Henri Hattel, Nicolas Roussel, Metter Rica Geiker, Optimization of Casting Process Parameters for Homogeneous Aggregate Distribution in Self-Compacting Concrete: A Feasibility Study, © IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, 2011, New Orleans, USA

16-11  A. Starobin, C.W. Hirt, H. Lang, and M. Todte, Core Drying Simulation and Validations, AFS Proceedings 2011, © American Foundry Society, Presented at the 115th Metalcasting Congress, Schaumburg, Illinois, April 2011.

15-11  J. J. Hernández-Ortega, R. Zamora, J. López, and F. Faura, Numerical Analysis